5,495 results for 2016

  • Forget me not : critical intervention of Tōtara North’s decaying industrial heritage

    Scally, Braeden (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project is a design-led investigation into how the people of Tōtara North could engage with their town’s forgotten industrial heritage while moving into the 21st century. Situated on the shores of the remote coastal town, the now derelict Lane & Brown Timber Mill and Shipbuilding Yard is the last standing example of a once functioning kauri timber mill. With the first change in ownership in over a century in 2004, the township’s industrial heritage is disintegrating back into the ground where kauri once grew. In the past, the native forests provided a connection between the people of the town and their relationship to the place. The resulting disjunction has led to an uncertain future for the occupants and their once globally significant industrial heritage. This project aims to stop this negative cycle and rejuvenate the industrial nature of the site whilst also providing people with a reason to stay. Informed by the past industrial process, which connected land and sea, the new programme seeks to reverse the path of production, from sea to land, reviving the past whilst also exploring alternative methods for future development. Through the dredging of the harbour’s excessive silt build up, a case for manufacturing adobe mud brick and a research centre for alternative earth construction is proposed, repurposing the kauri sediment from the seabed in order to construct a new future for the people of Tōtara North. The project questions the fate of our small historic towns, investigating the role of the architect and of heritage conservation in this context. Through an understanding of both tangible and intangible heritage, the reimagined sheds explore the design potential for representing heritage based upon three initiatives: building the stories, provoking unique intervention, and repurposing the past. Each initiative entails a response to the site at both macro and micro scales, extending past barriers and constraints of the norm to inspire the people, re-establishing their identity and connection to the heritage of the place. As a result, the local people and the wider public are able to dynamically engage with their past.

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  • Blurring the lines [:How can blurring the lines between theatre and performance create an alternative multipurpose performance space(s) which revitalises dormant urban spaces within the Aotea Quarter?]

    Rodrigues, Neil Craig (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The Aotea Quarter has been identified by the Auckland City Council as the cultural heart of Auckland. The Quarter currently lacks necessities, such as adequate connections between major public squares, and a current lack of connection between the cultural and arts facilities. These links and connections prevent the Quarter from fulfilling its true potential as Auckland’s leading cultural hub. The weak and ineffective connections are caused by the inactive edges and undeveloped dormant urban spaces (such as council owned car parks) within the Quarter. This research project builds on the Aotea Quarter Framework plan to revitalise the Quarter. The primary focus is making a substantive contribution to the creation of a Theatre District within the Aotea Quarter. Outdoor theatre and street performance exemplifies human interaction, as emotions and reactions are not hidden away in the darkness of the auditorium but rather exposed in daylight and defenceless if the performer approaches. It creates a bond between the performer and audience, and between the audience members themselves. Through blurring the boundaries between theatre and performance, the project proposes multipurpose outdoor performance spaces. The design creates purposeful visual and physical links and connections with the theatres in the vicinity. Simultaneously, the project looks at the urban design problems caused by the construction of Mayoral Drive. The design aims to strengthen the corner of Mayoral Drive and Queen Street and improve the connection between Aotea Square and Myers Park. People are a city’s biggest attraction and we will naturally gravitate to exuberant and lively places. The thoroughfares are designed to attract people by creating the opportunity for impromptu performances and rehearsal spaces, while forming links with the existing performing arts venues.

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  • Technical report two: Analysis of curriculum documents

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, Elizabeth; Hay, K; Maidment, JM; Walker, S; Ngan, L (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Report on reader attitudes and behaviour

    Morris, Paula; Robertson, C (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Technical report three: TISWEANZ Taxonomy

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, Elizabeth; Hay, K; Maidment, JM; Ngan, L; Walker, S (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Report on citizenship law: New Zealand

    McMillan, K; Hood, Anna (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Technical report one: Methods for the creation of terms for indexing social work education in Aotearoa New Zealand (TISWEANZ)

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, Elizabeth; Hay, K; Maidment, JM; Ngan, L; Walker, S (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Antimicrobial Peptides in Jawed and Jawless Vertebrates

