85,985 results

  • American influence on citizens through New Zealand commercial radio

    Reilly, B. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emerging consensus tends to suggest there is overwhelming American dominance of New Zealand radio in music. This study sets out to enquire on such claims by looking at music, and enquiring on its effect on citizens and their engagement and creation of culture. There is evidence emerging that indicates a mixture of American as well as British influence. Foreign influence in the radio scene has been apparent since the time it became a popular addition to the New Zealand household in the 1920s. Over the following decades, the radio industry has turned to the dominant Anglo-American players for guidance and inspiration. Now with a maturing local industry that is becoming more confident in its own skin, this reliance on foreign industry is coming under question regarding its affect on the indigenous population. We set out to question which theory best describes the new landscape that the radio industry finds itself in, and how this is affecting the production of content received by the listening public. Working within a framework of cultural imperialism and hybridity, the findings indicate where it is contrary to what has been simplistically alluded to as a simple mixture of global and local.

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  • m-learning for work based apprentices:- a report on trials undertaken to establish learning portfolios

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on ongoing work that is being completed on developing a mlearning delivery package for apprentice bakers. These include: - a report on trials of formative assessment questions using the mass text messaging (SMS) software eTXT , from New Zealand Telecom. - the evaluation of web 2.0 applications (Flickr , Filemobile , Springdoo etc) to collate, archive and organise eportfolios of workplace based assessment evidence using mobile phones to gather the evidence in the form of photos, videos or audio files - a summary of suggestions that can be used to construct a customised mlearning platform for use at CPIT - the blending of various aspects of distance and mlearning that will be used to support mobile phone based delivery of a New Zealand National qualification - a start at building a model for mobile learning pedagogy pertinent to workplace based learners.

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  • Mobilisation of recalcitrant soil nutrient fractions supports foliar nitrogen to phosphorus homeostasis in a seabird soil

    Hawke, D.; Condron, L.M. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background and aims: Although the nutrient enrichment literature emphasises anthropogenic sources, seabirds deposit large quantities of marine detritus at breeding and roosting sites. Little is known of the chemical fractions and plant availability of seabird soil nutrients and their relationship to nutrient limitation patterns. Methods: Nutrients in mineral soil from a breeding colony of burrowing seabirds were progressively depleted by growing radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) separately in small pots over 4–10 months. Soil from destructively sampled pots was analysed using a version of the Hedley fractionation scheme; foliage was analysed for C, N and δ15N using isotope ratio mass spectrometry, and for P using microwave assisted digestion and ICP-OES. Results: Foliar C:N and δ15N increased with plant mass for both species, but N:P remained constant within plants of each species. As total soil P was progressively depleted, concentrations of bicarbonate-extractable soil P were maintained. This occurred mainly by depletion of non-labile inorganic P forms, thus demonstrating potential mobilisation of all refractory P (as defined by our chemical fractionation method) into plants growing at the seabird site. The increasing foliar δ15N was consistent with the progressive mobilisation of more highly recycled forms of N. Conclusions: We infer a species-specific stoichiometric homeostasis for N and P in plants grown in seabird soil, facilitated by mobilisation of recalcitrant forms of soil N and P.

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  • Writing about the spiritual side of grieving

    Arnold, S. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The Collins Dictionary defines ‘spirit’ as ‘the force or principle of life that animates the body of living things’. ‘Spiritus’ is the Latin word for spirit and also means breath. A bereaved parent in Finkbeiner’s study (1998: 238) says, ‘If children are part of parents they are not arms or legs, but bones and breath.’ Rudolph Steiner (1973) believed that during the first seven years of life, a child shares its mother’s spiritual energy in the same way it shared her blood in the womb. I would add to that by saying that in my own experience, and in the experience of many bereaved parents, the spiritual connections with one’s child do not end with the death of that child. Although much has been written about the mental, emotional and physical aspects of grieving, discussion of the fourth aspect of the quadrant, the spiritual, is discouraged in western society, where spiritual experiences of the bereaved are accounted for as part of the psychology of grief. This paper examines the spiritual side of grieving and the challenges of writing about it in a creative writing PhD. It draws on research about after-death communication and near-death experiences that aim to determine whether human consciousness survives death. It also reflects on my own writing which argues that the bereaved need not accept the pathologising of their experiences.

