82,974 results

  • Mathematics education ITE students examining the value of digital learning objects

    Hawera, Ngārewa; Wright, Noeline; Sharma, Sashi (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    One issue in mathematics initial teacher education (ITE) is how to best support students to use digital technologies (DTs) to enhance their teaching of mathematics. While most ITE students are probably using DTs on a daily basis for personal use, they are often unfamiliar with using them for educative purposes in New Zealand primary school settings. Our mathematics education programme is finding ways to address this issue, beginning with a small research project. The study’s aim is to support ITE students to develop critical thinking, confidence, knowledge and skill using DTs in teaching and learning. This paper arises from the larger action research study that sought 40 Year two ITE students’ perceptions about the mathematical content of particular Digital Learning Objects (DLOs) promoted by the Ministry of Education, and how these might be used with learners in the classroom. Key research methods were survey instruments, field notes and classroom observations. Findings from two questions in student perception surveys (centred on any mathematics concepts and skills they thought the relevant DLOs would support children’s learning, plus how these same DLOs could be used in primary classrooms) suggest that they would mainly use the DLOs to consolidate ideas already taught or learned.

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  • Extracting the MESA SR4000 Calibrations

    Charleston, Sean A.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Streeter, Lee; Cree, Michael J. (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Time-of-flight range imaging cameras are capable of acquiring depth images of a scene. Some algorithms require these cameras to be run in `raw mode', where any calibrations from the off-the-shelf manufacturers are lost. The calibration of the MESA SR4000 is herein investigated, with an attempt to reconstruct the full calibration. Possession of the factory calibration enables calibrated data to be acquired and manipulated even in “raw mode.” This work is motivated by the problem of motion correction, in which the calibration must be separated into component parts to be applied at different stages in the algorithm. There are also other applications, in which multiple frequencies are required, such as multipath interference correction. The other frequencies can be calibrated in a similar way, using the factory calibration as a base. A novel technique for capturing the calibration data is described; a retro-reflector is used on a moving platform, which acts as a point source at a distance, resulting in planar waves on the sensor. A number of calibrations are retrieved from the camera, and are then modelled and compared to the factory calibration. When comparing the factory calibration to both the “raw mode” data, and the calibration described herein, a root mean squared error improvement of 51:3mm was seen, with a standard deviation improvement of 34:9mm. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

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  • Surficial sediments of Raglan Harbour

    Sherwood, Alan M.

    Thesis
    University of Waikato

    Raglan Harbour is a drowned river valley system lying in a structurally depressed fault block. Much of the upper reaches of the harbour consist of tidal flats formed by sediment veneered shore platforms, and dissected by relatively deep channels. Estuarine conditions occur in the tidal reaches of major streams entering the harbour. Sediment textures reflect a gradual decrease in energy conditions passing, up the harbour from clean, well-sorted sands near the harbour entrance to mainly muddy sands and sandy muds that characterise the tidal flats. Tidal currents result in highly variable energy conditions. Modes of sediment transport and deposition and a generalised scheme of current patterns and relative current strengths throughout the harbour are interpreted from textural analyses. The coastal iron-sands are the principle source heavy minerals in sediments throughout Raglan Harbour. Bulk sediment mineralogies and clay mineralogies indicate detrital inheritance from hinterland rocks as the main source of terrigenous sediment supplied to the harbour as fluvial sediment load and by shoreline erosion. Benthonic organisms supply most of the carbonate and organic matter in the sediments, as well as causing considerable sediment reworking. Phosphatic concretions found in certain areas of the harbour appear to be of Recent to Sub-recent diagenetic origin. Much of the present aerial extent of Raglan Harbour is probably the result of shore platform development within the harbour during the last 8-10,000 years. The bulk of the material eroded during this process has been removed from the sedimentary system of the harbour and deposited on the continental shelf.