    Gibbons, Olivia Robyn (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a major part of the innate immune defence system which shows a broad spectrum of activity, defending the host against invading microbes. The aim of this work was to identify the AMPs present in yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) and pouched lamprey (Geotria australis) and use molecular techniques to fully sequence their cDNA and quantify their expression in adult individuals. Using bioinformatic approaches candidate AMP genes were ascertained from available S. lalandi and G. australis RNA-seq transcriptomic databases, obtained from various tissues. Selected AMPs were chosen to have their full cDNA sequence amplified using RACE-PCR, which were then cloned and sequenced. Complete cDNA sequences were obtained for S. lalandi hepcidin and moronecidin, whereas attempts to complete the G. australis defensin-like cDNA were unsuccessful. Comparison of the S. lalandi hepcidin and moronecidin protein sequences with proteins already characterised in other fish showed good homology and conservation of important features. In addition, specific primers were designed to examine the expression levels of S. lalandi hepcidin and moronecidin in gill, liver or spleens of three fish. Analysis showed hepcidin expression to be highest in liver tissues, whereas moronecidin expression was highest in the gills and spleens. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the AMP genes present in S. lalandi and G. australis and some initial characterisation of S. lalandi hepcidin and moronecidin, which will permit the development of future research applications. Overall, characterising AMP genes in jawed and jawless vertebrates is vital for economical and successful fish farming, while also providing possible therapeutic benefits associated with AMP research in biomedicine and disease in wild fish stocks.

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  • Heart-shaped worlds: Cordiform maps in the context of early modern Europe

    Watson, Ruth (2016-11-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Long fascinating to those who study cartography, the cordiform maps (from the Latin for heart, cor) are known to few outside that small group. The cordiform projection has been considered something of an anomaly, sitting uncomfortably with the discoveries and discourses of the New World or the genesis of modern cartography. This paper asks why the shape of a heart was chosen for imaging the world. To answer this requires exploring meanings for the heart image outside of its use in cartography. This approach sees the map not as a fixed sign, judged by its geographic content alone, but a complex image under pressure from wider expectations upon the mapmakers and their audiences. In the sixteenth century, meanings were attributed to the heart that we no longer subscribe to today, including learning and memory, leadership and wisdom. A second aim is to establish that the maps??? shape ??? the heart ??? was intimately entangled with aspirations about the New World. Ultimately, these unusual maps can illuminate the mindset of those in Europe aspiring to a new vision of human affairs, suggesting that the early modern cartographic enterprise was not as homogenous as is often considered. This paper introduces audiences to the maps as well as key issues that have hindered their interpretation. It will show that they, perhaps more than any other maps of their time, are critical for revealing potentially conflicting and controversial aspirations for the New World.

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  • Anxiety and depression, personality traits relevant to tinnitus: A scoping review

    Durai, M; Searchfield, Grant (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Scoping reviews of existing literature were conducted to identify key personality traits relevant to tinnitus, and examine the relationship between affective disorders and tinnitus.The methodological framework of Arksey and O'Malley was followed.Sixty studies were chosen for charting the data, 14 studies examined personality traits exclusively, 31 studies examined affective disorders exclusively, and 15 studies investigated both.The presence of one or more specific personality traits of high neuroticism, low extraversion, high stress reaction, higher alienation, lower social closeness, lower well-being, lower self control, lower psychological acceptance, presence of a type D personality, and externalized locus of control were associated with tinnitus distress. Anxiety and depression were more prevalent among the tinnitus clinical population and at elevated levels.Personality traits have a consistent association with the distress experienced by adult tinnitus help-seekers, and help-seekers are also more likely to experience affective symptoms and/or disorders.

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  • Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Call for Better Data

    Wilson, Marcus T.; St George, Lynley (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is increasingly used to treat stroke, Parkinson's disease and depression (Fregni et al., 2005; Loo and Mitchell, 2005; Hallet, 2007; O'Reardon et al., 2007; Ridding and Rothwell, 2007). rTMS uses bursts of magnetic pulses to change the excitability and connection strengths of cortical neurons. However, the evidence to inform clinical application is highly inconsistent (Thut and Pascual-Leone, 2010; Hamada et al., 2013) and substantially based on trial and error. Systematic theory is lacking. Typically, in rTMS research, measurements of motor-evoked potential (MEP) are made, often in terms of the strength of the MEP and the length of the cortical silent period that follows. However, the MEP is probably a poor and certainly an indirect measure of changes in the brain (Nicolo et al., 2015), clouding our understanding of rTMS mechanisms. In practice, therefore, particular amplitudes and timing of pulses in an rTMS sequence are selected because they show promise in small subsets of people. However, even basics such as the sign of any change in the outcome measure (e.g., does the MEP increase or decrease?) is debated. Many results show a wide spread in responses. It has become common to talk about “responders” and “non-responders” although evidence for a binary distinction in these two groups is lacking—in reality there is usually a continuum of response often including potentiation in some and depression in others (Nettekoven et al., 2015). Moreover, Héroux et al. (2015) provide evidence that the irreproducibility of results may be due to small sample sizes, unscientific screening of subjects and data, and selective reporting of results.