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  • How does enterpreneurship within rural tourism diversify rural ecomonies - Banks Peninsula - New Zealand?

    Cloesen, U. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Rural tourism is considered an economic alternative for farmers who are facing sinking profits and require additional income. This in turn can lead to an entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurship takes place when seperate legal entities for new ventures are formed. Entrepreneurship is commonly defined as creating something of value from practically nothing (Timmons in Morrison et. al., 1999, p.10). It is the process of creating or seizing an opportunity, and pursuing it regardless of the resources currently personally controlled. this involves the definition, creation and distribution of value and benefits to individuals, groups, organisations and society at large. One example for this is the establishment of the first private rural walkway in New Zealand on Banks Penninsula.

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  • Groundwater biofilm dynamics grown in situ along a nutrient gradient

    Williamson, W.; Close, M.; Leonard, M.; Webber, J.; Lin, S. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes the in situ response of groundwater biofilms in an alluvial gravel aquifer system on the Canterbury Plains, New Zealand. Biofilms were developed on aquifer gravel, encased in fine mesh bags and suspended in protective columns in monitoring wells for at least 20 weeks. Four sites were selected in the same groundwater system where previous analyses indicated a gradient of increasing nitrate down the hydraulic gradient from Sites 1 to 4. Measurements during the current study classified the groundwater as oligotrophic. Biofilm responses to the nutrient gradients were assessed using bioassays, with biomass determined using protein and cellular and nucleic acid staining and biofilm activity using enzyme assays for lipid, carbohydrate, phosphate metabolism, and cell viability. In general, biofilm activity decreased as nitrate levels increased from Sites 1 to 4, with the opposite relationship for carbon and phosphorus concentrations. These results showed that the groundwater system supported biofilm growth and that the upper catchment supported efficient and productive biofilms (high ratio of activity per unit biomass).

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  • Key attributes for success within the ICT job market: a case study of ICT students' view

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on attributes that are seen as being critical to success within the ICT sector roles. The required attributes as identified by a study of 205 randomly selected ICT roles have been compared with students’ perception (based on the preliminary results of a study of one student focus group). Overall, there were difficulties in drawing clear conclusions from the outcome of one case study only. However, we were able to identify some key issues in both agreements and mismatches on winning attributes for future studies.

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  • The progress to digital television in New Zealand: an update

    Norris, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article was written for the prestigious International Journal of Digital Television (I am a member of the Editorial Board of this journal). One of the primary aims of the journal is to monitor the progress of the digital revolution worldwide - there are considerable differences in approach and timing between countries. The article surveyed the statistics relating to digital penetration in New Zealand - somewhere between 61 and 70 percent. More significantly it also examined several key issues at the intersection of the digital transition and public broadcasting (broadcasting not driven by commercial or ratings imperatives). Such issues include the National Government's decision to remove the Charter from TVNZ, thus rendering it wholly commercial, and the prospects for survival of TVNZ's two digital commercial-free channels. The article provided a timely analysis of the environment in which the digital transition was proceeding, and a discussion of the key issues that would affect the transition.