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  • An illustration of interdisciplinary science: Small-scale coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Wilson, Marcus T.; Waas, Jake; Tang, Alex; Iyer, Kartik; Rodger, Jenny (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a commonly used medical technique for influencing the strengths of neural connections in the brain. It is used, for example, for treating major depression. In TMS, an electric coil is placed on the surface of the scalp, and a rapidly changing current passed through it. This current-loop creates a changing magnetic field which in turn creates an electric field in the brain through electromagnetic induction. The underlying science beyond this point is less understood. The electric field somehow causes changes in the way brain cells (neurons) behave. This can lead to lasting changes in strengths of connections between neurons. To investigate the basic underlying science of TMS and inform clinical application, it would be advantageous to carry out experiments with rodents and complement these with numerical models. Unfortunately, we run into problems here. The scaling of physical effects is unhelpful – to create the same electric field over a smaller area (e.g. a mouse motor cortex as opposed to a human motor cortex) we generate more heat per unit volume and create larger forces in the coils, meaning it is difficult to apply equivalent situation to mice as to humans. We propose ways of optimising the coil geometry and currents. To increase the electric field strengths we require coils with high permeability cores to provide high field strengths, but at the same time ensuring eddy current heating is minimized. Paradoxically, coils with few turns are favourable because their low inductance allows for a rapid change in current. Numerical models (e.g. SIMNIBS, www.simnibs.de) are widely used for calculating electric field strengths in the human brain under TMS. However, they hide underlying assumptions that are only applicable to humans. We have tried with difficulty to model the equivalent case for the mouse. We have had more success in writing our own finite-area code for evaluating these fields. Example results for the induced electric field are shown in the figure. We find that the simple, unfolded structure of the mouse brain is advantageous in calculating the electric field intensities making the mouse particularly suitable for investigating coil design experimentally. Overall, this work illustrates the value of cross-disciplinary approaches to research – physicists, computer scientists, animal biologists, engineers and medical professionals have all made valuable contributions.

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  • Managing potential interactions of subsurface resources

    Field, Brad D.; Barton, Barry; Funnell, R.; Higgs, K.E.; Nichol, A.; Seebeck, H.

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Subsurface resources include oil, gas, coal, groundwater, saline aquifer minerals, and heat (for geothermal use). Pore space itself should also be considered as a resource as it can be used for injection of waste fluids, produced water, storage of natural gas, compressed air, and supercritical CO₂. Use of subsurface resources can overlap in space, and pressure changes at one site can remotely influence resource use at other sites. Resource use can also vary in time, such as the use of depleted oil or gas fields for natural gas or CO₂ storage. Before allocation of a subsurface resource it is therefore useful to understand the potentially wide range of resources available in an area, how they might be developed successively, and how they could affect each other if used concurrently. While these issues are primarily geological, they have critical significance for legal, environmental, and economic considerations.

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  • Results from a 2015 survey of NZ farm managers/owners covering debt and related issues designed to explore the impact of debt

    Greig, Bruce J.; Nuthall, Peter L.; Old, Kevin

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    With increasing debt levels across primary production businesses it is important to have contemporary knowledge of the levels of debt on NZ farms, including both past and present levels, but more importantly, have information on the difficulties debt levels might be creating and the human factors associated with these debt levels. This report provides information and data from a random stratified survey across all farm types in all regions of New Zealand designed to answer the questions highlighted. In general the data is presented rather than deeply analysed as this will occur in a series of research articles to follow. The information contained in the report is available for everyone with an interest in debt matters to allow them to further analyse situations deemed to be important. The information was obtained through an eight page questionnaire sent out to the sample which was stratified by farm type, farm area, and region. The strata percentages of the total sample of nearly 2300 farmers were based on the population percentages. The response rate was 19% with the responses not being significantly different from the sampled percentages. The data is contained in 133 tables which divide the information according to farm type, total farm capital groupings, debt levels, and equity groups in most cases, but also by farmer age, education level and exam grades in other cases. Manager gender divisions are also presented where appropriate as well as labour unit level groupings. It is clear debt levels vary widely with some farms having zero debt, but also some have small equity. Most farms are held in trusts and partnerships of some kind, though sole proprietorship is also important. Most debt is through fixed mortgages with interest only payments occurring. In real terms capital gains are virtually non-existent, and the return on capital hovers round 3% making debt reduction difficult, though it is occurring as shown by the changing equity levels. Anxiety over debt issues, and many other issues, is also prevalent. Information on the farmers’ objectives is also presented showing farmers seek many outcomes from their farms other than financial. If the latter was the main objective many farmers would sell up. Also presented is data on farmers’ management style as this could well impact on debt levels and repayments. The full list of questions asked and information obtained is listed in the appendix copy of the questionnaire.

