4,428 results for 2017

  • 牛津大学饱蠹楼图书馆所藏十九世纪中国音乐教材述略 (Musical teaching texts in Chinese preserved at the Bodleian’s Library, Oxford University)

    Gong, Hong-Yu (2017-12-21T13:30:56Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

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  • Simulation is not a pedagogy

    Erlam, Gwen; Smythe, L.; Wright-St Clair, V. (2017-12-21T13:30:36Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Simulation as a teaching/learning tool has evolved at an unprecedented pace which some believe has occurred despite a lack of research into pedagogies appropriate to guide this technology-based learning tool. There seems to be some confusion as to what simulation actually is. Some have called simulation a pedagogy, which is incorrect. Simulation is not a pedagogy, but an immersive teaching/learning platform which is a representation of a functioning system or process. Simulation has been used in undergraduate nursing education in a focused manner for nearly 20 years. Its effectiveness in improving clinical reasoning and critical thinking is not certain if overall instructional design principles do not reflect suitable philosophical paradigms. Simulation as a teaching/learning platform is maximized when instructional design includes the inspiration of behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. Behaviorist design principles include rote learning, repetition, modular learning, stimulus-response, and conditioning. Cognitivist design principles include observational techniques, bootstrapping, and equilibration in the form of assimilation and accommodation. Constructivist design principles include new habit formation through experience and interaction with a “mature social medium” in the form of a simulation facilitator. All of these philosophical underpinnings have the potential to maximize simulation when used as underpinnings in the overall design.

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  • Is there a housing crisis in New Zealand or is it only a metaphor? Results of a critical metaphor analysis

    Romova, Zina; Varley, Steve (2017-12-21T13:30:58Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper reports on a corpus-based study of metaphor use in the discourse of the Auckland housing topic in News and Commentary sections of The New Zealand Herald over the months of July to September 2016, the time of intense debate in the media on the housing situation in Auckland. The paper outlines an approach combining cognitivist and the Critical Metaphor Analysis. The study aims to reveal the persuasive ideological functions of metaphors in the News and Commentary genres and the covert intentions of the writers with particular reference to perceptions of a housing crisis a year before elections in the country. Our findings include a classification of metaphors used in the reporting of and commenting on the housing situation in Auckland based on cognitivist conceptualisation of metaphors, a comparative statistical analysis of the metaphors used in the News and the Commentary genres, and an explanation of the factors that may influence the recipients' decoding of the identified metaphors. We conclude from the analysis of the newspaper texts and the corpora that the metaphorical language used in both these genres promotes the readership's perception of a market in crisis.

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  • Bring your own device (BYOD) and teacher pedagogy in a New Zealand primary school.

    Rae G; Dabner NJ; Mackey J (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The practice of students bringing their own mobile devices (BYOD) to school is increasingly being used to leverage digital learning opportunities in New Zealand schools. This paper presents a summary of the findings from a case study that explored the experiences of three primary school teachers as they introduced BYOD into their classrooms for the first time. The aim of the study was to understand the impact BYOD had upon their pedagogical practices and to identify factors that influenced these practices. The paper includes recommendations for schools and teachers who may be considering implementing BYOD in the future.

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  • Academic self-efficacy, evaluative anxiety, and achievement during the transition to university.

    Sotardi VA; Brogt, Erik (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Encountering the pedagogy of live and interactive architectural projects

    Pretty, Annabel; McPherson, Peter (2017-12-21T13:30:24Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The use of the word “live” as a prefix for a project, is a thought-provoking, and perplexing concept; does one assume that all other projects are dead? Or is it that "(a)live," in the studio build paradigm, is about the currency and value of the moment? Or is it that one is operating outside of normative architectural academia, and is therefore (a)live? Untangling the meta meaning of the verb “live” and then juxtaposing it with the word “interactive” could draw the reader to the conclusion that we are talking about a nonmomentary or continuous two-way transfer of information – often as not between the student, the lecturing staff and external agencies (in many cases real clients). It is this existence between the borderland of academia and practice that this chapter hopes to unpack and clarify.

