90,990 results

  • The use of eLearning, blended learning and digital literacy tools to improve student engagement at Cut Above Academy, increasing student retention and student success

    Young, Curtis (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The main purpose of this research has been to establish whether or not the adoption of blended learning and digital literacy tools may increase student engagement in a trade based training environment, therefore improving student retention and student success. Cut Above Academy, (CAA) a private tertiary education, (PTE) provider, has been used as a case study to assess the viability of an eLearning innovation. The research has adopted a business theory approach, which employs change management theory and innovation theory. CAA’s business goals are to improve student retention and student success. A literature review has indicated that boosting student engagement will improve student retention and student success. The literature review has demonstrated a positive link between new technology and student engagement. The proposal of this research is for CAA to initiate an eLearning innovation with a Learning Management System, (LMS) and the internet on campus. An eLearning strategy would be a process innovation in the current approach to delivering education which will add value to the service experienced by customers. A phenomenological approach has been used with qualitative research. In-depth interviews have been conducted to analyse the willingness of staff and students to adopt the change. Industry representatives have been interviewed to establish a graduate profile and eLearning experts from Unitec have been interviewed to benchmark change management strategies for eLearning. Recommendations have been provided for a process innovation strategy. Recommendations have been made for the human resource management, (HRM) impact of developing staff capabilities in information and communications technology, (ICT) and digital literacy. This research has been conducted during the previous ownership of CAA. New leadership represents an opportunity to revise the strategy for eLearning. This research has concluded that an eLearning program with digital literacy tools training is not only beneficial for a training institution with the goal of increasing student success; it is essential.

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  • Why trade students withdraw from their courses : students’ perspectives

    Clague, Philip (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Despite increasing numbers of students embarking on tertiary studies in New Zealand, the proportion of students completing a qualification is low compared to other OECD countries and Ministry of Education data shows that completion rates are low for students at Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) compared to other tertiary organisations within New Zealand. This dissertation examines the reasons why students at a polytechnic stay on or withdraw from their courses. A qualitative methodology was employed for this research, focusing on a course with a low success rate at Unitec New Zealand. The primary sources of data were student pre- and post-course questionnaires and semi-structured interviews with three students. This research project found that polytechnic students face a number of issues including finances and the time and cost of having to commute daily to the institution. This research project also found that the youngest students had the highest risk of withdrawing from the course prior to its completion. Additionally, this research project found that the main factors that put ITP students at risk of not successfully completing their course could be identified prior to, and in the early stages of, their courses. These findings imply that early intervention by academic and support staff may lead to improved retention rates among this demographic of student. The interventions include: interviewing the students prior to the course to ensure they are aware of the costs involved in full-time study; having the students identify issues that may lead to having to withdraw and putting support in place to mitigate the effects of these issues; making a greater effort to socially and academically integrate the students and ensuring that students who struggle to pass early formative assessments are given extra support.

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  • Bamb’upyog : a bamboo ecological construction, learning and exhibition centre

    Shah, Akshay (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The title Bamb’upyog is a combination of two Hindi words, bambu (which translates to bamboo) and upyog (which translates to application, or utility). This research project explores the possibility of applying bamboo as a primary material in architecture. The proposed design is for an ecological construction, learning and exhibition centre, located in Mumbai, India. The facility is a complex of three distinctly different buildings, dedicated to experimentation, innovation, demonstration and promotion of sustainable construction. The project investigates how such a facility can be constructed by predominantly using bamboo. The Centre is necessary because the current, carbon intensive building practices in India are not sustainable in the long term. Bamb’upyog begins by investigating bamboo as a material, its characteristics, advantages and socio-cultural implications. Current knowledge, use of techniques and similar objectives of showcasing the true potential of this ‘green gold’ are some of the important characteristics reflected in the precedents. The array of precedents yielded a selection of possible construction systems and details. The investigated precedents, coupled with existing information, are significant to the research in providing strategies and guidelines for design. The site and its analysis, and the program development led to organising the site in the form of a campus with three key buildings- a Learning Centre, a Workshop and an Exhibition Centre. The intention is to change the public perception of bamboo. The goal of the ecological centre is for developing communities to gain and disseminate knowledge and skills for optimising the use of locally sourced materials in a sustainable, socially acceptable and culturally appropriate manner. Project site: Mahim Nature Park (MNP) in Mumbai, India.

