89,483 results

  • Commodified Evil's Wayward Children: Black Metal and Death Metal as Purveyors of an Alternative Form of Modern Escapism

    Forster, Jason John (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study focuses on Black Metal and Death Metal music as complimentary forms of commodified evil, which, in contrast to most other forms of commodified evil, provide an alternative form of modern escapism. In particular, it demonstrates that in glorifying evil their respective natures and essences effectively suggest to us that the ability to overcome our problems, and cope with the world's atrocities, lies not in the vain hope that justice will prevail, but rather, in embracing evil and actively cultivating a desensitizing ethos of utter indifference to the plight and suffering of others. In addition, because Black Metal and Death Metal have both generated their own distinct sub-cultures, which are predominantly populated by marginalized youths, this study simultaneous begs the question: What is it that motivates them to produce and/or endorse forms of music, and thereby become members of sub-cultures, which ostensibly promote such a negative world view? Consequently, it also demonstrates some of the important ways in which they can serve to help their proponents regain a sense of power and control over their lives. It then concludes by looking at Black Metal and Death Metal's (potential) social effects - both negative and positive.

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  • Land, authority and the forgetting of being in early colonial Maori history

    Head, Lyndsay Fay (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis attempts to understand the intellectual milieu of Maori society in the early colonial period through the medium of Maori-language sources of information dating from that time. A base in Maori documentary allows Maori history to exist under the same disciplines as that of other literate peoples. The thesis argues that the imposition of English meanings on Maori language has shaded Maori meanings. It offers a rereading of documents including the Treaty of Waitangi in order to restore their Maori historicity. Maori society has also been misrepresented historiographically by the creation of false distance between metropolitan and indigenous culture, including the failure to sufficiently consider the shaping force of literacy on Maori perceptions of citizenship and on the politics of sovereignty that developed at mid-century. The thesis argues that land sales were the main Maori experience of government, and that the government's ability to define the terms of the market reconstrued society in ways which destroyed its former political structure.This turned it into a land-owning collective, in which power lay not in human consequence, as formerly, but in the size of the cultivations to which an owner could prove a right in terms constructed by officials. All members of the kin-group were constutued land owners, and the status of the chief was reduced to the size of the lands to which he could prove ownership. By 1865, when the Native Land Court was instituted, power within Maoridom lay in the land itself: te mana o te whenua. This position was written into culture, and endures into the present. The premise of the thesis is that change towards western norms is the proper frame of study of colonial Maori society, but that the magnitude of change has been obscured, both by the politicisation of the past on presentist premises and by the transformation of colonial models into what is now assumed to be 'traditional Maori society'. In order to separate the colonial from the traditional the thesis looks at precontact society custom regarding authority over land and fisheries. The thesis underscores the magnitude of change when tapu disappeared as the support of chiefs' civil governance, which was played out in the migration of mana (personal power) from chiefs to, modern, land. The disappearance of tapu also, however, aided the rise of Maori civil society within the colony on the basis of the desire for modernity which kept Maori engaged with the government - and therefore still governed. This is studied through letters that detail the operation of civil life in Taranaki and among Ngati Kahungunu, with special reference to the experience of Wiermu Kingi and Renata Kawepo.

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  • Hormonal control of wood formation in radiata pine

