88,788 results

  • Liminal Migrant : An Exploration of Immigrant Identity Issues Through Digital Photography and Digital Media

    Darvishzadeh Zolpirani, Korosh

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • The Current Status of the Balanced Scorecard As a Performance Measurement and a Strategic Management Tool in NZ Local Government Organisations

    Taulapapa, Ma'amora

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    In the early 1980s, a general dissatisfaction developed with traditional accountingbased performance measurement in the New Zealand public sector. The not-forprofit nature of public sector organisations had led to a perceived lack of transparency and accountability in their managerial styles. A change in management philosophy in the 1980s due to pressures from stakeholders, for example the government, and competition as well as rising costs (Local Government Forum, 1999) prompted public sector management to search for effective contemporary management tools to navigate towards public goals and expectations. The Balanced Scorecard (BSC), a performance measurement and a strategic management system, has been implemented in business organisations with success and is gaining acceptance in not-for-profit and public sector organisations. Despite potential benefits to public sector organisations, there are challenges and problems for implementers of the BSC (Griffiths, 2003). The research reported here examined NZ local government managers' experiences of implementing and using the BSC in local government organisations and their perceptions of its usefulness as a performance measurement and strategic management tool. It also sought to identify the factors that drive local government managers to undertake a BSC initiative, and the potential causes of BSC programme failure in the NZ local government context. The aim of this research was to provide an answer to the following question: "What is the current status of the use of the Balanced Scorecard as a performance measurement and a strategic management tool in local government organisations in NZ?" The research addressed the following questions: • Has the BSC been accepted as a performance measurement and/or a strategic management tool by local government organisations in NZ? • How do local government managers perceive the BSC as a management tool? • What factors are perceived to contribute to the successful implementation of the BSC? • What factors are perceived to contribute to partial and/or non implementation of the BSC? The findings indicated that the BSC is not widely used by NZ local government organisations. This is due to a variety of reasons. With regards to the research questions, the eight respondents who are current BSC users perceived the concept as; • a very useful management tool overall • a highly valid performance management tool • a highly valid strategic management tool The findings of this study suggest that the majority of NZ local government organisations are encountering problems with their BSC implementations and, at the same time, are learning as they go. Some interesting lessons for successful BSC implementation to emerge from this study include the need to ensure: • a full and participative pre-implementation decision process; • benchmarking best practice; • continuous learning and training; • adequate resources; • management support; • appropriate post-implementation review. Although this study reveals that reported BSC usage is currently low, applying these lessons may help to improve the perceived and actual usefulness of the BSC for measuring and managing the performance of NZ local government organisations.

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  • Interethnic Mothering - A Narrative Inquiry

    Davis, Lucia

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This narrative inquiry research brings to the larger field of motherhood studies particular experiences of migrant mothers, mothering in interethnic relationships. It presents a contextualized insight to interethnic mothering in New Zealand over a span of nearly 60 years. Personal experiences of sixteen immigrant mothers in New Zealand were captured through their stories and analyzed through narrative inquiry lenses, where the participants were not only the protagonists, but also the narrators of their stories. As narrators, they gave voice to significant others in their stories and filtered their mothering journey not only through action, but also through a large array of possibilities, opportunities, regrets and redemption. The research identified child-raising negotiations immigrant mothers held with the fathers of their multicultural children (fathers being New Zealanders of Maori or Caucasian descent) and with the New Zealand society at large, about culture, language, food, education and parenting milestones. The methodology used, narrative inquiry, allowed the researcher to distinguish between the temporal and spatial dimensions of the research and those of the shared stories of interethnic mothering. Personal narratives of mothering evolved in the context of master narratives of motherhood from countries of origin, where mothers were mothered, and from New Zealand, where their mothering begun, in a continuous balancing act. The time concept was enlarged to encompass the chronology of parenting interrupted by Kairos, the cyclical time of celebrations, enacted as cultural transmission tools. Emplotment and character mapping unpacked the richness of intercultural negotiations within mothers’ narratives. Interethnic parenting is becoming a reality for an increasing number of mothers in New Zealand and internationally. This research aims to inform practices of health care, education, employment, services delivered by central and local government, the business sector and Non-Governmental Organisations of the diverse reality of interethnic mothering in New Zealand.