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  • Swim or sink

    Thammalla, Mayank (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    It is believed, by the year 2,100, rising sea levels will consume the Maldives entirely. Without the land, the country cannot survive. This unique phenomena threatens an entire nation, an identity, and a 2,000 year old culture. Various options are being considered by the Maldivian government, who must make decisions now, that no other Maldivian generation has faced before; with the hope to geographically maintain their current position on the globe. This research project, Swim or Sink, explores the design of a prototype that architecturally utilises a semi-submersible oil rig, in attempt to demonstrate the housing of Maldivian people and their associated culture. The project analyses the social, urban and cultural structures of the Maldives capital - Malé, (the largest city in the Maldives) in conjunction with the evaluation of the semi-submersible oil rig template and its relevant structural parameters. The fusing of these core elements suggests the plausibility of cultural continuity within the parameters defined by the oil rig. Ultimately preserving their geographical and cultural presence on the globe, in a fail-safe manner.

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  • Nurturing locus : how can architecture nurture inspiration and ideas in creative thinking?

    Babatugon, John Anthony (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Architecture is what surrounds us. It is where we live, where we learn, where we work, and where we play. This project aims to produce an architectural design solution which generates an environment that nurtures creative thinking where inspiration and ideas seem to happen more easily. Creativity depends upon inspiration and ideas. It has been discovered that the creativity of an adult and a child are not the same. One is fearful and restrained, the other open and free respectively. Providing an interlock between these two characteristics which would integrate child and adults in an environment where interaction and play can happen which may inspire more courage in the adults to take greater risks, thereby fostering more adult creativity. Architecture would then need to help this sync, symbiosis, synergy of the two realms. Investigating what types of spaces, connections, environments, and atmospheres to facilitate a seamless integration of adults and children can be developed. This projects purpose is to design a creativity centre for innovation allied with a pre-school/kindergarten. The interaction between the adults (charged with innovation) and the children (vitality, clarity, and pure creativity) can spark break-throughs for adults. These interactions are associated around play and mental relaxation of their adult focus to allow subconscious creative activity to occur. The site is located in Auckland CBD, corner of Mayoral Drive and Wakefield Street. It is an existing carpark located between Telecom House and AUT buildings.

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  • Contacting with clarity : the communicative purposes of osteopathic touch

    Barrington, Anneke (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and describe osteopaths’ perspectives on the communicative purposes of their professional touch. BACKGROUND: Touch is a key defining feature of osteopathy. Physical contact between osteopaths and their patients is essential to communication during examination, diagnosis and treatment. Yet there is no existing research that describes the communicative purposes of touch from the perspective of osteopathic practitioners. METHODS: Purposive sampling led to the recruitment of five participants who were osteopaths registered and practising in New Zealand. Data were collected during single semi-structured interviews, which were then transcribed and analysed using the framework of interpretive description. RESULTS: Nine sub-themes emerged in the data, which were grouped into three key themes. Theme [A] Negotiation – communicating through the process highlighted the ways in which osteopaths use touch to communicate with their patients through the stages of a consultation. Theme [B] Reassurance and Empowerment – a therapeutic embrace explored how osteopathic touch communicates qualities of reassurance, care and empowerment which are considered invaluable components of the therapeutic process. Theme [C] Awareness – ensuring professionalism emphasised the need for osteopaths to maintain a context that is always appropriate for their professional touch, through the use of consent and boundaries, and conveying competence. CONCLUSION: Touch is an important tool used by osteopaths to communicate with their patients. For the participants, clarity and continuity are two key qualities of osteopathic touch that aid its communicative intentions. These include engaging the patient, establishing trust, providing reassurance and care, allowing patient involvement and empowerment, and conveying professionalism. Limitations of this study and indications for future research are considered.

