91,714 results

  • An investigation of the validity of a section of a theoretical model to predict work physiology parameters from age and weight : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Business Studies at Massey University

    Jeffrey, Glyn

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Work physiology is the study of physiological parameters of the body during work. Two of these physiological parameters are commonly measured to assess the cost of work : oxygen consumption and heart rate. In 1979 a theoretical model was developed to estimate some ergonomic parameters from age, height and weight. While this model predicted anthropometric, biomechanical and work physiology parameters, the present research was concerned only with the section of the model predicting work physiology parameters of oxygen consumption and heart rate from age and weight. In this study oxygen consumption and heart rate values were obtained from measurement of seven subjects working on an ergometer. These values were then used to test three of the equations in the predictive model. Two of the equations were found to be unreliable as predictors of oxygen consumption and heart rate for this sample, while one of the equations was found to be reliable. Further research with a larger sample is necessary before any firm conclusions about this section of the model may be made.

    View record details
  • Investigation of a novel intein-based Escherichia coli expression system for human methylmalonyl CoA mutase : a thesis presented to Massey University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Biochemistry

    Clark, Alice Rosemary

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Human methylmalonyl CoA mutase (hMCM) is a 78 kDa homodimeric mitochondrial matrix enzyme. hMCM catalyses the conversion of 2R-methylmalonyl CoA to succinyl CoA in the metabolism of propionyl groups, and requires the vitamin B12 -derived cofactor adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl). The mechanism of catalysis involves homolytic cleavage of AdoCbl's unusual C-Co bond, to generate radicals. Dysfunctional hMCM results in the rare, potentially fatal metabolic disorder methylmalonic acidemia. An experimentally determined structure of hMCM would add to the understanding of both the mechanism of catalysis and the molecular basis of some of the mutations underlying methylmalonic acidemia. The structure of the bacterial orthologue from Propionibacterium shermanii has been solved by x-ray crystallography, enabling the development of structural models of hMCM. Critical differences, however, between these two enzymes, mean that some regions of the models could be inaccurate. There is no x-ray crystal structure of hMCM. Purification of native hMCM for crystallization trials is complicated by ethical problems, low yields, and heterogeneity generated by the cofactor. To provide a more convenient source of pure, active human methylmalonyl CoA mutase for x-ray crystallography, an expression system for recombinant hMCM is required. Other researchers have expressed hMCM in Escherichia coli as (i) insoluble inclusion bodies, (ii) soluble fusion protein that cannot be separated efficiently from the fusion tag, or (iii) in low quantities. This research aimed to develop an E. coli expression system for the production of active human methylmalonyl CoA mutase, to enable x-ray crystallography structural studies. Based on the results of previous expression systems, four novel expression vectors were developed utilising the maltose binding protein and thioredoxin as solubility tags. It was hoped that conventional protease cleavage, to remove these solubility tags, could be circumvented by the use of intein-mediated cleavage. Intein-mediated cleavage was successful, and soluble active hMCM was recovered in low yields from a C-terminal thioredoxin solubility tag construct. hMCM was insoluble when expressed with MBP at the C-terminus.

    View record details
  • Investigation of the relationships that exist between athletic training, hormones and sleep in young healthy male athletes : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Physiology at Massey University