    Welsh, Shayne (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Pinus radiata is by far the dominant species grown in New Zealand plantations as a renewable source of wood. Several wood quality issues have been identified in the material produced, including the high incidence of compression wood, which is undesirable for end users. At present our understanding of the complex array of developmental processes involved in wood formation (which has a direct bearing on wood quality) is limited. Hence, the forest industry is interested in attaining a better understanding of the processes involved. Towards this goal, and for reasons of biological curiosity, the experiments described in this thesis were carried out to investigate several aspects of xylem cell development. In an in arbor study, changes in the orientation of cortical microtubules and cellulose microfibrils were observed in developing tracheids. Results obtained provide evidence that cortical microtubules act to guide cellulose synthase complexes during secondary wall formation in tracheids. The mechanisms involved in controlling cell wall deposition in wood cells are poorly understood, and are difficult to study, especially in arbor. A major part of this thesis involved the development of an in vitro method for culturing radiata pine wood in which hormone levels, nutrients, sugars and other factors, could be controlled without confounding influences from other parts of the tree. The method developed was used in subsequent parts of this thesis to study compression wood development, and the influence of the hormone gibberellin on cellulose microfibril organisation in the cell wall. Results from the in vitro compression wood experiments suggested that: 1. when a tree is growing at a lean, the developing cell wall was able to perceive compressive forces generated by the weight of the rest of the tree, rather than perceive the lean per se. 2. ethylene, rather than auxin, was involved in the induction of compression wood. Culture of stem explants with gibberellin resulted in wider cells, with steeper cortical microtubules, and correspondingly steeper cellulose microfibrils in the S2 layer of developing wood cells. This observation provides further evidence that the orientation of microtubules guides the orientation of cellulose microfibrils. Overall, the work described in this thesis furthers our knowledge in the field of xylem cell development. The stem culture protocol developed will undoubtedly provide a valuable tool for future studies to be carried out.

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  • Constructing a Traitor: How New Zealand Newspapers Framed Russell Coutts' Role in the America's Cup 2003

    Gajevic, Slavko (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis investigates how the news media constructs reality through newspaper representation of the role of a hero in society and a hero's loyalty to the nation. The research is based on a case study of New Zealand newspapers and how they framed Russell Coutts' role in the America's Cup 2003. Russell Coutts was the leading figure of "Team New Zealand"in 1995 and in 2000 when his team won and defended the America's Cup. He was praised by New Zealand newspapers as a hero during the time he led "Team New Zealand"from one victory to another. But, after the victory in 2000, Russell Coutts signed a contract with the rival team "Alinghi"and the framing of his heroic role in the New Zealand press changed. He became a defector from his team and he was framed as a traitor to his own country. Using discourse studies and semiotics as the main theoretical and methodological background, this thesis analyzes how the process of news framing is influenced by the rules of journalistic practice and by the wider social environment. The thesis explores how news values blend with mythological narrative in journalists' daily routine of producing news stories that both construct reality and reaffirm society's dominant values. The study reveals that the re-presentation of the nation in the news media is a simplified construction of an ideal and transcendental identity. Consequently, the role of the hero is framed as a representation of that ideal, and the hero is framed as a loyal leader - someone who should lead, not challenge, society's rules. The thesis discusses the news media's power to define identity by questioning a prominent individual's loyalty to the nation. The research illustrates that even a hero whose position is firmly established within the particular society can be radically re-defined if that hero is not following the expectations of the press and the rules of the society

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  • A Fast Algorithm for Painterly Rendering on Mobile Devices

    Mukundan, R.; Han, C. (2008)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    With the rapid growth of mobile graphics applications, non-photorealistic rendering algorithms developed particularly for devices with limited processor capabilities have become important in the areas of games design and augmented reality. This paper presents a fast painterly rendering algorithm suitable for implementation on mobile phones. Connected components in an image are identified and stored in an index buffer, using a sequential scan. Most of the subsequent processing is done only on this index buffer that contains one integer value per pixel. The proposed method does not use recursive procedures, complex floating-point computations, or texture processing functions. The painterly rendered effect is produced by suitably modifying the boundary of connected components and highlighting edges using entries from the index buffer. The paper presents the theoretical framework for the algorithm, implementation aspects and results.

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  • A Fast Inverse Kinematics Solution for an n-link joint chain

    Mukundan, R. (2008)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Cyclic Coordinate Descent (CCD) is a well known algorithm used for inverse kinematics solutions in applications involving joint-chains and moving targets. Even though a CCD algorithm can be easily implemented, it can take a series of iterations before converging to a solution, and also generate undesirable joint rotations. This paper presents a novel single-pass algorithm that is fast and eliminates problems associated with improper and large angle rotations. Experimental results are presented to show the performance benefits of the proposed algorithm over CCD and the “triangulation” methods, using different types of cost functions.