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  • At the confluence : heritage, landscape and the construction of belonging

    Frances, Helen (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Landscape architecture has a long history of engagement with heritage. Design practice frequently hones in on the expression of narrative associated with the design site to reflect, or promote, a sense of place. However, heritage is a cultural construct, a version of the past created by people to serve their needs in the present. Because it is invented by people it is always contestable; what is significant and valued by one group of people will not be so by others. Additionally, in relation to landscape there is a tendency to think only of built forms, material objects, historical narratives associated with place and scenic qualities as heritage concerns. Intangible heritage such as traditional practices, activities, art and story may be more important than material heritage for some people. This project uses the design of a riverside walkway in a small rural community with a very strong heritage story to test an engagement with heritage in the landscape that incorporates the political and intangible dimensions as revealed as significant by the community. The project uses four main streams of research to inform an iterative design process: interviews and focus groups to uncover the politics of heritage on this site, and explore the meanings and value of different kinds of heritage to the community ; an examination of rivers, the unique qualities of the rivers in the design site, and their meaning to the local community ; an examination of theories of landscape that provide a framework for representing intangible heritage; and an analysis of design precedents that reveal design principles for walkways and the dynamics of politics in contested sites. From these converging streams of research a design approach for the walkway is proposed that firstly places landscape architecture within the social-cultural political frame that generates heritage, and thus makes design part of a process that reinvents heritage, rather than simply reflecting it. Secondly, based on occupation of the site and activities within it, time and process are proposed as organising principles for representing heritage, rather than traditional methods of interpretation such as storyboards. Third, utilising design principles that emerged from the analysis of precedents, and a focus on process and community engagement, the design seeks to make a material space that attracts people to use it and works as an amenity for this community. Patuharakeke are a composite hapu descended from most major iwi groups in the north, including Ngati Wai, Ngapuhi nui tonu and Ngati Whatua, and affiliates to a very large number of hapu. Located on the south side of Whangarei Harbour, the Patuharakeke rohe stretches on the seaward side, including foreshore and seabed, from Mangawhai Heads in the south to the entrance of the Mangapai River, just south of Whangarei. The boundary extends inland to include the Brynderwyn, or Piroa, ranges, the hill blocks surrounding Waipu and the Kakanui Ranges further west (Patuharakeke Te Iwi Trust Board (Inc), 2007). In their statement of evidence to the Waitangi Tribunal Patuharakeke identify over fifty sites of significance in or around their rohe. Notable in relation to this project are the Waipu caves in the Pohuenui Fault Block, the Waihoihoi River that runs through Waipu, Uretiti beach and the whole of the Wangari (Bream) Bay coastal area known as Te Akau. In addition there are twenty-four recorded defensive pa in and around Waipu. Site: Waihoihoi River near the town of Waipu, Northland.

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  • Design for diversity : an architectural response for rehabilitation and reconnection of ecological diversity

    Waldo, Abby (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Architecture demands a certain responsibility to the changing environments of today’s world and the sustainable practices that can support it. Overtime, this responsibility has only become more important as habitat loss, pollution, over-exploitation, and species introduction are increasingly affecting the diversity of landscapes and resources of today’s world. How can a research facility on an off shore island in New Zealand educate and promote change for ecological significance and biodiversity? How can architects and designers 'design for diversity' while taking into account cultural context and the unique environments that surround them? This research project aims to explore the architecture and planning of an educational facility that is deeply rooted in the cultural ties of the land, and the island solutions that support it. In the end, the project develops a design proposal that compasses indigenous knowledge, values, and understandings in conjunction with Western science practices and research. Project site: Te Maraeroa on Hauturu-o-Toi (Little Barrier Island) in the Hauraki Gulf.

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  • Reclaiming the feminine : a co-operative inquiry on the embodied experience of the divine feminine in Social Practice

    Nedungat, Dheepa (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research represents the testimony of six women’s understanding of the divine feminine, including myself as co-researcher. Through a co-operative inquiry, we explored how our understanding influences us as social practitioners. Co-operative inquiry offered us an experiential and participative process to engage with the topic, by using a radical approach to research, in which the traditional role of researcher was replaced by a team of co-researchers all in equal positions. In this way, the research outcomes were generated based on a group effort. This study is important because an inquiry into the divine feminine demonstrates the challenges we face as social justice advocates particularly in terms of our personal identity as women and our personal experiences of power. The research suggests if we are truly to engage in practices that are emancipatory, empowering and transformative, we need to address those challenges and review our relationship to power. The results of this research demonstrate how the process of inquiry into the divine feminine calls for: having a balanced view, particularly in activism  reclaiming our power in our relationship to our womanhood and femininity  reclaiming our relationship to our body, our feeling self and to nature We were each touched, moved and inspired by the inquiry process. The inward reflection not only honed our self-reflective skills, it also created a bridge to a deeper understanding of who we are. We learnt through group dynamics, how to collaborate and authentically engage in reflection and meaning-making, despite our differences and beliefs. We uncovered, through transformation of our being, the qualities of the divine feminine. What we discovered, was not a list of qualities to aspire to, rather the transformative aspect of the divine feminine was in the process of inquiry. It was in this process of inquiring what the divine feminine means, that each of us came into relationship with ourselves in a new transformative way.

