92,922 results

  • Improved models of particle-size distribution: an illustration of model comparison techniques

    Buchan, Graeme D.; Grewal, K. S.; Robson, Alexander B.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    We investigated a relatively unexplored area of soil science: the fitting of parameterized models to particle-size distribution (a subject more thoroughly explored in sedimentology). Comparative fitting of different models requires the use of statistical indices enabling rational selection of an optimum model, i.e., a model that balances the improvement in fit often achieved by increasing the number of parameters, p, against model simplicity retained by minimizing p. Five models were tested on cumulative mass-size data for 71 texturally diverse New Zealand soils: a one-parameter (p = 1) Jaky model borrowed from geotechnics; the standard lognormal model (p = 2); two modified lognormal models (each with p = 3); and the bimodal lognormal model (p = 3). The Jaky and modified lognormal models have not previously been introduced into the soil science literature. Three statistical comparators were used: the coefficient of determination, R²; the F statistic; and the Cp statistic of Mallows. The bimodal model and one modified lognormal model (denoted ORL) best fit the data. The bimodal model gave a marginally better fit, but incorporates a sub-clay mode (untestable with the present data), so we adopted the ORL model as the physically best benchmark for comparison of other models. The simple Jaky one-parameter model gave a good fit to data for many of the soils, better than the standard lognormal model for 23 soils. The model comparison methods described have potential utility in other areas of soil science. The Cp statistic is advocated as the best statistic for model selection.

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  • Storytelling: circles and straight lines

    Bronkhorst, Jennifer (2009-11-26T02:58:51Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Storytelling: circles and straight lines is a qualitative, retrospective analysis of my thesis (a collection of iconoclastic New Zealand short stories, entitled In Transit), in which I define the scope of my creative work by: positioning my approach within the wider contemporary and literary contexts; explaining its conceptual framework; and describing my intention and process. To these ends, I have drawn extensively on my personal experience, accumulated knowledge, and orientation, supplemented by wide reading. Throughout the text, I substantiate my views, arguments and conclusions with reference to noted writers, critics, language experts, and philosophers.

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  • Exegesis and screenplay for a film entitled: White Magnolia

    Hong, Ki Myung (2009-11-25T04:00:10Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Most new migrants choose New Zealand as their second home country because New Zealand provides peaceful, safe and relaxed life style and also quality education compared to their homelands. However, for most migrants, settling down in New Zealand is one of the most dynamic and complex processes in their lives. Many migrants are struggling to adjust to New Zealand because the expression of cultural values is different in New Zealand than in their cultures. As migrants adjust to the new culture, their traditional cultural values are increasingly challenged by New Zealand cultural values leading to some degree of personal change. As a result, most immigrants encounter many unfamiliar cultural values in the initial stage of immigration to a New Zealand culture. This story is about the impact of culture-shock on an ordinary Korean migrant family and their struggle adjusting in a new society.

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  • Causes of truancy from mainstream education for a group of Pasifika students enrolled in alternative education

    Baleinakorodawa, Leronio (2009-11-23T02:29:09Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Research on the causes of truancy from mainstream education suggest that a range of factors such as poverty, ethnicity, the quality of relationship between students and teachers, and the nature of the classroom environment impact on students’ attendance in schools. The majority of the studies on truancy have been carried out with students in alternative education in the U.S.A and Australia. In New Zealand, research has focused on the truancy of Maori students. This study investigates the causes of truancy for Pasifika students in alternative education in New Zealand. Using a qualitative approach, data were collected using questionnaires and three focus group interviews. The findings from this study suggest that a number of factors affected students’ motivation to study. The behaviour of teachers and the school environment were found to affect the Pasifika students’ approach to learning. Some students had negative views of their own ability and lacked perseverance. Other students believed that a lack of parental or family support impacted negatively on their attendance. Consistent with the findings in other studies on truancy, this study found that a range of influences such as a lack of support from community leaders, students’ perceptions of their performance, the nature of the classroom environment, family structure, lifestyle factors and cultural and church activities contributed to Pasifika students’ truanting behaviour. This study suggests that schools that employ teachers who understand and empathize with the cultural aspects of Pasifika students and who can empathize with their situation will be most effective in preventing truancy among these students. Similarly, schools have dedicated programmes that accommodate the academic requirements of Pasifika students foster a more positive learning environment. Finally, schools should look to put in place initiatives to enable Pasifika parents to become effective partners in their children’s education.

