5,400 results for 2010

  • Semantic Referencing - Determining Context Weights for Similarity Measurement

    Adams BT; Janowicz, Krzysztof; Raubal, Martin (2010)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    Semantic similarity measurement is a key methodology in various domains ranging from cognitive science to geographic information retrieval on the Web. Meaningful notions of similarity, however, cannot be determined without taking additional contextual information into account. One way to make similarity measures context-aware is by introducing weights for specific characteristics. Existing approaches to automatically determine such weights are rather limited or require application specific adjustments. In the past, the possibility to tweak similarity theories until they fit a specific use case has been one of the major criticisms for their evaluation. In this work, we propose a novel approach to semi-automatically adapt similarity theories to the user’s needs and hence make them context-aware. Our methodology is inspired by the process of georeferencing images in which known control points between the image and geographic space are used to compute a suitable transformation. We propose to semi-automatically calibrate weights to compute inter-instance and inter-concept similarities by allowing the user to adjust pre-computed similarity rankings. These known control similarities are then used to reference other similarity values.

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  • A general framework for conflation

    Adams BT; Li, Linna; Raubal, Martin; Goodchild, Michael F. (2010)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    To date GIS-based conflation research has primarily been concerned with specific algorithms and tools for performing conflation on specific types of datasets. Most of these techniques focus on matching the geometry of geospatial features represented as points, polylines, and polygons. More recently the matching of the semantics of geospatial features has been identified as a key component of the conflation problem. In addition, conflation was conceived in terms of traditional GIS, but with the advent of neogeography, and in particular web-based maps with community-generated content, the representation of geospatial features on the earth has become increasingly heterogeneous in terms of geometry, semantics, data provenance, and error (Goodchild, 2007). In light of these complexities we present a general framework for conflation that aims to handle this diversity of representation.

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  • A cell-permeable dominant-negative survivin protein induces apoptosis and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to TNF-?? therapy

    Cheung, CH; Sun, Xueying; Kanwar, JR; Bai, Jizhong; Cheng, L; Krissansen, Geoffrey (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis (IAP) family which is widely expressed by many different cancers. Overexpression of survivin is associated with drug resistance in cancer cells, and reduced patient survival after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Agents that antagonize the function of survivin hold promise for treating many forms of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a cell-permeable dominant-negative survivin protein would demonstrate bioactivity against prostate and cervical cancer cells grown in three dimensional culture.

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  • Correction: A cell-permeable dominant-negative survivin protein induces apoptosis and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to TNF-?? therapy.

    Cheung, CHA; Sun, Xueying; Kanwar, JR; Bai, Jizhong; Cheng, L; Krissansen, GW (2010-10-28)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fast Automated Estimation of Variance in Discrete Quantitative Stochastic Simulation

    Shaw, Nelson (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Quantitative stochastic simulation is an important tool in assessing the performance of complex dynamic systems such as modern communication networks. Because of the proliferation of computers and devices that use and rely on networks such as the internet, assessing the performance of these networks is important to ensure future reliability and service. The current methodology for the analysis of output data from stochastic simulation is focused mainly on the estimation of means. Research on variance estimation focuses mainly on the estimation of the variance of the mean, as this is used to construct confidence intervals for the estimated mean values. To date, there has been little research on the estimation of variance of auto correlated data, such as those collected during steady-state stochastic simulation. This research investigates different methodologies for estimation of variance of terminating and steady-state simulation. Results from the research are implemented in the simulation tool Akaroa2.

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  • Fast Automated Estimation of Variance in Discrete Quantitative Stochastic Simulation

    Shaw, Nelson (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Quantitative stochastic simulation is an important tool in assessing the performance of complex dynamic systems such as modern communication networks. Because of the proliferation of computers and devices that use and rely on networks such as the internet, assessing the performance of these networks is important to ensure future reliability and service. The current methodology for the analysis of output data from stochastic simulation is focused mainly on the estimation of means. Research on variance estimation focuses mainly on the estimation of the variance of the mean, as this is used to construct confidence intervals for the estimated mean values. To date, there has been little research on the estimation of variance of auto correlated data, such as those collected during steady-state stochastic simulation. This research investigates different methodologies for estimation of variance of terminating and steady-state simulation. Results from the research are implemented in the simulation tool Akaroa2.

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  • List of Qualitas Code Corpus Programs used for Encapsulation Research

    Voigt, Janina; Irwin, Warwick; Churcher, Neville (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Simulation of Smoke Contamination in Upper Balcony by a Channelled Balcony Spill Plume in an Atrium

