91,745 results

  • Bicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamua

    Oliver, E. F.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    This dissertation is a synthesis of four years university study in the policy, planning and Maori resource issues area. I wrote this because many Pakeha still have no real understanding of Maori environmental values and management. I also wrote this to show "the way it is" with regard to Maori participation in resource management and decision-making. I was curious to know the reason why, even though recent legislation recognises Maori interests, their voices continue to be ignored in many important resource management areas. This dissertation discusses biculturalism and introduces the concept of bicultural resource management practice. Recommendations are made regarding what should be incorporated in to this type of practice. Their purpose is to guide those participating in resource management at the Government level right down to those working in resource agencies. This map of action came about from reflection on the institutions and legislative frameworks of this country. It was found that Aotearoa New Zealand's natural resources are managed within a monocultural framework. This dissertation has two main objectives. Firstly, to examine the common ground between Maori and Pakeha environmental values and management. The split people continue to make between Maori and Pakeha knowledge of the environment must stop. Fragmentation removes people from both the environment and the solutions to resource problems. If further research is completed regarding the common ground, a more holistic approach to resource management may be found. The second objective of this dissertation is to highlight the importance of institutional change. Without a commitment to institutional change, the policies recognising Maori interests will never be successfully implemented, nor will the essence of partnership guaranteed under the Treaty of Waitaki. In my view, if monocultural decision-making continues, so too will racial tension in this country. In many respects, this dissertation is intended for a Pakeha audience, but because I discuss common ground and bicultural resource management it will also be of interest to Maori. I feel a greater sense of identity with this piece of work by using personal pronouns. In my view, it is important not to separate oneself from one's research and because I discuss such concepts as common ground, I think it is entirely appropriate. Therefore, this dissertation is not written from the third person stance. Finally, I'll mention here that whakatauaki are found throughout the dissertation. This is because they contain valuable messages for all those participating in resource management.

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  • Pip and stone fruit production : proceedings of a course in "Fruit production" at Lincoln College in November 1980, with an additional paper from an earlier course in "Alternative land uses" held in February 1979

    Department of Horticulture, Landscape and Parks

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The papers included in this bulletin have been edited by staff of the Rural Development and Extension Centre, Lincoln College.

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  • Rock climbing on Banks Peninsula

    Grew, Ronan

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    As the pressures of modern life increase, more and more people are turning to a wide variety of outdoor pursuits to fill their leisure hours. While some are content to walk and jog, other more determined individuals seek out and climb steep and airy rock faces - this is rock climbing. Easy access and solid rock make Banks Peninsula ideally suited for rock climbing. This dissertation is an attempt to describe the origins and evolution of the sport to its present day status, that of a highly technical, competitive and physically demanding sport. One of the other purposes of this dissertation is to locate and describe the crags on Banks Peninsula. Finally, the dissertation will look at some use conflicts that have arisen in recent years and offer some tentative recommendations in an attempt to resolve these conflicts. Unfortunately, because of the technical nature of the sport, the author has had to resort to the use of a large number of specialist terms and jargon associated with the sport. For the uninitiated, there is a glossary of terms at the end of this document.

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  • Blueberry production

    Department of Horticulture, Landscape and Parks

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Proceedings of a course in "Fruit Production" at Lincoln College in November 1980, with an additional paper from an earlier course in "Alternative Land Uses" held in February 1979. The papers included in this bulletin have been edited, by staff of the Rural Development and Extension Centre, Lincoln College.

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  • Kahikatea - Podocarpus dacrydioides

    Symmes, G. W.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Kahikatea (Podocarpus dacrydioides) forests were once found extensively on alluvial plains and river flats throughout New Zealand. Today these forests have dwindled in extent; largely as a result of clearing of the fertile soils for pastoral farming and the use of the non-tainting timber for butter boxes. Kahikatea is still being used for many purposes despite the availability of suitable substitutes. The largest remaining areas of kahikatea are in South Westland, where they are protected by a Government-imposed moratorium on logging which expires in 1990. To protect these forests after that date and to establish ongoing reserves, two clear courses of action must be taken: the protection of these forests from logging, and the drawing up and implementing of a policy directed specifically at managing kahikatea in all stages and conditions of its development.

