5,646 results for 2013

  • Building energy performance testing: future labs that support the development of innovative building envelopes and systems

    Bellamy LA; Ridley I; Carre A (2013)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper considers the functional requirements of building energy performance laboratories with advanced capability to test and develop innovative building envelopes and systems. The aim is to contribute to an ongoing discussion on the future of building energy performance testing, which leads to the complementary development of new test facilities and methods around the world. The development of whole building simulator laboratories with the capability to test the energy and environmental performance of full-scale buildings is considered in light of practices used in fire performance and seismic structural performance testing. The design and use of building energy performance laboratories able to mimic dynamic outdoor and indoor conditions is discussed.

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  • Review of the book: Theodore Roosevelt and the American Political Tradition, by Jean M. Yarbrough

    Taillon, Paul (2013-08)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Managing the Cosmetic Patient

    Locke, Michelle; Nahai, F (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Post Metropolitan? British Settler Societies and the End of Empire

    Barnes, Felicity (2013-08-26)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The 'dominant effect' of games: Content vs. medium

    Schott, Gareth Richard; Van Vught, Jasper Frans; Marczak, Raphaël (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Digital games receive an age-restriction rating based on the depiction of harmful content and its possible impact on players. Following on from film, the relationship between media content and its psychological impact on audiences is assumed to be further heightened by the interactive nature of the medium as it makes players responsible for constructing the moving-image on screen. While classification processes continue to serve as an exercise in caution, there remains little evaluation of a particular rating decision’s accuracy via any subsequent examination of the interactions between player and game text. This paper argues for the benefits of researched accounts detailing the interactive experience of games for its capacity to challenge public understanding of the medium. In doing so, the paper will introduce a research design that is currently being employed to achieve an understanding of player experiences. The intention is to produce an empirically validated model of media ‘usage,’ capable of accounting for the ‘actual’ experience of play and the ways game texts are activated under the agency of players once they enter everyday life and culture.

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  • Assessment for learning and fostering student agency and autonomy in technology

    Moreland, Judy; Cowie, Bronwen (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In this paper we focus on how assessment for learning (AFL) practices can provide opportunities for students to develop identities as capable and independent learners who are aware of and able to employ a variation of and/or something similar to the accountability systems for knowledge generation and legitimation that are used by technologists. Sadler (1989) argued that the indispensible conditions for improvement are that students move from being consumers to active participants in their own learning and assessment. Carr (2001) adds that learner agency of this kind involves students being ready, willing and able to monitor and progress their own learning. As autonomous and agentic learners, students are attuned to opportunities to learn, to making deeper sense of their own learning and knowing when and how to take strategic action to progress their learning. They have ‘a nose for quality’ and the inclination and means to pursue this (Claxton, 1995). Using examples derived from a three-year research project undertaken with 12 teachers in New Zealand Year 1-8 schools we illustrate how teachers fostered student learning and learning autonomy through patterns of participation that construed learning as a social practice and collective responsibility. We detail the ways the teachers sought to ensure students had access to a range of opportunities for feedback and supported student affiliation with technology. We conclude that the ‘spirit’ of AfL (Marshall & Drummond, 2006) is evoked when teachers have a pedagogical mindset that foregrounds the sharing of responsibility with students as the norm, and when they provide students with opportunities, and the means, to exercise responsibility for their learning and learning progress.

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  • Pre-service teachers' perceptions of technology and technology education

    Forret, Michael; Edwards, Richard; Lockley, John; Nguyen, Nhung Hong (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Technology teachers’ perceptions and understanding of the nature of technology heavily influences their perceptions of technology education and consequently shapes their teaching practice. Understanding the nature of technology is also an important component of technology education and in 2007 the New Zealand technology curriculum introduced a new strand called the Nature of Technology. An important part of initial teacher education programmes is therefore to help student teachers develop their concepts and philosophies of technology and technology education. This paper reports findings from a survey of New Zealand student teachers’ perceptions of technology and technology education before and after their involvement in a compulsory course in technology education. The findings reported here are some of the initial results from one institution but are part of a larger project aimed at brining together similar data from across the country to inform development of pre-service technology education programmes.

