85,985 results

  • 'Signs of genius apparent'-The art of James Cook (1904-60)

    Pauli, D. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Profiles the artist. Discusses his drawings, water colours and oil paintings. Details his travels overseas, including his time at the Edinburgh College of Art and the Royal Scottish Academy, and his activities with the Australian Forces during WW2.

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  • The benefits of nurse-led pre-assessment

    Harris, C.; Watson, P. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A nurse-led pre-assessment clinic in the cardiology day unit at Christchurch Hospital has proved to be an efficient use of resources, a satisfying experience for patients and a way for expen'enced nurses to extend their practice.

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  • 2 classes, 2 languages, 2 methodologies and 1 assignment

    Nesbit, T. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 2002 two different programming classes at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology were given the same application to build as part of an assignment, with one class working in JADE and the other in PHP. The purpose of this paper is to identify the tasks that were the most difficult to complete, and what were seen as being the most important skills and competencies needed to complete the assignment, based on the language used.

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  • Attracting students to computing: The collaborative development of an innovative marketing tool

    Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years students enrolling in computing courses or choosing computing as a major have been declining. (McCallum, 2006, Chabrow, 2004) Review of the literature tells us that one of the reasons for this decline is the “image of computing” as a viable career option. To help eliminate this myth a project was established under the Accelerating Auckland Task Force TEC funding to create a DVD for high school students to show how exciting a career in computing can be. Six Auckland tertiary institutions collaborated to design and produce a DVD outlining eight different careers in the field of computing. This paper outlines the background to the declining enrolments, the collaboration of the six tertiary providers and the production and development of the DVD. Free copies of the DVD will be available at the presentation.

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  • ICT4D: working with communities for ICT enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Analysis of prerequisites: Methodology and a case study

    Lopez, M.; Lopez, D.; McCarthy, C.; Oliver, R. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    It is well known that it is dangerous to infer causation from correlation. However, the mantra that correlation does not imply causation can lead to some researchers believing that formal inference is never possible from a correlational study. This paper presents a theoretical framework, a conceptual framework and a methodology for establishing formal inference from the analysis of prerequisites in an educational context. This is important in education because some prior knowledge is often required for success in any topic or course. The method is illustrated with a case study that investigates the effectiveness of a level four certificate as preparation for further study. The case study identified the unique contribution to subsequent performance made by individual courses in the certificate. It also identified the specific courses in subsequent study which were most affected by the certificate courses. We conclude that the approach can indeed enable formal inference from a correlational study.

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  • Exploring the application of agile principles to tertiary computing education

    Proctor, M.; Atkins, C.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Smith, H.; Trounson, R.; Sutton, K.; Benson, N.; Dyke, S.; McCarthy, C.; Otto, M.; Nicoll, C. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper defines a proposed set of Agile Principles for Tertiary Computing Education as developed through an Agile Education workshop held during the annual Computing South Island Educators’ (CSIE) forum. The purpose of the workshop was to explore innovative and ‘Agile’ approaches that have been used within our South Island institutions to consider whether the principles of Agile development could be usefully applied or adapted to tertiary computing education. Each case study was analysed to determine alignment with Agile principles and emerging themes in the application of these principles to tertiary computing education were identified and discussed. This led to the development of a proposed set of Agile principles for tertiary computing education to support the development of computing courses, course components and programmes. Meaningful learning has emerged as a key factor for further exploration

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  • What influences practice nurses to participate in post-registration education?

    Richardson, A.; Gage, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Introduction: There is a need for educated primary health nurses to develop their practice, educational and career pathways in response to opportunities emerging from the Primary Health Care Strategy (PHCS). This study aimed to explore the opportunities and constraints encountered by practice nurses when participating in post-registration education. Methods: This study used exploratory qualitative design, incorporating focus group interviews with 16 practice nurses employed by Pegasus Health, Christchurch. Qualitative thematic analysis used a general inductive approach. Findings: Seven key themes emerged, including motivation to learn, enablers for learning and challenges to accessing education. Practice nurses also described their changing roles with clients and their vision for practice nursing in the future. Conclusion: This study considered accessibility of post-registration education for practice nurses and the extent to which they are embracing these opportunities in order to meet their practice needs. The PHCS states that primary health care nursing is crucial to its implementation. Successful expansion of primary health care nursing roles rests on the development of educational qualifications and skills, as well as career frameworks. It is envisaged that, with strong leadership and research skills resulting from professional development, practice nurses will be more able to reduce health inequalities. Study findings indicate that practice nurses are rising to the challenge of expanding their roles and engaging in post-registration education. They are more likely to pursue this if constraints are minimised and support increased. Currently practice nurses make significant contributions to primary health care and have the potential for an even greater contribution in the future.