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  • Interwoven Dress Cultures of New Zealand

    Ward, Junette

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The aim of this thesis is to analyse, design and produce a trans-seasonal daywear collection of women's contemporary fashion garments that reflect aspects of Aotearoa. Specific influence has been drawn from an investigation of wahine in relation to their acceptance and subsequent adaptation of European dress, during the transitional period of 1800-1900 in Aotearoa. Interwoven within the contextual framework, this exegesis supports the creative body of work by exploring two main aspects. Firstly there are the theoretical, historical and cultural issues surrounding the relationship of dress and social belonging together with the association of adornment and Maori identity. Secondly there is the notion of accessing and using the community as research and knowledge sources, material suppliers and as individual collaborative contributors to the project. The project sits within the paradigm of creative research and not only encompasses heuristic methodology within the studio environment, but leading up to that stage of the project, utilises resources from within the community as a framework for research enquiry. Identifying the potential for dress with a fusion of ideas and cross-cultural exchange, between Victorian European and Maori dress, a range of key design criteria relating to the inspired innovative designs has been identified. This has provided the opportunity for an eclectic mix of contemporary materials and fibres, to be used to design and create a trans-seasonal garment collection, informed by the resulting analysis of the interwoven issues explored in the exegesis.

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  • “I’m actually pretty happy with how I am”: A Focus Group Study of Young Women with Positive Body Image

    Poulter, Phoebe Isabel (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Previous qualitative and quantitative research on the body image of young women in Western cultures has predominantly focussed on the negative dimensions of women’s body image. This pathology-driven approach has contributed to an understanding of body dissatisfaction, but has not considered what contributes to the development and experience of positive body image for young women. In the present study, I aimed to contribute to psychological understanding of positive body image in young women at university using a mixed-methods approach. In the first part of the study, a sample of 139 young women aged between 18 and 25 years completed a series of questionnaires, including a demographic questionnaire, several measures of positive body image, and a measure evaluating the extent to which the young women were aware of, and had internalised, sociocultural messages about women’s bodies. Within the demographic questionnaire, participants were asked to provide a rating of agreement with the statement “I have a positive body image” on a scale from 1 (completely disagree) to 5 (completely agree). Young women who explicitly reported having a positive body image (providing a rating of 4 or more) were invited to participate in a focus group (N = 44, 32% of the initial sample). A total of 19 young women participated in one of five focus group discussions, in which they were asked about their experiences and thoughts about having a positive body image. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed, and underwent inductive thematic analysis. From the analysis, I identified four themes conveyed by women discussing their views about positive body image. The first theme is labelled ‘Body Image as Changing’ and highlights the way in which participants described their body image as becoming more positive as they grow older, and consists of two subthemes: ‘Aging and Caring Less about the Body’ and ‘The Transition from School to University’. The second theme, ‘Mindful Engagement with Media Content’, describes the participants reported pattern of engagement with the media, including three subthemes: ‘Awareness of Messages about the Female Body’, ‘Criticism of the Media’, and ‘Mindful Selection of Media’. The third theme, ‘Conceptualisation and Interpretation of Body- Related Information’, illustrates the way in which young women mentally conceptualised and interpreted events that are related to their bodies, and consisted of two subthemes: ‘Functional Conceptualisation of the Body’ and ‘Responding to Negative Thoughts and Feelings about the Body’. The final theme, ‘The Role of Religious and Cultural Identities in Shaping Body Image’, highlights the way that messages conveyed by religious and cultural ideologies impact the way women experiences their bodies. These findings contribute to understanding of how some women can establish and maintain positive body image, and may be applied in areas of education and clinical psychology. For instance, girls and young women may be educated on the media and taught cognitive strategies to provide a buffer against negative feelings about the body. The present findings may also inform future research, and several suggestions for this are discussed.

