88,600 results

  • Political Communication in a Multicultural New Zealand: Ethnic Minority Media and the 2008 Election

    Chambers, Kirsten Elizabeth (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    New Zealand’s 2008 general election, with its unprecedented focus on the “ethnic vote” and ethnic minority candidates with highest-ever party list rankings, proved compelling from a migrant engagement perspective. How do migrant communities achieve voice in their adopted country? And how does a now unmistakably multicultural nation address the political communication needs of an increasingly vocal, pro-active, and politically involved migrant population? This thesis examines the role of ethnic minority media in engaging migrant communities in the democratic process. In particular, it examines South Asian media in New Zealand and the extent to which they represented a vital public sphere for informing and engaging their wider migrant communities in public political debate during the 2008 election campaign. Applying qualitative and quantitative research approaches, this thesis elicits and analyses diverse perspectives of the extent to which local South Asian newspapers and radio current affairs programming represented an important complementary public sphere for informing and engaging migrant voters during the campaign. Ultimately, this study provides an alternative perspective on media coverage of the 2008 New Zealand general election, and insight into the role and influence of ethnic minority media within democratic discourse. As a contribution to the body of academic literature examining the media and minority political engagement, it is intended to provoke critical consideration of the communications needs facing new migrants in an increasingly multicultural New Zealand.

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  • The Soliloquy of Whiteness: Colonial Discourse and New Zealand's Settler Press 1839-1873

    Colvin, Gina Maree (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    From 1839 to 1873 New Zealand was characterised by ideological, religious, economic cultural and social contest. This struggle to order a new society, in which colonists and indigenes were required to co-exist, is captured in the newspapers of the day. These document and attest to a contest over power; power to appropriate and control resources, power to administer, control and institutionalize the colony, and power to ascribe identities. Newspapers published during the initial period of colonization in New Zealand are saturated with instances of ideological work where discourses were deployed that supported the colonial endeavour. In this study therefore I have sought to understand and articulate those racial ideologies, racial formations, and discourses, which emerged from New Zealand’s colonial press archives. How did New Zealand’s colonial press constitute the privileges, entitlements and struggles of the white British colonist in relation to the native? What white British colonial ideologies, discursive formations and discourses can be identified in the colonial press in relation to the native? Are there any patterns or relationships between these discourses? What did these discourses look like over time? A critical discourse analytical approach has been applied to a body of texts extracted from newspapers published in New Zealand between 1839 and 1873. From this analysis three broad discursive formations have been apprehended; the discourses of sovereignty, discipline and paternalism respectively. These discourses were not independent of one another but worked to construct an interlocking network of discourse that provided sound ideological coverage. The discourse of sovereignty provided a broad platform for working out the colony’s ideological and institutional plan; discourses of discipline discursively managed native disruptions to the plan, while discourses of paternalism invested the colonial project with affectations of concern and interest in the progress of the native. Weaving through these discourses are patterns of meaning which worked to constitute white British colonial authority in economic, political, judicial, social, martial and moral affairs. These constitutive repertoires were malleable and adaptable and attached and detached themselves, according to the context, to and from the discourses of sovereignty, discipline and paternalism. Over time it appears that these discourses and the associated patterns of meaning worked responsively and flexibly, bleeding into each other, reconstituting authority and identity across different contexts. Furthermore, these discourses and patterns attest to a complex encounter with a vociferous non-white challenge, which necessitated a flexible reservoir of rhetoric to situate and position the white British colonial incursion favourably in the white settler public arena.

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  • The Janus problem : a search for patterns in the life and fiction of Dame Ngaio Marsh.

    Harding, Bruce (1979)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis, as its title implies, seeks to understand the life and work of Ngaio Marsh, particularly as this concerns her writing. Chapter One deals briefly with the relevant biographical material, much of which is new. Chapter Two constitutes a literary defence of the study of detective fiction with acknowledged artistic merit. Chapter Three involves an analysis of Marsh's craftsmanship, her qualities of style and characterization and a discussion of her principal series characters. Chapter Four touches on the distinctive features of Dame Ngaio's New Zealand stories and English rural settings, finding points in common for both. Chapter Five considers the general influence of Ngaio Marsh's theatrical experience upon her writing. In the Conclusion a general summation of Marsh's career is presented.

