91,047 results

  • Enhancing Educational Outcomes for Alaska Native Students through Networked Inquiry

    Fickel LH (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Search for sterile neutrino mixing using three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    Adams J (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    © 2017 American Physical Society. We present a search for a light sterile neutrino using three years of atmospheric neutrino data from the DeepCore detector in the energy range of approximately 10-60 GeV. DeepCore is the low-energy subarray of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The standard three-neutrino paradigm can be probed by adding an additional light (Δm412∼1 eV2) sterile neutrino. Sterile neutrinos do not interact through the standard weak interaction and, therefore, cannot be directly detected. However, their mixing with the three active neutrino states leaves an imprint on the standard atmospheric neutrino oscillations for energies below 100 GeV. A search for such mixing via muon neutrino disappearance is presented here. The data are found to be consistent with the standard three-neutrino hypothesis. Therefore, we derive limits on the mixing matrix elements at the level of |Uμ4|2 < 0.11 and |Uτ4|2 < 0.15 (90% C.L.) for the sterile neutrino mass splitting Δm412=1.0 eV2.

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  • Evolution of a Networked Learning Community: Interweaving action-research and programme evaluation to create a PK-20 school-university collaborative partnership for learning and innovation

    Fickel LH; Chesbro P; Tucker S; Boxler N (2011)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The Effect of Area Level Deprivation on Obesity in New Zealand: Analysis of The New Zealand Health Surveys

    Kirk RC; Halim, A; Basu, A (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The importance of community engagement in learning to teach

    Fickel LH; Abbiss J; Brown L; Astall CM (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Teacher Education in indigenous contexts: Critical considerations of teacher educator understandings and decision-making related to treaty issues and social justice

    Stark R; Fickel LH (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite the existence of a treaty (Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi, 1840) in Aotearoa New Zealand that promised the indigenous Māori that their language and culture would be protected, these rights to autonomy and self-determination have not been fully realised. The persistent gap in the education system’s responsiveness to Māori educational aspirations and well-being poses a significant social justice challenge to educators, in particular teacher educators. In order to successfully respond to the educational needs of Māori as tangata whenua (the ‘people of the land’ or indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand) teacher educators must develop the necessary sociocultural knoweldge and culturally-responsive pedagogies to enact the fullness of their professional responsibilities as treaty partners with Māori. By focusing on the indigenous context of teacher education in Aotearoa New Zealand, we seek to illuminate a particular aspect of this complexity as a means to extend and problematise the discourse around international teacher educator knowledge and practice with respect to issues of diversity, culturally responsive practice, and social justice. In undertaking this inquiry, we draw from a larger qualitative investigation examining the perspectives of a small group of teacher educators regarding their understandings of the treaty in relation to their educational practice. Our analysis is informed by critical theory (Giroux, 2007; Kincheloe, 2008) and the notion of ‘teachers as gatekeepers” (Thornton, 1991, p 238).

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  • Humanizing secondary school contexts: learnings from Aotearoa New Zealand and Peru Latin America

    Fickel LH; MacFarlane S; Macfarlane AH; Nieto Angel, Maria Carolina (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Developing initial teacher action competence in working with culturally diverse learners

    Fickel LH; Astall C; Abbiss, J E (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Context of our work: § Teacher Education Reform in Aotearoa New Zealand § New ITE programme-Masters of Teaching and Learning § Action Competence Inquiry Framework: § Theoretical perspectives § Research question § Cultural Tool Critical Lens 1: Preservice Teacher Development of Action Competence Critical Lens 2: Theorizing teacher education practice Conclusion: Contribution to International/European conversation

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  • PLD Facilitated Support to Engage Teachers in Linking Family & Whānau to Classroom Literacy Pedagogy

    Fickel LH; Henderson C; Price G (2016)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    In response to the Ministry of Education (MOE) focus on enhancing the provision of Professional Learning and Development (PLD), the Literacy Team Facilitators of the Literacy Language Learning Te Waipounamu team have been engaged in a multiyear process of self-study and inquiry around improving their individual and collective PLD practices. Through this ongoing inquiry, research, and evaluation process the team has identified appreciative inquiry and ‘smart tools’ as “high leverage moves” within their PLD. In this paper, we provide a documentary account of one particular area of the team’s embedded inquiry, namely the use and impact of using the ‘Student Inquiry Protocol’ as a framework for engaging and supporting teachers to make explicit links to family/whānau as part of their literacy pedagogy practices. This protocol is used within the Teacher Inquiry process that underpins the PLD. Through this account we highlight the positive outcomes of this approach for both teachers and students.