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  • Kwaimani Ana Liohaua Gia, The Heart of Us

    Hundleby, Irene Karongo (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    In North Malaita, Solomon Islands, oral histories, songs and music have archived cultural knowledge and spiritual beliefs for generations. This thesis examines how North Malaitan ways of thinking and being are expressed and constructed within the music of Lau-Mbaelelea women. The overall structural framework of this thesis follows the life cycle of a woman and explores associated music contexts. Discourse communicates Malaitan observations, experiences and perception in a document that emphasizes feeling and sensing in addition to thinking and doing. This is the first ethnomusicological study of women’s music in Solomon Islands and the first to offer a bicultural (Solomon Islands-New Zealand) perspective on Solomon Islands music cultures. As a researcher working with my own peoples, this thesis focuses on ethnographic experiences learnt as an apprentice learning intangible cultural heritage from my elders. As a descendent, I am gifted access to a musical world that engages with both the natural and the supernatural, where physical and spiritual planes are deeply integrated. An indigenous perspective offers deep meanings of the context, function and purpose of Solomon Islands women’s music. In recent years, there has been a growing movement within a variety of disciplines (including indigenous studies, cultural studies, engaged anthropology and applied ethnomusicology) towards utilizing more ethical research methods and approaches. Knowledge of this movement has encouraged me to utilize methods that integrate local epistemologies and North Malaitan values. Thus, a collaborative approach has been used to gather collective knowledge. Such methods parallel how local knowledge is learnt within North Malaitan communities (i.e. my methods parallel indigenous epistemology). Embedded within all fieldwork methods is an ethical conduct model developed specifically to be ethically considerate and appropriate for indigenous research conducted in North Malaita. Solomon Islands women’s music – informal in nature, absent from kastom pagan rituals, and subject to cultural gender restrictions – has predominantly been omitted from history books, films and scholarly documentation. Significantly, however, Malaitan women are active participants in performances and important cultural rituals. As key culture-bearers within their families, clans and communities, women transmit knowledge and understandings through lullabies, laments, dance and evening song. Musical hybridity indicates that Malaitans have adapted and embraced transformational processes and are willing to continue their traditions into the twenty-first century. Identities of the past meld with those of the present and expose spiritual concepts and metaphoric complexity within our musical heritage. As individuals and as a collective sisterhood, Lau-Mbaelelea women are an integral part of the social weave. Kwaimani Ana Liohaua Gia (The Heart of Us), gives a voice to North Malaitan women through their music. This record of Malaitan music culture validates the influential positions and spiritual presence women have within their communities, sisterhoods and families. Women’s power and prominence is embedded within the ordinary; music nurtures, guides and entertains throughout daily life. Women demonstrate that their seemingly modest and unassuming roles form the crucial backbone – the ‘heart’ of our communities – as they support relationships, social health and wellbeing.

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  • Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds in New Zealand Honey

    Rowe, Adam (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Honey is a naturally sweet, carbohydrate-rich, viscous fluid consisting of mainly fructose and glucose produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera) mainly from the floral nectars of plants. New Zealand honey is some of the most desired in the world with substantial export value to New Zealand producers. With this growing industry, a greater understanding of the volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) in New Zealand honey could be valuable in developing and promoting the benefits in regards to flavour and quality. The aim of this research was to characterise the VOC composition of three varieties of New Zealand unifloral honeys using three different analytical methods, namely gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), GC-olfactometry (GC-O) and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Eighty-seven volatile compounds were identified (out of 124 peaks detected) in 11 samples of New Zealand honey from three floral origins (thyme, rata and manuka) with analysis by headspace solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS), of which thirty three were common across all three types of honey. However, the level that some of these compounds were present in each honey varied significantly. Examination of this data by principal components analysis (PCA) explained 57% of the variation in the data set for the first two principal components (33% PC1 and 24% PC2). Manuka honey was found to have the greatest variety of VOC’s while rata honey was found to have the least. A range of compounds were found to occur in all three honey types, but unique compounds were also identified, with 11 found in manuka (e.g. dimethyl disulfide and pinocarveol), 3 in thyme (2-heptanone, lilac alcohol D, dihydrojasmone lactone) and 1 in rata (p-cresol). Some honeys showed discrimination by compound class with the VOC’s in thyme honey being mainly acids and terpenes, whereas the majority of VOC’s in manuka honey were terpenes, alcohols and ketones. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and olfactometry (GC-MS-O) was used to identify odour active compounds using a detection frequency method with a panel of six assessors. Thyme honey was found to have the most odour active compounds with 48, followed by manuka with 40, and rata honey had the least with 29. Some odour active compounds were found in all three honeys, such as linalool and phenylethyl alcohol, whereas other odour compounds were distinct, being only identified in specific samples, such as hexanoic acid in thyme, (Z)-linalool oxide in rata and acetoin in manuka. The third objective of this study was to evaluate discrimination between 19 honey samples from four floral origins (thyme, rata, manuka and kanuka) by means of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Using a rapid headspace method, 130 mass ions (m/z) were found to have significant differences between the samples. It was found that the first two principal components (PCs) explained 60% of the variation in the data set (PC 1 38%; PC 2 22%). The honey samples of thyme and rata were clustered together in easily defined groups with thyme showing the greatest discrimination. However, there was no clear grouping for manuka or kanuka and the samples for both of these honeys tended to cluster together with considerable overlap, so that they could not be discriminated from each other in a robust manner. Results suggested that the analysis of volatile organic compounds is an effective method for the characterisation of unifloral New Zealand honeys. The results obtained using GC-MS were better than PTR-MS for discrimination of honey samples. However, PTR-MS might still prove useful as a fast, online screening method. GC-O provided complementary information specifically on the odour active compounds to identify compounds that contribute to the flavour character. These findings could be useful for improving the export value of New Zealand honey by providing a greater understanding of how odour compounds and their sensory aspects relate to honey quality. This information could also be useful for monitoring changes in flavour during processing and storage for quality assessment and shelf life prediction.

