85,985 results

  • A Comparison of Multi-Blade Coordinate Transformation and Direct Periodic Techniques for Wind Turbine Control Design

    Stol, Karl; Moll, Hans-Georg; Bir, G; Namik, Hazim (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The inherent periodic behavior of an operating wind turbine is not well accommodated by common time-invariant analysis and control techniques. A multi-blade coordinate transformation (MBC) helps to overcome this issue for rotors with three or more blades by mapping the dynamic state variables into a non-rotating reference frame. A number of researchers have applied MBC for modal analyses and individual blade pitch controller designs. They do so by assuming the transformed system model from MBC is time-invariant, which is not often the case. The paper explores the validity of the time-invariant assumption by comparison to direct periodic techniques, which retain all periodic system information. In a modal analysis study, eigenvalues of a system after MBC are compared to direct Floquet modes. In an individual blade pitch control design study, a linear quadratic regulation (LQR) design after MBC is compared to direct periodic LQR. A 5-MW three-bladed wind turbine model is used to quantify performance differences. Normal operating conditions are considered as well as conditions selected to increase the harmonics that are unfiltered by MBC. It is found that the direct periodic methods produce almost identical results to timeinvariant methods after MBC under all conditions studied. MBC is recommended for threebladed turbines, which can be followed by Floquet analysis or periodic control design methods if necessary.

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  • The ’Extra Strand’ of the Putaiao Curriculum

    Stewart, Georgina (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Science in the Maori-medium curriculum

    Stewart, Georgina (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • On Speaking Terms: Response to ’Dogmas of Ethnicity’

    Stewart, Georgina (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kaupapa Māori Philosophy and Schools

    Stewart, Georgina (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Knowing Our Place: Critical Multicultural Science Education

    Stewart, Georgina (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Are we there yet? Reflecting on progress towards the goal of reframing practicum as a high quality opportunity to learn to teach.

    Hoben, Ngaire (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mentoring to enhance the learning of pre-service teachers

    Hoben, Ngaire (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • School physical education policy failure in Mississippi and Tennessee

    Amis, John M; Wright, Paul; Dyson, Benedict; Vardaman, James; Ferry, Hugh (2008-03-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research presents findings of a study designed to investigate why some policy responses to the ongoing childhood obesity epidemic in the USA have proven to be largely ineffective. Eight case studies were created using qualitative data collected from four high schools in Mississippi and four high schools in Tennessee. These two states are consistently ranked as having some of the highest levels of obesity in the nation and have recently introduced several new policies designed to address the high rates of childhood obesity. The case studies were constructed to examine how policies designed to improve the provision for physical education (PE) were developed and subsequently enacted in schools exhibiting significant diversity along size, ethnicity, urbanicity, and economic dimensions. Data were drawn from 50 interviews with state officials, district administrators, school principals, PE and classroom teachers, counselors, and parents. Further data were collected from focus groups with students, sustained observation of relevant school-based activities, such as PE lessons, and documentary analyses of official and popular press publications. We present findings that indicate why PE policy has been ignored, misinterpreted, avoided, and/or distorted by key school-based actors. In particular, we find that administrators and PE teachers engage in sensemaking strategies that frequently preclude them from enacting policy in an effective way. Thus, we call for a different approach to future policy development. Rather than policy formulation and subsequent enactment being considered as largely independent activities, we argue instead for a dialectical process that highlights the local contextual constraints and micro-activities of relevant actors that shape the day-to-day lives of school stakeholders. In this way, policy can become more malleable and realistic, and may be enacted in ways that are locally relevant. This, we contend, will significantly enhance the likelihood of future obesity- and school-related policies being effective

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  • Comprehensive 3D imaging of blood vascular networks in lymph nodes

    Kelch, Inken; Phillips, Anthony; Bogle, Miles; LeGrice, L; Sands, D; Gerneke, Dane; Mansell, Claudia; Dunbar, Peter (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    To generate high-resolution 3D images of the blood vascular network in lymph nodes (LNs) , and study its topology and dynamics with the help of computer modelling.

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  • If you don't listen to the teacher , you won't know what to do: Voice of Pasifika learners

    Perger, Pamela (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper reporst on one aspect of a study that explored Pasifika students' ideas about learning mathematics at Year 7. Students were asked to name key practices for learning mathematics (espoused theory) and were then observed working during a regular mathematical class to identify practices they used (theory-in-use). Further discussion enabled the differences between students' espoused theory and their theory-in-use to be explored and evaluated. What it is these students consider 'best practice' in learning mathematics? Do they practice what they preach?

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  • Wanted - One Great Maths Teacher

    Perger, Pamela (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    What makes an effective mathematics teacher? Research has identified a number of attributes but most of these are noted from an adults, point of view. What is it that the students consider essential in an effective mathematics teacher? Here a picture of the ideal mathematics teacher as described by a group of 11-12 year old students is presented. The attributes they identified fell into two categories, one addressing factors associated with personal attributes of the teacher and the second factors relating to the learning environment the students saw as most supportive to their mathematical learning.

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  • Shareholder Remedies and their Interplay

    Hare, Christopher (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Identifying mathematics in children’s literature: Year seven students' results.

    Perger, Pamela (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Using children’s literature in mathematics is not a new idea. Although resources have been produced to support teachers in using literature in their mathematics programmes, there is little research to show this approach is successful. One debate associated with using children’s literature in mathematics teaching/learning is how much support is required for children to recognise the mathematics in the literature. The research that is available has focused on very young children interacting with stories being read to them or identifying adaptations needed to the text and/or illustrations to allow children to recognise the mathematical information inherent in the story. This paper presents the results of a study that used book reviews as a tool to identify the extent Year 7 students could identify the mathematics in children’s literature.

