88,788 results

  • Does anthropomorphism affect people's ability to distinguish fact from fiction?

    Hight, Sarah Rosemary (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Anthropomorphism is a fictional tool that is used in documentaries to invoke empathy and communicate science in an entertaining and engaging way. However, the appropriateness of anthropomorphism is contested as it may fictionalise scientific content, create misleading messages and undermine the factual authority of documentaries. This thesis presents the benefits and consequences of using anthropomorphism and explores whether anthropomorphism can alter people’s ability to distinguish fact and fiction. To test this empirically, participants (N= 265) were shown one of two films and then asked to answer a short online survey. The two films were the same duration (1.56 minutes), and used identical footage from A Million Dollar Nose (Hight, 2016; the creative component of this thesis). Although they both used the same narrator, one films’ narration was anthropomorphic (Film A) whilst the other was non-anthropomorphic (Film B). Half of the participants watched Film A and the other half watched Film B. All participants then completed a short survey containing multi-choice and Likert scale questions that tested memory recall and their attitudes towards the film’s content. The results found that although both films were perceived as having the same level of accuracy, the anthropomorphised film was less strongly identified as a documentary (P=0.002). However, the anthropomorphised film also increased accurate information recall (P=0.035) without creating anthropomorphic attitudes towards the films content. This suggests that anthropomorphism is a useful tool for communicating science, engaging audiences and increasing content absorption without compromising the information’s integrity.

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  • 'Doing the work of hearing': Exploring Cambodian school girls' educational persistence

    Rogers, Tracy Leigh (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This doctoral thesis reports on a qualitative feminist study that explored Cambodian school girls’ educational persistence. The study investigated the multiple sources of support school girls utilised to remain in secondary school in rural Cambodia. This thesis contributes to the gap in existing literature on girls’ educational persistence in contexts of social and material disadvantage, and specifically attends to the dearth of in-depth qualitative studies on girls’ education in Cambodia. The theoretical framework for the study was informed by feminist theoretical perspectives, including post-structuralism, and ‘community cultural wealth’. These perspectives helped frame the methodological approach used; guided the study’s ethical considerations; provided analytical tools; and demanded the reflexivity necessary to work ethically in a cross-cultural context. Methodologically, this study involved two self-funded fieldtrips to Cambodia in 2014 and 2015, where I worked with 43 school girls, 23 young tertiary women, and seven NGO representatives to collect the ‘data’. The study employed ten different data collection methods, including art-based research methods that emphasised participant-led involvement as well as more traditional researcher-led methods, such as interviews and questionnaires. Other methods used were both participant and researcher led, and included card sorting, self-managed video interviews, and member checks. I used a range of methods in order to ameliorate language barriers and power differentials, with the intention of valorising participants’ voices. Study findings revealed both the personal agency and vulnerability of school girls in contemporary rural Cambodia. The participants drew on a range of competing discourses when they spoke about ideals of girlhood and girls’ education in Cambodia, including discourses of female domesticity, girls’ and women’s rights, female altruism, and girls’ educational worth. In doing so, the participants constructed themselves as homemakers and educated individuals, dutiful daughters and independent women, and unconventional females and positive role models. A community cultural wealth perspective provided a nuanced understanding of girls’ educational persistence, and exposed a rich interplay between individual agency and strong familial and community support, which included resourceful friends, caring teachers, and knowledgeable NGO staff. The participants’ agency was evident in their navigation of institutional barriers and resistance to deficit discourses regarding socially and materially disadvantaged girls; whilst their familial and social capitals provided access to vital resources which allowed them to overcome institutional hurdles within the education system and broader society. Based on their own experiences of remaining in school, the participants provided advice for key stakeholders in girls’ education on the necessary actions required to enable more girls to persist at school.