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  • Exploratory factor analysis of the clinical learning environment, Supervision and Nurses Teacher Scale (CLES+T)

    Watson, P.B.; Seaton, P.; Sims, D.; Jamieson, I.; Mountier, J.; Whittle, R.; Saarikoski, M. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background and Purpose: The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES1T) scale measures student nurses’ perceptions of clinical learning environments. This study evaluates the construct validity and internal reliability of the CLES1T in hospital settings in New Zealand. Comparisons are made between New Zealand and Finnish data. Methods: The CLES1T scale was completed by 416 Bachelor of Nursing students following hospital clinical placements between October 2008 and December 2009. Construct validity and internal reliability were assessed using exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach’s alpha. Results: Exploratory factor analysis supports 4 factors. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from .82 to .93. All items except 1 loaded on the same factors found in unpublished Finnish data. The first factor combined 2 previous components from the published Finnish component analysis and was renamed: connecting with, and learning in, communities of clinical practice. The remaining 3 factors (Nurse teacher, Supervisory relationship, and Leadership style of the manager) corresponded to previous components and their conceptualizations. Conclusion: The CLES1T has good internal reliability and a consistent factor structure across samples. The consistency across international samples supports faculties and hospitals using the CLES1T to benchmark the quality of clinical learning environments provided to students.

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  • E-learning: Current trends, practices and issues for future consideration

    Asgarkhani, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As public interest in the Internet continues to grow, there is an increasing pressure on educators to incorporate Internet resources into traditional classroom programs in new and creative ways. Some institutions have introduced Web-assisted options as a supplement to face-to-face communication between students and educators/trainers, whilst others offer Web-based learning with the Internet as the sole medium for delivery. To date, there has been some debate with regards to the perceived effectiveness of these Web-assisted options (from the point of view of both teaching staff and students). This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the students’ attitudes towards webassisted learning (within the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology - CPIT).

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  • Process and strategy influences on product development performance in New Zealand

    de Waal, A.; Knott, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study is the first to evaluate the outcomes of alternative new product development (NPD) strategies among New Zealand firms. For each of six distinct NPD strategies, we assess performance by selecting the most applicable of 12 measures. We find that new product strategies produce better results than product improvement strategies, although managers rated profit margins unsatisfactory for all six NPD strategies. Our sample firms seldom reported using formalised NPD process or strategy, but when they did, this correlated positively with improved performance in all 12 measures. Firms generally recognised their NPD process performance as poorer than their product performance.

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  • The use of a commercial ERP system: Teaching business systems computing students

    Comins, N.; Young, A. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes the use of a commercial Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system in an undergraduate degree course. It will describe the process of deciding on which system to use, the implementation of several different ERP systems and the integration of the system into the curriculum of the course. The paper will also discuss the different pedagogical uses of the system, the different ways in which such a system can be implemented and the advantages and disadvantages of the different systems that were implemented. The paper will conclude with lecturer and student feedback on the process and application of employing such a large system into the course to enhance the teaching and learning of a business information system to computing students..

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  • Digital children's channels: A comparative analysis of three locally launched channels

    Zanker, R.; Lustyik, K. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There are over two billion children worldwide under the age of 18, who are targeted by an increasing number of television channels solely dedicated to them. As such globally circulated programmes and networks expand their reach using digital platforms, is there a need – and room for – locally produced television content for young people? From the perspective of national media policy advocates, locally developed, produced and broadcast programmes can provide children with a sense of their own place in an increasingly complex globalized media landscape and ensure that programmes are developed with the interest, perspective and views of local children in mind. This article explores the dichotomy between ‘local’ and ‘global’ television content targeting children in the context of debates on media globalization. Our three case studies from radically different media policy environments, focus specifically on locally produced content offered on dedicated national children‘s digital television channels launched locally to promote the cultural heritage of a specific nation or region. They provide concrete examples of how local content is conceptualized and what types of content children have to choose from. Our findings are paradoxical. Although each channel has been created to speak back to dominant audio-visual children’s flows from the periphery, our findings are that the better funded nationally based dedicated children’s channels have grown into successful market players beyond original national boundaries. The first case study examines dedicated local children’s provision in New Zealand, focusing on TVNZ6, a digital children‘s channel that operated as part of the public service broadcasting sector. The second case study focuses on children‘s television content in Hungary and uses the case of Minimax network Hungary, an Eastern European regional commercial targeting children growing up in a dynamically transforming post-communist media system. The third case study looks at television content produced in the Middle East by focusing on Al Jazeera Children’s Channel (JCC), a pan-Arabic non-commercial edutainment channel established in Qatar and funded by the Qatar Foundation.