    Ho, Chee Leong (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This research project has studied commercial building atrium upper balcony smoke contamination due to a balcony spill plume using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) version 5.0. Simulation prediction on temperature and smoke contamination on small-scale model balcony configuration are compared with earlier researchers’ work, Tan (2009) and Harrison (2009), who conducted a one-tenth smallscale experiment. Twelve experiments are selected for simulation. Most of the temperature predictions are relatively within the range of the experiment’s records. It is found that 10°C above ambient temperature (20°C ambient) slice files from FDS are also relatively matched to the photographic records of the experiment for smoke contamination. Hence, this shows that these FDS models are able to predict upper balcony smoke contamination fairly accurately. Subsequently, the FDS small-scale models are extended to small and full-scale five balcony configuration, full-scale five balcony configuration without upstand and a seven balcony configuration for smoke contamination assessment. Full-scale fire size is up to 4.7MW, which is for sprinklered shop fire. This study shows that full-scale configuration will have higher temperature within the balcony and more severe smoke contamination when compared to the small-scale model. The predictions are also highly sensitive to the boundary conditions. This study also demonstrated that the upper balcony smoke contamination is also affected by the height of the atrium. Taller atria will have more severe smoke contamination on the lower balcony. Finally, a new correlation is developed for the three to seven balcony with upstand configuration; this correlation has incorporated the atrium height parameter into the equation. This correlation will allow the designer to make the first order of assessment on upper balcony smoke contamination due to balcony spill plume

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  • Assessment and Validation of the Fire Brigade Intervention Model for use within New Zealand and Performance-Based Fire Engineering

    Claridge, Ed (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Fire Brigade Intervention Model (FBIM) has been in use for over a decade and is used regularly throughout Australia and to a lesser extent in New Zealand. Since November 2008, the FBIM has been referenced within the New Zealand compliance document C/AS1 and is accepted by the New Zealand Fire Service (NZFS) as a suitable methodology to demonstrate the performance requirements of the New Zealand Building Code (NZBC) relating to fire brigade operations. However, the FBIM currently has no New Zealand data available to reflect NZFS operations. At present, building designs are using Australian data which is potentially dated and which has only undergone limited validation for New Zealand conditions. An analysis of building consent applications as submitted to the NZFS for review has been undertaken with specific emphasis on quantifying the impact of alternative fire engineering designs and fire-fighting facilities. This statistical review has indicated that up to 67% of all the fire reports reviewed contained insufficient information to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the NZBC. For new buildings that contained alternative fire engineering designs, the NZFS made recommendations specific to fire-fighting facilities in 63% of the reports reviewed. A review of international performance-based building codes is provided to compare international performance requirements and expectations on responding fire fighters from overseas codes. The NZBC and prescriptive requirements are also discussed for their requirements and implications for fire-fighting requirements. This project presents data that has been collected from a number of sources including specifically designed exercises, NZFS incident statistics, incident video footage and from attendance and observation at emergency incidents. Validation of this data has been undertaken against fire ground field experiments and with real emergency incidents attended during this research. A FBIM is provided based on the data presented in this research using a probabilistic riskbased approach and Monte-Carlo analysis methods considering a high-rise building scenario. This identifies some of the advantages of using probabilistic methods and the FBIM rather than the traditional percentile approach. An FBIM analysis allows the building designer to factor in the effects of fire fighters on the building design and to identify areas of the building design that may need further consideration.

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  • Evaluation of timber floor systems for fire resistance and other performance requirements

    Grant, Gordan (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Timber is a traditional building material used for floor construction in historic buildings and is widely used today in domestic and residential construction. There is increased interest in timber for long span floor systems in commercial and multi-storey residential applications. A major reason for this interest is timbers high strength-to-weight ratio, and when used in floors, can lead to significantly lighter buildings. These resulting weight savings allow for smaller foundations and less lateral load applied to seismic-resisting structural systems. New timber and timber-concrete composite floor systems have emerged to provide increased span lengths. These longer span timber floors are typically achieved with deep solid timber joists of laminated veneer lumber or glulam, solid timber laminated deck plates and timberconcrete composite floor systems. There are several engineered timber floor joist and timber floor truss products already available in Australasia. New floor systems recently introduced into the market include Potius stressed-skin floors and Flexus floor, both of which are prefabricated into floor panels off site. The timber-concrete composite floor system utilises the compressive strength of concrete and the tensile strength of timber. The composite concrete topping adds weight to the floor system, however this is offset by structural, fire and acoustic benefits. Currently there is ongoing study of timber-concrete composite floor systems at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, and stressed-skin floor systems at the University of Technology in Sydney, so that these longer span floor systems can be used for building design in the near future. Gypsum board ceilings are typically installed beneath timber floor systems to provide an enclosed space for distribution of building services behind a visibly uniform finish. A gypsum board ceiling can also provide fire resistance and acoustic performance and the information for these aspects is readily available. Alternatively, some floor systems allow exposed timber joists or timber surfaces. In these situations, fire resistance and acoustic performance are specifically designed.

