90,549 results

  • Learning about and through teaching : Course work and practicum during initial teacher education

    Grudnoff, Lexie; Ward, Lorrae; Ritchie, Jenny; Brooker, Barry; Simpson, Mary (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper reports on findings from the final pilot of a survey (N=811) to be used by multiple New Zealand initial teacher education providers to measure graduating teacher perceptions of how well their programmes prepared them to start teaching. The survey, commissioned by the Teacher Education Forum of Aotearoa New Zealand (TEFANZ), is their proactive response to the political accountability demands that are a feature of teacher education internationally, and to the need for higher education to take a lead in the accountability ‘narrative’ (Shulman, 2007). This paper focuses on the perceptions of graduating student teachers regarding the learning opportunities provided to them during their ITE programmes. It compares opportunities during course work and practicum and suggests that more attention should be given to both components to ensure that student teacher learning is maximised in teacher preparation programmes.

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  • Visual arts education: Provoking learning conversations

    Wrightson, Helen; Plows, J. (2013-04-20)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Visual arts praxis dilemmas can invoke uncertainty, calling for courage to engage in learning conversations that promote innovative ideas. These may challenge teachers but by engaging in dialogue can invite reflection and possible changes to practice. This workshop explores visual arts education and differing ideas teachers hold about children’s drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture. Visual arts are a valuable mode for children to make meaning and express emotions so let’s talk and explore possibilities

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  • Culturally responsive practice as quality early childhood care and education provision.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Over the last two decades New Zealand has become one of a small number of culturally and linguistically superdiverse countries. Superdiversity indicates a level of cultural complexity surpassing anything previously experienced. Aotearoa NZ is now home to 160 languages, forecasted to deepen even further. “Learning to interpret across cultures demands reflecting on our own experiences, analyzing our own culture, examining and comparing varying perspectives. We must consciously and voluntarily make our cultural lenses apparent. Engaging in the hard work of seeing the world as others see it must be a fundamental goal for any move to reform the education of teachers and their assessment”--Lisa Delpit Culturally responsive practice - Management and practitioners to demonstrate their awareness of historical, social, cultural and political contexts, and the impacts of past and current social, educational and economic policies in relation to contemporary inequities.

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi: Relationships of Promise

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This talk will draw upon my recent writing, and on work from our Teaching and Learning Research Initiative project Titiro Whakamuri, Hoki Whakamua: We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning. Pedagogies of care and affect, which resonate te ao Māori conceptualisations of inter-connectedness will be proposed as a source of optimism in response to the challenges that we face. One conceptual tool in response to these matters of concern is an ethic of care (Noddings 1995), applied in our recent study as the notion of ‘caring for ourselves, others and the environment’. A second conceptual tool is re-visibilisation and revalidation of Indigenous onto-epistemologies, which position humans as part of and reliant upon, rather than superior to and detached from our local and global world(s).

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  • Management Control in a Thai-Owned Chicken Company in Thailand

    Dokkularb, P.; Lord, B.R.; Dixon, K. (2014)


    University of Canterbury Library

    The purpose of this study is to add knowledge of the composition and exercise of management control systems. The study focused on a Thai-owned chicken processing company in Thailand. Thailand was chosen for this study both because the researcher (the first-named author) is Thai and because few previous management control studies have been about Thailand even though Thailand has a high level of foreign investment. Although Thailand has been influenced significantly by Western ideas, it differs from many of its South and Southeast Asian neighbours in having maintained a much greater degree of formal political autonomy than its neighbours. This ethnographic research shows that only some factors from previous studies, namely national culture and demographic characteristics, are relevant to the Thai-owned chicken company’s MCSs. Other factors not identified in previous studies were found to be important; for example, being a family business, competition in the markets for labour and custom, and labour laws have influenced and shaped the Company’s MCSs.

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  • Predicting tidal heights for new locations using 25 hours in situ sea-level observations plus reference site records: a complete tidal species modulation with tidal constant.