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  • The wall, the joint, the window, stair and door

    Sedon, Laura (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Through the investigation Carlo Scarpa’s architecture, four design techniques have been chosen; these techniques explain the reasoning behind Scarpa’s decision making. The four techniques will be the influence in discovering a new approach to reactivating an existing building. The site selected for this project is the Leys Institute, Ponsonby. The site, as well as the general Ponsonby area, has a long history and a strong community mentality. How the history of the site can be incorporated into the design will be investigated through the use of exploratory drawings and model making. Drawings and modelling will also be used to investigate how the four Carlo Scarpa techniques are applied to the building. The intention of this project is to generate a design that uses Scarpa’s design techniques to create community based spaces within the building that will draw the local people in. Scope and limitations: Although this project involves the use of an existing building, it is not a conservation project. Design decisions will be made with respect for conservation, but will not follow the ICOMOS NZ Charter guidelines.

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  • Suitable leadership styles increase workplace motivation in the Lao banking industry

    Vongphanakhone, Suksavanh (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    In today‟s fast changing environment, flexibility and adaptability are significantly important factors for organisations to survive and thrive. The study of effective leadership styles is one of the key management functions which enable an organisation to sustain its competitive advantage and develop both its employees and the organisational outcomes.In order to ensure good quality management for an organisation, it is imperative to have effective leadership styles to produce positive business outcomes such as high levels of productivity, effective and efficient use of resources, high levels of quality and a positive can do attitude. Lao People‟s Democratic Republic (PDR) is in a period of dynamic change. The country is making a gradual transition to a market economy and opening up to external trade and foreign investment.Thus, the government requires organisations and businesses to improve their service and business performance, especially the service of the banking industry which is one of the major factors boosting the Lao economic growth. However, the performance and efficiency of commercial banks in Laos is still low compared to the international standard and there is huge customer dissatisfaction regarding the low service of banks' staff. The aim of this study is to identify the practical leadership styles that the banking industry in Laos should apply to improve employee performance and to increase their motivation at work. This research also identifies the main factors that motivate employees in Lao banks to work. In terms of the methodology, this research employs mixed methods in order to better explore the research problem. Findings from the research reveal that there are some weaknesses associated with the current leadership practices in Lao banks. There are a number of employees who are dissatisfied with their immediate superior‟s leadership practices, and a very small number of employees felt satisfied with their work performance; this is a result of the low level of staff empowerment in the banks. There are four main leadership styles that employees preferred their superiors to be practising in order to improve their work performance and motivation at work. The possible four effective leadership styles are authentic leadership, transformational leadership, charismatic leadership, and participative leadership. In the area of motivational factors, results from the survey reveal that money is not the only factor that motivates employees to work but there are other significant factors such as self-esteem needs, opportunity for growth and fairness in the workplace.

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  • Investigating the perceived benefits and difficulties associated with academic mentoring for Maori students within secondary education in Aotearoa-New Zealand

    Millar, Sheena (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This study set out to examine the perceived benefits and difficulties associated with academic mentoring for Maori students within secondary education in Aotearoa-New Zealand. A qualitative methodology was employed for this research, which focused on two mainstream secondary schools. At each school, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the educational leader in charge of the academic mentoring programme, and focus group discussions were undertaken with staff, whanau and Maori Year 12 and 13 students. This study sought to approach the research from a strengths-based perspective, meaning that the schools selected were consistently producing results for Maori students above the national average in their decile range. The data collected were used to identify themes and commonalities across the schools in a cross-school analysis. The findings indicate a variety of approaches to how academic mentoring can be offered in secondary schools. However, there are commonalities which impact on the perceived benefits and difficulties associated with academic mentoring for Maori students in mainstream secondary settings in Aotearoa-New Zealand. The literature and the data show that academic mentoring is an approach which could assist Maori student achievement if certain conditions exist. These conditions are: supporting Maori student academic decision making with data; including whanau in the implementation and running of the programme; addressing any sustainability issues associated with the programme; and being aware of the cultural pedagogy staff require to educate the whole child. Conversely, a challenge identified is that the experience of academic mentoring for Maori students is dependent on the academic mentor. This means not all teachers are equipped with equal skills when it comes to academic mentoring. These findings suggest that school leaders need to consider carefully how they will introduce, implement and run such programmes. The academic mentoring programme cannot be an ‘add-on’; it must be integrated into a school-wide approach which supports culturally responsive pedagogy based on timely, easy-to-access academic data. The recommendations arising from this study have implications for schools that include: schools having good student data management systems; schools allocating adequate time to the academic mentoring programme; schools working with staff to make sure they are using culturally-responsive pedagogy; having support available to professionally develop academic mentors; ensuring the mentee groups are of a manageable size; and involving staff, whanau and Maori students in the setting up and development of the academic mentoring programme.