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  • Examination into the Reliability of Seconday Water Supplies

    Brammer, Henry (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Secondary water supplies have been included within the standard due to their perceived increase in the reliability of the water supplied to the sprinkler system, however, the decision on which secondary water supply best fits a building or region has not been adequately researched. By deriving the availability of the water supply, the different solutions covered by the New Zealand Standards can be compared. The methodology considers the major influences on the reliability of a water supply headworks as well as the infrastructure involved in the secondary water supplies. In order to assess the reliability of these systems, critical components within the system need to be identified. Comprehensive data collected for all the critical components of the water supply are analysed to obtain a comparison of the reliability of secondary water supplies. A Monte Carlo simulation is then used to generate random failures. These failure can be used to examine the reliability of the water supply. The probabilities found during this examination confirm the additional reliability found in dual supply. It also shows that there are large variations in the reliability of the supply depending on the source of the town‟s mains supply. Current literature describing the reliability of water supplies is examined and a case study of the Adelaide headworks is conducted showing the compatibility of the calculated values to those found within the literature.

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  • Crossing boundaries: Sharing concepts of music teaching from classroom to studio

    McPhail, Graham (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study demonstrates how action research can provide a means for teachers to undertake research for themselves to inform and enhance their work. The focus of the research was the self-critique of pedagogical practice in one-to-one classical instrumental music teaching within the context of the author???s private studio. A series of lessons were videotaped and analysed, and each week goals were set for the improvement of practice in relation to theoretical propositions derived from both one-to-one teaching and general pedagogical literature. The author is an experienced classroom teacher as well as a violin teacher so is well placed to explore potential links between these teaching contexts. The development of a model of teaching modes, greater awareness of feedback quality and type and the challenge of monitoring change in action emerged as the key themes. Student engagement increased and teaching was enriched by perspectives and practices from wider educational theory and practice.

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  • Finding the balance: teachers as recontextualising agents in the struggle between classical and popular music in the secondary school curriculum.

    McPhail, Graham (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many commentators have argued that Western music education is in a state of crisis. Within the field, traditional views centred on classical traditions and cultural reproduction, are contrasted with alternative conceptions centred on popular music and rights of ownership. This paper discusses the application of Basil Bernstein???s concept of recontextualisation to an exploratory study of seven experienced New Zealand secondary school music teachers??? perceptions and experiences of these two accounts of music education. It considers the role that pedagogic autonomy plays in maintaining the tension experienced by these teachers in their curriculum realisation as they continually seek balance in recontextualising musical and educational values for pedagogic purposes.

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  • Using Grounded Theory to study the human aspects of Software Engineering

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Grounded Theory (GT) is increasingly being used to study the human aspects of Software Engineering. Unfortunately, the Grounded Theory method is still not widely understood in the Software Engineering discipline. We present an overview of the Grounded Theory method and discuss its use.

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  • How much is just enough? Some documentation patterns on Agile projects

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Agile methods advocate "just enough" documentation on Agile projects. Unfortunately, there are no clear guidelines on what is "just enough" documentation. We describe a set of patterns to help Agile software development teams define "just enough" in their own contexts. Teams can also employ these documentation patterns as strategies to overcome common challenges of adopting Agile methods.

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  • Balancing acts: Walking the Agile tightrope

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Self-organizing teams are one of the critical success factors on Agile projects - and yet, little is known about the self-organizing nature of Agile teams and the challenges they face in industrial practice. Based on a Grounded Theory study of 40 Agile practitioners across 16 software development organizations in New Zealand and India, we describe how self-organizing Agile teams perform balancing acts between (a) freedom and responsibility (b) cross-functionality and specialization, and (c) continuous learning and iteration pressure, in an effort to maintain their self-organizing nature. We discuss the relationship between these three balancing acts and the fundamental conditions of self-organizing teams - autonomy, cross-fertilization, and self-transcendence.

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  • Agile undercover: When customers don't collaborate

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Customer collaboration is vital to Agile projects. Through a Grounded Theory study of New Zealand and Indian Agile teams we discovered that lack of customer involvement was causing problems in gathering and clarifying requirements, loss of productivity, and business loss. ???Agile Undercover??? allows development teams to practice Agile despite insufficient or ineffective customer involvement. We present the causes and consequences of lack of customer involvement on Agile projects and describe the Agile Undercover strategies used to overcome them.

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  • Ecosystem services supporting livelihoods in Cambodia

    Persson, L; Phirun, N; Ngin, C; Pilgrim, J; Sam, C; Noel, S (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Final evaluation of "Project to Support Democratic Development through Decentralization and Deconcentration (PSDD)"

    Evans, H; Ngin, C; Lang, H; Min, M (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New bioactive halenaquinone derivatives from South Pacific marine sponges of the genus Xestospongia

    Longeon, A; Copp, Brent; Roue, M; Dubois, J; Valentin, A; Petek, S; Debitus, C; Bourguet-Kondracki, M-L (2010-08-15)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of South Pacific marine sponges of the genus Xestospongia has led to the isolation of a number of halenaquinone-type polyketides, including two new derivatives named xestosaprol C methylacetal 7 and orhalquinone 8. Chemical characterization of these two new compounds was achieved by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies. Evaluation of anti-phospholipase A2, anti-farnesyltransferase and antiplasmodial activities of this series is presented and structure/activity relationships are discussed. Orhalquinone 8 displayed a significant inhibition of both human and yeast farnesyltransferase enzymes, with IC50 value of 0.40 ??M and was a moderate growth inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum.

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