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  • Engineering the activities and specificities of a glycerol dehydratase and an alcohol dehydrogenase

    Maddock, Danielle (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    There is growing interest in finding renewable, environmentally friendly routes to chemicals that are traditionally derived from crude oil. The use of bacteria as living factories for the biosynthesis of these chemicals is one such alternative. Of particular interest for this application are the acetogenic members of the genus Clostridium, due to their ability to utilise carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide gas, as their sole carbon and energy source. Not only are these cheap and plentiful feedstocks, but they also both contribute to the greenhouse gas effect, so the ability to capture atmospheric carbon and turn it into useful chemicals makes this strategy especially promising. In this thesis, I have used enzyme engineering in an attempt to expand the chemical-production repertoire of Clostridium autoethanogenum to include butanone and 2-butanol, two important industrial solvents. C. autoethanogenum natively produces 2,3-butanediol, a precursor to butanone, which, in turn, is a precursor to butanol. The glycerol dehydratase from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpGDHt) can promiscuously catalyse the dehydration of 2,3-butanediol to butanone. However, it does so with low catalytic efficiency, and with strict stereoselectivity for the meso- isomer. While C. autoethanogenum produces a small amount of meso-2,3-butanediol, it predominantly produces (2R,3R)-butanediol. Therefore, in this study, enzyme engineering was used to try and create an enzyme that can turn over (2R,3R)-butanediol, and can catalyse the dehydration of both 2,3-butanediol isomers with high catalytic efficiency. KpGDHt is a dimer of an αβγ heterotrimer. Previous attempts to purify this enzyme had shown a propensity of the β subunit to disassociate during purification, yielding an inactive (αγ)2 complex. Modification of the enzyme to include a peptide linker joining the α and β subunits together (creating KpGDHt-L) prevented the loss of the β subunit during purification and increased the stability of the enzyme complex, with no detrimental effect on enzyme activity. Two strategies were used to modify the catalytic activity of KpGDHt-L: combinatorial active site saturation testing (CASTing), and consensus-guided mutagenesis. While neither strategy resulted in an enzyme that could turn over (2R,3R)-butanediol, and all variants built using CASTing showed significant losses in activity towards meso-2,3-butanediol, consensus mutagenesis yielded many variants with activity equal to, or greater than wild type towards meso-2,3-butanediol. Ultimately, the best variant enzyme contained a Thr200Ser mutation, which increased activity towards meso-2,3-butanediol by 3.6-fold. While further engineering will be required to bring activity with meso-2,3-butanediol to levels comparable to activity with native substrates, this study represents the first step on the path towards an efficient 2,3-butanediol dehydratase. The reduction of butanone to 2-butanol can be catalysed by the native primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase present in C. autoethanogenum (CaADH). This enzyme is strictly NADPH-dependent. As NADH is typically found at higher cellular concentrations, I used enzyme engineering to attempt to switch the cofactor specificity from NADPH to NADH. Site-saturation mutagenesis was used to mutate Ser199, the residue most proximal to the phosphate moiety differentiating NADPH and NADH. While no mutants were found that could utilise NADH, CaADH(S199A) showed a 3-fold increase in activity towards butanone, and CaADH(S199R) showed increased activity towards both acetone and acetoin. This work highlights the role that distal mutations can play in determining substrate specificity. This work represents the first attempt at mutagenesis of CaADH, and the most through mutagenesis study of KpGDHt. Insights from this work will help inform further mutagenesis of the two enzymes studied in this work, as well as contributing to our overall knowledge regarding enzyme engineering.

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  • Fetausia'i - a servant leadership paradigm for the mission of the Methodist Church in Samoa

    Latu, Latuivai Kioa (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Christian churches in Samoa today face public criticism regarding the autocratic style of leadership they have embraced and encouraged, which goes hand in hand with their lack of attention for people below the poverty line. This research addresses the problem entrenched in the theology and ecclesiology of the Methodist Church in Samoa (MCS) today, which is captured in the Samoan expression E lē fa’a’ele’elea se faife’au – literally translated, “pastors are not supposed to do dirty work.” The focus of the research is an analysis of the problem imbedded in this belief, particularly its failure to embody the Christ-like qualities of shepherding, stewardship, serving and caring. From a sociological point of view, the cultural values of tautua (service) and fa’aaloalo (respect) have been applied to the clergy through this expression in an exclusive and elitist way that promotes the status and wealth of church leaders or ministers, at the expense of the quality of life of their followers. The MCS’ style of leadership is hierarchical, and is manifested in the cultural system of va-fealoa’i or respect for those in authority, a system that privileges seniority and depends on the flow of material wealth from church members to clergy. This leadership model is viewed as absolute by many MCS ministers, but it also contributes to the contemporary economic and mission crises the Church now faces. It negates mutual service and embraces a notion of leadership centred in ‘being served.’ The Christological view of Jesus in the Gospels and the Pauline theology of servant leadership offers a different perspective, grounded in Jesus as ‘Servant-Lord.’ A new model of church leadership is proposed for the MCS, based on this Christocentric vision of servant leadership and the relational, inclusive and reciprocal understanding of service rooted in the Samoan cultural practice of fetausia’i (reciprocal caring).