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  • The Use of Joule Heating as a Phytosanitary Treatment

    Heffernan WJB (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • "This is not a work of fiction": Examining Robin Hyde's Passport to Hell as Creative Nonfiction

    Holder, Marissa (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    In 1936, journalist Robin Hyde prepared the final copy of a biographical novel that blended fact and fiction in order to capture the experience of the disreputable World War I veteran James Douglas Stark. The careful intertwining of research and creativity in Passport to Hell is redolent of present-day creative nonfiction and therefore renders Hyde a pioneer of the genre. However, creative nonfiction was not academically acknowledged until years after Hyde’s death, so her literary experimentation triggered a critical response from the public. This thesis traces back the origins of creative nonfiction so as to illuminate the uncertainty which continues to permeate the genre. Academic guidelines of creative nonfiction are then used as a platform to analyse Hyde’s employment of fictional techniques in order to illuminate the ingenuity of her creative writing. The criticism Hyde faced when publishing Passport to Hell is outlined alongside her insightful riposte which contributes to our understanding of creative nonfiction today. The creative component of my thesis is comprised of the first three chapters of a novelisation of the life of Ettie Rout, a sexual health campaigner who challenged local and international governments in order to improve the lives of soldiers during World War I. My interaction with creative nonfiction confirmed that even today, many authors struggle to operate within the confines of a single genre due to the continued debate around the level of fiction deemed appropriate in creative nonfiction. However, the fluidity Hyde exercises in Passport to Hell inspired a sense of freedom in my treatment of Rout, and therefore emboldened my commitment to focus more heavily on the intimate portrayal of her character rather than confining my work to the boundaries of genre.

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  • Is there a salty solution to sensitive soil sliding in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand?

    Robertson, Thomas Paul (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Found globally, sensitive soils are widely regarded as a key cause of slope instability. These sensitive soils often contribute to the production of large retrogressive landslides that pose significant danger to a people and infrastructure. Within the Bay of Plenty region, sensitive soil based landslides are widespread and numerous Moum et al (1970) successfully trialled remediation of a sensitive soil landslide in Scandinavia by application of potassium chloride via leaching columns. The aim of this study is to determine whether salt treatment of sensitive soils formed in halloysite rich soils of the Bay of Plenty provides a viable means of improving soil behaviour. Soil collected from the base of the landslide at Bramley Drive, Omokoroa, was treated with 3 differing potassium based salts (KCl, KOH and K₂CO₃) to observe which would produce the greatest positive rheological effect. Results indicated that treatment with KCL and KOH had a negative rheological effect on the soil reducing the liquid limit of the soil from a baseline of 92.3 to 79.3 and 83.5 respectively. Only K₂CO₃ did not have a negative effect on the soil, maintaining the liquid limit at 92.6. Soil kept within soil cores was then soaked in K₂CO₃ solution for a period of three weeks before being subjected to tri-axial testing at three confining pressures of 205 kPa, 280 kPa and 355 kPa; untreated soil cores were tested at the same stress conditions Tri-axial testing of the soil showed a significant increase in the peak deviator stress measured when comparing the untreated and treated soils at its point of failure, with increases in peak deviator stress measured for the treated soils in the order of 227% at 205 kPa, 187% at 280 kPa and 124% increase at 355 kPa. Strain softening for treated soil was also measured to be less than that of the untreated soil at all confining pressures, a trait reflected in pore pressures measured at point of failure also. Stress path plots indicated that untreated samples underwent contraction rapidly as deviator stress increased, with no clear failure point observed as would be expected from an over consolidated clay. In contrast, stress paths for the treated samples showed the soils dilating before reaching point of failure and undergoing contraction following failure. Differences in friction angle and cohesion were also measured between treated and untreated samples, with untreated soil indicating friction angle and cohesion of Φ’=19.3o, C’=26.6 kPa. These results were consistent with those given in literature and fell within the range expected for halloysite rich clays (Mills, 2016; Moon, 2016). Both friction angle and coheion values increased in treated soils (Φ’=28.2 and C’=58.4). Based upon the results gathered during this study I infer that stabilisation of the sensitive layer of soil found within Omokoroa is possible, in particular when treated with K₂CO₃. It is my belief that this occurs due to the successful intercalation of the K₂CO₃ ion into the halloysite basal space, displacing the water found in the space originally, and causing an expansion of the crystal lattice. The expansion of the halloysite crystal lattices in turn increases the particle contact areas, which as a result causes a rise in the cohesion and friction angle as a result of increased energy required to overcome the grain to grain friction when stress is applied. Increased basal spacing in the halloysite crystals accommodates pore fluid and thus allows for reduced pore water pressure during stress application. Though further research is warranted, results produced from this study show that treatment increases the effective strength of the soil to a significant and noticeable degree, and provides the impetus to warrant further research into the subject in the near future, as the potential engineering impacts in being able to effectively stabilise soil rich in halloysite holds significant value both in New Zealand and on a global scale.

