91,117 results

  • Circulation, nature, connection : breaking down institutional barriers to biophilic healing

    Foote, Scott (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research study is concerned with the how the circulation aspects of a hospital can be intentionally designed to enhance patient care. Natural environments have proven to be beneficial to healing and wellbeing. It is possible that circulation space could be the medium used to connect people back to nature within a hospital setting while continuing to provide for all the other requirements of a functional hospital. How these connections to nature might occur within my design will be a mix of direct and visual strategies. This will give the users of the complex the choice of how they want to occupy such a space. Design will be generated by the dual foci of reducing circulation while also obtaining a connection to nature. Visits to hospitals around Auckland reveal a lot of long, internal corridors which provide little or no external reference and have a tendency to disorient the visitor or occupier. Circulation systems in hospitals are usually controlled through the necessary connection of different departments, and focus on control of the spread of infectious diseases. Instead, this study attempts to find an in-between point where users could be given more choices, providing new opportunities to pull away from the dense, repetitive and sterile environment that the public currently perceive. As an example, North Shore Hospital’s circulation is very difficult to “read” for the visitor. The feeling of being locked in corridors with no visual connection or sense of location is very unpleasant. This is a major design problem. This research began with these criticisms, drawing on anecdotal experiences, to develop ideas about how people would prefer to be treated in hospital environments. It is argued by some authorities that nature is beneficial to healing and connection to it can play as important a role in recuperation as the medicine patients receive for their illnesses. This research project focuses on the value of nature to health treatments in the conventional hospital situation and will test different circulation systems and relationships to external landscapes.

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  • "Disasterpiece" : how can architecture turn a human disaster into a positive contribution to an area that was affected?’

    Baxter, Kyle (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Human disasters are a fact of life and can cause catastrophic results to the environment and society. Minimising and preventing these disasters is the best course of action, but in reality, humans make mistakes. We are left with the consequences and the issue of how to deal with them. This project focuses on how architecture can positively contribute to an area that has been affected by a human disaster. The Bay of Plenty suffered from a human disasterwhen the MV Rena ran aground on 5 October 2011. This project will look at the negative impacts of the disaster and, through this example, discuss how architecture might rehabilitate, reinvest and positively contribute to anaffected area. Project site: Wairanaki Bay (Motiti Island, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand)

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  • Volcanic urbanism : an investigation into the role of public open spaces as disaster relief areas in order to make a city more resilient.

    Gao, Yan (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project explores ways to utilise public open spaces to be part of resilient framework in Auckland in the event of a volcanic eruption and the likely subsequent secondary disasters (such as earthquakes and tsunami). This research employed Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and consists of two parts: (1) identification of public open spaces that are suitable as natural disaster evacuation sites in Auckland Region, and (2) development of a design strategy or a model of multifunctional park that can serve as an evacuation zone or be part of evacuation routes. Findings from this research may also be applicable to other places that have high risks of disasters. The concept of a multifunctional park is to enable an open to be used for daily non-emergency programmes as well as emergency response programmes during a disaster situation, to make a city more resilient and prepared for the natural disasters. Project site: Cornwall Park (Epsom, Auckland)

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  • Pehiāweri Marae papakāinga : a model for community regeneration in Te Tai Tokerau

