3,955 results for 2017

  • That 'austere anti-aesthetic angel': James K. Baxter and Puritanism

    Moffat, Kirstine (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    It is necessary to begin with an apology to James K. Baxter. In my previous musings on the Puritan legacy in New Zealand I have chastised Baxter, along with other writers and critics of his generation, for using Puritanism as a reductive catchphrase to summarise all that they most despise about New Zealand society (Moffat, 'Destruction'). The phrase that I have repeatedly used to epitomise Baxter's perceived antagonism is his description of Pu,itanism as an 'austere anti-aesthetic angel' (Complete Prose 2. 328). Returning to this phrase as I meditate at much greater length on Baxter's relationship with Puritanism, I realise that I am guilty of flattening and simplifying what is a much more complex engagement with Puritanism in his prose writing. Baxter's phrase contains both condemnation and implied praise. He was vehemently opposed to what he regarded as the Puritan suspicion of imagination and sexuality, and throughout his writing castigated all the social and religious forces that sought to curb and quell aestheticism and the natural, instinctual self. Yet, he also refers to Puritanism as 'austere', a quality that much of his writing and his own life choices suggest he regarded as admirable, particularly as it relates to a paring back and relinquishing of the unnecessary paraphernalia of capitalism and materialism. And what to make of 'angel'? Surely this is more than simply alliterative effect. It too undercuts the antagonism of 'anti-aesthetic' to suggest that in Baxter's eyes there is at least a trace of the divine about Puritanism and its legacy.

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  • Wellbeing effects from family literacy education: An ecelogical study

    Furness, Jane Amanda; Robertson, Neville; Hunter, Judy; Hodgetts, Darrin; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper describes a study that used community psychology theories to investigate family-focused literacy education programmes, evaluations of which usually focus solely on skills gains and their economic advantage. Specifically, the study drew on an ecological systems-based, culturally adaptive framework for personal, relational and collective wellbeing bringing much-needed new thinking to how family-focused adult literacy education might be theorised and practiced. The study traced the experiences of 19 adult participants in four family-focused literacy programmes in different communities in New Zealand over 18 months. Participant accounts from 79 key informant interviews, 12 classroom observations and programme documentation were scrutinized using latent theoretical thematic analysis which drew on broad perspectives of literacy, ecological systems theory, network theory and integrative theories of wellbeing. The study found that the programmes shared common principles and practices that prioritised holistic wellbeing whilst valuing literacy enhancement. It showed that participants experienced positive literacy, social and wellbeing-related outcomes. Programme effects were found to be interconnected and to flow on to other parts of participants’ lives and to their families and communities. We demonstrate community psychology’s critical contribution to a fuller understanding of family-focused literacy education.

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  • An Indoor Wireless Wi-Fi Energy Harvesting System with Super Capacitor Backup