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  • Some Computational Aspects of Discrete Orthonormal Moments

    Mukundan, R. (2004)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Discrete orthogonal moments have several computational advantages over continuous moments. However when the moment order becomes large, discrete orthogonal moments (such as the Tchebichef moments) tend to exhibit numerical instabilities. This paper introduces the orthonormal version of Tchebichef moments, and analyses some of their computational aspects. The recursive procedure used for polynomial evaluation can be suitably modified to reduce the accumulation of numerical errors. The proposed set of moments can be used for representing image shape features and for reconstructing an image from its moments with a high degree of accuracy.

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  • Regional Cooperation in the Suppression of Transnational Crime in the South Pacific: Threat Assessment by the Pacific Forum

    Boister, N. (2004)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Constitutionalism and Regional Integration: Lessons from the Europe's Constitutional Conundrum

    Hopkins, W.J. (2007)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Constitutional Convention process was portrayed by its proponents as a major step forward in the development of the Union and for some was seen as a step change in the nature of this most successful of international regional organisations. This process would lead to a European Union Constitution upon which to base future development of the Union. The rejection of the Constitutional Treaty which eventually emerged from the Laeken Process at the hands of the French electorate and their Dutch compatriots thus marks and equally serious reversal for those with such high hopes for this document. The failure of the Constitutional Treaty is more than a mere rejection of a European Treaty. This has happened before, both after Maastrict and Amsterdam, but the rejection of the Constitutional Treaty in core Union states marked a crisis not only in terms of this treaty but in the confidence in the European project as a whole. For the first time since 1957, the onward march of the European regionalisation process was clearly and unmistakably halted by the populace of its Member States. Their had been warnings before and rocky times along the way but this event, public as it was, could not be wished away by any amount of spin or political manoeuvring. The people had been allowed to speak and their voices were an unmistakable Non or Nej. However, although the failure of the Constitutional Treaty is clearly a fundamental problem for the continuing development of the Union it also has significant implications beyond Europe's borders. The success of the Union and the realisation that the same drivers that brought the Union's Member States together in 1957 apply increasingly to nation-states across the globe has led to interest in and the creation of international regional organisations in every populated continent. From the NAFTA agreement, to the CER via the Andes Community, nascent regional organisations are now the rule rather than the exception. Such developments are now to be seen taking shape in East Asia. The European Union, however, has had more of a role than merely convincing other regions of the advantages of regional co-operation, its success has led to its development being seen as a model for others. This paper examines this phenomenon in the light of the crisis that currently affects the Union in the wake of the TCE's demise. The crisis of confidence that now afflicts the EU gives significant food for thought to those countries considering regional cooperation in their own corners of the world. What does the failure of the ECT mean for European model of regionalism? Is the European model such a success after all?

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  • Self-governing schools and legal implications: theory and practice

    Leane, G.W.G. (2000)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    The New Zealand economy has been through a radical restructuring, commencing in 1984 and following a so-called ‘neoliberal’ philosophy of economic rationalism. A market-based model has been imposed on most public sector activities, including the provision of education, together with a new ethos of managerialism. As a corollary, earlier liberal notions of a minimalist state are embraced. The fear is that under so-called public choice theory individuals (including bureaucrats and politicians) will act in their own individual self-interest rather than in some idealised notion of the public good1. The dysfunctional result, it is said, will be ‘provider capture’ by those individuals and a consequent growth in government and, impliedly, a diminution in efficient resource allocation.

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  • Socio-legal currents in International Law Theory

    Leane, G.W.G. (2005)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    The ‘socio-legal’ has always been a vigorously contested space in International Law theory. The ‘legal’ has been consigned to near-irrelevance by realist international relations theory on the one hand, and lauded as a remarkable achievement of modernity on the other – a civilising enterprise aspiring to the preservation of peace by the State under the rule of law. The instrumental role of International Law in achieving the peace is now being reoriented by liberal institutionalists such as Anne Marie Slaughter. This theory postulates a regime of international, or at least transnational, law formulation through the interaction of networks of non-state actors such as domestic courts, regulatory agencies, executives, NGO’s and other discursive communities. There is a ‘thicker’, more diverse set of international relations which erodes the sovereignty of State from without and within. Globalisation can be characterised as a context and a vehicle for this new liberal-cosmopolitan project. The theory is not limited to procedural innovation, however, for it carries within it the specific telos of liberal internationalism, or in its strongest form a liberal millenarianism which aspires to something like a Kantian peace in an expanding zone of liberal law. If there is an ongoing tension in International Law theory between the theory and the practice then this new liberal institutionalist approach at least has the virtue of claiming to describe practice. However, its teleological claim must bear closer scrutiny from perspectives of both theory and practice. Is it really ‘new’ or just a light shone more brightly on old practices? Is there such a fundamental shift as to amount to a disaggregation of the State and an undermining of the centrality of the State in the global order? Do these networks represent something authentically ‘liberal’ or are they merely opaque, unaccountable, self-selecting elites? Are they really just a kind of vulgar interest-group liberalism or do they represent an embryonic civil society? Finally, can or even should liberalism make any claim to a post-historical space that leaves the non-liberal world mired in ideological backwaters?