    Kake, Bonnie Jade (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This thesis by design explores the ways in which architecture can facilitate the reconnection of Māori people to their lands, and the resumption of ahi kā (or, a living presence). This project is based on the philosophy that housing solutions for Māori should be integrated with economic and social development initiatives that are co-created and co-designed with the community. Through this research, the papakāinga concept has been explored as a model for the cultural, social, economic and environmental regeneration of communities in Aotearoa New Zealand, and implemented through the design of a papakāinga project located at Pehiāweri Marae in Glenbervie, Whāngarei, Aotearoa New Zealand. The disproportionate levels of housing deprivation experienced by Māori, when contrasted with the general population, is well-documented. Many Māori families have been effectively locked out of attaining home ownership (and the benefits of inter-generational equity) through conventional means, yet are unable to leverage their ownership interests in Māori land to secure home ownership. In addition to this, culturally-appropriate housing that is sensitive to Māori whānau dynamics and responsive to the relationship Māori have with their whenua is scarce. This research project seeks to address aspects of these complex issues within one specific housing project, and is timely given the current state of severe housing deprivation in Northland, and in the context of Ngāpuhi-nui-tonu moving towards settlement. The theoretical component of the thesis has sought to bridge kaupapa Māori research and architectural investigation. The research has therefore been heavily process-oriented, with the view to developing and testing alternative design and research methods for working with Māori communities. Applied design/research methods have included recording of oral histories and cultural mapping to inform design strategies that reflect the culture and history of the community, and the use of wānanga and participatory design techniques to meaningfully engage the community in the design process. In this process the role of the architect is reframed as skilled facilitator and interpreter, drawing upon their technical social, and cultural expertise to empower people to take a pivotal role in the design of their own communities through participatory processes. The design component of this project has culminated in the development of a 10 year masterplan for Pehiāweri Marae, and the design of an 8 unit + communal facilities papakāinga. A number of issues and opportunities have emerged through the development of the masterplan, including the potential reorientation of the wharehui, and siting of future planned projects, including a kohanga reo, playgrounds, and a whare pora. The papakāinga development includes a mix of 1, 2 and 4 bedroom units arranged in clusters of 2-3 dwellings, which have been designed for flexibility and with the ability to be configured as intergenerational whānau homes, or separate dwellings as needs change over time. The papakāinga also includes additional communal facilities that will support interdependence and community resilience whilst retaining a balance between private, shared and communal spaces. I hope that this research will also be of use to other Māori landowners in realising their own housing aspirations, both in Te Tai Tokerau and around the motu.

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  • A home today, designed for tomorrow : a home which can be added onto, subtracted from, and adapted as our lives change over time

    Kostiuk-Warren, J. Max (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project asks the question: ‘How can the home be redefined, in the New Zealand context, to integrate a high level of adaptability into the design scheme once the initial construction of the home has been completed?’ This question was chosen as a result of looking specifically at first home buyers and how a scheme like this could potentially benefit them. What if a homeowner could build small to save money initially, then easily be able to expand when needed later? The theoretical review looks into the history of prefabrication and includes a review of different types of prefabrication methods (component, panel, module, hybrid, and complete buildings). It also looks into the benefits and drawbacks of prefabrication in the building industry today. By examining historic precedents such as the Hivehaus, Boxus, ZipUp Enclosures, and the Nakagin Capsule Tower, it was possible to gain a greater understanding of what has been designed in the past and why it may not have been as successful as possible. Three main prototypes were explored through a highly detailed level of digital modelling. Digital modelling was chosen as it is the only medium to provide the level of detail required in order to really test how the building and all of its components would work in unison, to explore the full extent of the adaptability. The conclusion of this research project is a building that operates as an adaptable form to accommodate changes that reflect the changing needs of the occupants. This project will not look into creating and developing entirely new methods of construction in the New Zealand building industry. It will instead look at ways to utilise, expand on, and adapt methods of prefabrication which have already been developed (and proven to work in the New Zealand context) in a new way that will allow a high level of flexibility in the design/layout once the building has been constructed and is being occupied.

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  • Expectations and reality : primary school principals’ experiences of change leadership in the transition to digital learning environments