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  • Inquiring into PLD Facilitator Practice to Support Culturally Responsive Literacy Pedagogy

    Fickel LH; Henderson C; Price G (2015)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper presents a documentary account of one aspect of the PLD programme being implemented by the Literacy Language Learning Te Waipounamu PLD Team. The Team’s ongoing inquiry, research and evaluation processes identified appreciative inquiry and ‘smart tools’ as “high leverage acts” within the PLD programme. We focus here on a particular ‘slice’ of this ongoing embedded inquiry, namely the use and impact of the “Focus Student Protocol” as a PLD innovation. The protocol is used within the Teaching as Inquiry process that underpins the PLD programme. Through this account we highlight the positive outcomes of this approach for both teachers and students.

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  • Restoration and Loss after Disaster: Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement

    McManus R; Walter T; Claridge L (2018)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focussing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration / re-building. After comparing memorials to New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavour may be grassroots, organised from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.

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  • Flexible and Part-time Work Arrangements in the Canterbury Legal Profession : A Report prepared by the University of Canterbury Socio-Legal Research Group for the Canterbury Women’s Legal Association

    Cheer U; Taylor L; Masselot A; Baird N; Powell RL (2017)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    In 2015 a research team in the School of Law at the University of Canterbury developed a project with the Canterbury Women’s Legal Association to gather information about flexible and part-time work practices in the Canterbury Legal Profession. For the purposes of the project, part-time work is defined as a form of employment which carries fewer hours per week than a full-time job. A flexible work arrangement is defined as an arrangement where an employee benefits from working practices that offer different degrees of structure, regularity and flexibility. Such arrangements may include the ability to choose the start and finishing time of the working day or compressed work weeks. In November 2015 the Canterbury and Westland Branch of the Law Society, on behalf of the project team, invited all qualified lawyers practicing in the Canterbury and Westland area to participate in a short online survey examining flexible and part-time working arrangements. An invitation was also sent to all legal executives working in the same area. One hundred and thirty eight responses were received and over 90% of these were from female lawyers and legal executives. Although lower participation rate by males is reported in other studies focusing on the legal profession, the gender split in the responses in this project was far more pronounced, suggesting a lack of interest by local male lawyers in this issue. Survey participants were either practising lawyers or legal executives, with legal executives making up 21% of the survey cohort. Fifteen percent of the cohort identified as employers. Ninety six percent of the employee cohort was working on a permanent contract of employment. Just under 50% of the employee cohort were working under a flexible or part-time arrangement.

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  • Mediating publicness: An analysis of Pacific audiences’ desire for a sphere of their own in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Ross T (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper suggests that Pacific groups are positioned narrowly in New Zealand publicness, often in ways that run counter to Pacific audiences’ demand for in-depth news and information and public debate. Focus groups held with Pacific audiences at several urban centres in New Zealand found that Pacific news media are a key site of Pacific people’s publicness in New Zealand. Audiences looked to Pacific media (and, interestingly, Māori media) to fulfil their expectations for timely, in-depth and high-quality journalism, and for a space in which their communities could safely discuss issues and enact their citizenship. However, it is clear that more could be done to realise this role, not just on the part of Pacific media producers, but also funders and policy makers whose focus on Pacific media in terms of ethnicity and culture tends to overlook audiences’ demand for in-depth news and debate. This paper concludes that viewing ethnic media within categories of ethnicity or culture (as do funders, scholars and, often, media producers) risks both exaggerating the ‘otherness’ of ethnic minority groups and overlooking Pacific audiences’ media needs in terms of their participation in society. Instead, it suggests, policy-makers and funders could do more to recognise the journalistic and public sphere roles of the Pacific news media they fund.

