3,494 results for 2007

  • The Merry Marauders

    Rees, Arthur J. (2007)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The Merry Marauders (1913) recounts the humorous misadventures of an accident-prone theatre company, bringing to life the itinerant theatrical world and its struggles with the temperance movement and frontier environment. The novel is the first in a series of early New Zealand texts to be edited and published by Otago Studies in English. This series has been designed both to preserve these valuable early works and to make them available to a wider reading public.

    View record details
  • Beyond Hypericum: Perceptions of Treatments by Herbalists for Depression

    Bell Hunter, Kirsty Ann (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM) includes a diverse range of traditional and natural treatments practiced beyond orthodox medical practices. CAM therapies are used globally by consumers and rates of use are increasing. Medical herbalists are a group of CAM therapists who are trained in the practice of holistic healing to restore homeostasis via a number of modalities including herbal medicines, diet and nutrition and various mind and body techniques. Six women who had consulted medical herbalists for symptoms of low mood/depression were interviewed. Questions focused on: why the participants chose to visit a herbalist; contextual factors surrounding the participants at the time; what their treatment programs entailed; their perceptions of symptom relief, efficacy and the therapeutic relationship; perceived barriers to accessing these types of services and the long term implications the treatments had for the women. Overall, the women felt that the holistic treatments they received had been effective for low mood/depression. It also was evident that the quality of the therapeutic relationship contributed significantly to perceptions of efficacy. Furthermore, practitioners' holistic explanations about illness fostered participants' understanding of health issues, thereby encouraging patient autonomy over personal health care. The participants continue to utilize CAM therapies and medical pluralism for themselves or their children. As well, two participants engaged in CAM studies for professional or personal use. On the other hand, the cost of treatment was a strong disincentive, almost making treatments inaccessible for some. An additional barrier to accessing CAM was the widely held negative stereotyped attitudes about herbalists. It was thought that if CAM treatments were more widely accepted and subsidized, they would be a more realistic choice for health consumers.

    View record details
  • Sequential Analysis of Quantiles and Probability Distributions by Replicated Simulations

    Eickhoff, Mirko (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Discrete event simulation is well known to be a powerful approach to investigate behaviour of complex dynamic stochastic systems, especially when the system is analytically not tractable. The estimation of mean values has traditionally been the main goal of simulation output analysis, even though it provides limited information about the analysed system’s performance. Because of its complexity, quantile analysis is not as frequently applied, despite its ability to provide much deeper insights into the system of interest. A set of quantiles can be used to approximate a cumulative distribution function, providing fuller information about a given performance characteristic of the simulated system. This thesis employs the distributed computing power of multiple computers by proposing new methods for sequential and automated analysis of quantile-based performance measures of such dynamic systems. These new methods estimate steady state quantiles based on replicating simulations on clusters of workstations as simulation engines. A general contribution to the problem of the length of the initial transient is made by considering steady state in terms of the underlying probability distribution. Our research focuses on sequential and automated methods to guarantee a satisfactory level of confidence of the final results. The correctness of the proposed methods has been exhaustively studied by means of sequential coverage analysis. Quantile estimates are used to investigate underlying probability distributions. We demonstrate that synchronous replications greatly assist this kind of analysis.

    View record details
  • Developing Multi Agent Systems using the Model Driven Architecture and Aspects

    Cox, Toby (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Multi Agent Systems (MAS) comprise of a collection of autonomous and interacting agents that adapt to their environment. The agents within a MAS exhibit many of the same behaviours in the form of cross-cutting concerns. Aspects are a technology that can be used to represent cross-cutting concerns by weaving them through a system at specific points. In this paper a development process based on the Model Driven Architecture is proposed, that is used to perform a series of transformations from a platform independent to a MAS whose agency concerns are represented as aspects. The advantage of the proposed process is that a MAS containing many different types of agent can be easily modelled and transformed. Only the functional requirements of the MAS need be implemented after generation. The proposed process has been applied in small to medium MAS development scenarios with encouraging results obtained.

    View record details
  • A Framework for Collaborative Updates in Selective Data Replication Communities

    Fox, Simon (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Collaborative replication updates are an attractive property of Selective Data Replication in which data consumers cooperate to update their data set replications. Data consumer communities are implemented as groups of intelligent software agents who make decisions about when updates should occur. The software agent paradigm is suitable for achieving collaboration between individual agents, however some structured collaboration model must be followed. The theory of Cooperative Problem Solving (CPS) [19] describes a theoretical model for achieving collaboration between a group of software agents. We present a framework implemented using the OPAL agent platform, and derived from the CPS theory, for achieving collaborative replication updates within a community of data consumers.