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  • CDI words and sentences: Validity and preliminary norms for British English (figures and tables for CDI vocabulary data)

    Klee, T.; Harrison, C. (2001)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Editorial: Special Issue on Sensors Systems for Structural Health Monitoring

    Mukhopadhyay, S.C.; Chase, J.G.; Meyendorf, N. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Editorial for invited special edition on SHM

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  • Local and regional weather and climate

    Sturman, A.P. (2001)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    The synoptic weather systems described in Chapter 5 provide the backdrop for the local and regional variation of weather and climate that is a marked feature of the New Zealand environment. The nature of surface topography creates real problems for weather and climate prediction, because of the interaction of synoptic circulation systems with smaller scale dynamic and thermal effects. Surface-atmosphere interaction therefore provides the observed regionality of weather and climate. The term mesoscale is often used to describe atmospheric phenomena of a particular time and space scale lying between the synoptic and microscales (Figure 6.1), and is assumed here to include local and regional effects frequently observed around New Zealand. This chapter therefore examines atmospheric phenomena that have dimensions of the order of a few hundred metres to around 200km, which generally result from processes that operate over time periods of an hour to a day or so. However, climate features that are observed at this scale are the result of the integration of such mesoscale meteorological processes over much longer periods of time. Local and regional atmospheric phenomena are of particular significance to human activity, as their impact can be serious.

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  • Broad background to the physical environment

    Spronken-Smith, R.A.; Sturman, A.P. (2001)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    The physical environment is the set of physical and biological conditions that surround human beings at the Earth's surface. This book is broadly based on a systems approach to the physical environment. A system may be defined as 'a structured set of components of variables (i .e. phenomena that are free to assume variable magnitudes) that exhibit discernible relationships with one another and operate together as a complex whole, according to some observed pattern' (Chorley & Kennedy 1971). The Earth can be viewed as a system since virtually no part of the system operates in isolation from another, and thus changes in one part of the Earth system can affect other parts. A systems approach provides a rational set of procedures for subdividing the physical environment into subsystems, or units that demonstrate strong internal connections. For example, the physical environment consists of four main subsystemsthe atmospheric environment (or atmosphere), the hydrological environment (or hydrosphere), the geomorphic environment (part of which is often referred to as the lithosphere), and biological environment (or biosphere)-and the relationships between them (Figure 1.1). As Figure 1.1 shows, the subsystems interact within an open environmental system with inputs of energy, materials, and human activity, and outputs of specific environmental impacts.

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  • Synoptic controls on the weather

    Sturman, A.P. (2001)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    Atmospheric processes operate over a range of scales from global to micro. The synoptic scale refers to those processes that operate over a spatial scale of hundreds to a few thousand kilometres, with a time scale ranging from a day to about a week. Weather systems of this scale are the most familiar public representation of the atmosphere, as they appear daily in both newspapers and on television. They also tend to be the most relevant for many users of weather information, as people tend to plan their working or leisure activities on the basis of forecasts of synoptic weather activity. They are also of equal significance to both physical and human aspects of the environment, as individual weather systems control such things as the input of rainfall to a catchment, the effect of wind on plants, as well as the well-being of members of the public and the livelihood of such primary producers as farmers and fishers.

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  • Precipitation processes and water storage

    Sturman, A.P.; Owens, I.F.; Fitzharris, B.B. (2001)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    This chapter is the first of four on hydrological aspects of the physical environment. An introduction is provided to the concept of the hydrological system, including the transfer of water between the main storage components of the oceans, atmosphere, and land-based features such as lakes, snow, and ice. A systematic discussion is then provided, starting with the origins and nature of precipitation, and then moving to the main land-based storage components of snow, ice, and water.