    Kemp, Aaron (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Principals in New Zealand primary schools are aware of the expectations placed on them in their role as educational leaders. These expectations include being leaders of change, leaders of learning and leaders who are able to manage the daily operational requirements of a school. Advances in digital technologies have led to changes in the way we communicate, learn, solve problems and consume content. As such, these changes have altered the way key stakeholders in education (students, parents, communities and governments) acquire information, judge teaching and learning, and communicate with schools. The digital landscape is a field that encompasses change and new learning through a rapidly increasing school of thought, and as such, generates experiences that are worthy of investigation. This research critically examined primary school principals’ experiences with identifying and meeting expectations from a variety of stakeholders in regard to the transition of their schools from ‘traditional’ learning environments to digital learning environments (DLEs). It also examined the successes and challenges faced and how principals were best supported to manage challenges when transitioning to digital learning environments. A qualitative methodology was employed for this research using the method of semi- structured interviews. The information gathered from these interviews in relation to the expectations, successes and challenges placed on primary school principals served as the major indicators for the study. Eight Auckland primary school principals from schools with rolls between 200-700 students were interviewed using a semi-structured interview format. The literature review identified a number of key factors that impact on the effective implementation of digital learning environments. The findings of the research revealed that the expectations prioritised by the principals in leading the change were the need for them to ensure effective professional development in both pedagogical and practical understanding for themselves and staff, and to ensure that effective planning was implemented to meet the infrastructural challenges. This aligned with recent research reviewed in the literature. Due to the rate of change, context of change and speed by which the change occurs because of digital technology, principals believed that the skills of a change leader, which included a clear vision, planning, communicating and managing the change, were essential when transitioning to digital learning environments (DLEs). Lack of personal professional development support for the participants emerged through the course of the interviews. The findings led to the recommendation that principals require greater support from the Ministry of Education and professional development providers to develop their personal understanding of change leadership when transitioning to digital learning environments (DLEs).

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  • From industry professional to academic leader : identity migration in New Zealand polytechnics

    Marshall, Steven (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Academic staff in New Zealand polytechnics are mostly industry professionals who have been recruited directly into higher education with little or no background in academia. They have effectively immigrated to a new profession and often struggle to adapt to the culture of their new working environment. Academic immigrant leaders, who share strong identity bonds derived from their shared work histories with their staff, are positioned in the centre of relationships between themselves, their olleagues, and the organisations in which they are employed. Their identity is a complex hybrid amalgam of industry professional, academic and academic leader. The study examined theories of identity focusing on how individuals construct and adapt their identities in changing circumstances. Acculturation to new working environments was explored using an ‘immigrant’ metaphor. Prior studies have examined professional and academic identities of teachers, however, few have explored relationships between academic leaders and staff who share non-academic professional identities. This research employed an interpretive lens, within a constructivist paradigm to examine the personal experiences of sixteen academic leaders who identified as academic immigrants. Individual and group interviews illuminated personal experiences of embracing an academic identity, becoming an academic leader and sharing a professional identity with colleagues. Findings demonstrated that academic immigrants do not identify with traditional notions of academic identity, rather they frame their understanding of being an academic through the filter of their previous professional identity. They are deeply socialised in their professional identity and their loyalty lies with their discipline, rather than with the institution. This enables them to operate in discipline ‘silos’ which link strongly to professional values and practices and which can provide validation for behaviours that result in disconnection and tension with the institution. Academic immigrant leaders, who share these strong identity bonds with their staff, can contribute to this siloed behaviour by acting as ‘gatekeepers’ and choosing to prioritise their staff and discipline over the needs of the institution. Academic immigrant staff are attracted to polytechnics because of the applied and practice based learning, rather than ‘hard core’ academic processes. Institutions need to recognise the differences between their ‘old’ and ‘new’ profession and plan induction and socialisation processes that will support complex identity transition. Academic immigrant leaders are well placed to mitigate the identity-divide because they are in the middle of relationships between the institution and their staff with whom they hold a strong values bond based on their shared professional identity.