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  • The conceptualisation and measurement of consumer authenticity online

    Sherriff, Kevin James (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Electronic commerce has become a global phenomenon. “Online is now becoming an integral part of any country’s economy ……..it is important for businesses to understand where the future opportunities will be” (Interactive Media in Retail Group, 2012). By 2017 60% of all U.S. retail sales will involve the Internet in some way, either as a direct electronic commerce transaction or as part of a shopper’s research on a laptop or mobile device (internetRetailer.com, 2014). With worldwide electronic commerce increasing exponentially, there are significant opportunities available for businesses that are competent in the online environment (eMarketer.com, 2013). However the inauthenticity of online; brands, services and communities hinders the potential efficacy of electronic commerce in New Zealand and probably the World. The research reveals that consumers that can appropriate authenticity in their online; brands, community, and service will be more likely to engage in positive consumption behaviour. Moreover, with online consumer purchases in 2014 involving 3.5 billion global consumers spending $1.5 trillion euro’s the online retail opportunities are significant (eMarketer.com., 2013). Yet while there have been numerous studies focused on various aspects of electronic commerce, a review of academic research identifies a knowledge gap in the conceptualisation and measurement of consumer authenticity online. In order to fill that deficit a literature review is conducted. The literature review reveals the following nine primary constructs of authenticity: Approximate (Iconic), Identification, Production, Situation, Social, Moral, and Pure (Indexical) Authenticity, Virtuous and Practical Self and Interpersonal Self-authentication. The research uses these constructs (in addition to: consumption behaviour and its two constructs - rational and experiential thinking) to build a conceptual model and develop hypotheses to explain consumer authenticity online. In order to test the theoretical model a survey instrument is constructed using measures selected from academic articles based on their ability to validly measure the constructs in the model. The survey is then used to collect data from five hundred randomly selected online consumers from the wider Auckland district of New Zealand. The data collections method is via surveys administered on a face-to-face basis. After data collection and cleaning a two-stage data analysis procedure begins: The first stage comprises descriptive data analysis to identify the trends of the dataset. The second stage or model development stage uses a two-phase process of confirmatory factor analysis to develop the model and determine its validity, and structural equation model analyses to test the hypothetical relationships. This is achieved by measuring the hypotheses of the original model and then modifying the model to better represent the characteristics of the dataset as advised by the AMOS analysis output. Finally, both the accepted and rejected hypothesised relationships conceptualised in the alternative SEM model are analysed from; theoretical, consumption modes and consumer interpretation perspectives and the managerial implications determined.

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  • Coastal callback : an architectural research project exploring the fundamental relationship between New Zealand’s built and coastal environments.

    Curtis, Joshua (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The Purpose of this project is to provide a sustainable and responsive design solution which provides education and creates awareness of the importance of our coastal environment, and the potential dangers of building on the coast. The relationship between the built and coastal environments of New Zealand is out of balance, and as a growing society we are expanding our occupation of the land in places which cannot be sustained. This project will examine the implications and effects of building in such environments. It will explore how architecture can exhibit the power and forces of such locations, creating in depth knowledge and understanding which will ultimately change people’s attitude towards the coast. It is important to understand that this project is not about creating a solution to building by the coast, but it is about creating awareness of the issues, and showcasing the natural elements (wind, tide, swell, sea level rise, storms) and their effect on building structures. This project will deliver a powerful impact on our human senses, using what we see, hear, smell, touch, and taste to evoke complete understanding of the coastal conditions, and their effect on our buildings. Elements of this facility will react and respond to the changing environment by physically moving, opening and closing, creating and retaining energy to explain and educate about the power, and importance of the surrounding coastal environment. The challenge is not to create a design solution in response to changing climatic conditions. The real challenge is to create human awareness and understanding of the fragile coastal environment, and the impact and dangers of building in such places. Any design outcome will have some effect on the coastal environment. Whether this effect will be positive or negative, beneficial or destructive, is a judgement that can only be tested in a fullscale experiment, but the project, as a theoretical prototype is an opportunity to explore and discover a new way of designing around our coasts. The project becomes a Coastal Awareness Centre at North-east end of Moturiki Island, Mount Maunganui.