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  • Multiwavelength fluorescence studies of Bacillus bacterial spores

    Sarasanandarajah, Sivananthan (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Fluorescence techniques are being considered for the detection and identification of bacterial spores. This thesis sets out to empirically characterize the detailed autofluorescence spectroscopic properties of spores and their target molecules. The multiwavelength fluorescence studies from a unique endogenous biomarker, dipicolinic acid (DPA) and its calcium salt (CaDPA) in bacterial spores are found to be useful for fluorescence characterization of spores. A systematic determination of the fluorescence profile of the major chemical components of Bacillus spores and the effect of UV irradiation on them has been performed in dry samples, wet paste and in aqueous solution. The thesis applies reliable tools for accurately describing complex nature of spectral profile from bacterial spores, and for interpreting and identifying their spectral properties. We show that multiwavelength fluorescence technique combined with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) clearly indicates identifiable grouping among dry and wet Bacillus spore species. Differences are also observed between dried, wet and redried spores, indicating the stark effect of hydration on fluorescence fingerprints. The study revealed that changes in fluorescence of spores due to hydration/drying were reversible and supports a recent model of a dynamic and dormant spore structure. The spectra were analysed with PCA, revealing several spectroscopically characteristic features enabling spore species separation. The identified spectral features could be attributed to specific spore chemical components by comparing the spore sample signals with spectra obtained from the target molecules. PCA indicated underlying spectral patterns strongly related to species and the derived components were correlated with the chemical composition of the spore samples. More importantly, we examined and compared the fluorescence of normal spores with a mutant of the same strain whose spores lack DPA. We discovered that the dramatic fluorescence enhancement of Bacillus spores can be caused by UV irradiation in the spectral region of this unique biomarker without any pre treatment. Differences between spectra of spores, spore strains and other biological samples are very marked and are due to the dominance of the dipicolinate features in the spore spectra. This could lead to a cheap, more sensitive, faster and reagentless bacterial spore detector.

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  • Animal writing : magical realism and the posthuman other.

    Schwalm, Tanja (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Magical realist fiction is marked by a striking abundance of animals. Analysing magical realist novels from Australia and Canada, as well as exploring the influence of two seminal Latin American magical realist narratives, this thesis focuses on representations of animals and animality. Examining human-animal relationships in the postcolonial context reveals that magical realism embodies and represents an idea of feral animality that critically engages with an inherently imperialist and Cartesian humanism, and that, moreover, accounts for magical realism's elusiveness within systems of genre categorisation and labelling. It is this embodiment and presence of animal agency that animates magical realism and injects it with life and vibrancy. The magical realist writers discussed in this dissertation make use of animal practices inextricably intertwined with imperialism, such as pastoral farming, natural historical collections, the circus, the rodeo, the Wild West show, and the zoo, as well as alternative animal practices inherently incompatible with European ideologies, such as the Aboriginal Dreaming, Native North American animist beliefs, and subsistence hunting, as different ways of positioning themselves in relation to the Cartesian human subject. The circus is a particular influence on the form and style of many magical realist texts, whereby oxymoronically structured circensian spaces form the basis of the narratives‟ realities, and hierarchical imperial structures and hegemonic discourses that are portrayed as natural through Cartesian science and Linnaean taxonomies are revealed as deceptive illusions that perpetuate the self-interests of the powerful.

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  • Itinerant teachers of music : a state of flux.

    Carter, Karen (2003)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Teachers who are itinerant contend with many factors that complicate their ability to deliver programmes. This thesis investigates the experiences of one such group of itinerant educators, Itinerant Teachers of Music (ITMs). They are responsible for the teaching of instrumental music in secondary schools in AotearoalNew Zealand. I used a case study to examine the phenomenon of itinerancy and considered the experiences of ITMs and ITM Co-ordinators in the Canterbury region and the views of the Heads of Music Departments (HoDs Music) with whom they work. This included observing ITMs at work and interviewing ITMs, ITM Co-ordinators, and HoDs Music about being itinerant. I consulted strategic documents such as music education reports, curriculum statements and job descriptions to examine the place of ITMs in official music education discourses. A social constructionist perspective underpins the research. Social constructionism emphasises the socially constructed reality of ITMs' experiences and raises issues of power and access to those discourses that define itinerancy. I argue that itinerancy as encountered by ITMs is characterised by three main themes: temporality, invisibility and adaptability. Time dominates itinerant work. Teaching is compressed into twenty minute blocks, travel times are minimised. An ITMs day is intensive, with scarcely a wasted minute. This influences the quality oftheir work and interactions with colleagues. Their present situation is affected by historical discourses of itinerancy, their future determined by current restrictions. To be itinerant, with multiple work sites and frequent travel is to be largely invisible. This invisibility, as ITMs engage in their work, impacts on their identity, status, relationships and place in schools and educational discourses. Adaptability and flexibility are essential ITM traits. ITMs are required to conform to the demands and expectations .of diverse school systems, HoDs Music and students, as well as their own employers, as they work within systemic constraints. They are multi-skilled musicians and teachers. ITMs work in conditions intensified by itinerancy where temporality, invisibility and adaptability are the criteria by which they are defined and they have defined themselves. I conclude with nine recommendations for change that involve a review of the operational structures regulating the practice of itinerancy in the ITM programme and an examination of the resources allocated to it.