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  • The grape experiments at Lincoln College

    Department of Horticulture, Landscape and Parks

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This bulletin is a progress report on the trials that have been done up until June 1981. Bulletin no. 36, first edition.

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  • Survey of agricultural professionals - a report to the New Zealand Institute of Agricultural Science

    Sheppard, R. L.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    A report to the New Zealand Institute of Agricultural Science

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  • Heritage sites as tourist attractions : a case sudy of Luang Prabang, Lao People's Democratic Republic

    Phosikham Thongmala

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore the significant factors on international tourists' decision-making to visit Town of Luang Prabang and to identify the role of World Heritage status on international tourists' decision to visit the Town of Luang Prabang in Lao PDR. The study was conducted in the Town of Luang Prabang over the months of April and May 2009. It employed the use of a quantitative research methodology with a self-administered questionnaire survey with international tourists who were eighteen years and over. The survey was conducted at Luang Prabang International Airport, Mount Phousy, Xieng Thong Temple, open-air night market, Internet shops and restaurants along the Mekong and Namkhan rivers. The results of the research indicated that the World Heritage status of Luang Prabang plays a crucial role in attracting tourists to visit the town. However, while most of the participants stated that they travelled to the town of Luang Prabang because it is on World Heritage list, only one in three of the participants perceived themselves as 'heritage tourists'. The findings showed that this contradiction was associated with tourists' age and length of stay. Tourists who labelled themselves as 'heritage tourists' tended to be older and had a shorter length of stay in Lao PDR as well as on their total trip compared to tourists who did not call themselves heritage tourists. The study also found that older tourists were more knowledgeable about the World Heritage status of Luang Prabang before they started their trip and indicating that older tourists used more generating markers than younger tourists. The study contended that younger people often travel to heritage sites but they do not label themselves 'heritage tourists'. It is suggested that younger tourists feel uncomfortable with name heritage tourists because they might think 'heritage' is related to some thing 'old'. This study may help marketers to identify their markets and have more understanding that not all tourists to heritage sites have the same level of motivation for cultural heritage experiences and perceive themselves as heritage tourists.

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  • Country branding, consumption values, and purchase decision confidence: a case study of tourists to Thailand

    Srisutto, Sawaros

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    The tourist’s purchase decision process in travelling abroad is complex. With global competition, tourists have an opportunity to choose from many countries. There are many factors influencing tourists’ travel destination choices, and affecting the confidence in their purchase decisions. These factors relate to consumption values, travel information sources, and country image. There is a lack of research simultaneously investigating these three factors together. Moreover, the research into how consumption values influence tourists’ travel decisions is limited, and would benefit from deeper investigation. This research seeks to examine the factors affecting tourists’ travel destination choices, and the factors influencing their purchase decision confidence. Furthermore, the research investigates whether the pattern of consumption values and travel information sources used differ based on socio-economic characteristics and purposes of trip. To understand the importance of consumption values to tourists, the concept of consumption values theorised by Sheth, Newman, and Gross (1991) was adapted. A quantitative approach was used with a self-administered survey questionnaire distributed to tourists arriving at Suvarnabhumi Airport, the International Airport of Thailand. The valid sample size was 1,707 respondents from seven world regions (East Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania, the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa). The results showed that functional and emotional values were the main factors motivating tourists to travel abroad. They searched for travel information from various sources, mainly from the internet, previous experience, word-of-mouth recommendations, and travel guidebooks. They also evaluated country image, and had few constraints on travelling to their selected country. Furthermore, the results indicated that five consumption values (functional, emotional, social, conditional, and epistemic) had slight positive relationships with the usefulness of a variety of travel information sources. The findings also indicated that functional and emotional values positively related to tourists’ purchase decision confidence. Images focusing on relaxation, infrastructure, convenience, and the attractions of a country also significantly influenced their confidence. In addition, five travel information sources (previous experience, brochures/pamphlets, the internet, friends/family/relatives, and travel guidebooks) were found to significantly affect confidence. Some socio-economic characteristics and purposes of trip had statistically significant differences in consumption values and the usefulness of information sources; however, there were only small mean differences. This research contributes to the theoretical and practical implications of destination marketing by extending knowledge on the relationships between consumption values, travel information sources, country image, socio-economic characteristics, purposes of trip, and purchase decision confidence. It also provides an understanding of how consumption values relate to tourists making their travel decisions, and supports the idea of how a country could build an effective brand to attract tourists. The findings of this study provide useful information for destination and tourism marketers in planning an effective marketing strategy, and in promoting a country brand to attract tourists.