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  • Extraction of pathogenesis-related proteins and phenolics in Sauvignon Blanc as affected by grape harvesting and processing conditions

    Tian, Bin; Harrison, Roland; Morton, James D.; Jaspers, Marlene V.; Hodge, Simon; Grose, C.; Trought, Michael C.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) and chitinases are the two main groups of pathogenesisrelated (PR) proteins found in wine that cause protein haze formation. Previous studies have found that phenolics are also involved in protein haze formation. In this study, Sauvignon Blanc grapes were harvested and processed in two vintages (2011 and 2012) by three different treatments: (1) hand harvesting with whole bunch press (H-WB); (2) hand harvesting with destem/crush and 3 h skin contact (H-DC-3); and (3) machine harvesting with destem/crush and 3 h skin contact (M-DC-3). The juices were collected at three pressure levels (0.4 MPa, 0.8 MPa and 1.6 MPa), some juices were fermented in 750 mL of wine bottles to determine the bentonite requirement for the resulting wines. Results showed juices of M-DC-3 had significantly lower concentration of proteins, including PR proteins, compared to those of H-DC-3, likely due to the greater juice yield of M-DC-3 and interactions between proteins and phenolics. Juices from the 0.8–1.6 MPa pressure and resultant wines had the highest concentration of phenolics but the lowest concentration of TLPs. This supported the view that TLPs are released at low pressure as they are mainly present in grape pulp but additional extraction of phenolics largely present in skin occurs at higher pressing pressure. Wine protein stability tests showed a positive linear correlation between bentonite requirement and the concentration of chitinases, indicating the possibility of predicting bentonite requirement by quantification of chitinases. This study contributes to an improved understanding of extraction of haze-forming PR proteins and phenolics that can influence bentonite requirement for protein stabilization

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  • Understanding the fresh produce safety challenges

    Hussain, Malik; Gooneratne, Sarojith R.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Editorial. This article belongs to the Special Issue Fresh Produce Safety.

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  • The Consequences of Using Advanced Physical Assessment Skills in Medical and Surgical Nursing: A Hermeneutic Pragmatic Study

    Zambas, SI; Smythe, EA; Koziol-Mclain, J

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Background Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of "advanced" physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. Design This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Method Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. Results The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Conclusion Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. Relevance to clinical practice The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting.

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  • Identification and Activation of TLR4-mediated Signalling Pathways by Alginate-derived Guluronate Oligosaccharide in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    Fang, W; Bi, D; Zheng, R; Cai, N; Xu, H; Zhou, R; Lu, J; Wan, M; Xu, X

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Alginate, a natural acidic polysaccharide extracted from marine brown seaweeds, is composed of different blocks of β-(1, 4)-D-mannuronate (M) and its C-5 epimer α-(1, 4)-L-guluronate (G). Alginate-derived guluronate oligosaccharide (GOS) readily activates macrophages. However, to understand its role in immune responses, further studies are needed to characterize GOS transport and signalling. Our results show that GOS is recognized by and upregulates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on RAW264.7 macrophages, followed by its endocytosis via TLR4. Increased expression of TLR4 and myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2) results in Akt phosphorylation and subsequent activation of both nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). Moreover, GOS stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs); notably, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation depends on TLR4 initiation. All these events contribute to the production of inflammatory mediators, either together or separately. Our findings also reveal that GOS induces cytoskeleton remodelling in RAW264.7 cells and promotes macrophage proliferation in mice ascites, both of which improve innate immunity. Conclusively, our investigation demonstrates that GOS, which is dependent on TLR4, is taken up by macrophages and stimulates TLR4/Akt/NF-κB, TLR4/Akt/mTOR and MAPK signalling pathways and exerts impressive immuno-stimulatory activity.