    Byun, D.S.; Hart, D.E. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    A hybrid technique for predicting tides for new locations, based on as little as 25 h of concurrent temporary and reference site sea level observations, plus up to a year of reference records, is evaluated using 2-yr South Korean and New Zealand case studies. Comparisons are made between the existing prediction methods of conventional standard harmonic analysis and prediction (CSHAP) and tidal species modulation with tidal constant corrections (TSM1TCC). Building on these approaches, a new procedure is developed to produce a complete tidal species modulation (CTSM) equivalent of CSHAP, with the added inclusion of nodal factors and angles, astronomical arguments, and tidal species tidal constant correction terms (1TCC), to generate results for temporary sites. The CTSM1TCC approach described here overcomes the record length limitations of traditional standard harmonic-based prediction methods, making the technique more useful to diverse coastal and hydrographic researchers. The CTSM1TCC method is refined using yearlong input and comparative data from contrasting hydrographic settings, revealing spring periods, specific months, and conditions devoid of nontidal residual extremes (e.g., storms) as the most appropriate sample periods for collecting temporary site data in order to maximize prediction accuracy. CTSM1TCC represents a viable alternative to tidal prediction methods using multiconstituent inferences, for those wishing to make predictions for new sites based on established conventional tidal prediction software, with the added benefits of efficient input data collection and no need for a decision process regarding multiconstituent inference calculations. CTSM1TCC could, without compromising accuracy, support the spatial and temporal proliferation of tidal predictions across coastal oceans, where fieldwork funds and instruments currently hinder predictions for new locations.

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  • Predicting the Activation Time of a Concealed Sprinkler

    Suen, Yeou Wei (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This research examined a heat transfer model to predict the activation time of a concealed sprinkler. Concealed sprinklers consist of two stages of activation. They include the release of cover plates from a recess housing and the breakage of the glass bulbs or melting of the solder links. The research analysis is divided into two sections. The first section includes the prediction of cover plate activation time (stage one) and the second section includes the prediction of glass bulb activation time (stage two). Each prediction result is compared with the experimental data conducted by Annable (2006) and Yu (2007). A lumped heat capacity method is introduced to predict the activation time of the cover plate. This method has been used for predicting the activation time of a standard pendent exposed sprinkler. It is reasonable to apply this method by assuming they are flush with the ceiling. The analysis results are compared based on the percentage of predicted and measured uncertainties. A recommendation is provided for which method is appropriate to apply to predicting the cover plate activation time. The proposed of using FDS5 simulations is to simulate the heat transfer to the sensing element (glass bulb only) within the recessed housing. The constructed simulation models comprises of ceiling within a compartment. The simulations of various sprinkler heads are performed to investigate any parameters that can potentially affect the activation time of the sprinklers. To simulate the glass bulb, combined thermal properties including glass and glycerine are modified to account for the differences in mass. Prior to stage two analysis, the FDS5 simulation was tested to predict the activation time of a standard pendent exposed sprinkler. The results showed positive progress to carry onto the next analysis. In stage two analysis, the simulations are constructed with and without the presence of vent holes within the recess housing. The combined activation time for concealed sprinklers show lack of solid predictions compared to the experimental data especially Yu experimental data.

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  • An Investigation into the Classroom Interactions of Twice Exceptional Students in Comparison to their Typically Developing Peers

    Lewis, Taryn (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Students who meet criteria for both being intellectually gifted and having a disability are known by the term ‘twice exceptional’. To date there is little known about the classroom interactions of these students, and how these interactions impact their developing self-esteem. The interactions of four gifted primary school students with identified learning difficulties (twice exceptional) were observed along with four matched typically developing students and their teacher during normal classroom teaching activities. The number and type of positive, negative, neutral or no response interactions were recorded over four, one hour observation sessions. The Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory was then administered to the four twice exceptional and four comparison students. Results indicated that there was little difference between the twice exceptional and comparison students in terms of number of interactions recorded, with the twice exceptional students showing slightly more positive interactions with their teacher and peers. All four twice exceptional students reported lower self-esteem levels than their matched peers, with two students being in the low range. The results suggested that these four twice exceptional students were interacting in a manner similar to their typically developing peers, although they displayed lower self-esteem levels. The implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are discussed.

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  • Printed Chromatography Media (Keynote)

    Fee, C.J.; Dimartino, S.; Nawada, S. (2013)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Keynote Presentation

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  • Rubisco's chiropractor: a study of higher plant Rubisco activase

    Keown, Jeremy Russell (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Rubisco activase operates as the chaperone responsible for maintaining the catalytic competency of Ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) in plants. Rubisco is notoriously inefficient, rapidly self-inactivating under physiological conditions. Rubisco activase uses the power released from the hydrolysis of ATP to power a conformational change in Rubisco, reactivating it. Rubisco activase has been previously shown to form a large range of species in solution; however, little has been done to relate the size of oligomeric species and physiological activity. In this thesis data is presented from a range of biophysical techniques including analytical ultracentrifugation, static light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering combined with activity assays to show a strong relationship between oligomeric state and activity. The results suggest that small oligomers comprising 2-4 subunits are sufficient to attain full specific activity, a highly unusual property for enzymes from the AAA+ family. Studies utilising a number of Rubisco activase variants enabled the determination of how Rubisco and Rubisco activase may interact within a plant cell. A detailed characterisation of the α-, β-, and a mixture of isoforms further broadened our knowledge on the oligomerisation of Rubisco activase. Of particular importance was the discovery of a thermally stable hexameric Rubisco activase variant. It is hoped that these findings may contribute to development of more heat tolerant Rubisco activase and lead research into more drought resilient crop plants.

