5,674 results for 2016

  • Integration of indigenous knowledge into disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) policies for sustainable development: The case of the Agta in Casiguran, Philippines

    Molina, JGJ; Neef, Andreas (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Due to a combination of physical, socio-economic and political factors, the Agta, an indigenous group in Casiguran, Philippines, are highly susceptible to the threat of natural hazards, especially typhoons, floods, storm surges and landslides. Despite their evident vulnerabilities, the Agta possess valuable indigenous knowledge, generated through practical and long-standing experiences, culture and local resources, which they utilise in coping and in ensuring their safety from the detrimental impacts of disasters. However, the decision-making and planning processes of the local government in the area of disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) remain insensitive to Agta???s knowledge and context, putting them in a more precarious condition and compromising the sustainability of their livelihoods. Employing qualitative and participatory methods, such as semi-structured interviews, policy and document analysis, participant observation and validation workshop, it is argued that there is a need for integrating Agta???s indigenous knowledge into the existing DRRM policies and plans of the local government in respect of the rights to sustainable development and survival of the former and in response to the legal obligation of the latter. A sustainable development framework that calls for a process of harmonising indigenous knowledge and science-based information in DRRM towards vulnerability reduction and disaster resilience guided the investigation. While the local government recognises the importance of indigenous knowledge in DRRM, integration with science only happens at the individual level and is not applied in formal settings such as planning and decision-making processes of the municipality. The study recommends mechanisms to ensure Agta???s inclusion in the local government???s DRRM decision-making, planning, and policy formulation processes such as effective implementation of national laws on DRRM and indigenous peoples; active representation in DRRM council and committees at the municipal and village scales; documentation, validation and integration of indigenous knowledge in different sectors such as education, health and livelihood; organising work; and capacity building initiatives that will realise Agta???s rights to sustainable development and disaster safety.

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  • Local responses to land grabbing and displacement in rural Cambodia

    Neef, Andreas; Touch, S (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cambodia is endowed with relatively abundant natural resources. The Royal Government of Cambodia (RGC) holds about 75-80 per cent of the country???s territory under the status of ???state land??? (USAID 2011). The 2001 Land Law allows the RGC to reclassify ???state public land??? into ???state private land??? as a precondition to allocate concessions for various purposes. An increasing share of state private land has been allocated as economic land concessions (ELCs) to Cambodian business tycoons, political elites and foreign investors since the mid-2000s, mostly for agro-industrial plantations and ??? more recently ??? tourism developments. As a consequence, land disputes have shown an increasing trend from the 2000s onwards. The Cambodian League for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights recorded a total of 1,162 land conflicts ??? each involving at least five households ??? in the 10 years from 2004 to 2013 (C Oldenburg, personal communication). Most of the cases occurred in areas with strong economic growth, were about agricultural land and involved powerful foreign investors, domestic political and economic elites and local authorities. According to data collated by the Cambodian Human Rights and Development Association (ADHOC), more than 770,000 Cambodians ??? equal to almost 6 per cent of the population ??? have been affected by land grabs and resulting conflicts over natural resources (ADHOC 2014). Military and police forces have played an increasingly prominent role in land disputes and land evictions, siding with company owners and national, provincial and district authorities (Neef et al. 2013).

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  • Measures of pleasure

    Sword, Helen; Blumenstein, Marion (2016-07-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Can we measure academic pleasure? Should we? This serious-yet-playful session will report on findings from a four-year study in which more than 1,200 academics in 15 countries were asked to describe the main emotions that they associate with their academic writing. Rather than seeking to ???measure pleasure??? in any one definitive way, our research team employed a variety of methodologies and perspectives in our coding and analysis of the data. It???s tempting to say that we sought to illustrate the adage, ???There are many different ways to skin a cat??? ??? but what an unappealing metaphor! Instead, let???s say that we were guided by the structure and ethos of Wallace Stevens??? poem ???Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird???, which employs multiple perspectives to shift readers toward a deeper, more complex understanding of what they are ???really??? seeing. Some of our methodological approaches were unashamedly quantitative: for example, having coded the data to establish the relative percentages of respondents expressing purely positive, purely negative or mixed emotions about their writing, we ran a regression analysis showing how those ratios varied across demographic groups. Some were qualitative, drawing on established research paradigms such as content analysis, cluster analysis and grounded theory. And some were inspired by critical and creative paradigms from beyond the social sciences, such as narratology, material textuality, graphic design (in particular, the work of McCandless [2000]) and the poetics of metaphor. In the spirit of anti-???methodolatrists??? such as Feyerabend (1993), Law (2004) and Thrift (2008), our goal was not to produce a single, definitive set of ???proven??? findings but to experiment with a multiplicity of approaches and see where they might lead us. The nation of Bhutan famously measures not just the Gross Domestic Product of its citizenry but their Gross National Happiness as well. What if the nation of Academia, likewise, were to value emotions such as satisfaction, passion and well-being alongside conventional performance metrics such as research outputs and citation rankings? Our session will interrogate the very notion of measuring pleasure even while indulging in the pleasures of measurement. We hope that participants will leave with a renewed confidence that the Measured University need not be a place devoid of playfulness and pleasure.