    Abd Kadir, Ermeey (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Currently, researchers are highly interested in finding alternative methods of powering lowpower wireless devices. One of the promising methods is radio frequency energy harvesting (RFEH). The harvesting system, which is a combination of a rectenna, a power processing circuit and an energy storage device, harvests available radio energy in the atmosphere of the wireless devices. This thesis focusses on the system design, analysis, and measurement of a RFEH system which operates in an indoor environment. The thesis is divided into three major parts. The first part is about approximating the amount of incident power received on the surface of a harvesting antenna. Previously, received power at a harvesting antenna location is determined using the Friis equation in which the equation considers antenna gains, the output power of a transmitting antenna, and the transmittingreceiving antenna distance. The distance between the antennae is related to the free space loss, and it is used in estimating the received power. For the thesis, the approximation of incident power on the harvesting antenna is investigated further by considering the antenna dimensions, its elevation from the reference plane, which is the ground level, its distance to the transmitter, and misalignments. These three factors contribute to the characterization of the amount of power that could be supplied at the output of the harvesting antenna. The ray-based model is the approach selected for determining the incident power, and the three factors are added into a general transmitter-receiver model to approximate the incident power characteristics. A full simulation study is conducted, and it is found that the results obtained from the analytical analysis and simulations are in good agreement. The second part of the thesis is about developing a new bridgeless rectification circuit for an indoor Wi-Fi energy harvesting system. The proposed circuit is dedicated for impedance matching and voltage boosting for an indoor Wi-Fi energy harvesting system. The impedance matching is achieved by an LCL T-network in parallel with an inductive branch; such an arrangement can boost the input voltage level entering the rectifier diode by the combined effect of a T-network and bipolarity charging of the output capacitor. The return loss equation and an estimated value of matching circuit parameters are obtained analytically. There are three different modes for the voltage boosting process at two different input cycles. The power converting process is modelled, analysed, and relevant equations are derived. For simulation purposes, the dimension of the bridgeless rectifier circuit input port is designed using a co-planar waveguide arrangement where from the measurement, the impedance is 52.5 ??. Low return loss at 2.45 GHz is presented by proper circuit analysis and design. Practical measurement results based on an AC power source with an output impedance of 50 ?? also verified that the proposed circuit could function as an impedance matching and voltage boosting converter circuit with the aid of two additional low-voltage boost modules attached to the output of the bridgeless rectifier circuit as a load. It has demonstrated that the output voltage of the final energy buffering supercapacitor of 1800 ??F can be approximately charged up to around 3 V for about an hour when the input power of the AC source is set at -30 dBm (1 ??W). The third major part of this thesis is about a power processing circuit for an indoor Wi-Fi energy harvesting system. The complete power processing circuit is for an indoor energy harvesting system. The circuit is used to convert power from high-frequency AC to DC and stored in a supercapacitor bank for driving low power wireless sensors. The circuit is modelled using an equivalent circuit which is analysed mathematically. In the analysis, the need for matching the antenna and the rectifier input impedance is highlighted. The proposed circuit can work with an incident power as low as -50 dBm. The final RF to the dc conversion efficiency of the proposed system is consistently within 30% at -20 dBm input power. The practical results demonstrated that the efficiency of the harvesting system is higher than previous multi-band radio frequency energy harvesters. This research has created some outstanding methods and results for an indoor Wi-Fi radio frequency energy harvesting system, especially in approximating the incident power at a harvesting antenna, proposing a bridgeless rectification circuit, and developing a power processing circuit. The contribution will be useful for further research and application of the RF energy harvesting systems in the near future.

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  • Contact phenomena in the Serbian community in New Zealand: The language of the first-generation bilinguals

    Mincic-Obradovic, K (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis investigates the Serbian-English contact situation in New Zealand. It examines the language of 37 late bilinguals born in Serbia, who have been living in New Zealand for approximately ten to twenty years. Data for the analysis was collected in the 2004-2013 period, and comprises e-mail, text and Skype messages. Starting from Matras' (2009) functional approach, based on the view that language is a social activity and that communication is goal-driven, the study looks at the replication of English lexical matter items (MAT-replication) and their integration into Serbian, as well as at constructions which use Serbian lexemes but are modelled on English language patterns (PAT-replication). It investigates how the process of replication from English emerges in bilingual repertoires in New Zealand Serbian, and what factors contribute to this process. This study endorses Matras' argument that bilinguals, who have the repertoires of two languages at their disposal, exploit both of their languages, and make the most effective use of their full bilingual repertoire. This is particularly visible where lexical insertions are used consciously to achieve special conversational effects. Analysis shows that Serbian remains the pragmatically dominant language of first-generation Serbian immigrants in New Zealand, and supplies both the matrix and the morpho-syntactic frame. English is becoming stronger over time, and both MAT- and PAT-replications become more frequent. There is also an increase in innovations which are result of malfunctions in language selection, such as the borrowing of English-origin discourse markers, the loss of case markings in Serbian nouns, and failure to assign Serbian case markings to replicated English nouns. The study confirms that observed changes very much reflect creativity of individual participants, and that social factors have an important role in facilitating propagation of innovations in this bilingual community.