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  • Parlour of the muses

    McKenna, Kiri (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Architecture is inherently collaborative, however the most pervasive image of a great architect is that of an isolated genius. This image is gendered and contradicts the normal practice of collaboration in design. In the history of architecture, collaborative relationships have been ignored in favour of the individual monograph, and thus pluralities, like the female side of a family tree, cease to exist. [The museum has played a part in the reputation of the male sole author ; the heroic individual]* Many architects who did not fit this image, have, until recently, remained critically unrecognised for their work. This research looks at similar phenomena within the art world and engages with the arguments in order to see what comparisons could be drawn with architecture. In order to bring these arguments together, to make this project more than a survey of criticisms and to move away from the single voice in an argument, this research uses the idea of dialogue as a means for questioning the dominance of polemic individuals. This research project looks at the use of dialogue as a design tool, as a means of exploring influences and collaborations, and as a means of questioning the image of the great architect. Allowing for the interruption of other voices, it provides a method for exploring the areas between two sides of an argument and avoiding rigid positions. This project attempts to imagine how a design might begin to express the complexities, the give and take, the conversations, and the collaborators. In this research the literature has offered a theoretical anchor for creative explorations. This was done in two ways: firstly, the texts which were most influential to this project were taken and used as the basis for an exploration through written dialogue secondly, a further attempt to understand these arguments was made through drawings, models, and paintings, which explore elements of these texts and dialogues, suggesting possible criteria for design. *Quote from page 76 of this thesis.

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  • The teaching of critical thinking : reviewing the perceptions of educators in tertiary institutions in New Zealand

    Mehta, Bhavana (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Teachers can inspire and motivate students to develop critical thinking. Successful critical thinkers can be successful and contributing citizens. According to the Oxford dictionary (2015) critical thinking is, “the objective analysis and evaluation of an issue in order to form a judgement”. In New Zealand education, the development of critical thinking is given utmost importance, spanning from Early Childcare education to tertiary education. Critical thinking is termed as a lifelong skill by the Tertiary Education Commission in the Statement of Intent 2015 – 2019. Critical thinking is one of the fundamental requisites expected of graduates by industry, business and employers. University brochures and websites in New Zealand assure the development of critical thinking skills in graduates. Critical thinking is deemed necessary for education, employment and successful life of an individual. In spite of all this, anecdotal evidence, reinforced by extant literature, indicates that understanding of critical thinking and associated development and assessment practices are inconsistent and deserving of further research. What remains unclear at present is the quality assurance for graduates who qualify the same level qualification from different institutions in New Zealand. This current study reviews the perceptions of educators about the nature of critical thinking and identifies the teaching strategies employed by those educators to develop critical thinking skills in students in tertiary institutions in New Zealand. The research results indicate development of critical thinking lays equal emphasis on the role of students, teachers and systems. The thesis suggests the Tertiary Education Commission may consider providing a definition of critical thinking across the entire tertiary education sector to maintain the common understanding of critical thinking among students and teachers. This research indicates development of critical thinking may be measured by mandatory introduction of a pre-critical thinking test and post-critical thinking test for all students in the tertiary educational institutions. Further, tertiary teachers face difficulty with international students. The research findings suggest introduction of critical thinking course for international students in the first year of undergraduate course to introduce them to the expectations of the educational demands in New Zealand and to begin developing critical thinking skills and dispositions early in their study.

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  • Architecture of resilience : how can architecture instil resilience within communities in the face of future disasters?

    Morgan, Peter (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project is about discovering ways that architecture can intervene and help preserve communities in the face of disaster. To preserve communities requires building resilience. This project focuses on how to instil resilience into a community and will explore ways non-architectural issues can be synthesized into architectural forms that can have the effect of changing perspective, raising awareness, and encouraging resourcefulness. It will consider methods of strengthening communities from within the parameters of an ecologically resilient perspective only; will argue that the traditional, engineering, understanding of resilience that informs current practice in western cultures is not as effective as an ecological approach to the preservation of communities in the face of natural disasters; and that establishing ecological resilience in communities is essential for their survival in the face of the increasing number of natural disasters expected in the future. The design aspect of the project will involve artificially introducing a disturbance factor, flooding, into an area which will be modified to handle it while also using it to promote community activity. Architectural installations will also be designed to facilitate use of the area. Project site: Thames, Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand

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  • Stimulating resilience : an architectural research project exploring gender based violence in internally displaced camps