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  • A preliminary evaluation of tectonic geomorphological signals within the Hamilton Basin

    Spinardi, Francesca (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Over the past year several fault traces have been discovered within the Hamilton Basin, prompting a need for further investigation for tectonic evidence in the basin in order to re asses seismic hazards of the basin. Examination of the most recently discovered fault revealed the trace cross cuts the 20,000 ka Hinuera Formation, indicating that the faults within the Basin are active and could potentially experience another seismic event. However, more information is needed to determine the rate of occurrence and potential magnitude of an event. LiDAR and geomorphic data indicates there are potentially up to ten more traces within the Hamilton Basin, but they have yet to be confirmed through geomorphical ground-truth mapping. Both the known fault traces and the potential traces are dominantly NE oriented and appear to be influenced by the surrounding fault systems, such as the Waipa Fault. A large basement depression located in the far northern area of the Hamilton Basin as revealed by seismic line and gravitational data indicates that extensional movement may be related to the faults. To better understand the risk and hazard potential of a seismic event, extensive study and information about the basement terrane and surrounding faults, such as the Waipa Fault, needs to be gathered. It is possible that the fault traces within Hamilton are transtensional splays that have formed to accommodate movement and space between the major fault systems. My project will be examining the inferred fault traces within the Hamilton Basin, as indicated by the geomorphology, seismic line data, existing borehole data, and geological and geomorphical ground-truth mapping. For this the history of the surrounding fault lines, such as their total offset and rate of occurrence, will be investigated in order to understand the behavior of the faults within the Hamilton Basin and the potential hazards they can cause.

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  • Vegetation recovery following volcanic disturbance on Mt. Tongariro, New Zealand

    McCann, Lynda Alison (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    On August 6, 2012, a series of volcanic eruptions occurred on Mt. Tongariro in the central North Island of New Zealand. The eruptions included pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), a debris flow and volcanic projectiles, each of which significantly affected native vegetation. The present study investigated four aspects of vegetation dynamics in relation to the eruptions. First, the effect of PDCs on the subalpine conifer, Phyllocladus alpinus. Second, differential species sensitivity to the PDCs. Third, the species composition of the impact craters formed by volcanic projectiles, and the fourth aspect, colonisation of a newly formed debris flow. Thirty P. alpinus individuals were sampled at twenty two plots throughout the area affected by the PDCs. The numbers of “Live” and “Dead” individuals within plots were significantly correlated with distance to the eruption, and tree height (a predictor of age). Smaller and younger P. alpinus were more likely to be “Live” while larger, older P. alpinus more likely to be “Dead”. This is most likely due to the exposure and temperatures associated with PDCs. The mean foliar cover for all “Damaged” individuals was 75.59% with these individuals significantly correlated to plot area and altitude. Increased light availability and the path of the PDCs may explain these findings. Phyllocladus alpinus was the species most affected by the PDCs with only 57.73% foliar survival. Species sensitivity appears to be based on a combination of height and morphological features. Taller species are most affected by PDCs with small, coriaceous or glossy leaves; or narrow flexible leaves being advantageous. Stiff curved leaves, hairs, scales and a dense growth form appear detrimental to foliar survival. Species richness and percent cover were measured, both inside and directly outside the impact craters in 2013, 2015 and 2017 respectively. Outside the craters there was an increase in species richness with each year of measurement, however, the percent cover decreased from 2013 to 2015 before increasing in 2017. This decrease is most likely attributed to a statistically significant decrease in the cover of Dracophyllum recurvum. Between 2013 and 2015 there was a decrease in both species richness and percent cover inside the craters. This trend reversed between 2015 and 2017 with a statistically significant increase in species richness, and an increase in percent cover. This suggests species survived the initial impact of the projectile but experienced subsequent dieback followed by regeneration. Thirty 2 x 2 m sites were sampled on the debris flow, with nine sites containing vegetation. The overall colonisation rate was 0.14 species/quadrat per year, with Poa the most frequent and abundant genus. Topography, substrate particle size and proximity to seed sources appear to constrain seed dispersal and germination, resulting in varying and low rates of colonisation. The present study highlights that species responses vary depending on the nature and magnitude of volcanic disturbance. Further research, including remeasurements, will continue to improve the understanding of mechanism/s that drive ecological succession after volcanic disturbance, and contribute to the development of future models of succession.