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  • SOOBs in Christchurch: go or whoa?

    Boyd, Felicity

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    This related directly to the content of the course SOCI 314 (Lincoln Univeristy), which provides a critical study of issues in the provision of professional services in environmental planning, design, social sciences, tourism, sport and recreation. As part of the assessment the articles were subject to the LPR review processes and those written by Felicity Boyd, Shaun Coffey, and Sean Garlick are included here.

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  • Golf course design

    Glasson, C. R.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Accompanying maps can be consulted in the library.

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  • The seed they sowed: centennial story of Lincoln College

    Blair, I. D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This is the story of a University College of Agriculture as it approaches its Centennial. It is essentially a personal story, for Lincoln College is a human family the stature of whose genealogical tree may be measured by the worth of successive staff and students. It is written, appropriately enough, by a member of the family who has lived in its midst for almost half the century, and while, therefore, the record is chronicled in fact it is presented with opinion. What has evolved is thus more of an historical portrait than a formal official history. When the College Council sought an author for this Centennial publication it turned naturally to Ian Blair, former student, recently retired head of the College's Department of Agricultural Microbiology and bulwark of the Old Students' Association. He accepted the commission and has laboured with patience, diligence and dedication. Known as much for the directness of his viewpoints as for his deep love for and loyalty to Lincoln College, Dr. Blair has left his own imprint on a manuscript that makes all the better reading for its forthright treatment. Passages may provoke discussion and debate, and if so neither the author nor the College as publisher is inclined to withdraw or recant. After all, history is dull record without the background of perspective interpretation and what author is worth the price of his pen who fails to cast some personal image over his writing? Suffice it to say that the views of the author are not necessarily those of the College and that each recognises that an occasional inaccuracy of fact inevitably will have evaded correction. Lincoln College, affiliated to the University of Canterbury, ranks third in order of foundation among New Zealand's university institutions, third also among agricultural colleges in the Commonwealth and first in the Southern Hemisphere. It takes pride in this seniority, as it does also in its mono-faculty objective of advancing knowledge in the fields of agriculture and related interests. It enjoys strong corporate unity through close relationships between staff and students aided by relative smallness in numbers. Its history therefore evokes a compact picture which nevertheless embraces all shades of varying disciplines under the one broad umbrella. As the College entered its one hundredth year it was honoured, on March 4, 1977, by a visit from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and by His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, who, in a special programme of inspection followed by a joint luncheon with Christchurch and provincial civic representatives, were able to note aspects of the history of the College and of its work. The occasion was marked by an announcement that the centennial year project for Lincoln would be the establishment of a foundation to advance education in New Zealand with special reference to agriculture and related interests. The Lincoln College Foundation, which Dr. Blair mentions in the final chapter of his book, thus translates some of a century's achievements into a national objective for the future, and an historian in fifty or one hundred years' time will have the opportunity of balancing this College's achievements on behalf of New Zealand in even clearer focus than has now been evident.

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  • Perspectives on the Canterbury Water Management Strategy

    Lomax, Adrienne; Memon, Ali; Painter, Brett D. M.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    The Canterbury Water Management Strategy: Strategic Framework, released in November 2009 by Canterbury Water , is an innovative planning initiative based on a collaborative governance model. The CWMS is a framework to manage Canterbury’s water resources sustainably by articulating a series of agreed principles and targets relating to allocation of water for competing uses and also for water quality. It proposes novel nested governance arrangements to undertake these functions on a management zone and regional basis, with linkages to national level arrangements. As part of a longer term longitudinal study of institutional arrangements for sustainable water management in Canterbury, a number of key informants who have been closely involved in the development of the CWMS were interviewed. They were questioned on the process of developing the strategy, the policies it contains, and the anticipated challenges and opportunities of implementation. In total, 21 key informants, reflecting a broad cross section of the organisations and interests represented during the development of the strategy, were interviewed in 14 separate semi-structured interviews in late 2009 and early 2010.