    Blackmore, Lara

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Background. Many people engage in exercise for recreation, to promote personal health and as a profession. Accordingly there is wide ranging interest in the factors that affect a person's performance during exercise and in how that performance can both he assessed and enhanced. The physiological basis of exercise performance and its enhancement have been investigated for many years. Such investigations in people are impeded by the understandable reluctance of participants to provide significant numbers of blood samples by venepuncture. The recent development of an ultrasound method for non-invasive sampling of extracellular fluid, called transdermal electrosonophoresis (ESP), offers tremendous opportunities for benign monitoring of physiological responses involving changes in blood/extracellular fluid composition associated with exercise and indeed in clinical settings. Sleep quality/quantity is considered to have significant impact on training effectiveness and performance, with poor sleep correlated with poor athletic outcome. The link here is considered to involve growth hormone, as poor sleep quality/quantity diminishes growth hormone concentrations and reduced growth hormone concentrations impede training induced muscle development. Training effectiveness and recovery have been monitored in past research through measurement of blood hormone profiles, in particular the testosterone: cortisol ratio. The overall objective of this study was to validate the use of ESP as a non-invasive blood sampling technique through the study of the relationships that exist between exercise, fatigability, fitness, and hormone levels in blood, saliva and extracellular fluid and the investigation of the impact of spontaneous sleep disturbances on these relationships in young healthy male athletes. Methods. Plasma, ESP and saliva samples were taken regularly from 14 male rugby players during a four-week study. The plasma and ESP samples were analysed for testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone concentration. The saliva samples were analysed only for testosterone and cortisol levels. Fitness was assessed each week using a maximal treadmill test and fatigability was also investigated. Sleep quantity/quality was investigated using personal sleep logs which the participants filled out daily. In addition the participants' alcohol consumption was reported in the sleep log. Results. Correlations between hormone concentrations measured in plasma and FSP were higher than the correlations for plasma and saliva. The results here were highly significant. An equation was derived to estimate plasma concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone using the concentrations of the hormones measured in ESP samples. Few statistically significant relationships between hormone profiles, sleep quality/quantity and athletic training were revealed in the analysis of the results of this study. A negative correlation was found between the mean plasma cortisol concentration measured in the morning and the estimated VO2 , and also between the cortisol concentration measured in the ESP sample and estimated VO2max , but this did not quite reach significance. A negative correlation between estimated VO2max and the mean total time asleep for the previous three or four nights was revealed. Conclusions. ESP sample analysis provides a more accurate estimation of testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone concentrations in plasma than saliva sample analysis does.

    View record details
  • Is Queenstown a sanctuary? : a retrospective study of the preparation, mitigation and recovery of the Queenstown community from the effects of the Queenstown flood and hazard slip events of 1999 : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Richardson, Vivien

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Using a salutogenic paradigm, the present study examined the factors that contributed to hardiness and resilience, in the Queenstown community, following the flood and slip events of November 1999. It was hypothesised that sense of community, coping style, self-efficacy, and social support would predict stress, as measured by the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-21 (HSCL). It was also hypothesised that unique environmental qualities of Queenstown, i.e. the lakes, mountains, small community and being a visitor destination, would make a significant contribution to participants sense of community. Hazard knowledge, preparation and mitigation, with particular reference to flood hazards was also examined Additionally, in depth interviews with a high intensity sample of participants, were also carried out. This qualitative information was intended to examine the strengths within the community that had helped the community to deal with the flood and slip events. Additionally, the interviews were used as a forum, for participants to raise their own issues, relating to these events. The hypothesis that the selected variables would predict resilience, was not supported, but support was found for the importance of the unique physical and environmental qualities of Queenstown to residents. The interview results provided support for the view that the Queenstown community was able to withstand the effects of the flood and slip events, with recovery of businesses and tourism being almost complete at four months post event. Though some of those properties affected by the event could never be restored, resulting in irreplaceable losses and changes to individuals' lives, the community showed remarkable strengths and had done much to address inadequacies highlighted by the events.

    View record details
  • Isolation and characterisation of the Drosphila dror2 gene : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Genetics at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Frith, Kathryn Joy

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a family of cell-surface receptors that have an important role in an array of cellular responses including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation (Fantl et al., 1993). RTKs and their ligands are important components in the determination of cell fate through signalling pathways that are activated during both invertebrate and vertebrate development (Pawson and Bernstein, 1990). The Ror subfamily of RTKs are thought to be important for the development of the nervous system as they are expressed highly in the nervous system in the developing embryo, but expression is minimal in adults. Three receptors in this subfamily have been identified. Rorl and Ror2 from humans (Masiakowski and Carroll, 1992) and Dror from Drosophila (Wilson et al., 1993). This thesis involved the isolation and characterisation of the fourth gene in this family Dror2 from Drosophila melanogaster. Degenerate oligonucleotides to conserved regions of the tyrosine kinase domain of RTKs were used to PCR amplify a 200 bp fragment from genomic DNA. A λ genomic library was screened with the labelled fragment in order to isolate the gene. The resulting clone was subcloned and sequenced to obtain the complete sequence of Dror2. The 3' end of the gene was determined by RT-PCR. The transcriptional start point was identified by using 5' RACE and sequencing of the amplification product. Expression of Dror2 was examined using Northern Blot hybridisation and in situ hybridisation to whole mount embryos. The 725 amino acid mature Dror2 protein comprises an extracellular domain containing the signal peptide, cysteine-rich region and kringle domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain and the intracellular domain containing a catalytic kinase domain. Three introns were identified, one in the middle of the cysteine-rich region and two flanking the kringle domain.