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  • New Right Economics Colonising Education: A New Zealand Experiment

    Leane, G.W.G. (2000)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    In 1989 the New Zealand government introduced a dramatic new policy initiative in to reconfigure the education system, particularly in its pre-tertiary institutional structures. Its themes centre around notions of economic rationalism (the pursuit of an ‘efficient’ use of educational resources inputs through the creation of a quasicompetitive ‘market’), managerialism (in imposing measurable and auditable ‘outputs’) and a skepticism of the old model arising out of public choice theory (the suspicion that teachers and bureaucrats are motivated by self-interest rather than the public good). The ability of Economics to ‘colonise’ education appears to echo similara moves by the Law and Economics school in legal theory. This paper describes in broad terms the new institutional forms of ‘Tomorrow’s Schools’ and looks to some of the confused / confusing ideological roots of the new model in terms of various versions of liberalism.

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  • The yellow dragon, the black box and the golden coin: new Chinese immigrants and their contributions to New Zealand's knowledge society

    Wang, Hong (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study explores whether and how skilled Chinese immigrants can contribute to New Zealand's knowledge society and economy with their knowledge and skills. As New Zealand is moving towards a knowledge society and economy, the attraction of skilled migrants is one of the critical strategies in maintaining its competitive advantages. However, the results of the socioeconomic integration of new skilled migrants always lead to debates on the real role of skilled migrants in New Zealand's society and economy. This study uses multiple research strategies combining analyses of historical and statistical materials, and a case study with fourteen interviews conducted with new Chinese immigrants, who came from Mainland China after 1990 and are living and working in Christchurch, to explore the relationships between these 'descendents of the dragon' and New Zealand's knowledge society and economy. Through these strategies, the study shows the role of knowledge in the emergence of New Zealand's knowledge society and economy, the value placed on knowledge and skills in New Zealand immigration policies and the change in the Chinese community with the growing demand for skilled migrants. It argues that tacit knowledge is not separated from but interactive with explicit knowledge through cultural values, social networks and structures, and interpersonal relationships. Therefore, in the process surrounding the entry of new skilled Chinese immigrants into New Zealand society, the knowledge economy is not exclusively economic but socially and culturally conditioned; and the knowledge society is not universal but diversified and interdependent.

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  • A Challenge to Externalist Representationalism: Analysing Georges Rey's Account and Salvaging his Project

    McKubre, Alexandra Catherine (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In "A Narrow Representationalist Account of Qualitative Content" and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind, Georges Rey challenges the tradition of combining externalism and representationalism about mental states. Specifically, his challenge takes the form of an internalist representationalist account of states with qualitative content. I examine his account, and find it problematic on the grounds that it fails to appropriately account for the substantiality and determinacy of qualitative content. However, I propose a solution to this problem in the form of an alternative view. This view compromises several aspects of Rey's view, most importantly in virtue of being a weak externalist position rather than internalist one. Yet, in keeping with Rey's project, this alternative view challenges the traditional combination of representationalism and externalism. It is a view on which mental states with qualitative contents are only indirectly individuated by elements in the external world. Mental states are not, as on a standard representationalist account, individuated by elements in the external world that they represent. While I conclude that Rey's view is incorrect, I salvage his project.