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  • Late-life homicide-suicide: A national case series in New Zealand

    Cheung, Gary; Hatters Friedman, S; Sundram, Frederick (2016-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Homicide-suicide is a rare event, but it has a significant impact on the family and community of the perpetrator and victim(s). The phenomenon of late-life homicide-suicide has not been previously studied in New Zealand, and there is only limited data in the international literature. The aim of this study is to systematically review coroners' records of late-life homicide-suicides in New Zealand. After ethics approval was granted, the Coronial Services of New Zealand was approached to provide records of all closed cases with a suicide verdict (age 65+) over a five-year period (July 2007???December 2012). Of the 225 suicides, 4 cases of homicide-suicide were identified (an estimated incidence of 0.12 per 100???000 per persons year). All four perpetrators were men; three had been farmers. Their ages ranged from 65 to 82. One case occurred in the context of an underlying psychiatric illness (psychotic depression in bipolar disorder). Firearms were used in three cases. Two cases were categorized as spousal/consortial subtype, one case as filicide-suicide, and one case as siblicide-suicide. The prospect of major social upheaval in the form of losing their homes was present in all four cases. The findings of this case series were consistent with the limited existing literature on homicide-suicide. Age-related biopsychosocial issues were highlighted in this case series of late-life homicide-suicide. Additionally, evaluating firearm licences in high-risk groups may represent a prevention strategy.

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  • The origins of Kura Kaupapa M??ori: Indigenous schooling in Aotearoa, New Zealand

    Tocker, Kimai (2016-09-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kura kaupapa M??ori are a unique New Zealand primary school education system in which children are immersed in a M??ori language and cultural environment with the aim of enabling graduates to ???live as M??ori??? within the wider world. This presentation provides a background of the events that led to the establishment of kura kaupapa M??ori in New Zealand. Interviews with founding members from the first Auckland kura kaupapa M??ori give a critical sense of the hopes and aspirations that guided them in their struggle to set up the kura kaupapa M??ori initiative. The desire to provide suitable schooling for their children, who had been educated in a pre-school M??ori immersion environment, led the pioneers on a two year political and legal battle to preserve M??ori language and culture and to provide a M??ori education that validates traditional M??ori knowledge and pedagogy. Narratives from the key figures in kura kaupapa M??ori movement provide information about the hardship they and their families endured in the setting up of kura kaupapa M??ori without government assistance, as well as clarification about the political strategies they employed in the pursuit of the legalisation of kura. The restructuring of New Zealand???s Education Department opened a space for the development of kura kaupapa M??ori, leading to legislation in 1989 and formal recognition in 1999 of the Te Aho Matua document, the guiding philosophy for the majority of kura today. The New Zealand case offers a lot to those considering how to engage in structural educational change. This paper will interest all those who work or study in indigenous education, and particularly those curious about the complex and often demanding political strategies required for the establishment of a state-funded school system for indigenous populations.

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  • Kura kaupapa M??ori: Preparing graduates to live as M??ori in the world today

    Tocker, Kimai (2016-08-31)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kura kaupapa M??ori are a unique New Zealand primary school education system in which children are immersed in a M??ori language and cultural environment with the aim of enabling graduates to ???live as M??ori??? and to make positive contributions as bilingual and bicultural citizens to New Zealand society and to the wider world. Narratives from some of the graduates from the first kura established in Auckland between 1984-1989, provide information about the learning of English language literacy skills, part of the goal of attaining bilingualism. In the early days of kura, classrooms were set up specifically for the teaching of English and placed apart from the main teaching areas to ensure the students??? M??ori language was kept intact. The graduates share their varied experiences of learning English at kura and express a recognition of the benefits of being skilled in the literacies of both M??ori and the English language. For the majority of the graduates it has been the M??ori language knowledge that has secured them employment in television, teaching and, for those who have chosen the academic world, their M??ori and bicultural knowledge has provided valuable understandings and insight for study and associated work. As bilingual and bicultural adults the graduates demonstrate self-confidence, self-determination and the ability to advance their talents to high levels of achievement.