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  • NACCQ qualifications - a preformance review and future developments

    Roberton, G.; Ross, J. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 1986 a committee, consisting of industry and polytechnic computing representatives, was formed to design a new qualification in computing that would replace the outdated New Zealand Certificate in Data Processing (NZCDP). As a result the Certificate in Business Computing (CBC) programme, a radical new approach to computing education incorporating competencybased assessment, was offered nationally in polytechnics for the first time in 1988. The National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ), formed to replace the NZCDP review committee, continued with the development of the Advanced Certificate in Business Computing (ACBC), introduced in 1989, and the National Diploma in Business Computing (NDBC), introduced the following year. The organisation has continued to strive to serve its member institutions over the last fifteen years by endeavouring to keep up with, and ahead of, developments in the rapidly changing field of Information and Communications Technology (ICT). This paper presents the findings from a comprehensive survey of NACCQ sector affiliates (includes Polytechnics and Universities) on which NACCQ qualifications and modules are currently being offered. It focuses on the question of whether the organisation is currently perceived to be addressing the needs of its members, and those of the ICT industry, in terms of the content of the current edition of the New Zealand Qualifications in Information and Communications Technology (the Blue Book).

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT: one year on

    Nesbit, T.; McPherson, F. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of a special foundation programme that has been completed by some international students as their first semester’s study towards the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies degree at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. The findings are useful for evaluating the ongoing use of the special foundation programme and will be of use to other members of the NACCQ sector who are using or considering using a similar foundation programme.

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  • Student workplace contracts: the tie that binds

    Wieck, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The establishment of a formal contract between student and employer is becoming a requirement for tertiary institutions that feature cooperative education courses. Such courses require students to complete a piece of work that would typically be completed by a recent graduate of the respective course. Employers get an opportunity to see what a potential employee can do, while the institution receives confirmation that, at least, their teachings can be related to productive tasks. In turn, students need protection from exploitation or physical accidents they might suffer while in the workplace. This paper reviews a selection of current and past student-employer contracts used for cooperative education (work placement) courses and by consulting employers, students and representatives of this and other tertiary institutions, explores the implications for their use. It concludes with recommendations for items to incorporate in an effective contract. A more quantitative treatment, including a more extensive survey, is planned for later in the year.

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  • The use of yeasts and moulds as sensing elements in biosensors

    Baronian, K. H. R. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Whole cell biosensors are able to provide information that sensors based on single and multiple types of molecules are unable to do. For example broad-spectrum catabolite analysis, cell toxicity and genotoxicity are best detected in the context of a functioning cell. Most whole cell sensors have used bacterial cells as the sensing element. Fungal cells, however, can provide all of the advantages bacterial cells offer but in addition they can provide information that is more relevant to other eukaryote organisms. These cells are easy to cultivate, manipulate for sensor configurations and are amenable to a wide range of transducer methodologies. An overview of the use of yeast and filamentous fungi as the sensing element of some biosensors is presented here.

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  • Education for registered nurses - does one size fit all?

    Hardcastle, J. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Postgraduate education does not meet the needs of all registered nurses. Assuming it does could be detrimental to nursing practice development and patient care.

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  • To what extent are Maori studying ICT? The policy implementation gap?

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Maori are studying ICT at a disproportionate rate. Maori make up 15% of the New Zealand population yet Maori school leavers are trailing the success tables and despite the advent of the Wananga, Maori tertiary students (aged 18 to 24) are declining (Social Report, 2007). Recent government reports are also identifying Maori as having a low level of involvement in ICT (NZ Government Executive, 2000). With the approval of CPIT’s Kaiarahi, this paper examines the current literature on this issue. It also examines the responsibilities under the Treaty of Waitangi, gives a brief overview and analysis of the government policies and strategies involved, and looks at how these responsibilities, policies and strategies are working in practice. Finally this paper suggests the need for in-depth collaborative applied research – both at a local and a national level.

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  • 'Back to the bedside': Graduate level education in critical care

    Hardcastle, J. E. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The need for post registration education for nurses practising at specialty level in critical care environments is widely acknowledged in nursing and educational literature. There is also clear consensus that the ultimate aim of educational preparation and practice development is to improve the delivery of nursing care to patients who are critically ill and provide support for their families. Yet the ‘right’ approach to educational delivery and evaluation is less clear and stimulates considerable debate amongst nursing educators, care providers, learners and regulatory bodies. The need for critical care nurses to apply advanced knowledge and technical skills to complex and dynamic practice situations necessitates the development of critical thinking and a problem-solving approach to clinical practice that can be fostered through education and experience. This paper explores the relationships within teaching, learning and practice development in critical care nursing and questions the popular assumption that ‘post graduate (Master’s level) education fits all’. Discussion focuses on the successful development and implementation of graduate level education for critical care nurses in the South Island of New Zealand and how this development is challenging existing approaches to the provision and evaluation of formal critical care education in New Zealand.