    Morris, Samuel (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    It is widely known and accepted that during an emergency, whether it is a natural disaster or a man-made conflict, women and girls are especially vulnerable to violence due to their gender specific roles, specific needs and society discrimination. Gender based violence (GBV) is a term applied to violence resulting in physical, sexual or mental harm performed by one gender to another. GBV and internally displaced people (IDP) are unfortunately linked together. Studies have shown that GBV is most prevalent in environments where there is a general lack of respect for human rights and urban environments which lack social structure. The United Nations and other humanitarian organizations are aware of GBV occurring in IDP camps, and have released handbooks on how to address the issue. Yet GBV is still common in IDP camps. The research is focused on the internal displacement of over 120,000 residents of Zamboanga City in the Philippines as a result of a 3 week siege led by the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) which occurred in September 2013. The research commences with an investigation of urban, spatial and social qualities within existing IDP camps in Zamboanga. The question is then posed, what role can architecture play in the prevention of, or to at least mitigate GBV from occurring? The question posed inadvertently directs the investigation towards the layout and urban fabric of IDP camps, community resilience and the building of community, both social and physical. The outcome of this research is the design of a community livelihood facility situated within an IDP camp. The following research will be achieved by visiting IDP camps in Zamboanga and completing field research. Tools such as the opportunity matrix will be utilized to study the patterns found within the camps. Spatial analysis of the camps and talking to experts in the field will help to define the extent of the problem and provide suitable solutions. Analytical drawing and modelling techniques will be used to test underlying spatial and conceptual strategies to see if they can be used to speculate and develop a narrative which discusses how females, both women and girls can reduce their own vulnerability. However, there will always be certain limitations to projects like this, especially when dealing with IDPs. This project aspires to enhance social elements, humanitarian rights, and mitigate GBV, but at the same time recognizes political influences and the allocation of resources often for political expediency rather for the well-being of the local community.

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  • Leading learning for Māori students : the challenges of leadership for teaching principals in small rural primary schools

    O’Leary, Hazel Aroha Abraham (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This study focused on examining teaching principals’ perceptions of educational leadership practices that were perceived to transform Māori achievement in small rural primary schools. A kaupapa Māori framework was applied to this research. This involved meeting and interviewing eight teaching principals, in their schools throughout the greater Wairoa, Gisborne and Eastern Bay of Plenty education regions. A sizeable proportion of Māori students are located in isolated, small rural primary schools that are led by teaching principals. The literature suggests a myriad of leadership challenges exist for teaching principals in small rural primary schools. An assumption is made that these challenges have stemmed from the implementation of the self-managing model, Tomorrows Schools (Brooking, Collins, Court, & O'Neil, 2003; Springford, 2006). Findings were analysed qualitatively, generating themes grounded from within each participant’s story. Mentoring and lifestyle choices were considered determinants that influenced people into taking up positions in small rural primary schools. The findings also indicated that there is an alarmingly increasing number of challenges that some teaching principals face alone and without appropriate support. Although twenty five years have gone by since the implementation of the self-managing model of Tomorrow’s Schools teaching principals are continuing to spend a considerable amount of their time supporting and managing responsibilities that should be carried out by Boards of Trustees. A new finding of this research highlights the positive value of having iwi and external providers collaboratively working together with teaching principals to strengthen strategic management, particularly the shaping of the vision of education for the identified iwi primary schools. In these iwi primary schools, teaching principals have committed to implementing and fostering te reo Māori (language), school wide, as part of strengthening and adopting Māori culture, karakia and values through ruma rumaki and mainstream classes.