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  • Intelligent drill wear condition monitoring using self organising feature maps

    Ashar, Jesal (2009-11-25T22:21:06Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The rising demand for exacting performances from manufacturing systems has led to new challenges for the development of complex tool condition monitoring techniques. Although a wide range of monitoring methods have been investigated and developed, there has been very little migration of these innovations into industrial practice. The principal factor behind this phenomenon is the stochastic nature of the environment in which the system must function. A truly universal application has yet to be developed. The work presented here centres around the application of an unsupervised neural network model to the said problem. These networks learn without the aid of a human teacher or supervisor and learn to organise and re-organise themselves in accordance to the input data. This leads to the network structure reflecting the given input distribution more precisely than a predefined model, which generally follows a decay schedule. The dynamic nature of the process provides an evaluation of the underlying connectivity and topology in the original data space. This makes the network far more capable of capturing details in the target space. These networks have been successfully used in speech recognition applications and various pattern recognition tasks involving very noisy signals. Work is in progress on their application to robotics, process control and telecommunications. The procedure followed here has been to conduct experimental drilling trials using solid carbide drills on a Duplex Stainless Steel workpiece. Duplex Stainless Steel was chosen as a preferred metal for drilling experiments because of this high strength, good resistance to corrosion, low thermal expansion and good fatigue resistance. During the drilling trials, forces on the workpiece along the x, y and z axes were captured in real time and moments of the forces were calculated using these values. These three axial forces, along with their power spectral densities and moments were used as input parameters to the Artificial Neural Network model which followed the Self-Organising Map algorithm to classify this data. After the network was able to adapt itself to classify this real world data, the generated model was tested against a different set of data values captured during the drilling trials. The network was able to correctly identify a worn out drill from a new drill from this previously unseen set of data. This autonomous classification of the drill wear state by the neural network is a step towards creating a “universal” application that will eventually be able to predict tool wear in any machining operation without prior training.

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  • Power characterisation of a Zigbee wireless network in a real time monitoring application

    Prince-Pike, Arrian (2009-12-02T21:46:13Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Zigbee is a relatively new wireless mesh networking standard with emphasis on low cost and energy conservation. It is intended to be used in wireless monitoring and control applications such as sensors and remotely operated switches where the end devices are battery powered. Because it is a recent technology there is not sufficient understanding on how network architecture and configuration affect power consumption of the battery powered devices. This research investigates the power consumption and delivery ratio of Zigbee wireless mesh and star networks for a single sink real time monitoring system at varying traffic rates and the beacon and non beacon mode operation of its underlying standard IEEE 802.15.4 in the star network architecture. To evaluate the performance of Zigbee, the network operation was simulated using the simulation tool NS-2. NS-2 is capable of simulating the entire network operation including traffic generation and energy consumption of each node in the network. After first running the simulation it was obvious that there were problems in the configuration of the simulator as well as some unexpected behaviour. After performing several modifications to the simulator the results improved significantly. To validate the operation of the simulator and to give insight on the operation of Zigbee, a real Zigbee wireless network was constructed and the same experiments that were conducted on the simulator were repeated on the Zigbee network. The research showed that the modified simulator produced good results that were close to the experimental results. It was found that the non beacon mode of operation had the lowest power consumption and best delivery ratio at all tested traffic rates. The operation of Zigbee mesh and star networks were compared to the results for IEEE 802.15.4 star networks in non beacon mode which revealed that the extra routing traffic sent by the Zigbee networking layers does contribute significantly to the power consumption, however even with the extra routing traffic, power consumption is still so low that it the battery life of the device would be limited by the shelf life of the battery, not by the energy consumption of the device. This research has successfully achieved its objectives and identified areas for future development. The simulator model for NS-2 could be improved to further increase the accuracy of the results as well as include the Zigbee routing layers and the experimental results could be improved by a more accurate power consumption data acquisition method.

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  • Story telling as koha: consolidating community memories

    Tanoai, Tuafale (2009-11-22T20:10:58Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project will explore a fusion of Tangata Whenua and Pacific perspectives within a performance installation framework. I intend to juxtapose community narratives within a video art form. I will explore the recording and transmitting of indigenous stories and will create contemporary narratives linking the past to the present. Working within my communities, (Tangata Whenua1, Pacific2, artists from different disciplines, LGBT3, and extensive friends networks), this project will investigate aspects of performance installation using live sets amid recordings of conversations and develop an interviewing practice. The performances are temporary and the devices ad-hoc.