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  • Study protocol: combining experimental methods, econometrics and simulation modelling to determine price elasticities for studying food taxes and subsidies (The Price ExaM Study)

    Waterlander, Willemina; Blakely, T; Nghiem, N; Cleghorn, CL; Eyles, Helen; Genc, M; Wilson, N; Jiang, Yannan; Swinburn, Boyd; Jacobi, L; Michie, J; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona (2016-07-19)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is a need for accurate and precise food price elasticities (PE, change in consumer demand in response to change in price) to better inform policy on health-related food taxes and subsidies.The Price Experiment and Modelling (Price ExaM) study aims to: I) derive accurate and precise food PE values; II) quantify the impact of price changes on quantity and quality of discrete food group purchases and; III) model the potential health and disease impacts of a range of food taxes and subsidies. To achieve this, we will use a novel method that includes a randomised Virtual Supermarket experiment and econometric methods. Findings will be applied in simulation models to estimate population health impact (quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) using a multi-state life-table model. The study will consist of four sequential steps: 1. We generate 5000 price sets with random price variation for all 1412 Virtual Supermarket food and beverage products. Then we add systematic price variation for foods to simulate five taxes and subsidies: a fruit and vegetable subsidy and taxes on sugar, saturated fat, salt, and sugar-sweetened beverages. 2. Using an experimental design, 1000 adult New Zealand shoppers complete five household grocery shops in the Virtual Supermarket where they are randomly assigned to one of the 5000 price sets each time. 3. Output data (i.e., multiple observations of price configurations and purchased amounts) are used as inputs to econometric models (using Bayesian methods) to estimate accurate PE values. 4. A disease simulation model will be run with the new PE values as inputs to estimate QALYs gained and health costs saved for the five policy interventions.The Price ExaM study has the potential to enhance public health and economic disciplines by introducing internationally novel scientific methods to estimate accurate and precise food PE values. These values will be used to model the potential health and disease impacts of various food pricing policy options. Findings will inform policy on health-related food taxes and subsidies.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000122459 (registered 3 February 2016).

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  • A process evaluation of the Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) randomized controlled trial

    Olstad, D; Ball, K; Abbott, G; McNaughton, S; Le, HND; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Pollard, C; Crawford, DA (2016-02-24)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) was a randomized controlled trial that operationalized a socioecological approach to population-level dietary behaviour change in a real-world supermarket setting. SHELf tested the impact of individual (skill-building), environmental (20 % price reductions), and combined (skill-building???+???20 % price reductions) interventions on women???s purchasing and consumption of fruits, vegetables, low-calorie carbonated beverages and water. This process evaluation investigated the reach, effectiveness, implementation, and maintenance of the SHELf interventions. Methods RE-AIM provided a conceptual framework to examine the processes underlying the impact of the interventions using data from participant surveys and objective sales data collected at baseline, post-intervention (3 months) and 6-months post-intervention. Fisher???s exact, ?? 2 and t-tests assessed differences in quantitative survey responses among groups. Adjusted linear regression examined the impact of self-reported intervention dose on food purchasing and consumption outcomes. Thematic analysis identified key themes within qualitative survey responses. Results Reach of the SHELf interventions to disadvantaged groups, and beyond study participants themselves, was moderate. Just over one-third of intervention participants indicated that the interventions were effective in changing the way they bought, cooked or consumed food (p???<???0.001 compared to control), with no differences among intervention groups. Improvements in purchasing and consumption outcomes were greatest among those who received a higher intervention dose. Most notably, participants who said they accessed price reductions on fruits and vegetables purchased (519 g/week) and consumed (0.5 servings/day) more vegetables. The majority of participants said they accessed (82 %) and appreciated discounts on fruits and vegetables, while there was limited use (40 %) and appreciation of discounts on low-calorie carbonated beverages and water. Overall reported satisfaction with, use, and impact of the skill-building resources was moderate. Maintenance of newly acquired behaviours was limited, with less than half of participants making changes or using study-provided resources during the 6-month post-intervention period. Conclusions SHELf???s reach and perceived effectiveness were moderate. The interventions were more effective among those reporting greater engagement with them (an implementation-related construct). Maintenance of newly acquired behaviours proved challenging. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN39432901.

