5,714 results for 2013

  • Proof of Concept Studies for the Practical Application of Joule Heating as a Phytosanitary Treatment for Export Pinus radiata (D. Don) Logs

    Heffernan WJB (2013)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Following initial feasibility work in 2007 [1] and a MAFBNZ funded project in 2009 [2], the Joule heating concept for log sterilization was incorporated into the STIMBR PGP project as section 1.5.2. This report details the construction, commissioning and testing of the log sterilizing apparatus which had largely been conceived and designed by the EPECentre before the start of this project. The procedure for sterilizing test logs is described and the results obtained with two such logs are presented and discussed against the objectives of section 1.5.2. Finally suggestions for further work, refinements to the system and tests to fill gaps in current knowledge are proposed, including the author’s current impression as to how a wharf-side machine might operate. Tests on the first log show that after treatment all measured locations in the timber exceed 56C for over 5 hours. Tests on the second log show that after treatment all measured locations in the timber exceed 56C for over 8 hours and 70C for about 3.5 hours. In both cases this includes the geometric centre of the log. These tests, therefore, show that Joule heat sterilization undoubtedly can work.

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  • An Educational Approach to the Art of Living

    Teschers C (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article will engage with theories about the art of living and the good life, especially Schmid’s concept “Lebenskunst”, as well as with relevant findings of positive psychology research from an educational point of view. An argument will be made for the importance for education to refocus on the lives and living circumstances of our students, and the contribution an art of living can make to education. It will be shown that a shift of the educational focus in theory and practise is necessary, away from being mainly economical driven to a more comprehensive understanding of education and Bildung that includes not only social and economical considerations, but also other important aspects of human life and well-being.

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  • Sources of Potroom Dust Emissions From Aluminium Smelters

    Wong, David (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Dispositions of elite-level Australian rugby coaches towards Game Sense: characteristics of their coaching habitus

    Light RL; Evans JR (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Bourdieu's analytic concept of habitus has provided a valuable means of theorising coach development but is yet to be operationalised in empirical research. This article redresses this oversight by drawing on a larger study that inquired into how the 'coaching habitus' of elite-level Australian and New Zealand rugby coaches structured their interpretation and use of the Game Sense approach to coaching to illustrate how habitus can be operationalised. It focuses on the identification of characteristics of the individual coaching habitus of four elite-level Australian rugby coaches and how they shape their interpretation and use of Game Sense. Drawing on suggestions made by Lau, we identify the characteristics of four individual 'coaching habitus' by examining their views on: (1) the characteristics of good coaches; (2) characteristics of great rugby players and how to develop them; and (3) their dispositions towards innovation in coaching. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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  • African Law Clinicians' Manual

    Palmer R; McQuoid-Mason D (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A glimpse of reality - what mathematical modelling at secondary school could look like

    Spooner, Kerri (2013)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this thesis was to explore authentic mathematical modelling and use that experience to develop and research a genuine mathematical modelling experience for secondary school students. A classroom activity was developed and trialled with a group of New Zealand year 12 average ability students at a decile 10 school. The focus of the unit was the process of mathematical modelling. Data was collected on the classroom learning activities and what parts of the mathematical modelling process was remembered. The three data sources were student diaries, classroom assessment and student interviews. The results showed that an authentic modelling process is achievable within the restricted classroom environment. With the prompts provided in the classroom activity students coped well identifying the essential aspects of the situation being modelled, and there was good recall by all students for strategies to identify the essential aspects of the situation. Students did not do as well forming a model once they had identified the essential aspects. Further work is recommended in developing strategies to help students with the model formation stage. To allow for a full experience of the process of mathematical modelling more time is needed than was given to this activity.