    View record details
  • Vocational Survival: Expanding the Film Value Chain for the Independent Filmmaker

    Jackson, Fiona (2018)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    As a case-study in the occupational sociology of the creative industries, this thesis develops an argument for expanding the traditional FilmValue Chain model in order to address what it means to be an independent filmmaker. The research focuses specifically on the filmmaker’s journey or course of action, rather than on film aesthetics or artistry, and ultimately presents this as a structured series of stages. To reach an understanding of this structure, the research combines (auto)ethnography with Grounded Theory in order to develop a thick description that moves between practical experience and emergent concepts. The exposed structure of an independent’s filmmaking career progresses through four frameworks: exploration, focus, independence, and establishment. The exploration stage is dominated by a high level of simple autonomy-orientation. The focus stage is dominated by growing realisation that the simple autonomy-orientation is too simple and a different orientation is needed. The independence and establishment levels encompass a complex autonomy orientation. The presentation of the research draws heavily on both identity theory and the emerging research paradigm of performative ethnography, and one chapter takes the form of a screenplay which interacts creatively with the other chapters, the synthesis of which has produced a model of independent practices. By extending John Caldwell’s analysis of industrial “promotional surrounds” (IPS), which identifies the dominant corporate and labour practices and “logics” in relation to which independents necessarily define themselves, this thesis articulates the nature of an “independent promotional surround” with its distinctive actors and logics. Finally, it proposes that this IPS expresses a discourse of independence and that an expansion of the traditional Film Value Chain model will recognise the tensions around which this discourse organises itself.

    View record details
  • Representing the one left over: A social semiotic perspective of students’ use of screen casting

    Murphy, Carol; Calder, Nigel Stuart (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper examines the potential of using screen casting with an iPad to enhance learning in mathematics. Data are presented from two seven-year-old students as they use the Explain Everything app to solve a division with remainder problem (DWR). A social semiotic perspective was used to interpret students’ use of multiple modes as they represented the mathematical ideas within the context of the problem. We consider how a social semiotic perspective has the potential to draw attention to the students’ interests and emerging expressions in representing mathematical relationships. We further consider how the use of representations in the app might relate to student learning.

    View record details
  • Exploring Critical Alternatives for Youth Development through Lifestyle Sport: Surfing and Community Development in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Wheaton, Belinda; Roy, Georgina; Olive, Rebecca (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    While competition-based team sports remain dominant in community and sport-for-development programs, researchers are exploring the value of alternative, less “sportized” activities such as lifestyle/action sports. In this paper, we explore the ways in which surfing is being used in development programs in Aotearoa/New Zealand, examining the perceived social benefits and impact. Our methods involved: (a) mapping the range of surfing projects; and (b) 8 in-depth interviews with program personnel. Widespread conviction in the positive developmental benefits of surfing was evident, and that surfing had a “special” capacity to reform or heal those who participate in it. However, the ways in which individuals’ self-developments were promoted appear to be following the traditional sport/youth development path. They focus on policies aimed at improved life chances, equipping youth with the tools for self-improvement and self-management, inculcating self-governance and self-reliance. However, a counter narrative co-existed, highlighting surfing as a freeing experience, which, rather than restoring social order, works to instigate a personal transformation or awakening. Despite the range of challenges presented by surfing as a tool for positive development, surfing presents a potentially “critical alternative” which if sport-for-development programs are to be a form of social change, we should remain open to exploring.

    View record details
  • Why do I need research and theory? A guide for social workers, by Jennifer Anderson-Meger[Book Review]

    Hunt, Sonya (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book “Why do I need research and theory? A guide for social workers”, by Jennifer Anderson-Meger.

    View record details
  • Transition to professional social work practice: The first three years

    Hunt, Sonya; Tregurtha, Melanie; Kuruvila, Albert; Lowe, Simon; Smith, Kelly (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article presents the findings of a longitudinal research project that followed the employ-ment outcomes of one cohort of Bachelor of Social Work graduates for three years. Prior to graduation, students receive professional preparation that develops their ability to critically engage with theory and practice. Following graduation, newly qualified social workers require quality induction, supervision and other workload management strategies to support the transition to social work practice. The development of this study was fuelled by political criticism of social work education. Additionally, there was a desire to track the employment outcomes of the graduates and understand what supported their transition to competent professional practice. The findings fit within a five-year longitudinal research project that follows three separate graduate cohorts each for three years to seek and compare participants’ experiences for their first three years post-qualification. An anonymous, semi-structured, on-line survey was used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data. By the second year of practice, these respond-ents were taking on the workload of an experienced social work practitioner with widely varied levels of support. By the end of their third year in practice, they reported that they had found little opportunity to apply their critical analytical academic skills to consider the wider social system in practice. Further, the graduates’ confidence in their cultural competencies also gradually decreased over the three-year period.