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  • Sam and Susana

    Heath, Tim (2009-11-29T19:46:48Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    My novel, ‘Sam and Susana’ is set in Auckland in 1968. The story centres on the developing relationship between two students: Sam, a 21 year old from a middle class palagi family, and Susana, a Samoan girl from Otara. When they meet Sam is cynical about university, dedicated to sports and to his drinking companions, but unresolved in almost all other areas of his life. He desperately wants to free himself from the well-to-do St Heliers home where he still lives with his parents, and move out into the world with a more secure set of values and ambitions. He has liberal ideas, bordering at times on Socialist, fuelled by the political events of the day, but not yet translated into any actions. Susana is overflowing with enthusiasm and sees being at University as a privilege. She is very uncertain about academia, but has a strong set of attitudes about everything else, especially the value of family, religion and morality. She is deeply conscious of her extended family’s pride and expectations. Their romance does not progress smoothly. For both of them, their relationship, together with the radical examination of values and attitudes arising from the political and social upheavals of 1968, demands large, uncomfortable challenges and changes to enter their lives.

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  • Ontology based personalized modeling for chronic disease risk evaluation and knowledge discovery: an integrated approach

    Verma, Anju (2009-11-23T00:55:28Z)

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Populations are aging and the prevalence of chronic disease, persisting for many years, is increasing. The most common, non-communicable chronic diseases in developed countries are; cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes, obesity, arthritis and specific cancers. Chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity have high prevalence and develop over the course of life due to a number of interrelated factors including genetic predisposition, nutrition and lifestyle. With the development and completion of human genome sequencing, we are able to trace genes responsible for proteins and metabolites that are linked with these diseases. A computerized model focused on organizing knowledge related to genes, nutrition and the three chronic diseases, namely, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity has been developed for the Ontology-Based Personalized Risk Evaluation for Chronic Disease Project. This model is a Protégé-based ontological representation which has been developed for entering and linking concepts and data for these three chronic diseases. This model facilitates to identify interrelationships between concepts. The ontological representation provides the framework into which information on individual patients, disease symptoms, gene maps, diet and life history can be input, and risks, profiles, and recommendations derived. Personal genome and health data could provide a guide for designing and building a medical health administration system for taking relevant annual medical tests, e.g. gene expression level changes for health surveillance. One method, called transductive neuro-fuzzy inference system with weighted data normalization is used to evaluate personalized risk of chronic disease. This personalized approach has been used for two different chronic diseases, predicting the risk of cardiovascular disease and predicting the risk of type 2 diabetes. For predicting the risk of cardiovascular disease, the National Nutrition Health Survey 97 data from New Zealand population has been used. This data contains clinical, anthropometric and nutritional variables. For predicting risk of type 2 diabetes, data from the Italian population with clinical and genetic variables has been used. It has been discovered that genes responsible for causing type 2 diabetes are different in male and female samples. A framework to integrate the personalized model and the chronic disease ontology is also developed with the aim of providing support for further discovery through the integration of the ontological representation in order to build an expert system in genes of interest and relevant dietary components.

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  • Doing more with less? convergence and public interest in the New Zealand news media

    Walker, Tamara (2009-11-25T01:34:53Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The traditional news media is being reshaped by the phenomenon known as media convergence. This thesis, which is presented as a journalistic, multimedia website (see http://www.artsweb.aut.ac.nz/mediaconvergence), explores media convergence in New Zealand. Its primary objective is to gauge the impact of convergence on the extent to which journalism fulfils its public interest duties. To this end, the defining elements of convergence are examined, along with its driving factors and impact on day-to-day newsroom practices. The research project is based on in-depth interviews with news media experts and practitioners and the results of an industry survey. The research findings indicate that convergence poses significant risks to public interest journalism. At present, however, there is more evidence of benefits than detriments.

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  • Using satisfaction arguments and rich traceability in requirements prioritisation

    Motupally, Praveen Kumar (2009-11-26T00:53:21Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Requirement Engineering (RE) is a distinct subset activity of Systems Engineering. Eliciting and Specifying requirements are the sub processes of RE. Eliciting and Specifying correct requirements, that meet the customer’s needs contributes to the project’s Quality and Success. However, determining the “Candidate Requirements” is challenging for a number of reasons. Requirement Prioritisation helps to cope with this problem. A number of Requirement Prioritisation methods exist. This dissertation aims to investigate a better prioritisation technique by subjectively assessing the “effort” between prioritising requirements with the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and prioritising “Satisfaction Arguments” (SA) with AHP and subjectively assessing the “effort” again. The results of the experiment show a similar set of priorities produced by both attempts, however, the perceived effort of prioritising SAs is less compared with prioritising requirements with AHP due to “Propagation of Priorities”. The results of the experiment show that “Propagation of Priorities” is possible with both the approaches, however “Propagation of Priorities” was found to be bidirectional when prioritising SA with AHP and unidirectional when prioritising requirements with AHP.