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  • Air rights

    Razak, Mohammad Iskandar Abd. (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This paper researches the history of the Transfer of Development Rights (TDR), a phenomenon of legal property understanding and city planning policy, which began in New York City and evolved into application in cities globally. Proposed are two building types which have emerged from the private application of TDR in New York City. These types, described as the Point Tower and the Cantilevered Building, exist as recent building phenomena. The paper also surveys a public, New York City Council-lead TDR scheme, the Special West Chelsea Transfer District (SWC) and the ability of the scheme’s regulations to create these two building types. In recognition of the debilitating affects of the Point Tower to the infrastructure and habitability of cities, this paper, proposes potentials for the Cantilevered building, as a counterpoint-type within city planning, urban design and architecture. Utilizing a prior experiment in New York City on alternate city planning grids performed by Sir Leslie Martin in his 1972 paper, “The Grid as Generator,” proposed is an alternate grid laid over the existing New York City blocks as a base from which the city blocks can develop with TDR. The overlay is proposed to enable better planning efficiency, sunlight penetration and as well to internalize public environments within city blocks at varying levels, by utilizing Cantilevered Building– type architectural form. The research finally reviews the allowable density and its possible distribution in a square kilometer of downtown Auckland in respects to the policy and regulation prescription under the Draft Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP) 2014. A new overlay grid is then proposed enforced by raised pedestrian paths at varying levels, in which available development area may be redistributed utilizing TDR to achieve the effects, as in the case of New York. The final proposition is a Cantilevered building in downtown Auckland which displays the potentials of the building type in the improvement of the public urban environment of the city. Project site: Downtown Auckland area comprising the Britomart Precinct, a part of the Queen Street Valley, Quay Park, Albert Park and the Learning Quarter. The area is approximately 750m by 750m and is bounded by Quay Street to the North, Victoria Street to the South, Hobson Street to the West and Princes Street to the East.

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  • Rider assessment in therapeutic horse riding

    Prattley, Deborah Jayne (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Background: Outcome assessment is important in rehabilitation to demonstrate the achievement of therapeutic goals, provide evidence-based therapy and assist in acquiring funding for therapy provided by charitable organisations. The New Zealand Riding for the Disabled Association (NZRDA) is a charitable organisation providing therapeutic horse riding programmes, however no standardised method of setting goals for riders or for evaluating goal achievement currently exists. Aims: To gather information about users of Riding for the Disabled Association (RDA) services in New Zealand, and use this to identify suitable methods of assessing goal achievement for outcomes relating to physical functioning of riders. Methods: A survey of RDA groups collected information describing rider demographics, disabilities and goals set during riding programmes. Existing assessment tests relating to goals for physical function were evaluated for psychometric properties and clinical utility in the RDA context. A pilot study using goal attainment scaling (GAS) was performed in one RDA group, with feedback provided via a questionnaire completed by participating coaches. Results: Data from 26% of RDA groups described 544 riders, the majority being aged less than 20 years and having one or more disabilities relating either to mental function or structures of the nervous system (n=595, 68% of reported disabilities), or to neuromusculoskeletal issues relating to movement (n=132; 15%). Approximately 35% of goals related to the physical attributes of balance, posture, motor skills, coordination or strength. None of the 407 assessment tests evaluated in relation to these attributes had both adequate psychometric properties and suitability for RDA use. The GAS pilot study received generally positive feedback from the four participating coaches, with ease of rider evaluation and increased focus being the main advantages. However, writing GAS goals was considered challenging and time-consuming. Conclusions: RDA groups provide therapeutic riding services to young people with a complex range of physical, psychosocial and cognitive disabilities. GAS has shown promise as a tool to evaluate riders’ achievements in a therapeutic environment staffed largely by volunteers who are not trained therapists. Further studies with modifications of the GAS method are recommended.

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  • In a Christchurch frame of mind

    Reynolds, Travers John (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project is for Christchurch. It proposes to provide useful low-cost space for the little businesses, privately owned, operating from a small capital base, that are essential to the restoration of this great city’s heart. Despite interventions from various groups, Christchurch struggles with its revival, four years on from the massive earthquakes of 2010 and 2011 that ripped apart the heart of this great New Zealand City. The key groups tasked with reconstruction have created several extensive master plans which set out a lot of ideals, yet little is happening to implement their visions. Even where things are happening, they do not align with international insights into city rebuilding. In a city once filled with small businesses, the small businesses have left, and the Central Business District appears almost defeated. But does the planning encourage their return? The heart of the city has dispersed and relocated: the real revival of Christchurch will depend on the availability of space for the previous occupants - diverse small to medium sized businesses that generate activity and human proximity. This project explores the potential for a bold new approach to collaborative business in order to revive small businesses, harness untapped resources and bring a struggling part of this city back to life.