    View record details
  • Perspectives on counselling supervision in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Crocket, Kathie (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article is based on an invited keynote address delivered at the first New Zealand Association of Counsellors’ National Supervision Conference Day in July 2017. It considers questions that have continued to be significant for professional supervision over time in counselling in Aotearoa New Zealand, noting considerations for contemporary practice. It reviews a range of research studies of supervision, highlighting recent contributions to discussions of culture and supervision and the use of e-technology in supervision. long white cloud our map in the sky (Robin Fry, 2008)1

    View record details
  • There must be a better way - The case against the New Zealand Literacy Strategy and some examples of how we can help students who fall by the wayside

    Dymock, Susan (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Literate cultural capital is a phrase used to describe the literacy knowledge and skills children have on school entry (Prochnow, Tunmer & Arrow, 2015; Tunmer & Nicholson, 2011). Literacy knowledge and skills include oral language, vocabulary, an awareness of how books operate, letter name knowledge, letter sound knowledge, phonological awareness, and invented spelling (Prochnow, Tunmer & Arrow, 2015). Children who commence school with a good level of literate cultural capital are advantaged and are more likely to develop age-appropriate reading skills as they progress through school compared to children who commence school with little literate cultural capital.

    View record details
  • By rule or by rote? To what extent does children’s spelling improve as a result of learning words with the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX strategy, compared with phonological spelling strategies?

    Dymock, Susan; Nicholson, Tom (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The present study was a randomised controlled trial designed to compare the effects of two spelling interventions on spelling of taught words and transfer words. The sample consisted of 55 seven-year-olds, including proficient and less proficient spellers, in two Year 3 classrooms. The spelling interventions were for three lessons per week, 20-minutes per lesson, over 10 weeks. In the first intervention we taught eight spelling strategies that showed children how to stretch out the sounds in words and how to use different phonological spelling strategies, including how to spell short and long vowel sounds and phonics strategies, such as use of the silent e marker, how to break long words into syllables, and the doubling rule. In the second intervention students learned the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX strategy along with putting words to be learned into alphabetical order and writing each word in a sentence. They were not taught any strategies or rules. The control group completed comprehension, vocabulary, and punctuation activities. In order to see if the control group might implicitly learn the words, all groups in all lessons were exposed to the same words by reading a story to them that contained the words. Results for taught words showed that both intervention conditions increased participants’ spelling at an equivalent rate, greater than that of the control condition. For transfer words not taught but that followed similar patterns to the taught words, the strategy intervention showed greater transfer to spelling new words with similar patterns compared with the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX condition and the control condition. For this reason we conclude that although both intervention approaches had strong local effects in terms of learning to spell specific words, teaching rule-based spelling strategies had more global effects in terms of transfer to new words than the LOOK, SAY, COVER, WRITE, CHECK, FIX for both proficient and less proficient spellers.

    View record details
  • How reading published stories and making story webs can work together to enhance classroom story writing

    Dymock, Susan; Nicholson, Tom (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Many students find story writing a challenge (Beard & Burrell, 2010; Calfee & Patrick, 1995; Dunn & Finley, 2010; Dymock & Nicholson, 2010; Richards, Sturm, & Cali, 2012; Saunders & Smith, 2014). Teachers need a simple strategy that will have a significant positive effect on the quality of student writing. This teaching idea is about going from "Too hard" to "I can do that". Our suggestion is to use the well-known story web strategy in a different way by applying it to a published story and then going from this to story writing.

    View record details
  • An interview: Making art as a dialogue with materials, moments and motivations

    Price, Graham; Earl, Kerry (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Graham Price has worked extensively in primary, secondary and tertiary art education in Otago (1976–1997) and since 2000 in pre-service secondary and primary art education within the University of Waikato arts education team. He has experience in developing art education resources, Waikato professional development programmes, and the development of visual art assessment in primary schools through the National Education Monitoring Project 1995–2008. His research interests include arts integration, the history of art education in New Zealand and how students talk about art. His own artwork spans painting, jewellery and sculptural responses to calligraphy. He actively participates in a cappella choral performance. In this piece Graham shares his views and his approach to art making.