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  • The challenges of regulating diffuse agricultural pollution to improve water quality: a science policy perspective on approaches to setting enforceable catchment load limits in New Zealand

    Duncan, Ronlyn

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Worldwide, the cumulative effects of diffuse pollution arising from a range of human activities are diminishing the quality and ecosystem capacity of lakes, rivers, estuaries, and oceans. Devising effective ways to regulate the causes and effects of diffuse pollution is a fraught legal, political, policy, and management challenge given the difficulties in identifying and measuring who is responsible for what, where, and when. In 2011, under its Resource Management Act, 1991, the South Pacific nation of New Zealand introduced national policy to arrest diffuse pollution with a requirement for local government to institute enforceable water quality and quantity limits on all freshwater bodies. The blueprint for these national freshwater policy reforms comes from its South Island region of Canterbury. Canterbury’s regional council has adopted a catchment load approach whereby an overarching limit on nutrient losses from agricultural land is calculated and linked to land use rules to control property-scale agricultural activities. With a focus on the Canterbury region, this case study examines two approaches to establishing a catchment load for diffuse nutrient pollution to link to legal provisions in its regional plan. One is based on a river’s nutrient concentrations and the other relies on predictive modelling. The case study opens important questions about measuring and regulating diffuse pollution and the difficulties faced by policy-makers and regulators in linking numbers to legally binding compliance and enforcement mechanisms, e.g. how to account for lag effects when establishing‘ in-stream’ limits and how to address changes in software when relying on ‘modelled’ limits?

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  • Gendered Academic Careers: A Comparison of Indonesia and New Zealand

    Toyibah, Dzuriyatun (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis aims to describe and better understand the gender gap in academic careers in Jakarta (Indonesia) and Auckland (New Zealand). The thesis is intended to measure and explain the operation of the gender gap, while also interrogating the construction of such indices as essentially Western in their assumptions. For example, The Global Gender Gap Report (World Economic Forum, 2015), rates New Zealand 10/145 and Indonesia, 92/145 of countries surveyed. A review of the global rankings shows a patterning of Western and non-Western countries and clearly invites deficit-based explanations in terms of development, culture, religion. As an Indonesian woman, such patterning also invites unease and disquiet. While I have experienced the everyday processes that produce the gender gap in academia and societally, I am also aware of the complexities and countervailing elements that reports like The Global Gender Gap Report might miss. One result of unease with a simple notion of the gender gap index, is to enrich research through the use of mixed methods, combining qualitative and quantitative approaches. This thesis explores and contextualises issues around the gender gap in academic careers, by using mixed methods across institutional cases based in Jakarta and Auckland. The methods used include: (i) secondary research, including analysis of promotion policies; (ii) an autoethnographic account, in which I discuss issues of gender, marriage, religion, patriarchy, motherhood, class, and social status; (iii) a quantitative analysis of differing datasets drawn from Indonesian and New Zealand institutions, using descriptive statistics, binary and ordinal regression; (iv) the non-comparability of datasets and of quantitative analysis reinforced my decision to include qualitative approaches in the mix of methods. Accordingly, I interviewed 30 academics in Auckland and Jakarta. The main findings of the research are: (i) It confirms the literature that male domination in academia is hidden and female academics who are mothers are marginalised. For academics who are also mothers, there is a collective understanding that the barriers are significant; (ii) Racial discrimination exists, but is largely invisible. Participants of colour acknowledged it and indeed had experienced it, though other participants, in the same universities, believed that it no longer occurred. Arguably, gender and race are rendered invisible in academic careers under a neo-liberal system, especially when using statistical analysis, as such elements are considered non-meritocratic factors; (iii) Understanding the academic gender gap in Indonesia is better framed by considering the fact that career progression follows civil servant regulation, and is not perceived as very prestigious in terms of income. Rather, being an academic, according to some Indonesian academics, is about a ???calling??? and devotion to knowledge development; (iv) On the other hand, studies in liberal, Western countries emphasise that family life, children, and domestic work are serious problems for female academics. To be single or childfree is considered to enhancefemale academic careeradvancement. In conclusion, comparing the scale of the gender gap index between liberal countries such as New Zealand and non-liberal countries such as Indonesia is very challenging due to cultural and structural differences. My research underscores that it is important to measure women???s conditions beside indicators developed in the Gender Gap Index (economic participation and opportunity, educational attainment, health and survival and political empowerment). It is necessary to include indicators which are accepted in all cultures and nations, such as the index of happiness, life satisfaction; indicators must align with desires and hopes for the future. Critique is essential to create the conditions for transformative change but that change should align with individual and collective aspirations.