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  • Questions of Cultural Identity and Difference in the work of Yasumasa Morimura, Mariko Mori and Takashi Murakami

    Khan, David Michael (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis explores the work of three contemporary Japanese artists - Yasumasa Morimura, Mariko Mori and Takashi Murakami - in relation to cross-cultural exchanges and differences between Japan and the West. In carrying out such an investigation, this study illustrates how these artists play with Japanese and Western cultural forms in the context of postmodern challenges to concepts of essence and authenticity, and in a technologically transformed world shaped by unprecedented global flows of information, people, products and capital. In Morimura's art-making, this play is characterized by appropriations and parodies of Western cultural icons. The idea of identity-as-essence is superseded by a vision of identity-as-performance - a conception of identity as a creative act, taking place within an immanent system of global exchanges. Whilst Morimura's work tends to reify difference, for Mori the opposite is true. Melding arcane scientific and religious ideas, Mori creates technological spectacles with which she fantasizes a vanishing of determinate identities and difference within the encompassing field of a culturally amorphous techno-holism. Murakami's 'superflat' art raises the possibility of resolving this tension between the reification and effacing of difference. In his work, 'Japan' and 'the West' are represented as discrete entities that, at the same time, emerge already entangled, as effects in a preexisting system of global exchanges.

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  • The Japanese Migrant Community in Christchurch: The Quest for New Values and Identity

    Kuragasaki-Laughton, Ayami (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Until the 1980s, there was no Japanese community in Christchurch, but only a small number of individuals living mainly amongst European New Zealanders. However, from the mid-1980s changes in New Zealand's immigration policies and the introduction of a working holiday scheme between Japan and New Zealand, led to the growth of a distinctive Japanese community. Its distinctiveness lays in a fact that unlike the classic 'New' immigrant communities of Japanese in Auckland and some other countries, it consisted largely of permanent residents rather than business expatriates. By the 1990s, the community had become large enough to support formal organisational structures, such as the Japanese Society of Canterbury, established in 1991 and the Japanese Supplementary School of Canterbury, opened in 1999. These organisations were founded by the permanent residents, not business sojourners. They fostered a sense of community and were expressions of Japanese identity, but they also promoted links with the host society. In this respect, they were representative of attitudes prevalent amongst the Christchurch's Japanese permanent residents. A survey conducted as a part of the research for this thesis reveals that Japanese in Christchurch retain a strong ethnic identification with Japan. However, it as well shows that they also have a strong civic identification with Christchurch and with New Zealand because they are glad that they live there; and it shows that most of them socialise extensively with European New Zealanders, support Canterbury and the All Blacks, and adopt aspects of 'Kiwi culture'. They have a dual loyalty to the land of their birth and the place where they live.

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  • Identifying Maori English and Pakeha English from Suprasegmental Cues: A Study Based on Speech Resynthesis

    Szakay, Anita (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis investigates the suprasegmental properties of Maori English and Pakeha English, the two main ethnolects of New Zealand English. Firstly, in a Production Experiment the speech of 36 New Zealenders is acoustically analysed. Using the Pairwise Variability Index (PVI) to measure syllabic rhythm, the study reveals that the two ethnic varieties display differing rhythmic patterns, with Maori English being significantly more syllable-timed than Pakeha English. It is also shown that, overall, Maori speakers use a higher percentage of High Rising Terminals than Pakeha speakers. The results relating to pitch suggest that Maori English pitch is becoming higher over time, with young Maori speakers producing a significantly higher mean pitch than young Pakeha speakers. Secondly, a Perception Experiment using 107 listeners is carried out to investigate the role of suprasegmental information in the identification of Maori English and Pakeha English. The ability of listeners to identify the two dialects based on prosodic cues only is tested in seven different speech conditions. The various conditions aim to isolate the precise suprasegmental features participants may use to identify speaker ethnicity. The results reveal that listeners are aware of the differing rhythmic properties of Maori English and Pakeha English, and are capable of tuning into the rhythmic characteristics of a speaker to use it as a cue in dialect identification, with some level of accuracy. The perceptual relevance of other prosodic cues is also discussed and the results indicate that, based on certain stereotypes, Maori English speech is assumed to be low-pitched, monotonous, hesitant and slow in pace. It is also shown that listeners who have had greater exposure to Maori English perform significantly better in a dialect identification task than those who are not integrated into Maori social networks, proving that the linguistic experience of the listener is a key indicator of his or her performance in ethnic dialect identification.