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  • Evaluation methodology and measurement approach

    Thomopoulos N; Carlson R; Kusumastuti D; Klok E; Hjalmarsson A; Hodgson F; Veenstra S; Grant-Muller, S (2013)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Evaluation approach for operational success and effectiveness of incentives

    Kusumastuti D; Bie J; Veenstra S; Thomopoulos N; Klok E; van Houten Y; van Berkum E; Grant-Muller, S (2013)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    In the broader sense, the SUNSET project aims to encourage sustainability in the transport system and to support people’s mobility. These goals are articulated as more specific objectives – specifically to reduce traffic congestion and CO2 emissions, and to improve personal safety and well-being. To support delivery of these project goals, the “tripzoom” application (app) has been developed for use with smartphone (on the iOS and Android platforms). The app has a range of functionality, but can be used as a channel through which various types of incentives can be offered. The incentives may encourage people to make smarter travel choices and to travel in more sustainable and health-promoting ways (e.g. by cycling or walking more often). The tripzoom app will be fully operational and tested in three living labs (LLs), namely: Enschede (NL), Leeds (UK), and Gothenburg (SE), with Enschede being the main LL and Leeds and Gothenburg being the reference LLs. During these LL trials various incentives will be tested, which may be tailored according to the design of the individual LL and local transport priorities.

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  • Effect of ground motion duration on structural collapse risk

    Chandramohan R; Baker JW; Deierlein GG (2013)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Influence of Ground Motion Duration on the Collapse Response of Bridge Structures

    Chandramohan R; Baker JW; Deierlein GG (2013)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    While it is generally perceived that ground motion duration will influence structural performance, previous research on the topic has produced mixed conclusions, which has led to the effect of duration being largely ignored in structural design practice. The believed reasons for the inconclusive results are the use of non-deteriorating structural models, attention not paid to behavior near collapse and the use of inefficient metrics to characterize duration. This paper summarizes preliminary results of a study that employs non-linear incremental dynamic analyses to assess the effect of ground motion duration on the estimated collapse risk of reinforced concrete bridge piers. Spectrally equivalent long and short duration record sets are used to isolate the effect of duration from that of other ground motion characteristics like response spectral amplitude and response spectral shape, and quantify its influence on estimated seismic collapse risk. Sensitivity of the effect of duration to model parameters is studied to help identify classes of structures most susceptible to long duration shaking. Preliminary findings and their implications on research and structural design practice are presented.

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  • Influence of ground motion spectral shape and duration on seismic collapse risk

    Chandramohan R; Baker JW; Deierlein GG; Lin, T (2013)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    The seismic collapse risk of a structure is largely influenced by the intensity and other characteristics of the earthquake ground motions. This study addresses the influence of the shape of the ground motion spectra and the ground motion duration on the structural collapse capacity, as determined by nonlinear response history analysis. The conditional spectrum is proposed as a more realistic characterization of spectral shape, compared to the commonly used uniform hazard spectrum. Ground motion duration is another important characteristic, which is quantified in terms of significant duration. The effects of spectral shape and duration on the estimated collapse capacity of a 5-story steel moment frame are demonstrated. Spectrally equivalent long and short duration record sets are employed to isolate the effects of duration. Preliminary findings indicate that cyclic strength and stiffness deterioration of components and accumulation of drift due to ratcheting can significantly reduce structural collapse capacity under long duration shaking.

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  • Application of a spring-dashpot system to clinical lung tumor motion data

    Ackerley EJ; Cavan AE; Wilson PL; Berbeco RI; Meyer J (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Purpose: The treatment efficacy of radiation therapy for lung tumors can be increased by compensating for breath-induced tumor motion. In this study, we quantitatively examine a mathematical model of pseudomechanical linkages between an external surrogate signal and lung tumor motion. Methods: A spring-dashpot system based on the Voigt model was developed to model the correlation between abdominal respiratory motion and tumor motion during lung radiotherapy. The model was applied to clinical data obtained from 52 treatments ("beams") from 10 patients, treated on the Mitsubishi Real-Time Radiation Therapy system, Sapporo, Japan. In Stage 1, model parameters were optimized for individual patients and beams to determine reference values and to investigate how well the model can describe the data. In Stage 2, for each patient the optimal parameters determined for a single beam were applied to data from other beams to investigate whether a beam-specific set of model parameters is sufficient to model tumor motion over a course of treatment. Results: In Stage 1, the baseline root mean square (RMS) residual error for all individually optimized beam data was 0.90 ± 0.40 mm (mean ± 1 standard deviation). In Stage 2, patient-specific model parameters based on a single beam were found to model the tumor position closely, even for irregular beam data, with a mean increase with respect to Stage 1 values in RMS error of 0.37 mm. On average, the obtained model output for the tumor position was 95% of the time within an absolute bound of 2.0 and 2.6 mm in Stages 1 and 2, respectively. The model was capable of dealing with baseline, amplitude and frequency variations of the input data, as well as phase shifts between the input abdominal and output tumor signals. Conclusions: These results indicate that it may be feasible to collect patient-specific model parameters during or prior to the first treatment, and then retain these for the rest of the treatment period. The model has potential for clinical application during radiotherapy treatment of lung tumors. © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