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  • Changing beliefs : an investigation into the effects of the Numeracy Project on teachers' understandings of Year 7 and 8 children's learning : research project report.

    Graham, Sue (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study reports on three teachers' initial perceptions regarding Year 7 and 8 children's understandings of fractions, decimals, and percentages and how these perceptions change as a result of involvement in the Ministry of Education professional development programme known as the Numeracy Project. An investigation into how aspects of classroom delivery that includes the use of concrete materials, classroom interactions, and grouping practices can change children's understandings of fractions, decimals, and percentages is also repOlied. The analysis indicates that children did not have the understanding teachers expected. Concrete materials were identified as something the slower children needed to use, and grouping practices favoured a whole class approach. Involvement in the Numeracy Project saw changes in perceptions and classroom practice. Teachers were able to identify realistic outcomes for children and showed a greater understanding of how children learn the concepts associated with fractions, decimals, and percentages. Flexible grouping, relevant use of concrete materials for all children, and focused interactions were identified as areas of classroom delivery that needed to be investigated further. The report investigates the use of different formats in order to distinguish between current research and my voice as an experienced teacher and mathematics facilitator.

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  • The influence of climate on the development of agricultural water supplies in Canterbury.

    Harding, Thomas Stanley (1978)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study evaluates the influence of climate in the development of agricultural water supplies in Canterbury. A discussion of the historical and spatial occurrence is presented, as well as a description of the suitability of the region to such development. The influence of climate is assessed by the provision of a measure of agricultural drought. This measure is achieved by the utilisation of the concept of potential evapotranspiration in the calculation of the soil water deficits. Description of the spatial variation of the annual soil deficit is provided. The annual soil water deficit is used in statistical analysis against various expressions of interest in irrigation development, and also against actual development in terms of the area border-dyked each season. It is concluded that there is indeed a tendency for climate, particularly drought, to influence the development of agricultural water supplies. It is, however, difficult to indicate its precise influence due to the involvement of other factors.

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  • Education in Canterbury, 1851-57 : an investigation of source material with particular reference to the extent of educational facilities, the nature of the curriculum, and problems of control, finance and organization.

    Watson, Leonard Edgar Leo (1961)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis is concerned with the earliest years of education in the Canterbury Settlement, from the arrival of the First Four Ships in December 1850, to 1857: a year which is notable tor the passing of the first Education Ordinance of the Province, and the end of the first Superintendency. It is therefore concerned with the infancy of the New Zealand education system. Knowledge of the facts about education in early Canterbury is very inadequate. It is not known how many schools existed, when they opened or closed, who their teaohers were or how many pupils attended them. Knowledge of what school books were used, what fees charged, or what subjects taught is equally slight. For this reason detailed accounts of the origins and growth of schools will be given, and an attempt made to fill in some of these gaps in our knowledge of the vital facts or the period. Alongside this there will be an attempt to see the development of education during this period as something dynamic, arising in the minds or the founders of the Canterbury Association influenced as they were by mid-nineteenth century ideas about church and school transferred to the settlement, where the ideals were changed by impact with the colonial situation, where the old problems which the colonists had hoped to have left behind them appeared again, sometimes in another form. Here the main emphasis will be upon the control, management and maintenance of the education system as a whole.