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  • Cross-cultural healing : an architectural response to Maori urban healthcare

    Callis, Kaitlyn Elizabeth (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    As an exchange student, New Zealand was uncharted territory, both culturally and environmentally. With a growing interest in the people and place affected by architectural design, I decided a project deeply rooted in the place made sense. Because of this, I chose to design a Maori-centered healthcare center, which correlates to the aspirations of Maori and Auckland District Health Board. The project site is located opposite Hayman Park, Manukau City, Auckland, where a large Maori population resides. The purpose of this project is to introduce a new conversation about contemporary cultural healthcare, something that differs from the standard healthcare typology. The design outcome is a strong visual building with cultural influences taken from the greater cultural landscape. The engagement with the natural environment, an important aspect to the Maori culture, is developed in several different stages of the overall design.

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  • Mesoparasite : a symbiotic affair. Design strategies that explore the parasitic habitation of Auckland Harbour Bridge as a destination in its own right

    Myburg, John (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project seeks to explore potential options for parasitic adaptation and habitation of unused space in a bridge structure where organic will meet infrastructure. It is a call for habitation that, looking at nature and machines for inspiration, would merge historical, existing and future elements showcased in a symbiotic addition to an iconic landmark. It is an attempt to renew old steel bones with facilities creating transit that would highlight environmental and technological concerns, cultural preservation and social interaction. Illustrated in structure, form and proportion, this project uses architecture’s remarkable capability to blend utility and beauty through a unique interpretation of behavioural strategies. The Habitable Bridge concept is used as a starting point for the examination and execution of a nature based structure, in which a multitude of urban functions are brought together. The bridge as infrastructure will be approached in an architectural challenge, pushing boundaries that will provide a new attitude in which architecture and infrastructure will be considered equal mediators in the connection to the city. Through analysis, parasitic architectural typologies will be employed to negotiate, stimulate and accommodate a symbiotic proposition on a host structure in the organic tradition. An architectural solution will be developed and introduced to adapt to the built environment of the Auckland Harbour Bridge, without affecting the stability and primary function of the structure during construction and operation. It should complement the bridge, boost the economy, create valuable real estate for the benefit of the city, and contribute to the diverse character of the City of Auckland. The symbiotic interface, between human and nature, re-evaluates the importance of nature in our built environment. This project explores the potential of reintegrating the relationship between human, architecture and nature. Includes walkway (Skywalk), cafe at sea level, restaurant above road level, 5 star Boutique Hotel, Sky bar.

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  • Rites of remembrance : an architectural research project exploring the funerary requirements of modern day secular New Zealand society

    Liew, Nicola (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Technological advancements have increasingly led to the alienation of human emotion from physical experience. A prime example of such can be demonstrated upon analysis of the business of death and dying, an experience which evokes raw emotion in its most extreme form, thus providing the perfect platform for highlighting the effects of the gradual institutionalisation of what were once beautiful forms of mourning and ceremonies surrounding death. Land shortage and the resulting increase in land value has pushed cemeteries in Auckland out of the city, meaning they no longer have a place in the urban context. Cemeteries thus are losing their integrity and becoming vast green spaces representing everything but the reality of death. The growing land shortage in big cities around the world together with the rise of secularism particularly in New Zealand has resulted in the increasing popularity of cremation over burial. As such, the crematory process has evolved accordingly and technological advancements have brought with them such issues as the loss of ritual in the funerary process as well as the lack of finality associated with cremation ceremonies. Through historical and theory research, analysis and application of precedent studies and analytical drawing, this project aims to bring people closer to the acknowledgment of death and to provide a healing environment for people of all cultural diversities with the process of grief. The research proposes a crematorium together with chapels, communal spaces and other ancillary facilities located in the Waipapa Valley of Parnell, re-engaging the urban environment and those city-dwellers with the transition from life to death. The diverse nature of New Zealand’s population meant it was paramount that this project provided for a number of facilities and spaces that would appeal to a multitude of diversities. Accordingly, establishing common threads of importance to the bereaved and analysis of the funerary process across a diverse range of cultures and religions have influenced and thus been incorporated into the design. This project delves into the notion of silence, with death being the most extreme form of silence and the journey towards the concept of eternal silence within being an important attainment in the grieving process for the bereaved. Exploration into healing silence transcends the idea of the passage between earth and sky, the momentary and the eternal and form links to the design of the site and crematorium in the Waipapa Valley. Throughout the design process, various issues and problems of the site and concepts are addressed and further concepts developed accordingly. It is noted that the final outcomes of this design process are indicative in nature only of the final design, with scope for further architectural development in the final design. Purewa Cemetery and Crematorium used to analyse the funerary process. Project site: 23 Cheshire Street, Waipapa Valley, Parnell.