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  • Aptitude testing as a predictor of success: the Christchurch experience

    Ross, J. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Christchurch Polytechnic has used an aptitude test to aid selection of students since 1975 and its usefulness as a predictor of success has been informally debated regularly since that time. In recent years, it has been used to assist in the selection process but achievement of a poor test result has not necessarily been used to exclude a student from beginning study. This paper examines the results of aptitude tests over a period of three years, and the subsequent performance of those students who joined the Certificate in Business Computing (CBC) programme for full-time study. Aptitude Test results are examined by section (pattern matching, mathematical reasoning, logic, words) in an attempt to find out if any one section provides a better indicator of success than the rest. The measure of success used is based on achievement of passes in the nine modules undertaken by new CBC students in their first semester of study. Trends which are observed in this analysis suggest that at the Pass mark which has been used so far, the test does not give a valid indication of success or otherwise. Whether or not a student succeeds in their first semester is not significantly dependent on whether or not they Passed the Aptitude Test. When a higher pass mark is considered, then there is a small level of correlation between achievement of that mark in the test and subsequent success in CBC study. Results in the logic section of the test provide the best indicator but the figures show that many students who did not score well in that section were still able to succeed in their study. The ability to predict success or otherwise in CBC study by using scores achieved in the Aptitude Test as a critical indicator remains inconclusive.

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  • Surface soil chemistry at an alpine procellariid breeding colony in New Zealand, and comparison with a lowland site

    Harrow, G.; Hawke, D. J.; Holdaway, R. N. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Procellariid seabirds occupied colonies on the pre-human New Zealand mainland from the lowlands to alpine areas, but the effect of geographic environment on soil nutrient cycling has not been investigated. To facilitate qualitative predictions of seabird breeding effects on terrestrial ecology and biogeochemistry, we compared surface soil (0–15 cm) results from a Hutton’s shearwater colony at 1230 m with a Westland petrel colony in lowland forest.

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  • How can mental health nurses prove they are culturally safe?

    Hughes, M.; Farrow, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, nurses have been required to be culturally safe in their practice. (1,2) But now all registered nurses (RNs) must show competency within their scope of practice, including evidence of competence in culturally safe practice. (3) At first, this requirement may appear challenging for nurses working in mental health, given that practice in this area sometimes requires nursing people against their will, or where personal freedoms are temporarily restricted. While mental health practice does have some unique challenges, good mental health nursing practice actually exemplifies cultural safety. Likewise, cultural safety supports the articulation of good mental health nursing practice, and the description of good mental health nursing practice will likely meet the requirements of an audit of culturally safe practice. Some mental health nurses have expressed concern that in any audit they cannot articulate the true complexities of mental health nursing. However, we suggest good mental health nursing practice embraces cultural safety.

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  • Experimenting with web-based course management applications - as a tool for sharing research information and promoting research

    Asgarkhani, M.; Weir, D. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During the past few years, there has been a major shift in the New Zealand tertiary education marketplace - more specifically, with Polytechnics offering degree programs alongside other qualifications that they have been making readily available. It is now necessary for them to be able to demonstrate that they are capable of conducting research - more specifically, in providing support, making resources and funding available and promoting a research-orientated culture. Polytechnics across New Zealand have applied various tools and techniques in order to promote and encourage research. This paper outlines the results of an experiment with Blackboard (a Web-based course management tool) as a tool for promoting research and scholarly activities.

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  • Relating to families through their seasons of life

    Tritschler, E.; Yarwood, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    An indigenous practice model - Seasons of Life - offers nurses a new way of relating to families transitioning to parenthood.

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