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  • Angiogenesis in the apical papilla of immature permanent teeth

    Navani, Hitesh (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Dental trauma, caries or developmental anomalies may result in reversible or irreversible injury to the dental pulp in immature permanent teeth and this presents a clinical conundrum. Immature teeth possess a more favourable healing potential, and this is partly contingent on the vascularity, and angiogenic potential of the resident cells and growth factors. Moreover, the apical papilla is a tissue unique to these teeth and plays an important role in root development and healing. Angiogenesis is a fundamental process in development and disease and is incumbent upon an intricate interplay of angiogenic genes, growth factors and their cognate receptors. The dental pulp is not a “doomed organ” (Rebel 1922) and is capable of healing. Hence, current therapies are aimed at preservation of pulp vitality and facilitating apexogenesis, but treatment outcomes are not always predictable. An increased understanding of angiogenic signalling in the apical region at a molecular level may improve this. This research explored the angiogenic potential of the apical papilla in healthy immature permanent human teeth and serves as a baseline for understanding potential responses to disease. As well as examining protein expression in the apical papilla tissue, the distribution and relative mRNA levels of angiogenic growth factors (VEGF, Ang-1, Ang-2), receptor proteins (VEGFR2 and Tie-2), and cell-surface markers (CD34 and CD45) were investigated. Immunohistochemistry and gene expression experiments conducted on the apical papilla showed that this tissue was comprised of angiogenic growth factors and receptors and few resident cells and blood vessels, demonstrating evidence that it is capable of partaking in and promoting angiogenic signalling. Endothelial cells were the predominant cells expressing these markers but expression on other cell types including fibroblasts and immature mesenchymal cells suggests they play contributory roles. VEGF, Ang-1, and Tie-2 exhibited greater immunopositivity and higher cell counts than Ang2 in the apical papilla, while CD34 and CD45 were sparsely distributed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction corroborated these results and revealed differences in gene expression between the apical and coronal regions. The differential expression of VEGF and angiopoietins and their receptor mRNA and protein in the apical papilla suggests the potential for these growth factors to contribute to physiological root development and pulp healing following injury. This study has enhanced our understanding of angiogenesis in healthy dental pulps, and contributes to the body of knowledge related to potential use of angiogenic-modulatory factors in vital pulp therapies.

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  • Biological and Behavioural Markers of Parkinson’s Disease