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  • Death as the Ideal Playground? Dark Tourism, Tour Guide and Tourist Performances and Empathic Concerns at the Buried Village of Te Wairoa, Rotorua, New Zealand.

    Foster-Bell, Alyse (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis explores tour guide and tourist performances and interactions at a ‘Dark Tourism’ site. The work is important because ‘Dark Tourism’ presents with more questions than answers; the trope of the ‘dark’ is itself under-examined, and previous studies are deemed ‘theoretically fragile’. Rather than the pursuing of ‘why’/motivational questions which underpin many previous studies, and/or the inclination towards ‘strait jacket’ approaches emanating from typologies, this thesis instead offers a new coherence and approach in a performance study which is concerned with the ‘doing of’ tourism at a Dark Tourism site. The thesis is based upon an ethnographic study of The Buried Village of Te Wairoa, Rotorua, New Zealand, the site that suffered the loss of some 150 lives, and livelihoods of its survivors, in the eruption of Mt Tarawera in 1886. In participant observation, sensing the ‘live’ physicality of a ‘being there’ (one cannot just read about it) allows for both the silences (of what is ‘not said’) and the affordances of the body - all those cognitive, sensual, somatic, visceral propensities - in that which is ‘felt’, to emerge. The study utilises paradigms of performance, and emotion, to examine that ‘how’ or ‘doing of’ (rather than the ‘why’ with its sticky morality subtexts and hints of ‘deviant leisure’). Emotion in general has largely been denied, avoided, suppressed, or downplayed in this field; empathy, in particular, has also been paid insufficient attention in both anthropology and tourism studies to date. Consequently, empathy is an emotion of particular interest here; empathic concerns are scrutinised, alongside the vicissitudes of ‘empathy’ itself. The findings show that tour guides engender at least the possibility of empathy. Tourists need to personalise the site in some way (in that they are ‘sold’ their own emotion), to experience empathic attunement. Humour, (both black, and comic) is also a surprising reveal. Black humour is used to negotiate the light/dark dichotomy of a currently regenerated parkland site, a site that is at once about eruption, death and destruction, on the one hand - and colonial ‘life and living’, on the other. Whilst matters of ‘motivation’ are not foregrounded here, questions of ‘death as the ideal playground?’ and ‘what is the attraction of Dark Tourism?’ do find an answer in this thesis: that it is one’s own emotion, rather than death per se, that matters at Dark Tourism sites. Humour, regarding those ‘lighter’ aspects presenting in Dark Tourism, needs further investigation. Emotion must also be allowed a standing of greater significance in tourism studies, and cultural studies more generally. Tuhourangi’s plight – not just a loss of life, of land, of an economic base and livelihood, but also of a critical loss of identity – is also discussed, and a renaissance noted.

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  • The role of control network in the accuracy of underground laser scanning surveys

    Page, Christopher John (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Terrestrial laser scanning is used in various fields with numerous applications, one being the documentation of heritage sites. Often scans will be georeferenced with respect to a real-world coordinate system. This is done using either direct or indirect georeferencing techniques. The indirect georeferencing method was used in this research, which uses coordinated targets, referred to as Ground Control Points (GCPs), that are captured in the scan scene. Manufacturers suggest a minimum of three GCPs are used, should the z-axis not be vertical, with additional GCPs for redundancy. Ideally GCPs should be placed evenly around the extent of the scan scene. For heritage site documentation, this is not always feasible given the unique and complex nature of each site. This research investigates the quantity and spatial variability of GCPs used in a scan scene, and the subsequent effect on the point cloud accuracy. A control test network was established at the School of Surveying (SoS), where variations of GCP scenarios were investigated, which was then applied to a case study in Arras, France. The case study being a network of underground World War One tunnels that were excavated by the New Zealand Engineering Tunnelling Company (NZETC), known as the Ronville Tunnels. The results from the SoS test network show, in this particular instance, that there is little benefit in using additional GCPs in a scan scene, should the minimum (three) be placed evenly around the extent of the area being captured. Low redundancy solutions may reduce the accuracy and robustness of georeferencing solutions, as seen with the case where large errors were present where the minimum number of GCPs were used. Geometrically poor placement of GCPs shows an increased correlation between the check points root mean square errors and range from the GCP centroid. The case study results, where the scan scene extents were hundreds of metres long, showed that it is necessary to supplement the minimum number of GCPs to mitigate uncertainties in the point cloud dataset. Similar to a least squares estimation adjustment where there are less fixed stations, there is more uncertainty for an unknown position. GCPs should therefore, be placed spatially around the extents of the scan scene and where scan scene extents increase so should the number of GCPs.