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  • Kura kaupapa M??ori: Preparing graduates to live as M??ori in the world today

    Tocker, Kimai (2016-11-22)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kura kaupapa M??ori graduates are making positive contributions as bilingual and bicultural citizens to New Zealand society and to the wider world. Unique to New Zealand, kura kaupapa M??ori provide a primary school education in which children are immersed in a M??ori language and cultural environment with the aim of enabling graduates to ???live as M??ori??? in the western world. Narratives from some of the graduates from the first kura kaupapa M??ori established in Auckland between 1984-1989, demonstrate how the establishment of effective relationships between teachers and students motivated learning. Information is also provided about the learning of English language literacy skills. In the early days of kura kaupapa M??ori, classrooms were set up specifically for the teaching of English and placed apart from the main teaching areas to ensure the students??? M??ori language was kept intact. The graduates share their varied experiences of learning English at kura kaupapa M??ori and express a recognition of the benefits of being skilled in the literacies of both M??ori and the English language. For the majority of the graduates it has been M??ori language knowledge that has secured them employment in television and teaching. For those who have chosen the academic world, their M??ori and bicultural knowledge has provided valuable understandings and insight for study and associated work. As bilingual and bicultural adults the graduates demonstrate self-confidence, self-determination and the ability to advance their talents to high levels of achievement. This presentation will interest all those who work or study in indigenous education, and particularly those curious about the place of English literacy in indigenous language education.

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  • Against the tidal forces of the day: idiorrhythmy, communitas, and the syncopated subject

    Willis, Emma (2016-07-07)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In How to Live Together, Roland Barthes, drawing from the monastic tradition, evokes a form of sociality ???where each subject lives according to his own rhythm???: not, ???an excessively negative form: solitude, eremitism???, nor ???an excessively assimilative form???. Rather, ???a median, utopian, Edenic, idyllic form: idiorrhythmy??? (2012: 9). Erika Vogt???s Artist Theatre Program???s Lava plus Knives (Performa 15) takes Barthes??? concept as a point of departure. The work is framed as a performed exhibition where a collective of eight artists ???while sticking to one???s own singular voice [???] must negotiate idiosyncrasies, affects, space and power relations??? (Aubin, 2015: 5). Also performed in Performa 15, J??r??me Bel???s Ballet approached the challenge of how to dance together. The short piece, as with his other work, deconstructed the aesthetic values assigned to dancing bodies, examining the interrelation of distinctive bodies and their spatial-theatrical framing. Both works are playful examples of ???idiorrhythmic clusters??? that resist the unified rhythm of consensus. Building on Barthes??? framework, I wish to read these works as dramaturgies of communitas and to interrogate the ways in which these aesthetic communities both accommodate rely upon difference. To do this I shall draw upon Roberto Esposito???s definition of communitas as: ???a dizziness, a syncope, a spasm in the continuity of the subject.???

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  • Redefining family: The inclusion of animals in the social work curriculum

    Adamson, CE (2016-09-30)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This presentation approaches the inclusion of animals within the social work curriculum through both theoretical and practical lenses. Aligning deep ecological principles of sustainability with a proposed expansion of the social work ecological perspective, the presentation establishes a theoretical rationale for the inclusion of animals within the social work curriculum. In so doing, the presentation aims to describe the subtle shifts in perspective that are required to make social work practice sensitive to the power of attachment relationships with animals, to the vulnerability of animals when subjected to human decision-making in times of stress and crisis, and to the potential strengths inherent in recognising the human-animal bond within our practice. Utilising examples from disaster planning and response, and from domestic violence intervention, the role that companion animals play within families and relationships is highlighted, and practical examples of animal-inclusive curricula are presented. Linking the philosophical assumptions of sustainability and inclusion to what is taught in Schools of Social Work provides the opportunity to ask some fundamental questions about the definition of ???rights??? and ???justice???: the presentation ends with a challenge to social work practice in regard to the inclusion of animals within our definitions of human rights and social justice.