    Alamri, Yassar Abdullah S (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Today, upwards of 10 million people—approximately 9 500 of whom reside in New Zealand—are living with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Yet, the means of diagnosing PD remain somewhat similar to those available to James Parkinson in 1817. Recently, however, there has been an increasing interest in the role of biomarkers in PD; these, in turn, are hoped to provide the necessary means by which PD can be diagnosed earlier, treated better and—ultimately—altogether prevented and/or cured. Given the multifaceted nature of the aetiology underlying PD, a “multi-system” approach to biomarkers is more likely to yield fruitful results. Thus, the overarching aim of this study was to explore several biomarkers (within two realms—biological and behavioural) that may be used at different time-points as the disease progresses. In the biological markers trials, biofluid samples (i.e., cerebrospinal fluid ‘CSF’ and plasma) were obtained from 11 patients with PD. Analyses of these samples did not detect any blackcurrant anthocyanins either before or after oral supplementation with blackcurrant concentrate for four weeks. Consumption of blackcurrant concentrate, however, significantly increased the CSF concentration of cyclic glycine-proline. This led to the hypothesis of an indirect mechanism underlying the putative benefit of berry-fruit consumption on the risk of developing PD—perhaps through modulating the peripheral resistance to insulinlike growth factor-1 otherwise observed in patients with PD. CSF concentrations of the aminoterminal fragment of C-type natriuretic peptide were significantly lower in PD patients than the reported range from a group of pre-operative orthopaedic patients. Finally, the obtained samples were utilised to characterise the profile of exosomes present in the CSF and plasma of PD patients. The three patients with the highest plasma exosome concentrations also had the lowest scores on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. The behavioural markers study investigated biomarkers in patients with established PD—a stage when cognition may become involved. The emphasis was to obtain an in-depth evaluation of novel eye movement-performance associations. In general, no remarkable differences in eye movement parameters were noted among the three study groups (n = 16 per group): PD with normal cognition (PDN), PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) and matched controls (NC) in natural and laboratory-based neuropsychological tasks. This indicates a relatively preserved organisation of neuropsychological task performance as evident from eye movements among the participants. In addition, some insights into human behaviour on several tasks were gained. In the animal naming task, participants from all three groups tended to fixate on the animal’s head in order to name it. Participants also fixated on the distal ends of lines when attempting the Judgement of Line Orientation task. PD-MCI participants were found to make significantly more vertical saccades when searching the Where’s Wally?™ Maze task in comparison with NC and PD-N participants. On the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, PD-MCI participants scored significantly lower than NC and PDN participants. Finally, task organisation of the tea-making task was mostly consistent among the study participants; PD participants (of both groups) executed the task significantly slower than NC participants. Given the relatively small sample sizes, an exploratory approach was generally taken. To gain confidence in the results of individual findings, further research ought to be carried out in order to exclude the possibility of sampling variability accounting for the reported observations.

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  • Becoming-common: Affective Technologies and Grassroots Activism in Contemporary Italy

    Urbano, Massimiliana (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis employs ethnographic methods to study grassroots activism in contemporary Italy. Through non-representational analysis, which involves participant observation and interviews in activist communities, I observe how technologies are affective and how, in relating to human and nonhuman bodies, technology can build a capacity to resist the Italian capitalist establishment. I suggest that the groups who have participated in this research provide a valuable, original example of how neoliberal tendencies to use technologies for domination can be resisted. The thesis outlines three forms of resistance involving the use of technology. First, the use of technology to produce affective spaces of collaboration; second, building technologies for the conservation and the production of grassroots memory; and, third, the use of corporate social media as a means to reach large numbers of people. I argue that a capacity for political action emerges from these practices, which I describe as a process of becoming-common, that is, as moments of coordination, solidarity and mutuality. The thesis thus demonstrates that the processes of becoming-common emerge in affective arrangements and enable a capacity for collective action from below.

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  • Strategy Implementation Literature Review