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  • Assessing the ecological impact of urban greening: A case study of roadside planting in Wellington, New Zealand

    Tessler, Jacob (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Roadside reserves in Wellington, New Zealand have been the target of a government-led, community-implemented urban greening initiative for the past 25 years. Prior studies of urban greening have shown numerous benefits to neighbourhoods and communities through increased engagement and stewardship, yet there remains a need for research into the ecological effects these programmes have on individual urban landscapes. This research conducted site surveys to determine the variation in ecological functioning and biodiversity within 36 reserves involved in the Wellington Free Plants Programme (FPP). These measures were compared to historical planting data for each site retrieved from council records. Candidate models were constructed based on novel and classical ecological theory, which sought to explain observed variation between physical and ecological measures across study sites and the relationship between these variables and biodiversity. Sites were small with an area ranging from 5.9m² to 246.5m² (mean = 37.8 ±49.5m²), and biodiversity levels (assessed using a Shannon-Weiner Index) ranged from 0.1 to 2.9 (mean = 2.1 ±0.7). The top performing candidate models to predict biodiversity included area, shape, and seedbank density. An examination of the effect of varying urban greening efforts across these sites utilised a multivariate analysis which included measures of ecological functioning, biodiversity, the number of years a site had been planted, and the number of individual plants provided over those years. A significant negative relationship was found between site disturbance and the number of planting years (F33.1 = 4.092, p = .051) while a somewhat significant positive relationship was found between biodiversity and the number of individual plants provided (F33,1 =3.536 , p = .069). These results indicate that current urban greening efforts contribute to the ecological health of roadside reserves and that the patterns and processes governing the biological composition of these reserves may be partially explained with traditional ecological theory.

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  • Whanganui Kaiponu: Ngāti Ruakā Methodologies for the preservation of Hapū waiata and oral taonga

    Haami, Meri (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This research explores Ngāti Ruakā perspectives on the preservation of hapū waiata and oral taonga, and it examines Whanganui kaiponu as a culturally appropriate methodology and research framework. Ngāti Ruakā perspectives are central to the study of hapū taonga within this research. This thesis also investigates the analysis of waiata through the decolonisation of western frameworks and methodologies on waiata study that have been used previously in ethnomusicology. This journey led me back home to the ahi kā, my whānau (especially my Nanny, Angel Haami) as well as my hapū from the Whanganui awa. This further affirmed my own identity through whakapapa and the significance of tūrangawaewae. Through discourse with hapū members and throughout the interview process, karanga was gifted and performed as oral hapū taonga to me. The context of this research centres on the interdisciplinary bridging of ethnomusicology and waiata Māori studies. This study highlighted critical aspects of preservation for Ngāti Ruakā concerning waiata. Hapū members raised issues relating to protection, transmission and pedagogy in regards to their hapū waiata or oral hapū taonga. This led to a need for re-establishing Whanganui kaiponu as a way of preservation and protection.

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  • Five Bodies

    Egerton, Ben (2017-12-09T13:30:07Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    A note on the poems: In 2004, the Los Angeles Police Department released images from its archives of crime-scene photography. The titles of the poems in the Five Bodies sequence are taken from photographs from the LAPD archive. These images, and others, can be viewed online at http://fototeka.com/lapd/gallery.html , or in the book Scene of the Crime: Photographs from the LAPD Archive by Tim Wride (Harry N Adams,2004).

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  • Systematics of Simplicia Kirk (Poaceae, Agrostidinae) – an endemic, threatened New Zealand grass genus

    de Lange, Peter; Smissen, R.D.; Rolfe, J.R.; Ogle, C.C. (2017-12-12T13:30:21Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    A new species of the New Zealand endemic grass Simplicia, S. felix is described. The new species is segregated from and compared with S. buchananii and S. laxa. Simplicia felix occurs mostly in lightly shaded areas of seasonally dry alluvial forest. A distribution map and an assessment of the conservation status of the new species are presented. Genetic variation in the genus was examined, building on previously published work but including additional sampling. Analysis of nrDNA ITS and ETS and plastid trnLintron and trnL–F intergenic spacer sequences show S. felix to be more closely related to S. laxa than to S.buchananii. NeighborNet analyses of AFLP profiles for the three species of Simplicia show each to consist of distinct clusters of genotypes well separated from each other.