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  • Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002: Ambiguities and the private sector

    Gerry, Rebekah (2014)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This papers reviews the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 and the regime it establishes. Although this regime works well most of the time, there are four key areas that need addressing. Incidents such as the 2013 Seddon earthquakes have highlighted the uncertainty around the definitional threshold of an emergency and requirements for a state of emergency. Further, the powers of emergency management actors are not clear. The paper also explores the actual and potential obligations and liability of the private sector. Five recommendations are ultimately made to address these issues.

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  • A decay of rights: The decision in New Health New Zealand Inc v South Taranaki District Council

    Goss, Rose Louise (2014)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The decision in New Health New Zealand Inc v South Taranaki District Council is the most recent legal development in the New Zealand debate about fluoridation of public water supplies. That decision centred on the interpretation of section 11 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act, the right to refuse medical treatment. The Court held that the fluoridation in question was legal, and reached a limited definition of medical treatment that did not encompass fluoridation. This paper analyses the reasoning leading to that interpretation, concluding that the decision is problematic and that the definition of s 11 needs to be remedied. The use of the wording of s 11 to limit the definition of medical treatment was inappropriate, as was the policy reasoning used to support that limitation. The structure of reasoning followed exacerbated these issues and adhered too closely to the reasoning in United States cases. Furthermore, the application of a de minimis threshold was conducted without adequate scrutiny, and such a threshold should not be applied to s 11.

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  • Exploring the Role of the Customer in the Fuzzy Front End of Innovation

    Harker, Liam (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The early stages of development for new advanced technologies are notoriously difficult to navigate and manage effectively in such a way that leads to successful commercial application. This paper explores how the use of flexible and exploratory frameworks based in customer engagement can provide valuable insights into how advanced technologies can be developed to solve validated market problems. The paper reflects on the challenges faced and lessons taken from our practical experience using this approach to develop advanced technologies emerging from within Victoria University of Wellington.

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  • Māori Orality and Extended Cognition: A cognitive approach to memory and oral tradition in the Pacific

    Murphy, David James (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Though philosophers have long held that interpretive anthropology and the cognitive science of religion (CSR) are opposed, this thesis offers an extended empirical assessment of the issues surrounding the implications of utilizing ethnographic material within a cognitive study of religious transmission. Using case studies from the Pacific, I consider a core question arising in both interpretative and cognitive disciplines, namely: how have oral cultures been able to preserve and transmit bodies of sacred knowledge cross-generationally without any external administrative tools (i.e. text)? First, I focus on the historical and ethnographic details of traditional Māori orality. I look at how orally transmitted knowledge was managed through the external cognitive resources associated with religious ritual. Here I find evidence within Pacific oral traditions that the problem of managing knowledge was overcome through tools and strategies that augmented memory and oral skill. I give special attention to the traditional Māori structuring of learning environments. Next I consider how macro-spatial tools – such as landmarks, and place names – helped support working memory and information management, and show that orientations to landscape are vital to ensuring collective memory. This thesis also demonstrates how culturally learned tools and strategies support the stability of religious cultural transmission. The use of external cognitive resources implies the complexity of managing and organizing sacred knowledge. Put simply, focusing on the historical accounts from the Pacific reveals a rich suite of culturally evolved tools and strategies for the transmission of religious knowledge. I show that tools such as ritual, myth, mnemonic techniques, and artifacts enable and stabilise such transmission. I hold, that such cultural environments constitute cognitive tools that are meaningfully described as cultural cognitive systems. Thus, combining descriptive accounts with the theoretical orientations of the cognitive sciences motivates what I call a ‘cognitive ecological’ model of mind. I argue that the cognitive ecological model is important because it orients researchers to the role that culturally evolved tools play in: (1) dramatically extending the human brain’s power to reckon with its surroundings and: (2) coordinating such knowledge across social groups and over time. The cognitive ecological model of mind I propose in this study is important for three reasons: First, it challenges the received view within the CSR – what I call the ‘Standard Internal Model’ (SiM) – which holds that the transmission of religious representations carries low cognitive demands (i.e. it is cognitively optimal). In contrast to SiM, the Pacific materials discussed here suggest that the oral transmission of sacred knowledge is cognitively demanding, culturally costly, and locally contingent. Second, my thesis demonstrates that historical and ethnographic evidence contains information that is vital for progress in the CSR since qualitative resources document how niche specific cultural practices often facilitate the acquisition and coordination of the complex knowledge resources over time. The ethnographic data supports the local optimality contention. Third, my thesis reveals that formulating tractable models for cultural transmission within the CSR is benefitted by an interdisciplinary approach. Such a prospect, I urge, is vital for intellectual progress between the humanities and the CSR. As such, and contrary to received opinion, my thesis shows how the CSR and the cultural anthropology of religion share a common intellectual fate.