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  • Flowers in a contemporary painting practice

    Cervin, Janette (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project originated from a cornucopia of personal experiences that informed a perspective shaped by a life growing up surrounded by flowers in the context of a large creative family and a domestic-craft background. This confluence of personal experiences and tacit knowledge acquired through years developing a painting technique which had its in origins in decorative folk art, formed the foundation for this Masters of Design project. This document considers the personal and historical significance of the flower in art and in social practices. My research explores the relevance and resonance of flower painting in a contemporary art practice. Historical research into traditional vanitas painters connects with explorations of contemporary materials and painterly applications. This body of work made as a result of this project was intended to rejuvenate the flower for its audiences and to evoke a positive collective response. Feminist and post feminist art has been referenced, not as political comment, but rather as a celebration of the repetitive and the decorative, qualities that have long been associated with women‟s craft. An investigation into obsessive and intuitive processes of art making, developed into the realisation of an excessively painted floral studio project. This series of visual inquiries has generated unique ways of communicating the sustainability of the flower in painting. The industrial surfaces amalgamating with traditional feminine floral motifs highlighted the dichotomy inherent in domestic and industrial contexts and materials. The floral garlands that decoratively frame idealised and imagined landscape‟s have extended possible conversations and provided a context that intends to refresh readings of the works. Frames within frames and alternative central images were explored - As my personal landscape shifted, so did my work. The body of work crafted for this project is framed from a personal perspective and the historical developments of flower painting in Western art. This practice delights in the celebration and the rejuvenation of the floral motif within a contemporary painting practice and the shared human pleasure that this can avail.

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  • Surface reality: geometry, craft and shape of the invisible world

    McPherson, Peter James John (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project investigates how the computer and Computer Aided Design software has influenced architecture in the past twenty years; from the influence the digital has had on design thinking to the production of buildings not before thought possible. A study of the principles of computer operation helps to establish a position for a proposal as to how digital tools might best be utilised by architects from an ideological and methodological perspective. A study into geometric principles works in parallel with a historical survey to gain an appreciation of the differences between dominant contemporary architectural theory and the projects being carried out by practising architects. Geometry is the constant throughout the study and the understanding of geometric principles and digital operations is critical to establishing a position with which to develop a methodology for exploring the design proposal for an events centre on Halsey Wharf in Auckland, New Zealand. The goal of this research is to inform the practise of architecture with the benefits of particular geometric solutions in order to offer an approach to engage directly with the shaping of architecture in a digital environment.

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  • Moving toward diverse cultural communities : lost in translation, when the sakura cherry blossom meets the pohutukawa : what are the opportunities and challenges facing Japanese migrants in Aotearoa/New Zealand?

    Kominami, Hiromi (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This thesis looks into Japanese migrants’ settlement experiences in New Zealand. The aim was to gain an understanding of the migration process purely from their perspective instead of seeing it as a marginalized idea of Asian migration. Using a qualitative research method, 14 Japanese migrants were interviewed during 2012. All participants shared their positive and negative experiences through their migration process. Many Japanese chose to come to New Zealand for quality of life, family decisions and international marriage. There was a strong sense of being Japanese after many years of their settlement and how this sense of identity shaped their migration experiences. There were some differences in the experiences between the younger generation who have arrived in New Zealand in their teens and others who have arrived in their adulthood. However, generally Japanese migrants were pleased with their new life and keen to integrate into New Zealand society. Although many of them have chosen to come to New Zealand for a better life style, there is still some uncertainty of the level of their commitment to living in New Zealand.

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