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  • Oceania Football Confederation: the impact of affiliate disaffiliation on the inter-organizational dynamics of a federated network

    Waugh, Daniel (2009-11-26T03:51:53Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The purpose of this research is to examine the impact of member disaffiliation on the inter-organizational dynamics of a network. To date the impact of an environmental disturbance such as member disaffiliation on the inter-organizational dynamics of a network has had minor academic interest. On January 1, 2006, the governing body of football in Australia completed their quest for a greater and more lucrative market by affiliating to the Asian Football Confederation (AFC). For this movement to occur Australia first had to disaffiliate from the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC). In football, a Confederation is a continental specific coordinator of football activities which operate under the auspices of the Federation International de Football Association (FIFA). At a theoretical level, this is a unique context to explore the impact of disaffiliation on the inter-organizational dynamics of a network. The research is based on a single case study approach, and involved 12 semi-structured interviews that were conducted with informants from within the OFC network, with secondary data being organizational documents. The informants were either the President or General Secretary of the members affiliated to the OFC. Dynamics that were explored included the impact on the legitimacy of the network, financial implications, and how the distribution of power has changed. The findings of the research indicated that for now, the perception is that the organization is still legitimate. However, if the Confederation does not improve from both a playing and administrative perspective, it may well become illegitimate. The redistribution of power within the network has shifted strongly in favour of the two French speaking nations, New Caledonia and Tahiti, which were both previously considered minor players within the network. It is unclear if this is due to their connection with France. The key conclusion from this research is that disaffiliation provides a ‘wake-up call’ to the remaining members, and forces them to stand on their own two feet and take responsibility for their actions.

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  • Awkward formalism: the role of objects in contemporary painting installation

    Kosovac, Ena (2009-11-30T21:25:53Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    I am a painter with a huge attachment to objects. In this painting project I aim to make objects whose objecthood is formed by the collision of the different languages of both painting and sculpture – objects that negotiate the boundary line between traditional genre divisions. These objects react to one another, where an aspect of one suggests the next, so that they develop like an epidemic. And therefore this project functions in an accumulative way, where each work or body of work acts as a stepping-stone for the next, so that the objects descend from a common ancestor and have a common origin. The project is primarily installational in nature – in the sense that, although emphasis is put on the individual objects, they are viewed together in installations, not as separate entities. I aim to consider installation in terms of the language of painting, which constitutes the formal underpinning of my practice.

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  • Impact of salespersons’ acculturation behaviours on buyers’ commitment

    Herjanto, Halimin (2009-12-07T01:00:20Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Healthy buyer-seller relationships are seen as a source of buyers’ satisfaction, commitment and loyalty. However, creating fruitful relationships with buyers is not always simple and straightforward for salespersons, especially when they seek to establish relationships with buyers from different cultures. Given the challenging nature of intercultural interaction, it becomes imperative for salespersons to identify the behaviours that will best suit such relationships. There is much evidence that salespersons frequently adopt acculturation behaviours in order to build relationships with buyers from different cultures, however the study of acculturation behaviours, though not unknown to marketing scholars, has not been well explored in relationship marketing domains. Studies on the impact of acculturation behaviours from the viewpoint of salespersons are particularly non-existent. The present study examines the limited available literature on this subject, and attempts to develop a better understanding of the concept of salespersons’ acculturation behaviours by proposing a model that explains the relationship between salespersons’ acculturation behaviours and buyers’ satisfaction as well as commitment in the banking context. The hypotheses are empirically tested in the present study by using appropriate statistical techniques. Results of the study indicate that the hypothesised model of salespersons’ acculturation behaviours fits the data well. The hypotheses focus on four dimensions of salespersons’ acculturation behaviours: assimilation, separation, integration and marginalisation. All of these dimensions, excluding separation, show an inter-relationship among the variables of the model and are confirmed with the right significance. Separation is not examined closely within the study as by its nature it is itself exclusionary of any form of interaction with buyers. Findings from the study indicate however that integration and assimilation positively affect buyers’ satisfaction, whereas marginalisation is negatively associated with buyers’ satisfaction. The results also reveal that buyers’ satisfaction has a mediation effect on the relationships between assimilation, integration, marginalisation and buyers’ commitment. The model also includes the constructs of interaction intensity, which is positively related to buyers’ satisfaction and buyers’ commitment. This study can be considered as an important step in establishing the linkage between salespersons’ acculturation behaviours and buyers’ satisfaction and commitment. It establishes that salespersons’ acculturation is needed to perform better and create sustainable intercultural interaction.