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  • Centering Language, Culture, and Identity at the Nexus of Professional Learning and Practice

    Henderson, Christine; Price, Gaylene; Fickel, Letitia Hochstrasser (2013)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Te ara e heke mai nei. Science, innovation and the Māori economy: mapping Māori enterprise (scoping phase)

    Ruckstuhl, Katharina; Ruwhiu, Diane; Lont, David; Yap, Max; Turner, Rachel (2013)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this TPK scoping report is to give insight into the extent to which it is possible to map the Māori economy from a High Value Manufacturing & Service Sector perspective. The intention is to determine what the current system is able to offer Māori business from a research, science and innovation perspective and to what extent Māori enterprises are ready to, are capable of, or have the desire or need to access those offerings. We also wish to better understand how discourse abour R&D intersects with what is known already about how New Zealand enterprises succeed and whether such models are applicable to Māori enterprises. Our concluding observation is that we suspect that developing a national innovation system that is comprehensive, flexible and capable of responding to an indigenous economy is ground-breaking from an international perspective.

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  • Is activin C a receptor antagonist: Implications for health and disease

    Lee, Kai Lun (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The Transforming Growth Factor-β superfamily (TGF-β) is a large family of structurally related cell regulatory proteins. The TGF-β superfamily was initially discovered in 1983, and research is still ongoing investigating its enormous complexity and diversity. This study focuses on a particular subset of the TGF-β superfamily, the activin growth factors.

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  • Composition and thermal analysis of crust formed from industrial anode cover

    Zhang, Q; Taylor, Mark; Chen, John; Cotton, D; Groutzo, T; Yang, X (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    When the anode cover is heated up in the reduction cell, the crust formation from the anode cover commences at the bottom and the process is driven by thermo-chemical processes. It is important to study the composition and thermal stability properties of the crust in order to understand the mechanisms of crust formation and deterioration. Several crust pieces were taken from industrial prebaked anode cells. A number of vertical crust sections were sampled from these pieces, and each section was analyzed for composition and phase change temperature. Results show that the bottom layer is enriched in cryolite, consistent with results published in the literature. The upper region was found to contain more chiolite. Crushed bath-based anode crust has higher CR than alumina based anode crust. The melting of chiolite in the crust leaves substantial macro-porosity there, which contributes to the absorption of NaAlF 4 and the penetration of bath through it. The formation conditions of crystalline crust were discussed.

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  • Discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationship analysis of 1,14-sperminediphenylacetamides as potent and selective antimalarial lead compounds

    Liew, Lydia; Kaiser, M; Copp, Brent (2013-01-15)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Screening of synthesized and isolated marine natural products for in vitro activity against four parasitic protozoa has identified the ascidian metabolite 1,14-sperminedihomovanillamide (orthidine F, 1) as being a non-toxic, moderate growth inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum (IC(50) 0.89 ??M). Preliminary structure-activity relationship investigation identified essentiality of the spermine polyamine core and the requirement for 1,14-disubstitution for potent activity. One analogue, 1,14-spermine-di-(2-hydroxyphenylacetamide) (3), exhibited two orders of magnitude increased anti-P. f activity (IC(50) 8.6 nM) with no detectable in vitro toxicity. The ease of synthesis of phenylacetamido-polyamines, coupled with potent nM levels of activity towards dual drug resistant strains of P. falciparum makes this compound class of interest in the development of new antimalarial therapeutics.

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  • The power to shock: Perceptions of visual and textual horror in Rammstein's performance aesthetics

    Burns, Robert GH (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    The use of monumental imagery, period clothing, German Romantic texts and guttural chants, which include nasal gestic speaking, all combine to make up what I regard as the Rammstein "formula". This formula has been apparent on all of Rammstein's recordings since Sehnsucht (1998) and in their stage performances, such as those in the DVDs Live aus Berlin (1999) and Volkerball (2006). Prior to this study, my research into Rammstein's aesthetics in performance had not extended to the band's use of album cover artwork, and it is also worth noting that the band's texts follow the darkly humorous and theatrically gothic themes that are used in their cover artwork and stage performances. There is a consistent thematic lineage between all Rammstein cover artwork that is "on point" and linked to song texts, the combination of which I argue, is designed to shock.