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  • The standing study : participant experience and acceptability of using a standing desk

    Robb, Sheehan (2014)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Background: Sedentary behaviour (including prolonged sitting) is associated with increase in common chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Due to the prevalence, and risks, of prolonged siting for office workers standing desks have been proposed as strategy to reduce sedentary time in the work place. Objective: This study aimed to identify and understand perceptual and subjective factors pertaining to the experience and acceptability of adapting to and working from a standing desk. Method: This generic qualitative study was part of a two armed study which collectively measured biological blood marker changes throughout the 16 week trial and how the desks were perceived, used, and accepted by the participants. Participants (n=6) were recruited via online media. They were selected for their age (25-40), weight, hip-waist ratio, and BMI measurements. Three semi- structured interviews were conducted at weeks 1-2, 14-16, and 21-22 of the trial. Data analysis generated themes and subthemes. Results:. Theme one: The physical, mental, and environmental experience of using a standing desk encompassed perceived improvement in physical, mental, and environment experience and reveals a process of adjustment. Physical improvements included energy and vitality, increased tolerance to standing, posture and decrease in discomfort with standing. Mental improvements include enhanced emotional experience, improved tolerance to stress, and feeling proactive about health, along with improved self-awareness, cognitive function and productivity. Improved perception of office environment included aspects of/due to perceived interaction with others and improved work station set- up. There was a process of adjustment which involved and adjustment period, initial discomfort, (other subthemes included too much too soon and standing full time) Theme two: Conclusion judgements, and acceptability: sitting and standing in an office environment. There were changes to the participants perception of sitting and it was identified that there were many reasons not to sit It was identified that there was a need to alternate sitting and standing. There was a high acceptability and affinity for using the standing desk as all participants wanted to continue to use the standing desk. Conclusion: The experience of using a standing desk resulted in a strong acceptability for its use in the work place in this group of participants.

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  • Using performance management techniques to enhance employee and organisational effectiveness

    Singh, Anjeshwar (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project is to explore the performance management techniques that are used by organisations to enhance organisational and employee effectiveness. The organisation chosen for this research falls into the small to medium enterprise category and is a consulting firm. This project attempts to define performance management, differentiates performance management systems and performance appraisal, and explains the three approaches to performance management. Further to this, it explores the various motivation theories that are associated with performance management. Performance and rewards are closely correlated; therefore, rewards management systems are also discussed in this project and how it contributes toward organisational and employee effectiveness. The various characteristics of performance management and the performance management process are outlined and how it affects employees and the organisation as a whole. Finally an attempt is made to validate the link between human resources, strategy and performance management. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are used in this project to collect data and a total of 64 respondents (which constitute 100%) took part in the quantitative study. For the qualitative study, a total of 5 personnel from the senior management team were interviewed. The data collected were uploaded into SPSS and analysed. The results from the analysis were used to test the null and alternative hypotheses. It has been specifically requested by the participating consulting firm not to mention the name of the organisation and therefore, the researcher has refrained from doing so. The results suggested that the main aim of the performance management system is to achieve organisational goals and having a clear, concise and well defined job descriptions play a crucial role in employee performance. Furthermore, it was found that the organisational mission and vision play an important role in the development and implementation of performance management policies and practices in an organisation, which must be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bound. However, the performance management process itself should be an ongoing process. In addition to this, motivation was found to be an important factor in employee performance; however, while rewards motivates employees the disciplinary procedures seem to demotivate employees and reduces employee performance. Clear links between performance management, HR, employees and organisational strategy were identified and these elements in an organisation are intertwined to attain organisational effectiveness.