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  • Characterisation of the radio noise environment in New Zealand

    Banks, Paul Russell (2009-11-23T04:10:02Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    A methodology for the measurement of the radio frequency environment close to the radio noise floor is presented for urban, suburban and rural areas within New Zealand for the purposes of characterisation and trend monitoring by radio spectrum managers. Flux density measurements in bands within a range of frequencies from 80 MHz to 8 GHz have been made in urban, suburban and rural areas of New Zealand during 2007 and 2008. An analysis of the band occupancy is presented in summary form. These summaries are intended as a starting point for radio spectrum usage and can be used as a reference for any future measurements. A description of the computer directories and charts resulting from these measurements, using 20 MHz bandwidths have also been included. All the results for the work have been collated in a set of computer directories named “NZRFI Directories 2007 2008”, which are intended as a reference for use in the determination of local activity in particular frequency ranges. A disc with the full range measurement spectral density charts and channel occupancy charts accompanies this work. Also included on the disc are sets of 20 MHz band charts for some urban, suburban and rural location measurements.

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  • Holding the digital mirror up to nature - a practice-as-research project exploring digital media techniques in live theatre

    Brannigan, Ross (2009-11-25T23:56:08Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Is an actor performing live if that actor is out of sight in the wings and appears on stage as a computer-mediated representation? Is co-presence with such a mediated embodiment problematic for the performer? This project seeks to explore the use of digital media elements, from the perspective of the actor, in the collaborative process of devising, designing, rehearsing and performing a Shakespearian theatre production. It raises issues of the creative possibilities that applications of new technologies afford and of a changing perception of the nature of liveness. Can digital media techniques usefully enhance the liveness of performance and extend the audience’s experience of the production? Specifically, can it augment their perception of themselves, mirrored on stage? Exploring the usefulness of digital media techniques takes a theatre practitioner into the intermedial, liminal spaces where the two fields converge. These are spaces of possibility where new ways of working might emerge. This thesis is presented primarily as an experimental performance and is contextualised by this exegesis with its written and DVD components.

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  • Holey umbrella

    Hall, Grant (2009-12-11T00:23:59Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The creative outcome of my Masters Degree is an extract of my manuscript for a novel. The extract is 40,000 words in length and represents approximately one half of the completed novel. Fissure is the title of the novel. It is a novel which is unconventional in relation to the mainstream understanding of what a traditional novel is. Fissure aims to position itself within a post modern framework. It consists of two primary narratives set apart in time.

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  • Perceptions and disjunctions in urban space

    Carter, Matthew James (2009-11-26T02:27:03Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this studio based visual arts project I am exploring through representational painting and compositing, perceptions, conjunctions and disjunctions in space and time in the urban environment. My approach situates the stranger as the phenomenological self, the perceptual being, at the centre of the research who explores the spatio-psychology of the city in the light of contradictory philosophies that move between seeing the city as a place of social malaise to seeing it as a malleable space for each individual within it.

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  • The role of the Newton Predication Test in the tax avoidance methodology

    Gosai, Rakesh Datt (2009-11-23T01:02:39Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The anti-avoidance provisions of the Income Tax Act 2007 are of immense concern to tax practitioners and the Commissioner of Inland Revenue alike. This is indicated by the huge volume of litigation in this complex area of the tax law. This dissertation endeavours to introduce the relevant legislation, considers important aspects of the law on tax avoidance, follows the common law developments in this area of the law, and studies the application of the legislation by the Commissioner and the Courts in recent tax cases in New Zealand and abroad. The dissertation focuses on the elements of tax avoidance and draws the “purpose or effect” element of the tax avoidance legislation and analyses the application of the “Newton predication test” in New Zealand tax cases and how the general anti-avoidance has been dealt with in the New Zealand tax cases.

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  • The One-China controversy, 1996-2002 : the impact of Taiwan's democratisation on the cross-strait policies of Taipei, Beijing and Washington

    Lin, Chin-sheng (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 535 p. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "February 2005."

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