    View record details
  • The social work regulation project in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Hunt, Sonya (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    INTRODUCTION: In this second of two articles on the history of professionalisation of social work in Aotearoa New Zealand, consideration is given to the more recent coalescing of forces from the 1990s to the initial implementation of the Social Workers Registration Act (2003), which led to our country’s example of a social work regulation project. APPROACH: This critical consideration of social work regulation in Aotearoa New Zealand situates it within the international social work professionalisation context alongside the national context. Consideration is given to the place of leadership and buy-in from the profession, political sponsorship, cultural considerations, and another ministerial review. Overlaying this, an examination of concepts of public trust, respect, and confidence in professions such as social work, are linked to crises of trust in professions in general, and placed within the current neoliberal, market-driven environment in which this project is anchored. CONCLUSION: The literature serves to document the history of social work regulation in Aotearoa New Zealand and as background for an ongoing research project which aims to uncover interests at work and interrogate the legitimacy of those interests, while enabling the voices of key actors from the time to surface, be explored, and be recorded.

    View record details
  • Functional analysis of candidate flowering time genes from the model legume Medicago truncatula

    Che, Chong (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Flowering at optimal times promotes the success of plant sexual reproduction and agronomic productivity and yield. Legumes are the second most important group of crop plants, but their flowering gene networks are less well understood than in the Brassicaceae and Poaceae. Medicago truncatula (Medicago) is a legume model plant with powerful genetic resources and which flowers in response to long day length and vernalisation (winter cold) conditions. A putative Medicago Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) subunit VERNALISATION2 (MtVRN2) was characterised previously in the Putterill laboratory, whose mutation led to early flowering. This indicated that MtVRN2 represses the transition to flowering in Medicago, opposite to VRN2 function in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). In addition, candidate floral integrator and homeotic genes had elevated expression in the Mtvrn2 mutant. An attempt was made to further characterise MtVRN2 function by analysing a candidate protein interactor CURLY LEAF (CLF, a candidate PRC2 member) using yeast two hybrid and pull down assays and selected candidate target genes (FLOWERING LOCUS Ta1, APETALA1, AGAMOUS-LIKE11 and SEPALLATA3b) using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR. In addition, a second candidate PRC2 member Medicago EMBRYONIC FLOWER2 (EMF2) was aimed to be functionally characterised. Third, the function of six candidate flowering genes related to SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) and FRUITFULL (FUL), some with elevated expression in the Mtvrn2 mutant, was examined by ectopic expression in Arabidopsis. The results of ChIP-PCR using transgenic Medicago plants overexpressing epitope HA-tagged MtVRN2 showed that MtVRN2 did not appear to bind directly to the selected candidate target genes. The protein interaction studies suggested that MtVRN2 might not physically interact with MtCLF via their VEFS and C5 domains respectively. The investigation of the cDNA clones of three MtEMF2-like genes revealed several different potential coding sequences from the annotated genomic sequence. Functional analysis revealed that MtEMF2 did not appear to play the same role as AtEMF2 in flowering time control. Three MtFUL genes and three MtSOC1 genes were identified in Medicago, as opposed to one of each in Arabidopsis. The overexpression of these six genes in Arabidopsis indicated the potential role of three of them, MtFULa, MtFULb and MtSOC1a in flowering time control because they accelerated Arabidopsis flowering.

    View record details
  • Dreams as an experience: An exploration of meaning-making