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  • Evidence of a strong domestication bottleneck in the recently cultivated New Zealand endemic root crop, Arthropodium cirratum (Asparagaceae)

    Shepherd, L.D.; de Lange, Peter; Cox, S.; McLenachan, P.A.; Roskruge, N.R.; Lockhart, Peter (2017-12-12T13:30:21Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    We use chloroplast DNA sequencing to examine aspects of the pre-European Māori cultivation of an endemic New Zealand root crop, Arthropodium cirratum (rengarenga). Researching the early stages of domestication is not possible for the majority of crops, because their cultivation began many thousands of years ago and/or they have been substantially altered by modern breeding methods. We found high levels of genetic variation and structuring characterised the natural distribution of A. cirratum, while the translocated populations only retained low levels of this diversity, indicating a strong bottleneck even at the early stages of this species’ cultivation. The high structuring detected at four chloroplast loci within the natural A. cirratum range enabled the putative source(s) of the translocated populations to be identified as most likely located in the eastern Bay of Plenty/East Cape region. The high structuring within A. cirratum also has implications for the conservation of genetic diversity within this species, which has undergone recent declines in both its natural and translocated ranges. This study was funded by a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship from the Royal Society of New Zealand (contract number RDF-MNZ1201) to LDS and the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Marsden Fund (contract number MAU0709). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript

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  • Representing the one left over: A social semiotic perspective of students’ use of screen casting

    Murphy, Carol; Calder, Nigel Stuart (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper examines the potential of using screen casting with an iPad to enhance learning in mathematics. Data are presented from two seven-year-old students as they use the Explain Everything app to solve a division with remainder problem (DWR). A social semiotic perspective was used to interpret students’ use of multiple modes as they represented the mathematical ideas within the context of the problem. We consider how a social semiotic perspective has the potential to draw attention to the students’ interests and emerging expressions in representing mathematical relationships. We further consider how the use of representations in the app might relate to student learning.

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  • Exploring Critical Alternatives for Youth Development through Lifestyle Sport: Surfing and Community Development in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Wheaton, Belinda; Roy, Georgina; Olive, Rebecca (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    While competition-based team sports remain dominant in community and sport-for-development programs, researchers are exploring the value of alternative, less “sportized” activities such as lifestyle/action sports. In this paper, we explore the ways in which surfing is being used in development programs in Aotearoa/New Zealand, examining the perceived social benefits and impact. Our methods involved: (a) mapping the range of surfing projects; and (b) 8 in-depth interviews with program personnel. Widespread conviction in the positive developmental benefits of surfing was evident, and that surfing had a “special” capacity to reform or heal those who participate in it. However, the ways in which individuals’ self-developments were promoted appear to be following the traditional sport/youth development path. They focus on policies aimed at improved life chances, equipping youth with the tools for self-improvement and self-management, inculcating self-governance and self-reliance. However, a counter narrative co-existed, highlighting surfing as a freeing experience, which, rather than restoring social order, works to instigate a personal transformation or awakening. Despite the range of challenges presented by surfing as a tool for positive development, surfing presents a potentially “critical alternative” which if sport-for-development programs are to be a form of social change, we should remain open to exploring.

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  • Why do I need research and theory? A guide for social workers, by Jennifer Anderson-Meger[Book Review]

    Hunt, Sonya (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book “Why do I need research and theory? A guide for social workers”, by Jennifer Anderson-Meger.

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  • Transition to professional social work practice: The first three years

    Hunt, Sonya; Tregurtha, Melanie; Kuruvila, Albert; Lowe, Simon; Smith, Kelly (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article presents the findings of a longitudinal research project that followed the employ-ment outcomes of one cohort of Bachelor of Social Work graduates for three years. Prior to graduation, students receive professional preparation that develops their ability to critically engage with theory and practice. Following graduation, newly qualified social workers require quality induction, supervision and other workload management strategies to support the transition to social work practice. The development of this study was fuelled by political criticism of social work education. Additionally, there was a desire to track the employment outcomes of the graduates and understand what supported their transition to competent professional practice. The findings fit within a five-year longitudinal research project that follows three separate graduate cohorts each for three years to seek and compare participants’ experiences for their first three years post-qualification. An anonymous, semi-structured, on-line survey was used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data. By the second year of practice, these respond-ents were taking on the workload of an experienced social work practitioner with widely varied levels of support. By the end of their third year in practice, they reported that they had found little opportunity to apply their critical analytical academic skills to consider the wider social system in practice. Further, the graduates’ confidence in their cultural competencies also gradually decreased over the three-year period.