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  • "Becoming the spoke in the wheel" : Wraparound and the Theory of Change : an investigation into what promotes changes within Wraparound : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Psychology at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    McNatty, Grace Ellexandra Dunnachie

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The aim of the present study was to explore the changes that young people with high and complex needs and their families’ experience through involvement with a Wraparound process. Also, to investigate if these changes aligned with those proposed by the Wraparound Theory of Change (WTOC; Walker, 2008). While there has been qualitative work done within the area of Wraparound, few studies have adopted Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Further, little Wraparound work has been done within the context of Aotearoa New Zealand. Finally, the WTOC is yet to be assessed and thus remains a theory. A fidelity measure was administered, and semi-structured interviews took place with five young people and six caregivers at the New Zealand Wraparound Program (NZWP) in the ‘plan implementation and refinement’ (third) phase of Wraparound. Analysis indicated NZWP families reported experiencing changes in the areas of family connectedness, psychological acceptance, self-efficacy, and supports. These findings were related to the pathways to change proposed by the WTOC which include (1) enhanced effectiveness of services and supports, individually and as a “package” leading to increased commitment to engage with services and (2) increased resources and capacity for coping, planning and problem-solving. Findings suggest the WTOC is accurate in its predictions for how changes come about for families involved in a Wraparound process. Such research supports future Wraparound refinement and evaluation. Additional international qualitative longitudinal research exploring change is required with young people and caregivers involved in Wraparound.

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  • What do we know about mathematics teaching and learning of multilingual adults and why does it matter?

    Ní Ríordáin, Máire; Coben, Diana; Miller-Reilly, Barbara (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The significant role of language in mathematics teaching and learning is not a new phenomenon. Given the growth of cultural and economic migration, the increasing international focus on education for economic development and the widespread use of English as a language for learning, we have become acutely aware of the importance of language in adults’ mathematics learning. While investigation has been undertaken in relation to the role of language in the learning and teaching of mathematics at primary and second level, little research has been done on multilingual (including bilingual) adults’ learning of mathematics and the ways in which teaching might support such learning. In this paper we investigate the role of language in the mathematics and numeracy education of bi/multilingual adults with a focus on the mathematics register and discourse; we address the relationship between language(s) and learning; we provide a review of available literature specific to adult learners; and discuss implications for adult mathematics education.

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  • Making the most of PIAAC: Preliminary investigation of adults’ numeracy practices through secondary analysis of the PIAAC dataset

    Coben, Diana; Miller-Reilly, Barbara; Satherley, Paul; Earle, David (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) assesses key information processing skills and collects information on how often people undertake a range of activities at work and in everyday life. We are exploring what secondary analysis of online anonymised PIAAC data can tell us about adults’ numeracy practices. In the process we review the accessibility and user-friendliness of the data for novice researchers and practitioners in the hope of encouraging them to explore this rich resource and give a brief account of our experience of the process of accessing publicly-available PIAAC data for secondary analysis.

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  • Biomimetic synthesis of thiaplidiaquinones A and B

    Khalil, IM; Barker, David; Copp, Brent (2012-12-28)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A biomimetic synthesis of the biologically active ascidian metabolites thiaplidiaquinones A and B is described. Reaction of geranylbenzoquinone with Et(3)N in CH(2)Cl(2) yielded two isomeric quinones, comprising the benzo[c]chromene-7,10-dione core of the natural products. Subsequent reaction with hypotaurine yielded the title compounds and their dioxothiazino regioisomers.