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  • Examining the Roles of Residuals Under an Adaptation Level Theory Model for Tinnitus Perception

    Durai, M (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of sound in the environment (1-4). The precise mechanisms giving rise to tinnitus perception and distress are still not fully known. The Adaptation Level Theory (ALT) model of tinnitus (5, 6) is an ecological framework which takes a holistic approach to understanding tinnitus and its complexity, in which tinnitus magnitude estimates are based on interactions between the focal component (tinnitus), contextual component (any background noise or applied sounds), and residual components (individual cognitive and behavioural characteristics). Aim: To empirically explore the influence and strength of individual residual factors under a novel Adaptation Level Theory (ALT) model of tinnitus perception. Personality traits, emotion and prediction/anticipation of sounds were residuals examined. Methods: Seven studies were undertaken as part of this doctoral thesis: 1) A scoping review investigated key personality traits relevant to tinnitus, and the relationship between affective disorders and tinnitus. 2) A web-based survey was administered to 154 individuals with tinnitus and 61 age, gender and hearing level-matched non-tinnitus controls. The survey measured four key self-reported personality traits (social closeness, stress reaction, alienation and self-control), tinnitus characteristics and hearing handicap. 3) A behavioural experiment (N=22) introduced short-term emotional stimuli, differing along valence and arousal dimensions, and measured tinnitus loudness and annoyance characteristics. Stimuli were presented in two modalities: auditory and visual. 4) A comprehensive narrative synthesis of current research assessed the feasibility of a relationship between auditory memory, predictive coding and tinnitus generation. 5) A short-term adaptation experiment (N=23) and two-week feasibility trial (N=7) compared the effect of predictable and unpredictable amplitude-modulated computer surf sound on tinnitus loudness and annoyance characteristics. 6) An electroencephalography (EEG) study that compared mean ERP amplitudes and oscillatory band activity in response to tone deviants and tone omissions (at the pitch of tinnitus) between individuals with tinnitus (N=16) and hearing-level matched controls (N=14). 7) A randomized tinnitus sound therapy clinical trial (N=18) was conducted comparing the effectiveness of nature sounds with neutral broadband noise. Multiple experimental outcomes relating to tinnitus, emotion, attention and psychological state were measured at three time points: at sound fitting, 4 weeks after administration and 8 weeks after administration. Results: 1) The scoping review concluded personality traits to have a consistent association with the distress experienced by adult tinnitus help-seekers, and help-seekers were also more likely to experience anxiety and depression symptoms and/or disorders. Limitations present in current research were lack of appropriately controlled comparisons when assessing personality trait profiles of tinnitus sufferers and non-tinnitus individuals. 2) Tinnitus sufferers displayed higher levels of stress reaction, lower social closeness, lower self-control and higher alienation than the control group in the web-based survey. 3) In the behavioural emotion experiment, low valence (unpleasant) auditory stimuli led to higher subjective tinnitus loudness ratings in males and females and higher subjective distress ratings in males only. Visual emotional stimuli did not have an effect on tinnitus characteristics. 4) The narrative review provided theoretical support and indirect electrophysiological evidence for continuous prediction errors generated within the auditory system driving tinnitus perception and distress, as well as eliciting global disruptions to attention and working memory. 5) Both short-term Unpredictable and Predictable sound administration led to a decrease in tinnitus loudness in the adaptation experiment, however, only Unpredictable sound lowered tinnitus distress ratings. 6) A larger N1c waveform was elicited in the absence of any tone deviation within the left primary auditory cortex of tinnitus participants for the EEG study. Abnormal N1c waveform growth was present across levels of deviant conditions for the tinnitus group. There was limited evidence to support the Thalamocortical Dysrhythmia hypothesis of greater theta and gamma activity present among individuals with tinnitus. A role for attention and auditory scene analysis in driving tinnitus perception and salience was supported. No differences were present between groups for tone omissions. Different levels of activity between tinnitus and control groups were observed in regions corresponding to attentional as well as limbic networks. 7) The administration of sound therapy led to significant reduction in tinnitus impact over 8 weeks; this effect was largely due to BBN sound therapy which resulted in significantly greater reduction of tinnitus impact compared to nature sounds. The positive effect of sound on tinnitus was supported by secondary tinnitus and psychologicalrelated outcome measures, but not interviews. BBN sound resulted in an increase in loudness level matches needed to match tinnitus; there was minimal change in loudness level matches for nature sounds. There were indications of individual preferences and individual outcome effects observed. The presence of tinnitus subgroups was apparent in terms of which sound was most favoured, which sound had the most benefit, as well as in how sound-tinnitus interactions occurred as time progressed. Conclusions: Personality traits, emotion and prediction all play a significant role as residual factors under the ALT model to shape final tinnitus perception and experience as well as in influencing response of tinnitus to introduction of external sound introduction. Overall, tinnitus magnitude appears to increase with high stress reaction, low social closeness, low self-control and high alienation personality trait levels, as well as by the introduction of unpleasant auditory stimuli. In contrast, the presence of sound therapy stimuli decreases tinnitus magnitude and demonstrates psychological benefit over time. This thesis provides some empirical support for the ALT model of tinnitus. Further research is needed to examine attention as a weighting factor, develop clinically useful indicators of ideal sound therapy levels under the ALT framework, as well as customize therapeutic sound to tailor for individual residual levels, needs and preferences over time. Development of computational models based on the ALT which integrate residual factors, weighting factors and tinnitusexternal sound interactions may be useful for delineating subgroups and predicting how an individual might respond to potential treatments. The findings from this thesis can form a basic computational template to build-on.