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  • Retinal amino acid neurochemistry of the southern hemisphere lamprey, Geotria australis

    Nivison-Smith, L; Collin, SP; Zhu, Y; Ready, S; Acosta Etchebarne, Monica; Hunt, DM; Potter, IC; Kalloniatis, M (2013-03-13)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lampreys are one of the two surviving groups of the agnathan (jawless) stages in vertebrate evolution and are thus ideal candidates for elucidating the evolution of visual systems. This study investigated the retinal amino acid neurochemistry of the southern hemisphere lamprey Geotria australis during the downstream migration of the young, recently-metamorphosed juveniles to the sea and during the upstream migration of the fully-grown and sexually-maturing adults to their spawning areas. Glutamate and taurine were distributed throughout the retina, whilst GABA and glycine were confined to neurons of the inner retina matching patterns seen in most other vertebrates. Glutamine and aspartate immunoreactivity was closely matched to M??ller cell morphology. Between the migratory phases, few differences were observed in the distribution of major neurotransmitters i.e. glutamate, GABA and glycine, but changes in amino acids associated with retinal metabolism i.e. glutamine and aspartate, were evident. Taurine immunoreactivity was mostly conserved between migrant stages, consistent with its role in primary cell functions such as osmoregulation. Further investigation of glutamate signalling using the probe agmatine (AGB) to map cation channel permeability revealed entry of AGB into photoreceptors and horizontal cells followed by accumulation in inner retinal neurons. Similarities in AGB profiles between upstream and downstream migrant of G. australis confirmed the conservation of glutamate neurotransmission. Finally, calcium binding proteins, calbindin and calretinin were localized to the inner retina whilst recoverin was localized to photoreceptors. Overall, conservation of major amino acid neurotransmitters and calcium-associated proteins in the lamprey retina confirms these elements as essential features of the vertebrate visual system. On the other hand, metabolic elements of the retina such as neurotransmitter precursor amino acids and M??ller cells are more sensitive to environmental changes associated with migration.

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  • Mapping cation entry in photoreceptors and inner retinal neurons during early degeneration in the P23H-3 rat retina

    Zhu, Y; Mistra, S; Nivison-Smith, L; Acosta Etchebarne, Monica; Fletcher, EL; Kalloniatis, M (2013-05)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The proline-23-histidine line 3 (P23H-3) transgenic rat carries a human opsin gene mutation leading to progressive photoreceptor loss characteristic of human autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. The aim of the present study was to evaluate neurochemical modifications in the P23H-3 retina as a function of development and degeneration. Specifically, we investigated the ion channel permeability of photoreceptors by tracking an organic cation, agmatine (1-amino-4-guanidobutane, AGB), which permeates through nonspecific cation channels. We also investigated the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors in distinct populations of bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells using AGB tracking in combination with macromolecular markers. We found elevated cation channel permeation in photoreceptors as early as postnatal day 12 (P12) suggesting that AGB labeling is an early indicator of impending photoreceptor degeneration. However, bipolar, amacrine, or ganglion cells displayed normal responses secondary to ionotropic glutamate receptor activation even at P138 when about one half of the photoreceptor layer was lost and apoptosis and gliosis were observed. These results suggest that possible therapeutic windows as downstream neurons in inner retina appear to retain normal function with regard to AGB permeation when photoreceptors are significantly reduced but not lost.