    Heays, Deborah

    Thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Dreams are hard to pin down. They can be paradoxical: strikingly vivid, easily forgotten and hard to forget, apparently clear in meaning, and difficult to understand. This research study examines the lived experience of several dreams of one psychotherapy client. The study is concerned with the unique lens of the dreamer’s subjective perspective of the dreams. A case study framework structures this investigation which is informed by hermeneutic phenomenology. The challenge this research seeks to address is to explore and understand dreaming from the dreamer’s perspective, both the experience of dreaming and the meaning made of the experience. Psychoanalytic concepts inform my understanding as a psychotherapist and a researcher. However the exploration of dreams is not limited to this perspective. Other approaches such as Jungian dream theory, phenomenology and a cultural and spiritual perspective are referred to in this study. The dreamer’s interpretation of dream meaning was not restricted to one perspective, but incorporated a range of theoretical perspectives. The literature reveals that much research on the meaning of dreams has been explored from the perspective of the clinician, not the dreamer. Few studies have researched the dreamer’s subjective experience and own meaning-making process. It is this process of personal meaning-making and its relationship to the dream as a lived-experience which is the focus of this research study and its significance lies in its investigation of this perspective. The study discovers that the participant/dreamer in seeking to find meaning within his dreams searches for one ‘true’ meaning of a dream. It is partly an elusive search because the dreamer paradoxically finds that the meaning-making process does not end with the discovery of one meaning, but rather new and different meanings continue to arise, and enrich the dream. Exploration of the dream experience showed that time, space and identity had a fluidity that contributed to the richness of the dream. Such experiences were shown to be memorable and enduring, and contributed to the meaning made of a dream. Finally this study discovered that even if meaning was not able to be made of a dream, the experience of the dream was valued and continued to be felt long after the dream had occurred.

    View record details
  • An investigation of how job satisfaction mediates the impact of emotional intelligence on organisational citizenship behaviour in the New Zealand hospitality industry

    Yan, Ruzi

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The two main purposes of this study were to explore whether employee emotional intelligence can influence the behaviours that motivate employees to help others and whether emotional intelligence can influence such behaviours as well as heighten job satisfaction. The theoretical framework for this study drew from empathy-altruism theory and affective events theory, first, to predict the relationship between emotional intelligence and organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB); and second, to determine how these elements and their relationship to each other are influenced by job satisfaction. This study adopted a quantitative research approach; data were collected from 116 participants working within different types of hospitality businesses in New Zealand using an online questionnaire. Bivariate correlation and mediation analyses were conducted to test this study’s hypotheses. This study focussed on two key issues for the hospitality industry: the emotional competencies of employees and how employees demonstrate OCB. Tourism is an economic driver for New Zealand, bringing increasing numbers of customers, development potential, and serious service quality challenges to the hospitality industry. Faced with challenges and global competition, New Zealand’s hospitality industry needs to emphasise high performance and quality service. Since the service that the employees provide is a real but intangible product in the hospitality industry, it would be helpful to understand how to improve employee job performance and create an emotional connection with customers, thereby contributing to customer loyalty and organisational efficiency. Findings did not show that job satisfaction played a mediator role in the relationship between emotional intelligence and organisational citizenship behaviour. However, the emotional intelligence of employees successfully predicted their OCB behaviours. All of the dimensions of emotional intelligence were found to be important for increasing helpful behaviours in the workplace. In particular, self-emotion appraisal was considered the main factor that induced helpful behaviours. This study’s findings are important for understanding the roles of emotional intelligence and helping behaviour in the New Zealand hospitality industry. While the concepts of emotional intelligence and OCB have been applied to hospitality settings in recent years, these concepts still need to be well-researched from different perspectives. Further studies are needed to develop a theoretical model that can systematically investigate emotions and behaviours within the hospitality industry. Findings link emotional competency to organisational behaviour in general management, thereby enabling a better understanding of organisational behaviour. Importantly, they also give insight into the effects of applying concepts of emotional intelligence to OCB. Findings provide practitioners with understandings of how emotional abilities contribute to job performance and inform appropriate strategies to improve employee job performance and customer experience. Findings also help employees better understand their emotions and behaviours in the workplace enabling them to achieve career success.

    View record details
  • Countertransference: A phenomenon that enriches the therapeutic process: A literature review with clinical illustrations

    Cox, Rachel L.

    Thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The objective of this literature review was to understand and describe the complex theoretical concept of countertransference and to identify how countertransference helped the therapist to understand the client’s psychological processes. Literature on countertransference from the past century has been examined using a modified systematic literature review, and psychodynamic concepts that underpin countertransference have been identified and investigated. These included identification, projective identification, introjective identification and empathy. The identification process detailed ways a client communicates with the therapist through conscious and unconscious means. The therapist also receives information about the client via her own thoughts and emotional responses - classified as countertransference. Countertransferential responses via the introjective identification process, gives the therapist access to experiences that the client is, as yet, unable to put into words. The therapist then makes sense of her responses within the therapeutic relationship with the client. This dissertation also explores the benefits and cautions of the therapist utilising countertransferential responses.

    View record details