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  • Measuring strategic performance in construction companies: a proposed integrated model

    Oyewobi, LO; Windapo, AO; Rotimi, JOB

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Purpose – This paper aims to examine and compare a performance measurement system and performance frameworks commonly used within the construction industry. The paper explores the strengths and weaknesses of balanced scorecard (BSC) and business excellence model (BEM) to propose an integrated model for measuring strategic performance of construction organisations as a single model. The purpose is to help organisations achieve performance excellence, financial integrity and continuous improvement in business results to sustain competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach – This paper examines and compares performance measurement system and performance frameworks commonly used within the construction industry. The paper explores the strengths and weaknesses of BSC and BEM to propose an integrated model for measuring strategic performance of construction organisations as a single model. The purpose is to help organisations achieve performance excellence, financial integrity and continuous improvement in business results to sustain competitive advantage. Findings – The study reveals that the most popular performance measurement framework in construction includes: BSC; Key Performance Indicators and European Foundation for Quality Management. However, literature also reveals that Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is being used to measure performance in the construction. The study findings indicated that BSC and BEM could be combined to provide an integrated model that will encompass every facet of construction performance measures. Research limitations/implications – The paper integrates the BSC and BEM performance measurement models, to provide construction organisations the opportunities of benefitting from the two models as a single tool without having to use more than one model or miss out any important aspect of performance measures. The model will assist organisations perform regular health checks of all business process and at the same time help align organisational activities with strategic primacy. Practical implications – The paper offers an integrated construction excellence model as a useful tool for measuring both financial and non-financial performance aspects of construction organisations. This will provide managers, owners and other stakeholders the chance of measuring processes and pre-eminent strategic initiatives using a single model. Originality/value – The conceptual paper presents an integration of processes and perspectives for measuring performance as a new and useful tool in the context of the South African construction industry. The paper suggests that research efforts should be directed on how to implement the strategic performance model efficiently within a specific construction environment.

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  • Creating Creative Technologists: playing with(in) education

    Walker, C; Connor, AM; Marks, S

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the industrial revolution, the organization of knowledge into distinct scientific, technical or creative categories has resulted in educational systems designed to produce and validate particular occupations. The methods by which students are exposed to different kinds of knowledge are critical in creating and reproducing individual, professional or cultural identities. (“I am an Engineer. You are an Artist”). The emergence of more open, creative and socialised technologies generates challenges for discipline-based education. At the same time, the term “Creative Technologies” also suggests a new occupational category (“I am a Creative Technologist”). This chapter presents a case-study of an evolving ‘anti-disciplinary’ project-based degree that challenges traditional degree structures to stimulate new forms of connective, imaginative and explorative learning, and to equip students to respond to a changing world. Learning is conceived as an emergent process; self-managed by students through critique and open peer review. We focus on ‘playfulness’ as a methodology for achieving multi-modal learning across the boundaries of art, design, computer science, engineering, games and entrepreneurship. In this new cultural moment, playfulness also re-frames the institutional identities of teacher and learner in response to new expectations for learning.

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  • Multi-dimensional creativity: a computational perspective

    Sosa Medina, R; Gero, JS

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper presents a multi-dimensional perspective for the study of creativity and formulates a framework for computational creativity that enables the definition of functional relationships among scales, and captures the effects of time. Its relevance and usefulness are shown first by classifying recent studies of computational creativity and second by illustrating multi-dimensional approaches to the computational study of creativity with sample simulation scenarios. The paper closes offering modeling guidelines for the computational studies of creativity.