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  • Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH): process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial intervention

    Foley, L; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Marsh, Samantha; Epstein, LH; Olds, T; Dewes, Ofanaite; Heke, I; Jiang, Yannan; Maddison, R (2016-05-26)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH) trial tested a family intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour in overweight children. The trial found no significant effect of the intervention on children's screen-based sedentary behaviour. To explore these null findings, we conducted a pre-planned process evaluation, focussing on intervention delivery and uptake.SWITCH was a randomised controlled trial of a 6-month family intervention to reduce screen time in overweight children aged 9-12 years (n???=???251). Community workers met with each child's primary caregiver to deliver the intervention content. Community workers underwent standard training and were monitored once by a member of the research team to assess intervention delivery. The primary caregiver implemented the intervention with their child, and self-reported intervention use at 3 and 6??months. An exploratory analysis determined whether child outcomes at 6??months varied by primary caregiver use of the intervention.Monitoring indicated that community workers delivered all core intervention components to primary caregivers. However, two thirds of primary caregivers reported using any intervention component "sometimes" or less frequently at both time points, suggesting that intervention uptake was poor. Additionally, analyses indicated no effect of primary caregiver intervention use on child outcomes at 6??months, suggesting the intervention itself lacked efficacy.Poor uptake, and the efficacy of the intervention itself, may have played a role in the null findings of the SWITCH trial on health behaviour and body composition.The trial was registered in the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (no. ACTRN12611000164998 ); registration date: 10/02/2011.

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  • Protecting New Zealand children from exposure to the marketing of unhealthy foods and drinks: a comparison of three nutrient profiling systems to classify foods

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Mackenzie, T; Vandevijvere, Stefanie (2016-09-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Promotion of unhealthy foods and drinks is a significant, modifiable risk factor for child obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases. We compared three accepted nutrient profiling systems: the Health Star Rating (HSR), the Ministry of Health Food and Beverage Classification System (FBCS) and the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe Nutrient Profiling Model, to identify the best system to protect New Zealand children from exposure to the marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages.13,066 packaged foods from the 2014 New Zealand Nutritrack database were classified as 'restricted' or 'not restricted' as per the WHO model; 'everyday/sometimes' or 'occasional' as per the FBCS model; and 's exposure to marketing of unhealthy foods and drinks should be subject to evaluation by an independent body.

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  • Modeling health gains and cost savings for ten dietary salt reduction targets

    Wilson, N; Nghiem, N; Eyles, Helen; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Shields, E; Cobiac, LJ; Cleghorn, CL; Blakely, T (2016-04-26)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dietary salt reduction is included in the top five priority actions for non-communicable disease control internationally. We therefore aimed to identify health gain and cost impacts of achieving a national target for sodium reduction, along with component targets in different food groups.We used an established dietary sodium intervention model to study 10 interventions to achieve sodium reduction targets. The 2011 New Zealand (NZ) adult population (2.3 million aged 35+ years) was simulated over the remainder of their lifetime in a Markov model with a 3 % discount rate.Achieving an overall 35 % reduction in dietary salt intake via implementation of mandatory maximum levels of sodium in packaged foods along with reduced sodium from fast foods/restaurant food and discretionary intake (the "full target"), was estimated to gain 235,000 QALYs over the lifetime of the cohort (95 % uncertainty interval [UI]: 176,000 to 298,000). For specific target components the range was from 122,000 QALYs gained (for the packaged foods target) down to the snack foods target (6100 QALYs; and representing a 34-48 % sodium reduction in such products). All ten target interventions studied were cost-saving, with the greatest costs saved for the mandatory "full target" at NZ$1260 million (US$820 million). There were relatively greater health gains per adult for men and for M??ori (indigenous population).This work provides modeling-level evidence that achieving dietary sodium reduction targets (including specific food category targets) could generate large health gains and cost savings for a national health sector. Demographic groups with the highest cardiovascular disease rates stand to gain most, assisting in reducing health inequalities between sex and ethnic groups.