    Siddique, MI; Shadbolt, NM

    Report
    Massey University

    The purpose of the Dairy Farm Systems for the Future project is to explore how to identify and design farming systems best suited to the changing environment and farmer circumstances. The approach adopted has been to: • Develop a better understanding by farmers, industry and researchers of possible, plausible future scenarios for dairying • Design and analyse potential farm system alternatives for each of the scenarios • Define a rigorous approach for evaluating farming systems. • Build greater industry capability and collaboration in farm system design & analysis. This is supported by literature reviews on scenario analysis, strategy implementation and modelling approaches for system design and analysis. The first, obviously, will inform the scenario analysis process, provide comparisons of similar studies and examples of what best to do with its outputs; the third is to ensure the most up-to-date methods are used in the modelling based on a comprehensive understanding of previous farm system modelling research. The strategy implementation review, this report, is based on the recognition that best strategy is only ever realised if implemented effectively. It is intended that the farm system design will also include the pathway of how the current system will evolve and the impact of this evolution on both the farm and the wider regional/national stakeholders. This description of the implementation of each strategy will be assisted by the frameworks and guidelines developed in this literature review. The key points when examining the scenarios that have been developed is that they are all plausible, they all represent a significant shift from the status quo, they all involve significant investment and change and that none of these is easy. There are significant strategic risks identified for each scenario so the process of designing and modelling farm systems for each of these scenarios need to take these into account. Strategy formulation of ‘dairy farm systems for the future’ for each scenario will clearly identify the options available and quantify their outcomes, therefore providing useful information for farmers and other stakeholders faced with each situation. While there is much research in both business and farm management literature on strategy formulation and many tools developed to assist in the process, the field of strategy implementation is less well researched. This literature review identifies a range of research, mostly from the business literature, in which academics have developed strategy implementation frameworks and models, some theoretical, some conceptual and tested empirically, others created from empirical work. A number of frameworks and recommendations have evolved since the early 1980s as documented chronologically in this report. The commercial world, for the most part, echoes these recommendations in the ‘best practice’ section of the review. The tool that is best documented both in the business and the farm management literature for strategy implementation is the balanced scorecard; this tool is explored in this review and recommended for use in the ‘dairy farm systems for the future’ design.

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  • Australia in the South Pacific

    Powles, AR

    Report
    Massey University

    Commissioned piece on the Australia in the South Pacific following the release of the 2016 Defence White Paper

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  • Caring for the Last 3%: Telehealth Potential and Broadband Implications for Remote Australia

    Dods, S; Freyne, J; Alem, L; Nepal, S; Li, J; Jang-Jaccard, J

    Report
    Massey University

    Australians living in remote regions of our nation live with far poorer health outcomes than those in our regional and urban areas. The gaps in health service availability and outcomes between people in urban areas and those in remote parts of our country are well known. Telehealth, the provision of health related services at a distance using technology assisted communications, offers a means to narrow this gap by improving the level and diversity of services in remote areas.

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  • Strategies for co-constructing an initial teacher education curriculum: A school-university partnership

    Sewell, AM; Cody, T; Weir, K

    Report
    Massey University

    The intended output of this small-scale project was to develop and to document effective strategies that would facilitate the co-construction of an initial teacher education (ITE) curriculum in a school-university partnership. In so doing, this project sought to make links between theories underpinning effective pedagogies, taught at the university, with the day to day practice of teaching and learning in three Normal Schools in the Manawatū. Using qualitative methodology, consisting of field notes from meetings, focus group discussions, observations and interviews, the following findings were identified as supporting the effective co-construction of a university ITE curriculum with school partners:  Building trust  Making visible our shared values  Willingness to share power and expertise  Being responsive to the school context  Promoting dialogue  Setting and resourcing manageable goals  Communicating effectively

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  • Catalysing Interdisciplinary Research at Massey University

    Goodyer, JE; Ryan, A

    Report
    Massey University

    As the research environment in which Massey University operates shifts to prioritise high-impact research and interdisciplinary research, it is imperative that the University acts proactively to develop the necessary capability to respond to these changes. From the findings of this research we propose that a key mechanism for helping to catalyse interdisciplinary research at Massey can be provided through establishing an ‘Integration and Implementation Sciences framework’ at Massey. An Integration and Implementation Sciences framework has immediate resonance in relation to wicked problems associated with fields such as Agrifood, sustainability and health. Interdisciplinary research is to be encouraged and supported through the creation of a new centrally-funded IDR seed fund. A key mechanism to support the development of staff expert in interdisciplinary research is through the creation of a ‘Framework for Interdisciplinary Research Professional Development’

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  • Changes in denitrification rate and N2O/N2 ratio with varying soil moisture conditions of New Zealand Pasture soils.