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  • Middle leaders matter. White paper

    Robson, J.; Bassett, M. (2017-05-16T14:30:02Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Middle leaders in Aotearoa New Zealand schools hold a pivotal role in leading the teaching and learning activities that determine the success of educational outcomes (Ministry of Education, 2012). Most middle leaders find their role rewarding, however, they experience the tension of being both teacher and leader. Although middle leaders have influential positions within schools, they are often not provided with specific middle leadership development, nor effective appraisal to undertake this complex role. Recent literature supports the need for middle leadership development and meaningful appraisal. In the absence of a government initiative, the onus falls on school leaders to develop and appraise their middle leaders, yet middle leaders believe it is not happening adequately (Bassett, 2016, Cardno & Robson, 2016). This white paper presents a case for an online course specifically designed for middle leaders. The online course offers a solution to the problem, and aims to explore the fundamental elements of middle leadership, from understanding the role itself, and leading teams, through to leading from the middle, and connecting communities of leaders across schools.

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  • Designing a novel educational game for teaching C# programming

    Hinds, M.; Baghaei, Nilufar; Ragon, P.; Lambert, J.; Dajakaruna, T.; Houghton, T.; Dacey, Simon; Casey, John (2017-05-17T14:30:01Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Learning to code can be a daunting experience for a lot of students. RunJumpCode is a novel 2D platformer video game, designed and developed in Unity, to teach players the fundamental concepts of C# programming. The game enhances the player’s programming knowledge by providing a fun range of challenges and puzzles to solve. We promoted the interaction of programming through a ‘Code Box’, allowing players to enter lines of predefined code that modifies in-game objects. This tool is essential in completing the challenges and puzzles we designed. To allow alterations of its properties, we made further manipulation of each object possible, which would give the player creative freedom to complete each level. Quizzes and journals were utilized to assess and collate their learnt material for future reference. In addition, we created a mobile application to track each player’s statistics throughout the game and compare their progress with other users. The results of a pilot study showed that users enjoyed playing the game and found it valuable for enhancing their programming knowledge.

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  • RunJumpCode : an educational game for educating programming

    Hinds, M.; Baghaei, Nilufar; Ragon, P.; Lambert, J.; Dajakaruna, T.; Houghton, T.; Dacey, Simon (2017-05-17T14:30:00Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Programming promotes critical thinking, problem solving and analytic skills through creating solutions that can solve everyday problems. However, learning programming can be a daunting experience for a lot of students. RunJumpCode is an educational 2D platformer video game, designed and developed in Unity, to teach players the fundamental concepts of C# programming. The game enhances the player’s programming knowledge by providing a fun range of challenges and puzzles to solve. We promoted the interaction of programming through a ‘Code Box’, allowing players to enter lines of predefined code that modifies in-game objects. This tool is essential in completing the challenges and puzzles we designed. To allow alterations of its properties, we made further manipulation of each object possible, which would give the player creative freedom to complete each level. Quizzes and journals were utilized to assess and collate their learnt material for future reference. In addition, we created a mobile application to track each player’s statistics throughout the game and compare their progress with other users. A full evaluation study has been planned, the goal of which is to examine the effect of using the system on students’ learning.

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  • Adaptive document image skew estimation

    Rezaei, S.B.; Shanbehzadeh, J.; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2017-05-12T14:30:02Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The skew of the scanned document image is inevitable, and its correction improves the performance of document recognition systems. Skew specifies the text lines deviation from the horizontal or vertical axes. To date, skew estimation algorithms have employed specific features in a repetitive process. We can improve these algorithms by simply using an adaptive algorithm. This approach is suitable when we have large number of similar documents. This paper proposes adaptive document image skew estimation algorithm using the features of existing methods and supervised learning. This approach significantly improves the skew estimation time and accuracy. The time improvement comes from the training that need be performed only once on the training images rather than the repetitive process for each image of previous algorithms. The accuracy improvement comes from the appropriate selection of features, learning algorithm and image adaptively. This method works well in all skew ranges up to 0.1°.

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  • Engaging children in diabetes education through mobile games

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Casey, John; Nandigam, D.; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein; Maddison, R. (2017-05-17T14:30:01Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Traditional methods for diabetic education rely heavily on written materials and there is only a limited amount of resources targeted at educating diabetic children. Mobile games can be effective, evidence-based, and motivating tools for the promotion of children's health. In our earlier work, we proposed a novel approach for designing computer games aimed for educating children with diabetes and applied our design strategy to a mobile Android game (Mario Brothers). In this paper, we report the findings of a preliminary evaluation study (n = 12) conducted over 1 week. The initial results showed that the children found the game engaging and improved their knowledge of healthy diet and lifestyle.