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  • A cyclical self-assessment process: Towards a model of how students engage in self-assessment

    Yan, Z; Brown, Gavin (2017)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    While significant progress has been made on understanding the effects of student self-assessment, the processes by which these effects occur are much less studied. The present research identified the actions involved in a cyclical self-assessment process. In this qualitative study, 17 undergraduate students from a teacher education institute took part in in-depth interviews focusing on the common actions students normally undertake to self-assess. The findings identified the following three actions that are commonly undertaken in the self-assessment process: (1) determining the performance criteria, (2) self-directed feedback seeking and (3) self-reflection. The paper discusses the implications of the findings and concludes with suggestions for promoting student self-assessment.

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  • Investigation of indolglyoxamide and indolacetamide analogues of polyamines as antimalarial and antitrypanosomal agents

    Wang, J; Kaiser, M; Copp, Brent (2014-05-28)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Pure compound screening has previously identified the indolglyoxy lamidospermidine ascidian metabolites didemnidine A and B (2 and 3) to be weak growth inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC50 59 and 44 ??M, respectively) and Plasmodium falciparum (K1 dual drug resistant strain) (IC50 41 and 15 ??M, respectively), but lacking in selectivity (L6 rat myoblast, IC50 24 ??M and 25 ??M, respectively). To expand the structure-activity relationship of this compound class towards both parasites, we have prepared and biologically tested a library of analogues that includes indoleglyoxyl and indoleacetic "capping acids", and polyamines including spermine (PA3-4-3) and extended analogues PA3-8-3 and PA3-12-3. 7-Methoxy substituted indoleglyoxylamides were typically found to exhibit the most potent antimalarial activity (IC50 10-92 nM) but with varying degrees of selectivity versus the L6 rat myoblast cell line. A 6-methoxyindolglyoxylamide analogue was the most potent growth inhibitor of T. brucei (IC50 0.18 ??M) identified in the study: it, however, also exhibited poor selectivity (L6 IC50 6.0 ??M). There was no apparent correlation between antimalarial and anti-T. brucei activity in the series. In vivo evaluation of one analogue against Plasmodium berghei was undertaken, demonstrating a modest 20.9% reduction in parasitaemia.

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  • Discovery and evaluation of thiazinoquinones as anti-protozoal agents

    Lam, CFC; Pearce, Allison; Tan, SH; Kaiser, M; Copp, Brent (2013-09-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Pure compound screening has identified the dioxothiazino-quinoline-quinone ascidian metabolite ascidiathiazone A (2) to be a moderate growth inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC?????? 3.1 ??M) and Plasmodium falciparum (K1 dual drug resistant strain) (IC?????? 3.3 ??M) while exhibiting low levels of cytotoxicity (L6, IC?????? 167 ??M). A series of C-7 amide and ????(??) analogues were prepared that explored the influence of lipophilicity and oxidation state on observed anti-protozoal activity and selectivity. Little variation in anti-malarial potency was observed (IC?????? 0.62-6.5 ??M), and no correlation was apparent between anti-malarial and anti-T. brucei activity. Phenethylamide 7e and ????(??)-glycine analogue 8k exhibited similar anti-Pf activity to 2 but with slightly enhanced selectivity (SI 72 and 93, respectively), while ????(??)-phenethylamide 8e (IC?????? 0.67 ??M, SI 78) exhibited improved potency and selectivity towards T. brucei rhodesiense compared to the natural product hit. A second series of analogues were prepared that replaced the quinoline ring of 2 with benzofuran or benzothiophene moieties. While esters 10a/10b and 15 were once again found to exhibit cytotoxicity, carboxylic acid analogues exhibited potent anti-Pf activity (IC?????? 0.34-0.035 ??M) combined with excellent selectivity (SI 560-4000). In vivo evaluation of a furan carboxylic acid analogue against P. berghei was undertaken, demonstrating 85.7% and 47% reductions in parasitaemia with ip or oral dosing respectively.

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  • Synthesis, DNA binding and antitumor evaluation of styelsamine and cystodytin analogues

    Fong, HKH; Copp, Brent (2013-01-28)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A series of N-14 sidechain substituted analogues of styelsamine (pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine) and cystodytin (pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridin-4-one) alkaloids have been prepared and evaluated for their DNA binding affinity and antiproliferative activity towards a panel of human tumor cell lines. Overall it was found that styelsamine analogues were stronger DNA binders, with the natural products styelsamines B and D having particularly high affinity (K(app) 5.33 ?? 10(6) and 3.64 ?? 10(6) M(-1), respectively). In comparison, the cystodytin iminoquinone alkaloids showed lower affinity for DNA, but were typically just as active as styelsamine analogues at inhibiting proliferation of tumor cells in vitro. Sub-panel selectivity towards non-small cell lung, melanoma and renal cancer cell lines were observed for a number of the analogues. Correlation was observed between whole cell activity and clogP, with the most potent antiproliferative activity being observed for 3-phenylpropanamide analogues 37 and 41 (NCI panel average GI(50) 0.4 ??M and 0.32 ??M, respectively) with clogP ~4.0-4.5.