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  • Forms and phytoavailability of lead in a soil contaminated with lead shot

    Rooney, C. P.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Gun clubs are widespread throughout New Zealand but the environmental impact of Pb shot has not yet been characterised in this country. This dissertation presents a study of the extent of lead contamination in soil and plants resulting from the activity of a gun club with a relatively small membership operating on arable farmland in Canterbury. The study site has been used for over 60 years for clay target shooting. The spatial distribution of lead concentration in the topsoil of a gun club site was determined by carrying out a grid survey. Lead in the soil profile was also determined to a depth of 20cm. A greenhouse study was conducted to assess plant uptake of lead. Total, exchangeable, oxide-bound, organic-bound and residual lead concentrations were determined by a sequential fractionation procedure. The highest EDTA-Pb concentrations were found approximately 100 m from the shooting area (ca. 6000 - 8000 mg EDT A-extractable Pb kg⁻¹ soil) with approximately 30% of the site area above the Australian & New Zealand Environmental & Conservation Council and National Health & Medical Research Council guideline limit of 300 mg kg⁻¹. Little reduction in lead concentration was evident to a depth of 200 mm. The data confirms that shooting activities in New Zealand may cause locally intense Pb contamination. Plant roots contained considerably greater concentrations of Pb than the leaves of all plant species examined. Significant translocation of lead to the shoots occurred, causing lead concentrations in the shoots to exceed the maximum allowable limit for foodstuffs. Approximately 90% of the total Pb at the site is present in the soil in metallic form, as Pb shot. Very little Pb is present as transformation products and soil-Pb compounds, illustrating the characteristic low solubility of Pb.

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  • Nutrient trading: a viable solution to water quality management in Selwyn District?

    Watkins, Matthew J. M.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Water quality is quickly becoming one of the most pressing environmental issues the world over. While historically New Zealand has enjoyed a relatively high quality of water, recent intensification of land use has resulted in its steady decline. This decline is highlighted perhaps no where better than in Selwyn District where all but the mountain rivers exceeded guideline values for nutrient enrichment. This observed state highlights the failure of the current regularity approach to successfully manage the tradeoffs between economic development and ecological conservation. Nutrient Trading Programs are an innovative approach to water quality management with a demonstrated ability to successfully manage these tradeoffs. Despite examples of its effectiveness in a number of applications throughout the world, Nutrient Trading Programs are not suitable in all circumstances. This dissertation evaluates the viability of a Nutrient Trading Program as an effective water quality management tool in the Selwyn District. Drawing from a range of evaluation studies, it develops a framework of four parameters through which this viability can be determined. Applying this framework to Selwyn District it highlights the current state of these determinant variables in the district and assess there likely impact on the success of a Nutrient Trading Program. Overall this analysis highlights a strong suitability of a Nutrient Trading Program in Selwyn District. Legal, economic and social conditions all appear to be favourable. While the biophysical and political conditions of the district highlight some potential challenges, it is reasonable to believe that they can be effectively addressed prior to a Nutrient Trading Programs implementation. Recommendations are provided to direct these efforts.

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  • Cutting propagation of Leyland cypress (XCupressocyparis leylandii)

    De Silva, Heike

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Leyland cypress is an inter-generic hybrid between macrocarpa cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa Hartw.) and Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis D.Don) Leyland cypress has become a popular tree species mainly because it is easy to establish and grow. It tolerates a wide range of sites and soils (from acid to alkaline, from clay to sand) as well as salt-laden winds, which makes it suitable for planting in coastal areas. The species is frost hardy and has survived frosts of up to -20°C in the Southwest ofthe United States. Growth rates are relatively high especially in moist, fertile soils and the plants respond well to trimming.

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  • An alternative wintering system for Southland: a comparison of wintering cows outside, on brassica crops versus inside, in a free stall barn in Southland, New Zealand