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  • Report on the Banishing Bullying Together projects in McLaren Park / Henderson South

    Bridgman, Geoffrey (2017-05-10T05:40:26Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Te Punanga Haumaru funding supports whanau and community driven action that encourages positive social behaviour in children and young people, and reduces the incidence of bullying. The Violence Free Communities Banishing Bullying Together BBT project in the McLaren Park/Henderson South (MPHS) area aims to: • Strengthen community and network awareness of bullying and engagement in proactive prevention approaches across all aspects of the project • Further develop the use, for younger community members, of performance and art processes which encourage positive and rich identity formation, group collaboration and the development of conflict resolution and leadership skills • Coordinate, through local community exploration of their needs and resources, a series of projects, run by community champions, that aim to improve the quality of life of the community • Create opportunities to influence how bullying is understood and responded to in social media Activities will include: • Hosting community events such as Pink Shirt Day, Our Amazing Place (OAP), SPEAK that connect whanau to services and project activities • Continued ROOTZ, Project Respect and Legacy workshops and the Mark-it-Up art project enabling young people to put their experiences and solutions to bullying into performances and art shared with the public. • Inspiring conversations in work places, churches and sports organisations about bullying prevention (Pink Shirt Day, Mark-it-Up) • Providing facilitation training around leadership and conflict resolution. • Utilising local celebrities as connectors and role models (SPEAK) • Positive social media work (Violence Free Communities, BBT and OAP websites and Facebook pages, Neighbourly) • Resources and tools such as the Bystander Guide to Banishing Bullying, OAP resources: The 2014-2015 BBT project builds on the previous year’s work of the same name also funded by Te Punanga Hamaru. The emphasis in this year’s programme shifted away from awareness building to building both individual and community capacity to prevent bullying. This was driven, in part, by our experience of building awareness and by an analysis of the drivers of bullying. For example, one of the most successful awareness projects last year was the stall that we ran as part of the OAP event. The stall was at the end of an alleyway that had pinned up a number quotes on A2 laminated posters from some residents about their fear of alleyways and, generally, of walking around their community and from other residents who weren’t fearful and wanted to engage with their community. Everyone who came along the alleyway wanted to discuss what they’d read and consider how they felt about the safety of their community and what coned be done to improve it. These were richer conversations with residents about a very important aspect of bullying (being safe in the street) that we were able to have than with events like Dinner with Difference (a community discussion event) or the community feedback sessions from the in-depth interviews we did last year. What it told us is that communication with residents has to be on their turf and in a way that means they can directly engage with the issues and, hopefully, take action.

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  • Digital DIY : EdFab Project

    Patel, Yusef; McMeel, D. (2017-05-12T14:30:04Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The widespread availability of automated fabrication tools is rising dramatically. Entry-level CNC routers, robotics and 3D printers can be a cost effective machinery for small to medium sized enterprises to implement. The demand to reduce housing costs and to increase resilience and quality within the construction industry will lead to a dramatic change in how we build in the years to come. Today, one extreme of housing design remains defined by prefabrication, mass-produced ‘off the shelf’ materials and processes. At the other extreme, bespoke housing still requires designers to hire specialist consultants and tradespeople to calculate, engineer and manufacture custom made building elements, resulting in outcomes that are not always cost effective. In this paper, we outline EDFAB: eco – digital fabrication research project, with the aim to challenge conventional processes and relationships and propose a radically new but viable design and building alternative. To achieve these aims, the project is developing a system that introduces process and product innovation. It combines enhanced construction technologies, new attitudes towards materials and digital fabrication methods to produce distinctive, high quality, healthier and cost effective residential buildings that conform to the international housing standard. The paper discusses the specific contribution to the project from the different involved research areas – building technology, architecture and digital fabrication technologies - and presents the early results towards a ‘do it yourself’ (DIY) 10m2 prototype domestic scale ‘sleep out’, designed and built using CNC routers and novel plywood construction methods that produce a kit-of-parts that are very easy to handle.

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  • Biosecurity awareness of ferry passengers travelling to islands in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand.