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  • "Smart" RCTs: Development of a Smartphone App for Fully Automated Nutrition-Labeling Intervention Trials

    Volkova, Ekaterina; Li, N; Dunford, E; Eyles, Helen; Crino, M; Michie, J; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona (2016-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is substantial interest in the effects of nutrition labels on consumer food-purchasing behavior. However, conducting randomized controlled trials on the impact of nutrition labels in the real world presents a significant challenge.The Food Label Trial (FLT) smartphone app was developed to enable conducting fully automated trials, delivering intervention remotely, and collecting individual-level data on food purchases for two nutrition-labeling randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in New Zealand and Australia.Two versions of the smartphone app were developed: one for a 5-arm trial (Australian) and the other for a 3-arm trial (New Zealand). The RCT protocols guided requirements for app functionality, that is, obtaining informed consent, two-stage eligibility check, questionnaire administration, randomization, intervention delivery, and outcome assessment. Intervention delivery (nutrition labels) and outcome data collection (individual shopping data) used the smartphone camera technology, where a barcode scanner was used to identify a packaged food and link it with its corresponding match in a food composition database. Scanned products were either recorded in an electronic list (data collection mode) or allocated a nutrition label on screen if matched successfully with an existing product in the database (intervention delivery mode). All recorded data were transmitted to the RCT database hosted on a server.In total approximately 4000 users have downloaded the FLT app to date; 606 (Australia) and 1470 (New Zealand) users met the eligibility criteria and were randomized. Individual shopping data collected by participants currently comprise more than 96,000 (Australia) and 229,000 (New Zealand) packaged food and beverage products.The FLT app is one of the first smartphone apps to enable conducting fully automated RCTs. Preliminary app usage statistics demonstrate large potential of such technology, both for intervention delivery and data collection.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000964617. New Zealand trial: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000644662.

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  • Effects of plain packaging, warning labels, and taxes on young people's predicted sugar-sweetened beverage preferences: an experimental study

    Bollard, T; Maubach, N; Greenaway, Natalie; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona (2016-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with increased risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and dental caries. Our aim was to assess the effects of plain packaging, warning labels, and a 20??% tax on predicted SSB preferences, beliefs and purchase probabilities amongst young people.A 2????????3????????2 between-group experimental study was conducted over a one-week period in August 2014. Intervention scenarios were delivered, and outcome data collected, via an anonymous online survey. Participants were 604 New Zealand young people aged 13-24 years who consumed soft drinks regularly. Participants were randomly allocated using a computer-generated algorithm to view one of 12 experimental conditions, specifically images of branded versus plain packaged SSBs, with either no warning, a text warning, or a graphic warning, and with or without a 20??% tax. Participant perceptions of the allocated SSB product and of those who might consume the product were measured using seven-point Likert scales. Purchase probabilities were measured using 11-point Juster scales.Six hundred and four young people completed the survey (51??% female, mean age 18 (SD 3.4) years). All three intervention scenarios had a significant negative effect on preferences for SSBs (plain packaging: F (6, 587)???=???54.4, p s predicted preferences for, and reported probability of purchasing, SSBs.

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  • Economic evaluation of price discounts and skill-building strategies on purchase and consumption of healthy foods and beverages: the SHELf randomized controlled trial

    Le, HND; Gold, L; Abbott, G; Crawford, D; McNaughton, SA; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Pollard, C; Ball, K (2016-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objective Pricing strategies are a promising approach for promoting healthier dietary choices. However, robust evidence of the cost-effectiveness of pricing manipulations on dietary behaviour is limited. We aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of a 20% price reduction on fruits and vegetables and a combined skills-based behaviour change and price reduction intervention. Design and methods Cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal perspective was undertaken for the randomized controlled trial Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf). Female shoppers in Melbourne, Australia were randomized to: (1) skill-building (n = 160); (2) price reductions (n = 161); (3) combined skill-building and price reduction (n = 161); or (4) control group (n = 161). The intervention was implemented for three months followed by a six month follow-up. Costs were measured in 2012 Australian dollars. Fruit and vegetable purchasing and consumption were measured in grams/week. Results At three months, compared to control participants, price reduction participants increased vegetable purchases by 233 g/week (95% CI 4 to 462, p = 0.046) and fruit purchases by 364 g/week (95% CI 95 to 633, p = 0.008). Participants in the combined group purchased 280 g/week more fruits (95% CI 27 to 533, p = 0.03) than participants in the control group. Increases were not maintained six-month post intervention. No effect was noticed in the skill-building group. Compared to the control group, the price reduction intervention cost an additional A$2.3 per increased serving of vegetables purchased per week or an additional A$3 per increased serving of fruit purchased per week. The combined intervention cost an additional A$12 per increased serving of fruit purchased per week compared to the control group. Conclusions A 20% discount on fruits and vegetables was effective in promoting overall fruit and vegetable purchases during the period the discount was active and may be cost-effective. The price discount program gave better value for money than the combined price reduction and skill-building intervention. The SHELf trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials Registration ISRCTN39432901.