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  • Static animation: an exploration into the ambiguous boundaries of Little Red Riding Hood through an illustrative typographic inquiry within animation

    Ryan, Sarah Patricia

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This practice-led thesis explores the ways in which a narrative can create a sense of the macabre, which instills the sense of fear of death, through an investigation of the relationship between illustration and typography. The research takes the traditional children’s folk tale Little Red Riding Hood as a reference for this investigation. The research invites a rethinking of the notion of the narrative through an examination of the relationship between static and moving image developed through an illustrative and typographical short animation. It also questions the potential of how illustration and typography interact within a children’s folk tale as part of the visual narrative, and how these elements can add a subliminal component to the static animation. Contradictions between text and image is a re-occurring theme within this thesis as the idea of pairing something threatening with something nonthreatening can also help in imprinting an unsettled or disturbed feeling in the viewer. This thesis also explores the idea of the psychoanalytic gaze, and how ideas put forth through the narratology code help to develop the sense of the macabre through story telling techniques and camera movement. The combination of these elements raise questions and provoke a rethinking of a cherished childhood folk tale.

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  • A Bayesian approach to norm identification

    Cranefield, Stephen; Meneguzzi, Felipe; Oren, Nir; Savarimuthu, Bastin Tony Roy (2015)

    Report
    University of Otago

    When entering a system, an agent should be aware of the obligations and prohibitions (collectively norms) that will affect it. Existing solutions to this norm identification problem make use of observations of either other's norm compliant, or norm violating, behaviour. However, they assume an extreme situation where norms are typically violated, or complied with. In this paper we propose a Bayesian approach to norm identification which operates by learning from both norm compliant and norm violating behaviour. By utilising both types of behaviour, we not only overcome a major limitation of existing approaches, but also obtain improved performance over the state-of-the-art, allowing norms to be learned with a few observations. We evaluate the effectiveness of this approach empirically and discuss theoretical limitations to its accuracy.

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  • Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Early Life Stages of the New Zealand Yellowfoot Paua, Haliotis australis and Factors Affecting Settlement.

    Maxwell, Paul Douglas Ian (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The purpose of this research was to spawn and settle larvae of the Yellowfoot Paua (Yellowfoot abalone) Haliotis australis (Gmelin, 1791) to investigate the early life stages of H. australis and the factors influencing settlement of the larvae of this abalone species in a commercial aquaculture context. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the morphological aspects of the development of the life stages of Haliotis australis from gametes, veliger larvae, post larvae and juveniles to 60 days post settlement (70 days post fertilisation). The photo micrograph results presented in this thesis represent the first comprehensive SEM micrograph record of the early life stages of H. australis. Settlement experiments tested success of larval settlement on four different diatom biofilm settlement substrates; 8-Day [old] Ungrazed Biofilm, 8-Day Grazed Biofilm (pre-grazed by conspecific adults to produce mucus trails), 1 Day Biofilm and No Biofilm. Half of the experimental replicates were settled with H. australis larvae treated with gamma(γ)-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to test the effectiveness of GABA as a chemical treatment to enhance settlement of H. australis larvae. Post larval survival at 33 days post settlement was used to infer the settlement success occurring at the time of settlement (between Day-0 and Day-4 post settlement). Analysis of mean survival data at 33-days post settlement identified that established diatom biofilms pre-grazed with conspecific adults (8 Day Grazed Biofilms) produced higher settlement than one day old diatom biofilm (1 Day Biofilm) and No Biofilm (control) treatments. Established diatom biofilms (‘8 Day Ungrazed Biofilm’) produced higher settlement than ‘No Biofilm’ treatments. The differences observed were statistically significant. The analysis of mean survival at 33-days post settlement identified that there was no significant difference detected between GABA and no-GABA treatments. However the observed results indicated that 8-Day Ungrazed Biofilms and 8-Day Grazed Biofilms treated with GABA, and untreated (no-GABA) 8 Day Grazed Biofilm settlement surfaces produced the best inferred settlement of H. australis larvae when compared to untreated 8 Day Ungrazed Biofilm and both GABA and no-GABA 1 Day Biofilm and No Biofilm treatments. These results suggest that pre-grazing of prepared diatom film settlement substrates with conspecific adult or juvenile abalone may be employed by hatcheries to ensure the highest rates of settlement in H. australis larvae. When the pre-grazing of established diatom biofilms is not a practical option in a larger scale aquaculture context, then the treatment of competent H. australis larvae with a GABA solution prior to settlement may be used to enhance the success of settlements onto established diatom biofilms.

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