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  • Asymptotic enumeration of symmetric integer matrices with uniform row sums

    McKay BD; McLeod JC (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    We investigate the number of symmetric matrices of nonnegative integers with zero diagonal such that each row sum is the same. Equivalently, these are zero-diagonal symmetric contingency tables with uniform margins, or loop-free regular multigraphs. We determine the asymptotic value of this number as the size of the matrix tends to infinity, provided the row sum is large enough. We conjecture that one form of our answer is valid for all row sums. An example appears in Figure 1.

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  • Truthmaking and the world-time parallel

    Leniston-Lee, Gareth (2013)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    There is a close structural parallel between the way we talk about time and the way we talk about modality (i.e. matters of possibility, necessity, actuality etc.). A consequence of this is that whenever we construct a metaphysical argument within one of these domains, there is a parallel argument to be made in the other. On the face of it, this parallel between possible worlds and moments in time seems to commit us to holding corresponding attitudes to the ontological status of non-present and non-actual entities. In this thesis I assess a claim made by Sider (2001: 41-42) that truthmaking – the idea that truth is grounded in existence – provides a way to avoid the commitment to ontological symmetry that this world-time parallel seems to foist upon us. Truthmaking challenges presentists, who deny the existence of past entities and actualists, who deny the existence of merely possible entities, to come up with a way of grounding truths that are ostensively about the events and entities that they deny exist. Sider’s claim can be broken down into three propositions: 1. Truthmaking provides reason to reject presentism. 2. Truthmaking does not provide reason to reject actualism. 3. Truthmaking breaks the ontological symmetry between time and modality. In this thesis I argue that while 1 is false, 3 remains true. While I am not a presentist myself I do not think that truthmaking provides a sound basis for rejecting the position. Much of this thesis is dedicated to defending presentism against the challenge truthmaking poses. I also don’t believe that truthmaking undermines actualism, but do not commit myself to any particular actualist response to the truthmaking challenge in this thesis. My central aim is to show that the presentist has a viable response to the truthmaking challenge and that this response does not have a viable parallel in the modal case. So while I think that both presentists and actualists can provide adequate responses to the challenge truthmaking poses, truthmaking still breaks the symmetry because the arguments made in defence of each position are very different. So one might rationally accept one argument but not the other.

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  • Technology Education for the Future: A Play on Sustainability.

    (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We are very pleased to welcome Technology Education scholars from around the world to New Zealand for PATT 27. We are delighted to have the PATT conference in the Southern Hemisphere for only the second time in its history. This conference, and these proceedings, continue the almost 30 year old tradition of sharing research and ideas in a collegial and inclusive setting. While the conference theme provides a particular focus on considering the future and sustainability through Technology Education, the proceedings also include a broad range of papers which focus on key areas of importance in primary, secondary and tertiary levels of education. We believe the conference and these proceedings will make a valuable, interesting and significant contribution to the discourses of Technology Education through the introduction of new ideas, the confirmation or critique of assumptions, and the exploration of experiences. This moves our profession forward to rest on a more secure research base and to mature through analysis, interrogation and communication. We appreciate your willingness to come to Christchurch despite the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes. We hope that you enjoy the city as it starts to rebuild its future. Your presence here is a small contribution to the rebuild so thank you from the shaken and determined citizens of Christchurch.