    View record details
  • An interaction study of a digital music stand

    Blinov, Alexey (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Digital music stands help performing musicians manage their music scores and assist them during performance by providing a way of turning pages without interruption. Many music stand systems exist at the moment, both on the market and in research labs. However, very few of those systems address the issue of page turning carefully and no systems consider animated page turning methods. In this report we propose and evaluate three animated page turning techniques. We also propose and evaluate three methods of interacting with the music stand using foot pedals. Our evaluations indicate that animation could be a very useful feature for beginning musicians; we also discover that using one control for issuing many commands to the digital music stand is quite difficult and requires careful consideration.

    View record details
  • Detecting Advertising in Radio using Machine Learning

    M¨uller-Cajar, Robin (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    We present an algorithm that can distinguish between advertising and music without understanding it, by extracting key attributes from a radio audio stream. Our method combines advanced filtering of an audio stream with machine learning algorithms to recognise the filtered variables. The result is lightweight enough to run on an embedded processor, and could thus be used to create a device that gives the listener the ability to filter advertising from radio broadcasts

    View record details
  • Algorithms for Real-Time Rendering of Soft Shadows

    Viney, Richard (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In computer graphics, calculating realistic shadowing and lighting terms for an arbitrary scene is a fundamental problem. When accurate interaction of lights with objects in a scene is achieved it greatly enhances the believability and the immersion that the viewer experiences. In this report we give a background to real-time shadow determination algorithms and present two approaches for real-time rendering of shadows that accurately model the umbrae and penumbrae of area light sources. A description of geometry shaders, a new technology in real-time rendering, is given, and we describe new methods that demonstrate how they can be used to shift significant amounts of mesh computation from the CPU to the GPU in the penumbra wedge soft shadow algorithm. We also present comparative and performance analyses of the soft shadow algorithms developed and discuss the performance characteristics of utilizing the geometry shader stage in shadowing algorithms. Our geometry shader based implementation provides a 21% performance increase to the penumbra wedge soft shadowing algorithm for certain meshes.

    View record details
  • UNDERSTANDING INTERACTION WITH COMMAND INTERFACES

    Quinn, Philip (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Developing models for describing the influences of interfaces on user interaction is a continuing goal of human-computer interaction research. Such models are developed through development of understanding and insight using the scientific method of observation and evaluation. We present a classification framework as a foundation for developing these models specifically for command interfaces. !is classification describes the components of interaction around four top-level categories: (1) organisation, (2) navigation, (3) interaction, and (4) presentation—as a set of theories and design considerations. We then develop the aspect of navigation, building a set of principles that describe the factors that influence it. Finally, we describe an empirical evaluation of one of these principles—a potential model for landmarking interfaces, that describes a logarithmic relationship between the number of visible items and the number of presented landmarks—and found it to hold true for the evaluation interface.

    View record details
  • Improving Task Switching Interfaces

    Humm, Keith (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Most interfaces for switching between tasks require slow, visual searches of candidates, where each candidate must be scanned in turn. We developed a logging tool for task switching actions and undertook a log-based study with eleven participants to empirically characterise task-switching behaviour, finding Zipfian distributions for window and application switching, and significant differences in interface use between single and dual monitor users. We then used this data to assist in designing a new interface (Spatially COnsistent Thumbnail Zones or SCOTZ) to allow rapid task-switching performance by utilising spatial memory. In a formal evaluation against three mainstream interfaces under four workspace conditions, SCOTZ attained the lowest mean times for all conditions and scaled better with workspace load, obtaining a significant difference under high workspace load. We conclude with a recommendation for using SCOTZ at all workspace loads, and suggest it be implemented and tested in a real-world environment.

    View record details
  • Tracking Object Trajectories Relative to Planar Surfaces Using Stereo

    Elliot, Matthew (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This project proposes a methodology for 3D tracking of objects in relation to a planar surface, with trajectory accuracy enhanced using applied statistical analysis. Planar surface extraction, with camera position and orientation invariance, is achieved by finding limiting regions established by graph-based segmentation and mapping the resulting segments to disparity data from a stereo camera. Secondly, object detection and tracking is performed using a combination of adaptive background subtraction and least squares linear regression for calculating object trajectories. The accuracy of bounding planar surface extraction is shown to be accurate to within 1.4% and tracking has shown similar high correlations between the calculated and actual positions.

    View record details
  • Sequential Quantile Estimation: Reference Manual of a Software Tool

    Eickhoff, Mirko (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Apparent Level of Safety of Buildings Meeting the New Zealand Building Code Approved Document C/AS1 – Fire Safety