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  • Contemporary Guidance for Stated Preference Studies

    Johnston, Robert J.; Boyle, Kevin J.; Adamowicz, Wiktor (Vic); Bennett, Jeff; Brouwer, Roy; Cameron, Trudy Ann; Hanemann, W. Michael; Hanley, Nick; Ryan, Mandy; Scarpa, Riccardo; Tourangeau, Roger; Vossler, Christian A. (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article proposes contemporary best-practice recommendations for stated preference (SP) studies used to inform decision making, grounded in the accumulated body of peer-reviewed literature. These recommendations consider the use of SP methods to estimate both use and non-use (passive-use) values, and cover the broad SP domain, including contingent valuation and discrete choice experiments. We focus on applications to public goods in the context of the environment and human health but also consider ways in which the proposed recommendations might apply to other common areas of application. The recommendations recognize that SP results may be used and reused (benefit transfers) by governmental agencies and nongovernmental organizations, and that all such applications must be considered. The intended result is a set of guidelines for SP studies that is more comprehensive than that of the original National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Blue Ribbon Panel on contingent valuation, is more germane to contemporary applications, and reflects the two decades of research since that time. We also distinguish between practices for which accumulated research is sufficient to support recommendations and those for which greater uncertainty remains. The goal of this article is to raise the quality of SP studies used to support decision making and promote research that will further enhance the practice of these studies worldwide.

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  • Interrogative city infrastructures

    Dyer, Mark; Gleeson, Richard (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The term City Infrastructures is restricted often to the physical elements of a city, while in practice it represents both hard infrastructure of built environment and utilities, as well as soft infrastructures comprising services, networks, social groupings, and personal skills. Part of the confusion is the lack of clarity about the role and delivery of infrastructure and its relationship to livelihood and livability. To address this issue, a critical examination was undertaken of urban sustainability from perspectives of City Infrastructures using an interdisciplinary framework that investigates the relationships, conflicts and connections between soft and hard infrastructures in terms of utilities, institutions, communities and personal skills.

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  • Body image amongst elite rugby union players. Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research

    Gibson, Claire; Hindle, Chloe; McLay-Cooke, Rebecca; Slater, Joanne; Brown, Rachel; Smith, Tiaki Brett; Baker, Dane; Healy, Philip; Black, Katherine (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    There is limited information on the risk of eating disorders and body image of elite male athletes. However, research suggests there are some athletes who have poor body image and they may be at increased risk of developing eating disorders. Therefore, the current study investigated risk of eating disorders, body image, and the relationship with age, in elite rugby union players during their pre-season training period. This cross-sectional study was undertaken at the start of the pre-season amongst elite rugby union players in New Zealand. Twenty-six professional rugby union players completed a 49-item questionnaire on body image and disordered eating. A ‘body image score’ was calculated from questionnaire subscales including ‘drive for thinness’, ‘bulimia’ and ‘body dissatisfaction’, with total scores above twenty indicative of poor body image. Body image scores varied from 8-39 out of a possible 0-100. Disordered eating behaviours were reported, including binge eating at least once a week (15%, n=4/26), pathogenic weight control use (4%, n=1/26) and avoidance of certain foods (77%, n=20/26). There was a statistically significant inverse association between the bulimia subscale and age (P = 0.034). At the start of the pre-season training period, many elite rugby union players experience disturbances in body image. The prevalence of disordered eating behaviours is of concern, and needs to be minimised due to the negative impact on health and performance. A focus on assessment and education of younger male rugby players may be required in order to reduce disordered eating patterns.