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  • Food for thought: the health of Pacific Islands young people in New Zealand : An Analysis Of The Dietary And Lifestyle Behaviours Of Pacific Islands Adolescents, And The Potential Long-Term Effects Of These Behaviours Upon Health

    Hayes, Lisa Simone (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this thesis is to provide an overview of the health of Pacific Islands young people in New Zealand, with a particular emphasis on the effects of their dietary and lifestyle behaviours upon long-term health. This research is based on the observation that noncommunicable, or life-style, diseases are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for Pacific Islands people in New Zealand, that these diseases are invariably attributable to dietary and lifestyle habits, and that these habits become instilled during the adolescent period. Three main methods were undertaken to achieve this aim. The first constituted a review of literature concerning the health of Pacific Islands people in New Zealand, including a discussion of what health means to Pacific Islands people, along with the main health issues that this population encounters. The importance of food to Pacific Islands people is also considered in this review, along with the influence of diet on Pacific Islands people's disease patterns. Existing studies concerning the dietary habits of Pacific Islands youth are also detailed. The second stage of the research involved conducting research into the health of Pacific Islands young people in Christchurch, based in part on the methodology and findings of these previous studies. As the thesis will show, while Christchurch has the fourth largest Pacific Islands population in New Zealand, this population is considerably smaller than those in other main centres. This means that Pacific Islands people have less health resources and services available to them. This research revealed that Pacific Islands young people in Christchurch, and in New Zealand in general, consume a diet that is high in fat and low in other nutrients. Research into the health of Pacific Islands young people is deemed necessary to help to counter the high incidence of lifestyle related diseases in the adult population. Further, by identifying potential health outlooks for the future generation of Pacific Islands adults, research in Christchurch will be useful in ensuring that services and resources to meet Pacific Islands people's specific health needs.

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  • Eke ki runga i te waka: the use of dominant metaphors by newly-fluent Māori speakers in historical perspective

    King, Jeanette Margaret (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In language revitalisation movements the main impetus and passion is often provided by adults who, as second language speakers, have gained fluency in their heritage language. As parents and teachers these adults often have vital roles in the ongoing transmission of the heritage language. This study is based on interviews with thirty-two Māori adults who have each made a strong commitment to becoming a fluent speaker of Māori. The study posited that the informants would have a strongly-held worldview which enabled them to engage with and maintain a relationship with the Māori language. This worldview is expressed through a range of metaphors, the four most frequent being: LANGUAGE IS A PATH, LANGUAGE IS A CANOE, LANGUAGE IS FOOD, LANGUAGE LEARNER IS A PLANT. The worldview articulated by these metaphors has a quasi-religious nature and draws on elements of New Age humanism, a connection with Māori culture and ancestors as well as kaupapa Māori (Māori-orientated and controlled initiatives). The source domains for these metaphors are traced through a study of various Māori sources from the 19th century through to the present day. This study shows how exploitation of these metaphors has changed throughout this time period leading to their current exploitation by the newly-fluent informants. The metaphors preferred by the informants were contrasted with the prominent metaphor LANGUAGE IS A TREASURE, the entailments of which were found to be more relevant to the experience of native speakers. The informants' experience also contrasts with the focus of language planners in that the informants are more focussed on how the Māori language is important for them personally than how they contribute to the revitalisation of the Māori language. These findings have implications for the revitalisation of the Māori language and have relevance for other endangered languages.

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  • Parks, people, and power: the social effects of protecting the Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve in eastern Nigeria

    Macdonald, Fraser Ross (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The thesis outlines the impacts produced on local indigenous people by the protection of the Ngel Nyaki Forest Reserve in Taraba State, eastern Nigeria. After locating my work in various fields of literature and providing detailed background information on the area in which I conducted my fieldwork and the people who inhabit that area, I proceed onto the core of my thesis, which is two-fold. Firstly, I outline the impacts produced on the local people who inhabit the settlements surrounding the reserve. I elucidate the social, cultural, psychological, economic, and residential impacts of protecting the reserve. Second, I show how local people have adapted to these profound impacts. I show that they have negotiated the effects in various ways, including migration, livelihood diversification and shifting economic dependencies.

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