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  • Semantic indexing of wearable camera images: Kids???Cam concepts

    Smeaton, A; McGuinness, K; Gurrin, C; Zhou, J; O'Connor, NE; Wang, P; Davis, B; Azevedo, L; Freitas, A; Signal, L; Smith, M; Stanley, J; Barr, M; Chambers, T; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to provide content-based search on image media, including images and video, they are typically accessed based on manual or automatically assigned concepts or tags, or sometimes based on image-image similarity depending on the use case. While great progress has been made in very recent years in automatic concept detection using machine learning, we are still left with a mis-match between the semantics of the concepts we can automatically detect, and the semantics of the words used in a user's query, for example. In this paper we report on a large collection of images from wearable cameras gathered as part of the Kids'Cam project, which have been both manually annotated from a vocabulary of 83 concepts, and automatically annotated from a vocabulary of 1,000 concepts. This collection allows us to explore issues around how language, in the form of two distinct concept vocabularies or spaces, one manually assigned and thus forming a ground-truth, is used to represent images, in our case taken using wearable cameras. It also allows us to discuss, in general terms, issues around mis-match of concepts in visual media, which derive from language mis-matches. We report the data processing we have completed on this collection and some of our initial experimentation in mapping across the two language vocabularies.

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  • Side draw optimisation of a high-purity, multi-component distillation column

    Kraller, MA; Udugama, IA; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Yu, Wei; Young, Brent (2016-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Distillation columns with side draws are widely used in the process industry to refine crude methanol into high-purity methanol. Historically, industrial methanol manufacturers have concentrated on meeting strict product specifications, while methanol yield and reboiler duty optimisation has often been neglected. In this work, a steady-state model of an industrial high-purity multi-component methanol distillation column was developed using a commercial process simulator. To achieve higher recovery at optimal reboiler duty, the side draw location and side draw mass flow rates were identified as two important factors. It was determined that a combination of lowering the side draw location while reducing the side draw mass flow rate will lead to the most optimal outcome. A design of experiment was also carried out to evaluate the stability of the column at recovery rates of 97.7% (current recovery) and 99.5% (proposed high recovery). Disturbances in the feed stream were identified as having the greatest effect, while the product purity was observed to become more sensitive towards all disturbances when operating at an enhanced recovery.

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  • Dynamic modelling and validation of a commercial scale geothermal organic rankine cycle power plant

    Proctor, MJ; Yu, Wei; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Young, Brent (2016-05)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The organic rankine cycle (ORC) is a heat recovery technology used for renewable energy generation such as the large-scale production of electricity from geothermal resources. In this paper a dynamic model of a commercial-scale geothermal ORC is developed in process simulation software and validated against plant data. The difference in power output between the model and plant was found to be 0.24% with a standard deviation of 1.40% of the average power output. The results from model validation are used to suggest improvements to the model, which is intended to be used for further investigation of optimisation and process control.

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  • Testing for new physics: Neutrinos and the primordial power spectrum

    Canac, N; Aslanyan, G; Abazajian, KN; Easther, Richard; Price, LC (2016-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    We test the sensitivity of neutrino parameter constraints from combinations of CMB and LSS data sets to the assumed form of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) using Bayesian model selection. Significantly, none of the tested combinations, including recent high-precision local measurements of H0 and cluster abundances, indicate a signal for massive neutrinos or extra relativistic degrees of freedom. For PPS models with a large, but fixed number of degrees of freedom, neutrino parameter constraints do not change significantly if the location of any features in the PPS are allowed to vary, although neutrino constraints are more sensitive to PPS features if they are known a priori to exist at fixed intervals in log k. Although there is no support for a non-standard neutrino sector from constraints on both neutrino mass and relativistic energy density, we see surprisingly strong evidence for features in the PPS when it is constrained with data from Planck 2015, SZ cluster counts, and recent high-precision local measurements of H0. Conversely combining Planck with matter power spectrum and BAO measurements yields a much weaker constraint. Given that this result is sensitive to the choice of data this tension between SZ cluster counts, Planck and H0 measurements is likely an indication of unmodeled systematic bias that mimics PPS features, rather than new physics in the PPS or neutrino sector.