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  • 'The Ultimate Version of Who You are Now': Performing the Gentleman Spy

    Moffat, Kirstine; Bond, Mark (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    ‘If you’re prepared to adapt and learn, you can transform’, superspy Harry Hart (Colin Firth) declares to his working-class protégé Eggsy Unwin (Taron Egerton) in Kingsman: The Secret Service (Twentieth Century Fox, 2015).1 The transformation Harry advocates is a jettisoning of Eggsy’s working-class outlook, clothing, and mannerisms in order to become a gentleman spy. Through focusing on the figure of the gentleman spy and his performance of masculinity in Kingsman and the graphic novel on which it is based, Mark Millar and Dave Gibbons’s The Secret Service (2012), we unpack two aspects of adaptation. Firstly, we examine the ways in which the gentleman spy trope is transposed from the graphic novel to the screen, answering the call from adaptation scholars such as Linda Hutcheon, Thomas Leitch, and Deborah Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan to broaden the adaptation discussion by moving beyond what Leitch terms the ‘literature on screen’ paradigm (64). It is important to consider ‘material from print journalism, franchise characters, television series, comic books, video games, and toys’ (Leitch 64) in order to ‘challeng[e] the comforts of disciplinary integrity’ (Cartmell and Whelehan 4). Furthermore, we contend that while the staples of the spy narrative remain constant in both texts, the graphic novel satirises elements of the genre while the film oscillates between homage and pastiche.

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  • ‘Once my relatives see me on social media… it will be something very bad for my family’: The Ethics and Risks of Organizational Representations of Sporting Girls from the Global South

    Thorpe, Holly Aysha; Hayhurst, Lyndsay; Chawansky, Megan (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper explores the ethics of representing girls and young women from the global South in Sport for Development (SfD) organizational campaigns via the case of Skateistan—an international SfD organization with skateboarding and educational programmes in Afghanistan, Cambodia and South Africa. Focusing particularly on Skateistan’s representations of skateboarding girls and young women in Afghanistan, we draw upon interviews with staff members as well as digital ethnography and organizational curriculum materials, to reveal some of the nuanced power relations within such media portrayals. In so doing, we also draw attention to some of the unintended risks of ‘positive’ representations of sporting girls from the global South, and some of the strategies employed by Skateistan to navigate such issues.

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  • Sportswomen and social media: bringing third-wave feminism, postfeminism, and neoliberal feminism into conversation

    Thorpe, Holly Aysha; Toffoletti, Kim; Bruce, Toni (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this paper, we take seriously the challenges of making sense of a sporting (and media) context that increasingly engages female athletes as active, visible and autonomous, while inequalities pertaining to gender, sexuality, race and class remain stubbornly persistent across sport institutions and practices. We do so by engaging with three recent feminist critiques that have sought to respond to the changing operations of gender relations and the articulation of gendered subjectivities, namely third-wave feminism, postfeminism and neoliberal feminism, and applying each to the same concrete setting – the social media self-representation of Hawaiian professional surfer Alana Blanchard. In aiming to conceptually illustrate the utility of these three feminist critiques, we are not advocating for any single approach. Rather, we critically demonstrate what each offers for explaining how current discourses are being internalized, embodied and practiced by young (sports)women, as they make meaning of, and respond to, the conditions of their lives.

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  • He mahi māreikura: Reflections on the digitising of the Pei Jones’ collection

    Whaanga, Hēmi (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The astounding growth in digital content in the past decade alongside the proliferation of Mātauranga Māori being made available through this medium has transformed and affected the ways in which we participate and communicate locally, regionally, nationally and globally. These advances have expanded the possibilities for both preserving and sharing our knowledge in non-traditional formats with our people and other Indigenous peoples across the world. This paper reflects on the digital journey of the Pei Jones’ Collection from its various origins to its current physical and digital manifestation in the University of Waikato Library

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  • Implant Conductor assembly with improved Radio Frequency properties

    Mccabe, Steven Owen; Scott, Jonathan B. (2017)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    In one aspect the invention provides an implant conductor lead assembly which includes an electrode lead, and at least one field target conductor. The field target conductor(s) is located adjacent to the electrode lead to mutually couple the field target conductor to the electrode lead. The electrode lead acts to concentrate electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of the implant conductor assembly towards the field target conductor or conductors.

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  • Sharemilking with the Te Raparahi Lands Trust (Wāotū)

    Hutcheson, Gail Yvonne (2017)


    University of Waikato

    This paper discusses sharemilking in New Zealand.

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