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  • Design of low-cost unmanned underwater vehicle for shallow waters

    Wang, W.H.; Chen, X.Q.; Marburg, A.; Chase, J.G.; Hann, C.E. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) have received worldwide attention and been widely used in various applications. In this paper, a recently developed low cost UUV prototype at the University of Canterbury is introduced, which is designed specifically for shallow water tasks, especially for inspecting and cleaning sea chests of ships for bio-security purpose. The main hull of the UUV is made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), with a 400 mm diameter and 800 mm length. External frames mount two horizontal propellers, four vertical thrusters and power is derived from onboard batteries. The maximum thrust force of up to 10 kg that is provided by the propellers can generate a forward/backward speed of up to 1.4 m/s for the 112 kg UUV. The vertical thrusters provide depth control with a max thrust force of 20 kg. The UUV is equipped with a range of sensors capable of sensing its instantaneous temperature, depth, attitude and surrounding environment. Costing less than US$10,000 for a prototype, it provides an excellent platform for further underwater vehicle development targeting shallow water tasks with a working depth up to 20m.

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  • Estimating elasticity in heterogeneous phantoms using Digital Image Elasto-Tomography

    Peters, A.; Chase, J.G.; Van Houten, E.E.W. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com

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  • Strobe Imaging System for Digital Image-based Elasto-Tomography Breast Cancer Screening

    Hann, C.E.; Chase, J.G.; Chen, X.Q.; Berg, C.; Brown, R.G.; Elliot, R.B. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Digital Image-based Elasto-Tomography (DIET) technology relies on obtaining high resolution images of a breasts surface under high frequency actuation, typically in the range of 50-100Hz. Off-the-shelf digital cameras and imaging elements are unable to capture images directly at these speeds. A method based on strobe imaging is presented for obtaining the required high speed image capture at a resolution of 1280x1024 pixels and actuation frequency of 100 Hz. The final working system produced images that enabled effective 3D motion tracking of the surface of a silicon phantom. The motion is tracked accurately using a novel Euclidean Invariant signature method.

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  • A simple hybrid testing approach for dynamic analysis of civil structural control devices

    Chase, J.G.; Chen, X.Q.; Mulligan, K.J.; Rodgers, G.W.; Elliott, R.B. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Effective real-time testing of structural control devices relies on a hybrid test system that couples virtual structures under dynamic loading with physical sub-structures or devices in a dynamic test rig. The use of sensors and actuators in a closed-loop feedback system maintains the dynamic equilibrium of the overall system comprising the physical test article and virtual modelled structure. The virtual-real hybrid testing method thus alleviates much of the time and cost associated with full-scale testing and enables tests that would be infeasible without full-scale complete structural tests. Thus, it can reduce the uncertainty in designing such a full scale test by testing, in hybrid hardware in the loop fashion, the devices and sub-systems required to ensure the best overall full-scale experimental design. Hence, a major outcome is the savings in the cost, time and complexity of the resulting full scale experiment. To accomplish this goal, this research presents simple, cost-effective and robust hybrid test system, and outlines solutions to the major issues faced in developing any hybrid system. The overall approach is centred on the dSpaceTM real-time control system development tool. The major issues in developing a hybrid system are: minimal signal processing lag, optimised sensing resolution and bandwidth, and efficient model computation. All three affect the ability of the system to maintain dynamic equilibrium of the overall virtual-physical system, and thus provide an accurate test. The final system readily accommodates non-linearsingle and multi-degree-of-freedom models and an operating bandwidth of 1 kHz. Test results and experimental outcomes are based on studies of a linear single degree of freedom structure and a non-linear rocking wall system that includes impact loads and timing subject to random ground motions. The results clearly illustrate system simplicity, efficacy and how they can be used to illustrate the potential outcomes of full scale experiments but at simple, fast low cost level. Keywords:

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  • A Glucose-Insulin Pharmacodynamic Surface Modeling Validation and Comparison of Metabolic System Models

    Chase, J.G.; Andreassen, S.; Pielmeier, U.; Hann, C.E.; McAuley, K.A.; Mann, J.I. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    invited special edition

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