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  • Letters of Credit and Choice of Law: Mismatching Principles?

    Hare, Christopher (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Knowing Receipt Liability at the Crossroads — Where to From Here?

    Hare, Christopher (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Banks and SMEs: A Legal Perspective

    Hare, Christopher (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • O le Maea Malosi- The strengthened Sinnet. What is distance learning from a Pasifika Perspective?

    Toso, Sauni, VMSL (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper discusses the theoretical ideas that inform a model of practice used to promote effective teaching and learning to meet diverse needs of Pasifika learners (McDonald, 2004; Alipia, 2005; Airini, 2005; Koloto, 2001). The model was applied to the University of Auckland Early Childhood Education satellite programme at Tokoroa between 2004 -2007. Teaching staff from the School of Pasifika Education in the University’s Faculty of Education commuted 214 kilometres weekly to Tokoroa to deliver the same courses as their counterparts at Auckland. The programme used intensive forms of interaction between students and lecturers, an interactive pedagogical style described in the metaphor ‘O le Maea Malosi’. The metaphor suggests that it is the strength and quality of the relationships which encourage effective delivery and enhance learning.

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  • Place- based curriculum and current education. Creating alternative curriculum?

    Jesson, Jocelyn (2001)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    One of the important tenets of John Dewey's work is a connection between the child and the society in which they existed (Dewey  1915)    The term place- based curriculum emerged  in the 1980s from the work of Malcolm Skilbeck (1980).  It was then used  as descriptor  of school curriculum which focuses content on the immediate concerns of the learner, and their own experience, in order to make sense of the world.    The  New Zealand 1990s Curriculum Review was largely underpinned by these ideals, alongside those of  teacher-created curriculum and an enhanced  teacher professionalism. However the Curriculum Review  as it was being implemented also established a series of largely unexamined tenets for curriculum planning which in spite of the published curriculum statements, implied that there was a right answer for curriculum, and its assessment.   In other words, curriculum was assessment, whether it was at secondary level through the NCEA or now as national standards for primary schools. In the current climate, the neo-liberal educational policy environment is pushing schools and teachers to measuring appropriate predetermined responses, in which creating curriculum is somehow a given. This is leading to resistances with a stand off between the politicians and teachers, but no real sense of curriculum. A more positive way  forward will be for recognising that a 21st century education should  reflect a more deeper understanding of place, how the place came to be that way, and where is that place and its people going?  This presentation uses the example of a place- based consideration of  some  curriculum for  Thames- Waihi.   This arises because 2012 is 100 years after the death of Frederick Evans, the leader of the striking miners on 12 November, 1912.  The town  surrounds   a  company town of  Newmont Mining Ltd (US) and Fonterra ( NZ) , the example of the past creating the future.

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  • Letters of Credit and the Rome I Regulation

    Hare, Christopher (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Of the numerous international transactions entered into by banks, none has attracted the interest of conflicts lawyers like the letter of credit and analogous autonomous payment undertakings. Despite the standardization of the SWIFT formats used to issue letters of credit, banks have been strikingly resistant to the inclusion of choice of law clauses among the other standard form clauses in such instruments. Accordingly, the choice of law rules that apply when the parties have failed to choose a governing law themselves are of particular significance in this context. This remains so despite the ICC’s adoption in 2007 of the UCP 600, which contains a standard set of substantive rules applicable to the vast majority of letters of credit. As the UCP 600 is not comprehensive in its coverage, important questions continue to be governed by the contract’s governing law. These include the existence and scope of the exceptions to the autonomy of the letter of credit, the principles applicable to the assignment of the letter of credit’s proceeds, and the contractual, tortious, and restitutionary remedies that a party to a letter of credit may have. The determination of the law governing such instruments is no easy task, however, as the letter of credit is effectively made up of a matrix of interlocking contracts, each of which could theoretically have its own governing law. The paper focuses on how the English courts in particular (and, to a lesser extent, other jurisdictions) have determined the law governing the various relationships that make up the letter of credit, in particular the relationship between the credit beneficiary and the issuing bank and/or confirming bank. In this regard, the paper examines decisions at common law and under the Rome Convention, and assesses the extent to which the new Rome I Regulation will alter this position. The paper demonstrates that whilst the approach of the English courts might produce a commercially sensible result in the most straightforward types of payment credit, there has been something of a failure to examine the precise nature of the payment obligation involved. Accordingly, there has been little articulation of whether a different approach is appropriate depending upon whether a court is dealing with a payment, acceptance, or negotiation credit. In particular, the paper demonstrates that the English courts have failed to appreciate the difficulty involved in determining the applicable law when the letter of credit is “freely available” or “freely negotiable”. This failure has been particularly evident when the English courts have tried to apply the Rome Convention to such letters of credit, as in Marconi Communications International Ltd v PT Pan Indonesia Bank Ltd TBK (2005), although courts in other jurisdictions have demonstrated a greater awareness of the difficulties involved. The paper concludes that as a matter of principle (and contrary to the current position of the English courts) the law of the issuing bank should govern its relationship with the credit-beneficiary in a freely negotiable/freely available letter of credit, or, where the relationship under consideration is that between the credit-beneficiary and a confirming bank, the law of the confirming bank. The paper argues that this solution is not only commercially sensible, but is also most consistent with the Rome I Regulation, which introduces the important word “manifestly” in Article 4(3). The paper concludes by expressing the hope that this deceptively minor change in the Rome I Regulation will enable the English courts to sidestep the problematic Marconi decision in the future.

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