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  • Outcomes and Impact of Training and Development in Health Management and Leadership in Relation to Competence in Role: A Mixed-Methods Systematic Review Protocol

    Ayeleke, RO; North, Nicola; Wallis, Katharine; Liang, Z; Dunham, Annette (2016-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: The need for competence training and development in health management and leadership workforces has been emphasised. However, evidence of the outcomes and impact of such training and development has not been systematically assessed. The aim of this review is to synthesise the available evidence of the outcomes and impact of training and development in relation to the competence of health management and leadership workforces. This is with a view to enhancing the development of evidence-informed programmes to improve competence. Methods and Analysis: A systematic review will be undertaken using a mixed-methods research synthesis to identify, assess and synthesise relevant empirical studies. We will search relevant electronic databases and other sources for eligible studies. The eligibility of studies for inclusion will be assessed independently by two review authors. Similarly, the methodological quality of the included studies will be assessed independently by two review authors using appropriate validated instruments. Data from qualitative studies will be synthesised using thematic analysis. For quantitative studies, appropriate effect size estimate will be calculated for each of the interventions. Where studies are sufficiently similar, their findings will be combined in meta-analyses or meta-syntheses. Findings from quantitative syntheses will be converted into textual descriptions (qualitative themes) using Bayesian method. Textual descriptions and results of the initial qualitative syntheses that are mutually compatible will be combined in mixed methods syntheses. Discussion: The outcome of data collection and analysis will lead, first, to a descriptive account of training and development programmes used to improve the competence of health management and leadership workforces and the acceptability of such programmes to participants. Secondly, the outcomes and impact of such programmes in relation to participants??? competence as well as individual and organisational performance will be identified. If possible, the relationship between health contexts and the interventions required to improve management and leadership competence will be examined.

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  • Contour interpolated radial basis functions with spline boundary correction for fast 3D reconstruction of the human articular cartilage from MR images

    Javaid, Zarrar; Boocock, MG; McNair, PJ; Unsworth, Charles (2016-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate a new image processing technique that can provide a "near real-time" 3D reconstruction of the articular cartilage of the human knee from MR images which is user friendly. This would serve as a point-of-care 3D visualization tool which would benefit a consultant radiologist in the visualization of the human articular cartilage.The authors introduce a novel fusion of an adaptation of the contour method known as "contour interpolation (CI)" with radial basis functions (RBFs) which they describe as "CI-RBFs." The authors also present a spline boundary correction which further enhances volume estimation of the method. A subject cohort consisting of 17 right nonpathological knees (ten female and seven male) is assessed to validate the quality of the proposed method. The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method dramatically reduces the number of data points required for fitting an implicit surface to the entire cartilage, thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction over the comparable RBF reconstruction method of Carr. The authors compare the CI-RBF method volume estimation to a typical commercial package (3d doctor), Carr's RBF method, and a benchmark manual method for the reconstruction of the femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages.The authors demonstrate how the CI-RBF method significantly reduces the number of data points (p-value < 0.0001) required for fitting an implicit surface to the cartilage, by 48%, 31%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. Thus, significantly improving the speed of reconstruction (p-value < 0.0001) by 39%, 40%, and 44% for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages over the comparable RBF model of Carr providing a near real-time reconstruction of 6.49, 8.88, and 9.43 min for the patellar, tibial, and femoral cartilages, respectively. In addition, it is demonstrated how the CI-RBF method matches the volume estimation of a typical commercial package (3d doctor), Carr's RBF method, and a benchmark manual method for the reconstruction of the femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages. Furthermore, the performance of the segmentation method used for the extraction of the femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages is assessed with a Dice similarity coefficient, sensitivity, and specificity measure providing high agreement to manual segmentation.The CI-RBF method provides a fast, accurate, and robust 3D model reconstruction that matches Carr's RBF method, 3d doctor, and a manual benchmark method in accuracy and significantly improves upon Carr's RBF method in data requirement and computational speed. In addition, the visualization tool has been designed to quickly segment MR images requiring only four mouse clicks per MR image slice.

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  • The great airway debate: Is the scalpel mightier than the cannula?

    Baker, Paul; O'Sullivan, EP; Kristensen, MS; Lockey, D (2016-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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