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  • Car sharing in Wellington, New Zealand: Benefits and barriers

    Sobiecki, Lucia (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Sprawling urban development and high levels of car dependency in New Zealand have resulted in a range of adverse impacts, including increased greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. Car sharing can support compact development and sustainable transport patterns by providing a potential alternative to car ownership. Despite the increasing popularity of car sharing overseas, it is still in the early stages of development in New Zealand. There is a growing body of international literature about car sharing; however, very little has been written about car sharing in the New Zealand context. This thesis contributes to the literature by exploring car sharing in Wellington. This study has adopted a mixed method approach, surveying Wellington residents about car sharing and interviewing car share stakeholders. The findings from this research indicate that car sharing is a transport innovation which offers Wellington significant benefits. Perhaps most importantly, car sharing can reduce car ownership and usage, which in turn can help reduce congestion, demand for parking and greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, this study provides evidence that the people most interested in car sharing in Wellington have similar characteristics to car share members overseas. This includes younger people, apartment dwellers, households without children, and people who use a car occasionally but do not necessarily own one. This thesis also highlights that car sharing is complementary to alternative modes of transport, and underlines the close connection between car sharing and modern technologies such as automated booking. The findings from this research indicate that car share providers face a range of barriers, including access to public parking and financial assistance. Progress has already been made to remove barriers facing car sharing but more support for car sharing could allow Wellington to take full advantage of its benefits.