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  • Octodon degus (Molina 1782): A model in comparative biology and biomedicine

    Ardiles, AO; Ewer, J; Acosta Etchebarne, Monica; Kirkwood, A; Martinez, AD; Ebensperger, LA; Bozinovic, F; Lee, TM; Palacios, AG (2013-04-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    One major goal of integrative and comparative biology is to understand and explain the interaction between the performance and behavior of animals in their natural environment. The Caviomorph, Octodon degu, is a native rodent species from Chile, and represents a unique model to study physiological and behavioral traits, including cognitive and sensory abilities. Degus live in colonies and have a well-structured social organization, with a mostly diurnal???crepuscular circadian activity pattern. More notable is the fact that in captivity, they reproduce and live between 5 and 7 yr and show hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases (including Alzheimer's disease), diabetes, and cancer.

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  • A robust wire detector for a vine pruning robot

    McCulloch, Josh (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    An automated vine pruning robot is being developed to reduce the cost of labour in vineyards. This automated system requires an accurate model of the vine’s structure, including the locations of support wires, in order for the robot to make good decisions about where and how to prune the plant. In this project we have developed a system for accurately and robustly detecting pixels belonging to wires in Bayer Images taken by the robot of the vine’s canopy. Our system uses support vector machines for classifying wire and non-wire pixels, and a set of masks for optimally distributing training examples over an image. We have found an optimal subset of features for describing these examples and are able to achieve upwards of 90% precision with more than 20% recall. The system generates data ideal for wire fitting and use by the automated vine pruning robot. The techniques discussed could be generalised and used in other scenarios where selecting ideal example data from a large pool of potential examples, and finding optimal features to represent these examples is required.

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  • Method For Segmentation Of Articulated Structures Using Depth Images for Public Displays

    Watson, Robin (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A novel method is presented to analyse articulated structures in depth data and is used in an attempt to implement gesture-motion control. The method first uses region growing with a depth threshold to obtain an initial segmentation of the scene into different bodies. Region growing is carried out again on these bodies to produce subregions. A head tracking method and hand tracking method were implemented using the depth analysis. The head tracking had an average of 22 pixel error. The hand tracking was unsuccessful.

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  • Applications of Dual Quaternions in Three Dimensional Transformation and Interpolation

    Smith, Matthew (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Quaternions have long been integral to the field of computer graphics, due to their minimal and robust representation of rotations in three dimensional space. Dual quaternions represent a compact method of representing rigid body transformations (that is rotations and translations) with similar interpolation and combination properties. By comparing them to two other kinds of rigid transformations, we examine their properties and evaluate their usefulness in a real time environment. These properties include accuracy of operations, efficiency of operations, and the paths that interpolation and blending methods using those transformation methods take. The blending and interpolation methods are of particular interest as we constructed a skeletal animation system to highlight a potential application of dual quaternions. The bone hierarchy was constructed with dual quaternions and a sequence of identical hierarchies with different transformations at each bone can be interpolated as though they were keyframes to produce animations. Weighted transformations required in skinning the skeleton structure to a triangular mesh also prove an effective application of dual quaternions. Our findings show that while dual quaternions are useful in the context of skeletal animation, other applications may favour other representations, due to simplicity or speed.

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  • Developing an Online Algorithms Tutorial for New Zealand High Schools

    Duncan, Caitlin (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Computer Science was introduced to New Zealand schools as an NCEA topic for the first time in 2011. The rapid development and introduction of the NCEA standards resulted in a lack of teaching resources and left many teachers feeling unprepared to teach these topics. Providing easily obtainable resources is crucial to the success of this curriculum. The research underpinning the development of a resource for students and teachers, to assist them with the algorithms section of the curriculum, is presented. “Algorithms” will form a chapter in the online textbook, the Computer Science Field Guide (CSFG). The chapter will convey the basic concepts of what an algorithm is, their associated costs and the differences in costs for algorithms which accomplish the same tasks. An introductory video, a sorting algorithms visualisation, and two interactive applications have been developed for the chapter. These interactives use Searching and Sorting Algorithms to illustrate to students the differences in costs between different algorithms. Algorithm simulations and a preliminary teacher survey indicate the chapter content is successful and its effectiveness will be fully assessed after its release at the 2013 Computer Science for High Schools event on December 4th .

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