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  • Perspectives on counselling supervision in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Crocket, Kathie (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article is based on an invited keynote address delivered at the first New Zealand Association of Counsellors’ National Supervision Conference Day in July 2017. It considers questions that have continued to be significant for professional supervision over time in counselling in Aotearoa New Zealand, noting considerations for contemporary practice. It reviews a range of research studies of supervision, highlighting recent contributions to discussions of culture and supervision and the use of e-technology in supervision. long white cloud our map in the sky (Robin Fry, 2008)1

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  • There must be a better way - The case against the New Zealand Literacy Strategy and some examples of how we can help students who fall by the wayside

    Dymock, Susan (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Literate cultural capital is a phrase used to describe the literacy knowledge and skills children have on school entry (Prochnow, Tunmer & Arrow, 2015; Tunmer & Nicholson, 2011). Literacy knowledge and skills include oral language, vocabulary, an awareness of how books operate, letter name knowledge, letter sound knowledge, phonological awareness, and invented spelling (Prochnow, Tunmer & Arrow, 2015). Children who commence school with a good level of literate cultural capital are advantaged and are more likely to develop age-appropriate reading skills as they progress through school compared to children who commence school with little literate cultural capital.

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  • By rule or by rote? To what extent does children’s spelling improve as a result of learning words with the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX strategy, compared with phonological spelling strategies?

    Dymock, Susan; Nicholson, Tom (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The present study was a randomised controlled trial designed to compare the effects of two spelling interventions on spelling of taught words and transfer words. The sample consisted of 55 seven-year-olds, including proficient and less proficient spellers, in two Year 3 classrooms. The spelling interventions were for three lessons per week, 20-minutes per lesson, over 10 weeks. In the first intervention we taught eight spelling strategies that showed children how to stretch out the sounds in words and how to use different phonological spelling strategies, including how to spell short and long vowel sounds and phonics strategies, such as use of the silent e marker, how to break long words into syllables, and the doubling rule. In the second intervention students learned the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX strategy along with putting words to be learned into alphabetical order and writing each word in a sentence. They were not taught any strategies or rules. The control group completed comprehension, vocabulary, and punctuation activities. In order to see if the control group might implicitly learn the words, all groups in all lessons were exposed to the same words by reading a story to them that contained the words. Results for taught words showed that both intervention conditions increased participants’ spelling at an equivalent rate, greater than that of the control condition. For transfer words not taught but that followed similar patterns to the taught words, the strategy intervention showed greater transfer to spelling new words with similar patterns compared with the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX condition and the control condition. For this reason we conclude that although both intervention approaches had strong local effects in terms of learning to spell specific words, teaching rule-based spelling strategies had more global effects in terms of transfer to new words than the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX for both proficient and less proficient spellers.

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  • An interview: Making art as a dialogue with materials, moments and motivations

    Price, Graham; Earl, Kerry (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Graham Price has worked extensively in primary, secondary and tertiary art education in Otago (1976–1997) and since 2000 in pre-service secondary and primary art education within the University of Waikato arts education team. He has experience in developing art education resources, Waikato professional development programmes, and the development of visual art assessment in primary schools through the National Education Monitoring Project 1995–2008. His research interests include arts integration, the history of art education in New Zealand and how students talk about art. His own artwork spans painting, jewellery and sculptural responses to calligraphy. He actively participates in a cappella choral performance. In this piece Graham shares his views and his approach to art making.

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  • The social work regulation project in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Hunt, Sonya (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    INTRODUCTION: In this second of two articles on the history of professionalisation of social work in Aotearoa New Zealand, consideration is given to the more recent coalescing of forces from the 1990s to the initial implementation of the Social Workers Registration Act (2003), which led to our country’s example of a social work regulation project. APPROACH: This critical consideration of social work regulation in Aotearoa New Zealand situates it within the international social work professionalisation context alongside the national context. Consideration is given to the place of leadership and buy-in from the profession, political sponsorship, cultural considerations, and another ministerial review. Overlaying this, an examination of concepts of public trust, respect, and confidence in professions such as social work, are linked to crises of trust in professions in general, and placed within the current neoliberal, market-driven environment in which this project is anchored. CONCLUSION: The literature serves to document the history of social work regulation in Aotearoa New Zealand and as background for an ongoing research project which aims to uncover interests at work and interrogate the legitimacy of those interests, while enabling the voices of key actors from the time to surface, be explored, and be recorded.