    Fraser, Diane; Dabb, H.; Graham, C. (2017-05-10T05:40:23Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Protection of the islands of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park, particularly those that are ‘Pest Free’, from the impacts of invasive organisms is vital for the ongoing management of New Zealand native species. It is well known that the rate and extent of spread of invasive species have primarily been due to human-mediated transport, be this intentional or unintentional. Due to the high residential/commercial/visitor attraction of these islands, there is significant opportunity for the transport of invasive species via private or commercial sea and air craft. This project aims to increase and celebrate passenger awareness of biosecurity risk, increase the understanding of the types of materials transported on ferries and identify some of the commercial sources of these products. Passengers travelling on ferries to primarily Great Barrier and Rakino islands were engaged in conversation to gain an indication of the level of biosecurity awareness of passengers. The results will assist Auckland Council in the strategic management of risk pathways to the islands of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park.

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  • Healthy Deaf Mind Seminar Series. Feedback summary and analysis. Coalition of Deaf Mental Health Professionals, Auckland.

    Bridgman, Geoffrey; Sainsbury, C. (2017-05-10T05:40:26Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Healthy Deaf Minds Aotearoa conference took place in Auckland (20th), Wellington (24th) and Christchurch (30th) in November 2015. 196 people attended across the 3 venues including a small group of CDMHP members who ran the events, and helped to facilitate 2 panel sessions. THIS REPORT This report provides a brief overview of conference, and presents a summary of attendees feedback, gathered via feedback forms, which were distributed and completed on the day, and 2 facilitated panel sessions. The feedback form was designed by conference hosts CDMHP to elicit delegates perspectives on the value of the day, areas where they would like further information, and priorities for Deaf mental health service development. A questionnaire from Dr Brendan Monteiro’s (the guest speaker) work place, St Georges Healthcare, in the UK was also distributed to gauge attendees views on the relevance, quality, and delivery of his presentations. The rating scales used to measure attendees understanding of each topic before and after each presentation have been included in this report. WHAT WAS HEALTHY DEAF MINDS AOTEAROA ABOUT? The principle aim of conference was to provide the opportunity for attendees to come together and learn about the needs of Deaf people with mental health needs, and more specifically, in the criminal justice system. Exploration of Deaf development, mental illness and recovery in the Deaf world context provided a shared learning platform through which Deaf people, practitioners and service commissioners could develop their respective knowledge. The importance of culture and communication in attaining positive treatment outcomes was a central theme throughout the day.

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  • The effects of the Parent Empowerment Programme (PEP) with parents of young Māori children

    Landon-Lane, Corina (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Parenting programmes have been shown to be effective in reducing children’s challenging behaviours and increasing parental use of positive behaviour strategies. However, it is difficult to find a brief group parenting intervention that teaches function-based assessment and from this function-based intervention plans. It is even more difficult to find a programme that has been culturally adapted for a Māori population. The aim of this project was to collect evidence on the effectiveness of the culturally adapted Parent Empowerment Programme (PEP). The present project used a non-concurrent single case design with a sample of three parent-child dyads and one Playcentre supervisor. Parents self-identified a home routine time where their child engaged in challenging behaviour. Two 2-hour PEP workshops were conducted in the home of one of the participants. Parents undertook a 36 question Knowledge Quiz pre- and post- workshop. From the workshops, the parents identified the function of their child’s challenging behaviour and then identified the strategies they would use to decrease this behaviour in the home setting. Video recordings were used to obtain baseline, intervention, and follow-up measures on the percentage of time children engaged in challenging behaviour, and the percentage of parental use of positive behaviour support strategies during the identified home routine time. The results showed: 1) three of the four participants increased their knowledge of functional behaviour assessment and positive behaviour strategies, 2) parents correctly identified the function of their child’s behaviour then identified and implemented a positive behaviour support strategy, 3) children’s challenging behaviours decreased and parental use of positive behaviour strategies increased during intervention phase, this was maintained at follow-up, 4) social validity results were varied with three of the participants finding the PEP socially acceptable, and 5) all participants engaged with and completed the programme. The findings provide support for the effectiveness of the culturally adapted Parent Empowerment Programme, and showed that three parents can successfully identify and implement a function-based intervention in their own home with success.

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