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  • The use of learning technologies to facilitate engagement in an online course

    Gedera, Dilani S.P.; Williams, P. John (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    E-learning is becoming increasingly popular in many countries for its flexibility in terms of time, place and pace. Research affirms that learning technologies support interaction and collaboration among learners and improve learning outcomes. However, current practices of e-learning are not without constraints and there is a need for empirical research to assist practitioners in determining the best uses of learning technologies. This paper seeks to develop an understanding of students’ experiences and their perspectives of learning with the educational technologies of ‘Adobe virtual classroom’ and ‘Moodle’ that facilitated activities in a university course. The study was conducted using a case study method over a period of one semester. With Activity Theory as its research framework, the research methods of this study include individual interviews, online observation and document analysis. This paper includes some of the initial findings of the research and a brief discussion on how the educational technologies facilitated students’ engagement in this course. This may inform practitioners of the pragmatic constraints and affordances of existing technologies, learning activities and strategies used in online learning environments.

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  • Using Activity Theory to understand contradictions in an online university course facilitated by Moodle

    Gedera, Dilani S.P.; Williams, P. John (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Activity Theory can offer insights into learning processes that are facilitated by Learning Management Systems. Contradictions, as a basic principle of Activity Theory, assist in identifying the tensions and conflicts that emerge in systems of online learning environments. Using Activity Theory as its research framework, this study focuses on the contradictions that emerged in the form of tensions, frustrations, misunderstandings and miscommunication in a fully online university course in New Zealand. The data collection methods of this case study included individual interviews, online activity observation and documents analysis. Outlining some of the findings of the study, this paper will discuss how students’ participation in learning activities facilitated by Moodle was affected by these contradictions.

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  • Hubble flow variance and the cosmic rest frame

    Wiltshire DL; Smale PR; Mattsson T; Watkins R (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    We characterize the radial and angular variance of the Hubble flow in the composite sample of 4534 galaxies, on scales in which much of the flow is in the nonlinear regime. With no cosmological assumptions other than the existence of a suitably averaged linear Hubble law, we find with decisive Bayesian evidence (ln B >> 5) that the Hubble constant, when averaged in independent spherical shells, is closer to its asymptotic value when referred to the rest frame of the Local Group (LG), rather than the standard rest frame of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). An exception occurs for radial shells in the range 40/h - 60/h Mpc. Angular averages reveal a dipole structure in the Hubble flow, whose amplitude changes markedly over the range 32/h - 62/h Mpc. Whereas the LG frame dipole is initially constant and then decreases significantly, the CMB frame dipole initially decreases but then increases. The map of angular Hubble flow variation in the LG rest frame is found to coincide with that of the residual CMB temperature dipole, with correlation coefficient -0.92. These results are difficult to reconcile with the standard kinematic interpretation of the motion of the Local Group in response to the clustering dipole, but are consistent with a foreground nonkinematic anisotropy in the distance-redshift relation of 0.5% on scales up to 65/h Mpc. Effectively, the differential expansion of space produced by nearby nonlinear structures of local voids and denser walls and filaments cannot be reduced to a local boost. This hypothesis suggests a reinterpretation of bulk flows, which may potentially impact on calibration of supernova distances, anomalies associated with large angles in the CMB anisotropy spectrum, and the dark flow inferred from the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. It is consistent with recent studies that find evidence for a nonkinematic dipole in the distribution of distant radio sources.

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  • Admirality Islands

    Nevermann, H (2013)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

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  • CYMRC 9th data report (2008-2012)

    (2013)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This is the 9th Data Report released by the CYMRC (the Child & Youth Mortality Review Committee). It predominantly reports on data from 2008 to 2012, with some tables and figures for 2002-2012, and some for the time period 1979-2012. These data are from the Mortality Review Database, which contains information on all deaths in children and young people aged 28 days to 24 years who died in New Zealand from 2002 to the present.

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