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  • Functional analysis of candidate flowering time genes from the model legume Medicago truncatula

    Che, Chong (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Flowering at optimal times promotes the success of plant sexual reproduction and agronomic productivity and yield. Legumes are the second most important group of crop plants, but their flowering gene networks are less well understood than in the Brassicaceae and Poaceae. Medicago truncatula (Medicago) is a legume model plant with powerful genetic resources and which flowers in response to long day length and vernalisation (winter cold) conditions. A putative Medicago Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) subunit VERNALISATION2 (MtVRN2) was characterised previously in the Putterill laboratory, whose mutation led to early flowering. This indicated that MtVRN2 represses the transition to flowering in Medicago, opposite to VRN2 function in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). In addition, candidate floral integrator and homeotic genes had elevated expression in the Mtvrn2 mutant. An attempt was made to further characterise MtVRN2 function by analysing a candidate protein interactor CURLY LEAF (CLF, a candidate PRC2 member) using yeast two hybrid and pull down assays and selected candidate target genes (FLOWERING LOCUS Ta1, APETALA1, AGAMOUS-LIKE11 and SEPALLATA3b) using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR. In addition, a second candidate PRC2 member Medicago EMBRYONIC FLOWER2 (EMF2) was aimed to be functionally characterised. Third, the function of six candidate flowering genes related to SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) and FRUITFULL (FUL), some with elevated expression in the Mtvrn2 mutant, was examined by ectopic expression in Arabidopsis. The results of ChIP-PCR using transgenic Medicago plants overexpressing epitope HA-tagged MtVRN2 showed that MtVRN2 did not appear to bind directly to the selected candidate target genes. The protein interaction studies suggested that MtVRN2 might not physically interact with MtCLF via their VEFS and C5 domains respectively. The investigation of the cDNA clones of three MtEMF2-like genes revealed several different potential coding sequences from the annotated genomic sequence. Functional analysis revealed that MtEMF2 did not appear to play the same role as AtEMF2 in flowering time control. Three MtFUL genes and three MtSOC1 genes were identified in Medicago, as opposed to one of each in Arabidopsis. The overexpression of these six genes in Arabidopsis indicated the potential role of three of them, MtFULa, MtFULb and MtSOC1a in flowering time control because they accelerated Arabidopsis flowering.

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  • Sedimentology and depositional environments of Murihiku Supergroup sediments exposed in the Southland Syncline, New Zealand: Implications for reservoir potential in the Great South Basin

    Howden, Angus David (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    A considerable amount is known about the biostratigraphy and organic geochemistry of the Murihiku Supergroup sediments exposed in coastal outcrops of the Southland Syncline, New Zealand. Much less work has been undertaken on the sedimentology of these strata, or understanding their depositional environments and depositional trends through time. What these implications are for reservoir prospectivity in the adjacent Great South Basin, has also had little study focused on it. This thesis addresses these issues by undertaking outcrop-based sedimentological and facies interpretations of these rocks, thin-section based petrographic composition and provenance analysis, augmented by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), as well as porosity and permeability measurements from outcrop core plugs. Petroleum industry seismic data has additionally enabled seismic facies mapping of Murihiku rocks in the offshore Great South Basin. Outcrop observations point to a progressive change in depositional setting, from shelf / upper slope settings during the Late Triassic, to base of slope turbidite deposition in the Early Jurassic. This transgression is followed by regression into fluvial settings in the youngest outcropping Murihiku rocks in the study of Middle Jurassic age. Petrographically the sandstones are feldspathic and lithic arenites and feldspathic and lithic wackes. Provenance suggests derivation from an evolving, intermediate arc that was becoming more siliceous through Late Triassic and Middle Jurassic time. Diagenesis is characterised by early calcite and chlorite precipitation which have almost completely destroyed any primary porosity. Any secondary micro porosity has subsequently been infilled through dissolution of framework grains and zeolitization. SEM and core plug porosity and permeability measurements corroborate the diagenetic changes observed petrographically, with only fluvial facies of Middle Jurassic (Upper Temaikan) age showing any measureable porosity or permeability. As a result, reservoir potential for the Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic, Murihiku Supergroup rocks analysed in this study is low. Younger Murihiku sandstones which are postulated to occur offshore in the Great South Basin are likely to be less influenced by burial diagenesis. As shown from North Island occurrences, these younger successions hold some potential.The reservoir potential for these youngest portions of the Murihiku succession therefore remains positive, both in the Great South Basin, as well as other frontier areas of Zealandia, and continue to provide an exploration target for the petroleum industry.

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