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  • Investigation of the electrophilic reactivity of the cytotoxic marine alkaloid discorhabdin B

    Lam, CFC; Grkovic, T; Pearce, Allison; Copp, Brent (2012-04-21)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The mechanisms of action of the cytotoxic marine pyrroloiminoquinone alkaloids the discorhabdins are unknown. We have determined that discorhabdin B acts as an electrophile towards biomimetic thiol nucleophiles leading to debrominated adducts. In contrast, less potent cytotoxins discorhabdins D and Q failed to react, supporting an SAR model of cytotoxicity requiring an orchestrated combination of an electrophilic ??(1) carbon centre and a nucleophilic N-18 amine for potent activity. The stereospecific nature of nucleophile trapping exhibited by both enantiomers of discorhabdin B implies the biogenesis of ovothiol A substituted discorhabdins H, H(2), K and K(2) need not be mediated by enzymatic processes.

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  • Marine natural products

    Blunt, JW; Copp, Brent; Keyzers, RA; Munro, MHG; Prinsep, MR (2013-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This review covers the literature published in 2011 for marine natural products, with 870 citations (558 for the period January to December 2011) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1152 for 2011), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included.

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  • Illness Perceptions and Mortality in Patients With Gout: A Prospective Observational Study

    Serlachius, Anna; Gamble, Gregory; House, M; Vincent, ZL; Knight, J; Horne, Anne; Taylor, WJ; Petrie, Keith; Dalbeth, Nicola (2017-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    To examine whether illness perceptions independently predict mortality in early-onset gout.Between December 2006 and January 2014, a total of 295 participants with early-onset gout (<???0.05 for all). In the fully saturated model, the association between consequence beliefs and mortality remained robust after additional adjustment for ethnicity, disease duration, diuretic use, serum creatinine, and pain score (HR 1.18 [95% confidence interval 1.02-1.37]; P???=???0.029).Negative beliefs about the impact of gout and severity of symptoms, as well as concerns about gout and the emotional response to gout, were independently associated with all-cause mortality. Illness perceptions are important and potentially modifiable risk factors to target in future interventions.

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  • Rapid synthesis of indole cis-enamides via hydroamidation of indolic alkynes

    Dickson, E; Copp, Brent; Barker, David (2013-09-18)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The synthesis of indolic cis-enamides using a ruthenium-mediated hydroamidation of indole alkynes with primary oxalamides or ??-keto amides is reported. Using this method the total synthesis of igzamide and Z-coscinamides A and B has been achieved.

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  • Establishment of a Phenotypic-based Sand Dollar Fellaster zelandiae Embryo Development Assay and its Application in Defining the Structure-Activity Relationship of Discorhabdin Alkaloids

    Grkovic, T; Copp, Brent (2013-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An embryo development assay using the common New Zealand intertidal species Fellaster zelandiae (sand dollar) is presented. The assay was validated by comparing activity profiles of a range of discorhabdin alkaloids, natural products sourced from Latrunculia spp. sponges containing a core pyrido[2,3-h] pyrrolo[4,3,2-de]quinoline tetracyclic skeleton bound to various spiro-substituents at the C-6 position. Structural features on the discorhabdin molecule that correlated to the greatest degree of F. zelandiae embryo developmental inhibition were the presence of a spiro-dienone moiety and a C-2 bromine substituent. Based on the sand dollar embryo development assay results, a mechanism for the activity of the discorhabdin alkaloids is proposed.

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  • Synthesis of Hemitectol, Tectol, and Tecomaquinone I

    Cadelis, Melissa; Barker, David; Copp, Brent (2012-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The first total syntheses of Tectona grandis (teak) natural products hemitectol and tectol are described. The observation of spontaneous dimerisation of hemitectol to tectol suggests the monomer is the true natural product and that the dimer is an artifact of isolation.

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