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  • Seallagain: Gaelic Grammar at a Glance

    Parsons, Catrìona NicÌomhair (2016)

    Book
    University of Otago

    A native Gaelic speaker born in the Isle of Lewis and a graduate of Edinburgh University, Scotland, Catrìona NicÌomhair Parsons has been involved in the teaching of Gaelic language and song in North America for decades. For thirty summers, she taught Scottish Gaelic at the Gaelic College, St. Ann’s, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, where she was commissioned to prepare Gàidhlig troimh Chòmhradh, a Gaelic course in three volumes with recorded text. For many years, she taught in the Celtic Studies Department of St. Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia; after retiring, she spent six years working for the newly constituted Nova Scotia Office of Gaelic Affairs. She has written well over a hundred Gaelic-English articles for local newspapers. Her poetry has been published in Scottish Gaelic periodicals GAIRM and GATH, and she has produced her solo CD of Gaelic songs entitled “Eileanan mo Ghaoil” in tribute both to Cape Breton and Lewis. From Seattle, Washington, to Grandfather Mountain, North Carolina; from Toronto to Nova Scotia, Canada; from Sydney, Australia, to Dunedin, New Zealand, Catrìona has been privileged to share her beloved language and culture with motivated students, many of whom are now instructors themselves. This, her most recent work, is a synthesis of all of the grammatical insights garnered from decades of experience teaching Scottish Gaelic to learners around the world. It clearly demonstrates in easy-to-read chapters, tables, and examples how the Gaelic language is structured. Rules, forms, pronunciation, and a host of other issues are all logically and systematically explained. Furthermore, this book can act as a handy reference for either the beginner or native speaker.

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  • Herr Daniel Bandmann and Shakespeare vs the World

    Warrington, Lisa (2016-12-27)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    German actor Daniel Bandmann played his first Hamlet at the age of 20, and made his English language debut as Shylock in New York, 1863. In his prime, he performed extensively in America, Great Britain, Australia, and New Zealand, amongst other countries. Though he played roles which ranged from Narcisse and the Corsican twins to Jekyll and Hyde, he was perhaps most closely identified with a handful of Shakespearean roles: Hamlet, Shylock, Macbeth, Othello, Iago. His apparently ungovernable temper led to a love/hate relationship with the critics, played out in public through the newspapers. His responses to criticism open a window into his playing of these roles. This paper examines Bandmann’s acting in the role of Hamlet and the critical interchanges he engaged in around the world, as an exemplar of the interaction of theatre and the global media.

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  • The gut microbiome and insulin resistance in children born preterm

    Jayasinghe, T; Chiavaroli, Valentina; Jayan, S; Ekblad, C; Derraik, J; Hofman, Paul; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Cutfield, Wayne; O'Sullivan, Justin (2016-07-24)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is increasing evidence that the gut microbiome influences the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Studies also show that preterm children are at increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that adverse early life events in preterm infants may lead to alterations in the gut microbiome, which negatively affect metabolism later in life. Aim: To examine the association between metabolic phenotype with the gut microbiome composition and functional capacity in healthy prepubertal children born very preterm (4.0, LefSe). There were also functional changes in the activity of the microbiome in children born preterm, including glutamate and arginine metabolism, known to be involved in glucose homeostasis. Changes to the metabolites within the preterm fecal and plasma correlated with the observed phenotypes. Conclusion: Children born very preterm have reduced insulin sensitivity and display differences in gut microbiome species and activity. We speculate that (i) these changes in the gut microbiome of children born preterm were established in early infancy, and (ii) the altered gut microbiome contributes to insulin resistance.

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  • Dietary guidelines on trial: the charges are not evidence based

    Mann, J; Morenga, LT; McLean, R; Swinburn, Boyd; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jackson, Rodney; Kennedy, J; Beaglehole, R (2016-08-27)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Weak commitments, empty pockets and no direction

    Taylor, Prudence; Knight-Lenihan, Stephen (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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