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  • Karangahape Road train station : an urban catalyst for revitalisation

    Tyrrell, Nina (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The general focus of this research project is to explore how a train station in a rich and diverse up and coming neighbourhood can act as a catalyst for architectural exploration. This exploration is how architecture facilitates and enriches the connections of place and site and perhaps enables Auckland to become a step closer to reaching the desired title of ”world’s most liveable city”. It is clear that in terms of transportation and movement patterns “Auckland is lagging behind even cities with signi cantly lower populations”. The general ideas are that urban regeneration around transit centres is growing. Transit buildings themselves need to facilitate connectivity, be innovative and act as the connective tissue between the urban public spaces and the functional spaces. The context of this research pertains directly to Auckland city. Progressively more people are starting to live in urban environments. Therefore, there is a gradient of interaction, which adds value, authenticity fluidity and identity to the city. The project focuses on urban connections within the context of Karangahape Road precinct and investigates current knowledge including current station design, transport-oriented development and the concept of urban space. The project also analyses and understands design strategies gathered from precedents around the globe. The intention of the design is to discover and explore strategies of connections through movement and architectural activation. The research will also look at streetscapes, celebrate the grain and history of the site, and nd how best to stitch together the heritage of the site and the function of the train station. The discovery and exploration of connections and hybrid activities are to develop an environment that facilitates and encourages activity and intensification around the created station, existing connections and future nodes and networks.

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  • Pit stop : stitching together medical facility and transport infrastructure

    Undevia, Suchi (2015-10)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Hospitals are a legacy of humanity’s deepest compassion. They embody society values and culture. Recognized as icons of health and wellness within our society, there is no greater irony in architecture that these civic buildings have a disposition to create unlivable, uncaring, and hostile spaces. They have become places avoided by most, addressed with reluctance, and ignored in terms of conventional buildings in architecture. The research is inspired by the growing conviction that there is a need to pursue fresh and innovative approaches to hospital design. Propelled by the idea of reviving the image of hospitals in society, and suturing the severed physical and social connections to the city, this project explores architecture’s role in achieving these aspirations. Starting from the evolution of hospitals and their physical and social impact on the city, this research focuses on the heart of the hospital, the emergency care services. With its roots in military medicine, civilian emergency services perform a vital role in our society. A design proposal derived from the research findings for an accident and emergency center in Auckland is presented as a test-bed for architectural speculation and future debate on hospital design. This is a project aimed at achieving a more architecturally expressive and empowering image of healthcare and its reinstatement within our city’s infrastructure. This research seeks to convince students and healthcare professionals of the great artistic and cultural tradition of a hospital as a work of architecture. Project site: Nelson Street under the Karangahape Road Bridge.

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  • Redemption stream : architecturally weaving the Waihorotiu stream through Māori and Pakeha culture

    Ure, James Alexander (2015)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The meaningless pattern of buildings, monotony, and fast pace of the city has created a disconnection between people and the Auckland CBD environment. As a consequence people are largely unaware of the diverse and meaningful experiences of the city, weakening the significance of place for individuals, and cultures. This research project, Architecturally weaving the Waihorotiu stream through Maori and Pakeha culture, explores the possibility of strengthening the meaningful relationship between people and the environment through a synthesis of the urban and natural in central Auckland. The project analyses the social, urban and cultural values of the central Auckland context in conjunction with an evaluation of architectural elements that increase experiential time, and create an engagement of people with the significant buildings, and restored stream. The combining of these core elements suggests the possibility of a common cultural understanding of caretaking for the land through the participation in common experiences, where common meanings and symbols are created and understood. ... "Auckland’s main CBD road, Queen Street, provides a visible connection between the cities coast and ridgeline environments. Many Aucklanders may be unaware that the road follows the original path of the Waihorotiu stream. The Waihorotiu stream, which was the water source for early European Auckland, and once harboured waka and sailing ships, still runs beneath Queen Street in a maze of storm water pipes and leftover 19th century culverts"--Introduction on page 6. Project site: Queen Street, Auckland, N.Z.

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