    de Wolde, Albert

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    In New Zealand, dairy cows generally calve in the spring and produce milk through spring, summer and autumn. This is arranged this way to ensure that there is ample good quality grass available when the cows require it most; in early lactation. In the winter most farmers dry all their cows off to let them gain strength and condition in anticipation of the next calving and lactation. The feeding and tending of the cows during the winter period is generally called “wintering” Cows in the Southern parts of New Zealand are mainly wintered on brassica crops. This system has been inherited from the few dairy farmers that were there before the dairy influx in the nineties. Typically cows were farmed at 2.5 cows per hectare (“one cow to the acre”) and the cows were wintered on brassica crops on the milking platform (home farm). Fifteen to twenty percent of the milking platform was sown out in kale or Swedes and new pasture was sown afterwards. The soil had enough time to restore under pasture and this system worked reasonably well. It did not take long for the newly imported farmers to work out the opportunity cost of having part of the milking platform out of the grazing round for winter crops. Wintering the cows off the milking platform and increasing the stocking rate to about three cows to the hectare on the home block was considered to be a better option. Cows were sent off the milking platform during winter to a runoff. The crop rotation on such a runoff can be as intense as fifty per cent of the land in brassica’s at any given time. Most of these runoffs have previously been used for sheep farming with nearly the whole farm in grass. During the first crop rotation the whole farm can be introduced to brassica crops before the negative effects of this practice are noticed. A common practice is to plough up enough area for winter feed, use the ground for wintering for two years, put the paddocks back into grass and plough up the next lot. This first crop rotation can take up to eight or ten years, but at some stage the first cropping round will run out and paddocks that have had brassica crops in them before will have to be used again. This is when the negative effects are felt in regard to soil structure damage and weed infestation. The viability and sustainability of this system is now in question. This report describes an investigation into the physical, environmental, animal health/ welfare and financial implications of an alternative to this system.

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  • An empirical analysis of factors that influence the adoption of internet banking in China: A case study of Zhengzhou

    Zheng, Nancy

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    The developments in information technology and telecommunications have set in motion an electronic revolution in today's banking industry including China's banking sector. This in turn results new delivery channels for banking products and services such as Automatic Teller Machine (ATM), telephone banking, cable television banking, Personal computer banking (PC), and Internet banking. Internet banking has become one of the most popular banking adopted by consumers. The evolution of Internet banking benefits both the banks and their customers, and most banks have been using it as one of their distribution channels. Benefits of the internet banking to banks include generating additional revenue, improving customer service, extending marketing, and increasing cost saving. For consumers, Internet banking means convenience, but there is an increasing risk exposure to consumers in regard to internet-based services and the growing importance of offering consumer support services such as security to mitigate security risk exposure. This research investigates the factors that affect consumers' adoption of Internet banking services in Zhengzhou, China. These factors include personal factors, services quality factors, price factors, service product factors, situational factors, perceived risk factors, computer illiterate factors, etc. This research also provides an understanding of the specific factors that affect the consumers' decision whether or not to adopt Internet banking.

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  • Planning education and the role of theory in the new millennium: a new role for habitat theory?

    Montgomery, Roy L.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    In the last two decades of the twentieth century, planning pedagogy in New Zealand responded to broader intellectual and social trends, and, arguably, indirect political pressures, with a turn or return, depending upon one’s view of planning history, to matters of process. I would describe this as a retreat rather than return. For example, the widespread rhetoric around the introduction of the Resource Management Act (RMA) in 1991 was that management would now be effects-based. Rather than formulate prescriptive or proscriptive policies, planners were to concentrate instead on guaranteeing that the process of assessing, approving or rejecting applications, handling appeals and monitoring consents was conducted in an efficient, transparent and democratic manner. Consequently, in the planning practice literature of the 1980s and 1990s and the first several years of the new millennium, the main emphasis was on best practice guides or protocols. For example, in New Zealand the 2005 Urban Design Protocol, published by the Ministry for the Environment, argues that good urban design follows the “seven ‘c’s”: context, character, choice, connections, creativity, custodianship, and collaboration. While such principles have merit, they require what I would term the eighth ‘c’: content that operationalises the principles (i.e., what actually makes for durable urban design). Disappointingly, the Urban Design Protocol shies away from saying anything about what is good versus bad urban design.

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  • The ECan Act: understanding the new provisions for planners

    Rennie, Hamish

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    The Environment Canterbury (Temporary Commissioners and Improved Water Management ) Act 2010 (the ECan Act) has provided some interesting new planning provisions that will exercise the minds of planners, lawyers and, I suspect, the Courts over coming months if not years. The ECan Act was introduced and passed under urgency on 30 March 2010 without going through a Select Committee process. Here I address aspects of provisions for Canterbury Water Conservation Orders and moratoria.

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