    Jha, N; Saggar, S; Tillman, R; Giltrap, D

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Impact of a Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI) Education Package on Nurses' Knowledge and Indwelling Catheter Management Practices

    Hernandez, MA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Objectives: 1. To identify staff nurses' current knowledge, attitudes and indwelling catheter management practices 2. To implement a catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) education package on two surgical wards 3. To determine if a significant difference exists in the staff nurses' indwelling catheter management practices before and after the introduction of a CAUTI education package Research Question: What is the impact of a CAUTI education package on the knowledge, attitude and indwelling catheter management practices of nurses? Design: A descriptive design involving mixed methods approach was utilised to answer the research question. The methods used include focus group discussions that explore and describe nurses' attitude toward catheter care and CAUTI prevention; pre-test and a post-test to measure and compare the nurses' level of knowledge on CAUTI prevention; and document analysis of a catheter maintenance checklist to identify staff nurses' catheter management practices. Setting: Two surgical wards of a general district hospital located in Manukau City, Auckland, New Zealand Participants: A convenience sample of staff nurses (n=27) from the two surgical wards were invited to participate in the study through e-mail. Information about the research was discussed through flyers. Study participation was voluntary, with utmost respect for human dignity and autonomy. Methods: The study had three phases. The first phase utilised focus group discussions that involved the gathering of baseline data to determine nurses' knowledge and attitudes about catheter management and CAUTI prevention. The second phase involved the implementation of education sessions and utilised a pre and post-test to measure nurses' level of knowledge. The final phase or the evaluation phase identified the impact of the education package on the nurses' knowledge, attitudes and whether this was translated into practice. This phase utilised an evidence-based checklist that nurses complete daily given patients with urinary catheters. Results: A total of 13 staff nurses attended two focus group discussions. The focus group revealed that there is diversity in the undergraduate training experience and on-the-job training of nurses that relate to their catheter management practices. Another theme that emerged from the focus group is the nurses' awareness, access and use of organisational policies and guidelines which serve as a primary go-to guide when recalling information at work. The staff also highlighted that the quality of their current catheter care practice utilizes a collaborative approach, is dependent on the nursing process and is affected by the nurse's and the patient's gender. The nurses also verbalized that there is training required in the use of catheter management resources. Lastly, catheter care challenges such as gender, dementia in patients and ethical dilemma affect nurse's catheter management practices. Fourteen nurses attended the education session. For the pre and post-test, paired t-test was carried out in order to test for a significant difference in the overall score. Descriptive statistical analyses indicate that there is a significant difference (p < 0.0001) in the overall score between the pre and post-test, with a mean difference of 6.64 and 95% CI of (4.96, 8.33). Document analysis of the catheter maintenance checklist revealed that most of the post-surgery patients came to the ward with catheters already in, thus prompting the nurses to complete only the catheter maintenance part of the checklist and the catheter removal part if necessary. Majority of the patients also had their catheters removed on the first day and this is documented on the checklist. Noticeable also is the dwindling of numbers of completed checklists when the study period reached its fourth month. Conclusion: The CAUTI education package had a significant impact on the nurse's knowledge. While various factors affect catheter management practices, enhanced training will not only improve nurses' knowledge, but their practice as well. Catheter maintenance checklists serve as procedure prompts for nurses although dwindling of numbers may be expected as time passes by. This could be remedied by regularly reminding staff to complete the checklist and documentation. Finally, quality improvement initiatives on CAUTI prevention would help improve CAUTI rates and nurses' knowledge, skills and attitude toward catheter management.

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  • An evaluation of clinical supervision of allied health professionals from two district health boards: A preliminary summary report

    O'Donoghue, KB

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Lime enhances denitrification rate and denitrifier gene abundance in pasture soils treated with urine and urine + DCD.

    Jha, N; Palmada, T; Berben, P; Saggar, S; Luo, J; McMillan, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Measuring farmers’ self-efficacy for managing perennial summer forages

    Drysdale, D; Hartnett, MK; Sewell, A; Gray, D; Kemp, P; Wood, B

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Farmers’ self-efficacy beliefs impact on their learning and decision-making processes, and as such provide vital information to agricultural extension providers. Self-efficacy is measured as an individual’s perception of what they ‘can do’, rather than what they ‘actually do’, providing an indication of their present efficacy to carry out a specific future task. This paper reports on the design, development and pilot study of a tool to provide quantitative measures of farmers’ self-efficacy when considering the introduction or management for perennial summer forages. Preliminary results indicate that this tool provides a robust means of measuring changes in self-efficacy beliefs within this specific domain of managing perennial summer forages. Understanding farmers’ efficacy beliefs may guide the design of more effective agricultural extension activities to better assist farmers in their learning and decision-making when adopting innovative agricultural practices.

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