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  • Perspectives of Muslim husbands' roles in women's health and cancer in Indonesia

    Widiasih, Restuning (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In developing countries such as Indonesia, women face many health issues, including cancer. Social, cultural and economic factors are known barriers to women accessing health services and achieving a good health. Studies in Indonesia suggest that husbands’ support may influence women’s health behaviour, including women in breast and cervical screening and treatments. However, little is known in Indonesia about husbands’ roles in women’s health, including illness prevention, early detection, and treatment of women’s cancer. The main objectives of this study were to uncover Muslim husbands’ roles and perspectives regarding women’s health and women’s cancer, and to establish whether there were different perspectives of husbands’ roles related to geographical location, age or other social, health or cultural characteristics. This study used an Islamic ontological approach. The Basic Model of Religiosity and Health, the Health Belief Model, and the Help-Seeking Behaviour and Influencing Factors Framework theories informed data collection. A descriptive exploratory methodology was used. Methods included focus groups with 11 groups (n=73) of married Muslim men, and interviews with married Muslim women (n=20) and health professionals (n=10) from rural and urban areas of West Java province, Indonesia. Data were analysed using two techniques: the Comparative Analysis for Focus Group and the Comparative Analysis for Interviews. The findings revealed that Islamic teaching has an extremely significant position for Muslims husbands in guiding them in their family’s roles. Muslim husbands were very involved in women’s health and cancer. These roles were influenced by internal and external factors. Husbands’ significant roles in women’s health include maintaining women’s health and facilitating health treatments. However, they have a limited role in disease prevention, and early detection of women’s cancer. Muslim husbands’ limited health literacy of women’s cancer was a significant barrier in rural and downtown areas. This study’s findings contribute to a new perspective on religion as a vital influence and driver of health and health behaviour in nursing theory. There is a need for Indonesian nursing practice to incorporate a cultural safety approach to caring for Muslim husbands and wives, and for nurses to ensure men are more fully informed about women’s health. This study identified the need for improvements in health services and a reform of the health system especially in improving husbands’ knowledge and awareness of women’s cancer, and the dissemination of information about women’s cancer services, especially in rural and downtown areas. Additional health education programmes including some that target men’s health literacy are required alongside improvements in health services, especially women’s cancer services.

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  • Developing Efficient Workflows for Contemporary Design Processes and Robotics

    Smith, Cameron (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This Master’s thesis forms a section of a team based research project with the aim to understand how contemporary tools can inform a contemporary design workflow. This workflow is primarily focused on utilizing a robotic arm to incrementally form sheet aluminium into architectural components. Specifically, my role within this team is from the Project Management point of view trying to understand how Project Management can improve team focused contemporary design. The goal of the thesis is to establish a workflow outlining an efficient process for designing and fabricating prototype architectural systems. Research Questions: Team: How can contemporary tools inform a contemporary digital workflow? Individual: How can Project Management improve the performance and efficiency of team focused contemporary design workflows? The aims of the research are to first establish an understanding of the digital fabrication workflow and establish what management tools best fit within the workflow. This aligns with the team goal to create and establish how digital fabrication and robotics could be applied to New Zealand construction practice. The goal is not to suggest a replacement for current methods, but to understand and integrate a methodology using a parametric design process and, to aid the introduction of complexity in design not currently available through traditional construction and joinery methods. Understanding the function Project Management has for workflow management and development is a primary research goal which can be broken down into parts. - How can activities be efficiently designed? - What procedures need to be implemented? - What are the best process management techniques? The knowledge gained through an iterative work study shows that project managers have a unique perspective within the development of digital fabrication workflows. A project manager integrated into this process is able to influence and define the key performance indicators of projects undertaken within this contemporary environment. The method used to establish and develop a workflow for digital fabrication processes, is a work study. This involves developing a workflow based on similar cases and then redevelop it based on performance indicators from literature. Identifying key areas of failure is a part of this process and is a common method within industry for improving organisation efficiency and productivity. A limiting factor of this research is the fact the team was learning the process overtime. Therefore, people are subject to unequal levels of understanding of what needs to be considered as part of workflow development gaining new perspective with hindsight. This is not, and cannot be accounted for, however is noted as part of lessons learnt during the reflection process of the work-study.

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  • Calendar 2000

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (2000)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Victoria University calendar for 2000.

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