    McGhie, Craig (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The key objective of the project was to develop a risk ranking model to assess the apparent level of safety of buildings designed to the Approved Document for New Zealand Building Code, Fire Safety Clauses C1, C2, C3, C4 (C/AS1)(1). This is a prescriptive fire safety code. The study included a literature review of fire risk analysis methods. This found that there are numerous methods from simple risk ranking techniques such as that used in this project to detailed probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) techniques. It was generally found that more sophisticated analysis, such as PRA and Reliability Index methods are most suited to specific engineering problems while the risk ranking schemes are better suited to “broad-brush analyses” across a large range of buildings. The risk ranking model developed is based on a simple weighted points system where the building geometry, use and fire safety features are graded according to the likely impact they will have on safety. The model output is a single numerical index value, termed the Fire Safety Index (FSI). A high index indicates a safer building. The model is best used for a comparative analysis as the results are not an absolute measure of risk. The results of the analysis of buildings designed to C/AS1 indicate that the level of safety increases predominantly with increasing building escape height and/or increasing occupant numbers. The report raises questions over the level of safety afforded by sprinkler systems and whether or not the sprinkler tradeoff provisions of C/AS1 are appropriate. The model proposed in this study could be developed further and used to determine whether or not a specific fire engineering design (alternative solution) provides an “equivalent” level of safety to that achieved by the prescriptive solution C/AS1. The model requires further testing and validation before it would be suitable for this task or any other practical uses.

    View record details
  • Generating FDS Fire Simulation Input using IFC-based Building Information Model

    Dimyadi, Johannes A W (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The adoption of a performance-based design approach in the regulatory framework and the accessibility of advanced computing technology have provided an incentive for fire engineers to use more sophisticated and computational intensive numerical simulation models such as Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) to solve complex fire engineering problems. While other disciplines within the AEC/FM industry are starting to enjoy the benefits of sharing digital building model data, the current fire modelling practice still uses a somewhat conventional approach in gathering the basic building information. The conventional paper-centric practice represents a duplication of effort and contributes to errors as well as an unnecessarily high overhead in the fire simulation process. Sharing a common digital building information model using standard specifications such as the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) can provide a considerable costs saving as well as an improvement on the quality and accuracy of the information exchanged. The report looks at the current practice of CAD and building information modelling, highlights some of the constraints and the challenges in the data exchange process. The report also reviews an IFC based software parser for fire simulations and provides recommendations for extending the scope of its data mapping implementation. A web-based application has been developed specifically to demonstrate the extent in which IFC-based building information model can be used to generate the input data required for FDS simulations.

    View record details
  • Fire Performance of Connections in Laminated Veneer Lumber

    CHUO, Terence Chung Biau (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The embedment strength of timber with respect to exposure temperature has not been widely studied. Some studies have suggested that the timber totally loses its embedment strength when the timber temperature reaches 300°C. This research concentrates on the embedment strength study of Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) timber product exposed to elevated temperatures up to 250°C using singly bolted connections. Experiments showed that the embedment strength of LVL decreased at a constant rate from 0.08 kN/mm² to 0.025 kN/mm² once the bolt temperature increased from ambient conditions. The embedment strength was then assumed to remain at strength of 0.025 kN/mm² as the bolt temperature continues to increase from 120°C. The difference between the estimated failure load based on Johansen’s Equations and the experimental failure load for the connections tested under fire conditions was less than 30%. The estimation was based on bolt strength reduction using NZS 3404, the experimental charring rate and the experimental embedment strength. The predicted failure mode agreed with experimental for all types of connection.

    View record details
  • Steelwork Partially Protected From Post-Flashover Fires In Gypsum Plasterboard Lined Compartments

    Brown, Nick (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report extends the step-by-step method of thermal analysis of unprotected steel, to a multi mass system and includes radiant heat transfer between elements. The analysis was applied to i) partial protection of a beam and to ii) a light-gauge radiation shield around a steel beam. Both the partial protection of the bottom flange, and the light-gauge steel radiation shield improved performance but did not give useful protection against a realistic fire in a gypsum plasterboard lined fire compartment. The report also formulates a method of thermal analysis for gypsum plasterboard ceilings. This analysis was applied to a gypsum plasterboard ceiling giving protection to a steel beam within the ceiling space. Gypsum plasterboard ceilings were found to give useful protection to steelwork in the ceiling space. The analysis method can be implemented using a spread-sheet analysis, or by using a simplified approach based on the ‘equal area concept’. Three compartment experimental tests, along with previous furnace data, validates the analysis. The report also compares the time-temperature curves of the three compartment experimental tests with the Eurocode (and modified Eurocode) Parametric design fires.

    View record details
  • Anti-inflammatory agents from New Zealand marine organisms

    Pearce, Allison; Berridge, MV; Harper, JL; Maas, E; Perry, NB; Webb, VL; Copp, Brent (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Refining effectuality of development aid: Donors??? malfeasances

    Ngin, C (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Marine natural products

    Blunt, JW; Copp, Brent; Hu, WP; Munro, MHG; Northcote, PT; Prinsep, MR (2007-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This review covers the literature published in 2005 for marine natural products, with 704 citations (493 for the period January to December 2005) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green algae, brown algae, red algae, sponges, coelenterates, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates and echinoderms. The emphasis is on new compounds (812 for 2005), together with their relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Biosynthetic studies, rst syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included.

    View record details
  • Natural product growth inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Copp, Brent; Pearce, Allison (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Covering: 2003???2005.

    View record details