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  • A standards-based approach to federated identity

    Lopez, M.; Mann, S.; Peppiatt, J.; Sewell, A.; Stott, C. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Federated Identity allows users to access multiple services at different organisations with the same credentials. In this paper, we summarise key work currently being carried out on Federated Identity. We evaluate several existing and suggested schemes and propose a new standards-based platform-neutral design pattern that uses current mature technologies and is suitable for the implementation of federated identity in a business-tobusiness context. The design pattern is verified with a practical implementation at two polytechnics.

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  • Testing the diagnostic efficacy of the iPad2 for emergency radiologic consultation in rural New Zealand

    Hayes, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the diagnostic accuracy of handheld computing devices is comparable to that of monitors that might be used in emergency teleconsultation. Subjects and Methods: One handheld device, an Apple iPad2 was studied. The diagnostic efficacy of this device was tested against that of secondary-class monitor - the reference standard (primary class being clinical workstation display) for images of slices from CT of the brain. Participants read 100 brain images looking for a specific abnormality (example: fresh intracranial bleed) and rated their confidence in their decisions. Participants were timed but told that the timing was for statistical purposes only, so we could compare the time taken to read images on both monitors. Readings were by Intensive Care physician consultants. These consultants were selected as they were the ideal professional to review images of CT heads with the ability to take part in study. Results: Despite experiencing slower workflow, clinicians evaluating patients for injuries reported similar diagnostic performance regardless of whether they read images from Apple's iPad2 or a traditional LCD monitor. The results are encouraging and indicate that from a hardware perspective, the iPad2 display is suitable for preliminary emergency interpretation.

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  • Web-assisted learning: A review of planning and theory

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of the phase I of a research project (planning and theory of e-learning) that looks at theory of benefits and value of e-learning, planning to achieve perceived benefits and values. Phase II will compare the reality of the outcomes after implementation of e-Learning solutions versus planned outcomes. The paper covers some of the key issues web-assisted or e-learning through discussing the various stages (technologies) of e-learning solutions, potential benefits; the state of the e-learning industry; the barriers to introducing e-learning and building a model to assess strategic value of e-learning through web technologies. It concentrates on literature review, planning and theory mostly related to early 2000 when the e-learning phenomenon really emerged.

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  • Analgesia for relief of pain due to uterine cramping/involution after birth

    Deussen, A.; Ashwood, P.; Martis, R. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: Women may experience differing types of pain and discomfort following birth, including cramping after birth pains associated with uterine involution. Objectives: To assess the effectiveness and safety of analgesia for relief of after birth pains following vaginal birth. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 December 2010) and the reference lists of trials and review articles. Selection criteria: All identified published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing two different types of analgesia or analgesia with placebo or analgesia with no treatment, for the relief of after birth pains following vaginal birth. Types of analgesia included pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. Main results: We have included 18 studies (involving 1498 women) in this review. However, only nine of the included studies (with 750 women) reported 24 comparisons of analgesia with other analgesia or placebo and had data that could be included in our meta-analyses. The majority of studies investigated pharmacological analgesics and these were grouped into classes for this review. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were significantly better than placebo at relieving pain from uterine involution as assessed by their summed pain intensity differences (SPID) (mean difference (MD) 4.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.87 to 5.82; three studies, 204 women) and summed pain relief scores (MD 5.94; 95% CI 3.83 to 8.01; three studies, 204 women). NSAIDS were compared with opioids in one small study of 23 women reporting SPID and summed pain relief and found no difference. A larger study of 127 women found NSAIDs to be significantly better than opioids at reducing pain intensity six hours following study intervention (MD -0.70; 95% CI -1.04 to -0.35). Opioids were compared with placebo in three studies that could be included in meta-analyses; one small study of 23 women reporting SPID and summed pain relief and found no difference. One study of 95 women found no difference in pain intensity six hours following the study intervention. A third study of 108 women found significantly more women in the placebo group reported no pain relief than women in the opioid group (risk ratio 0.10; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.23). Aspirin was significantly better than paracetamol when pain intensity score was assessed six hours after study intervention (MD 0.85; 95% CI 0.29 to 1.41; one study 48 women) at relieving pain from uterine involution. Paracetamol was not better than placebo when pain intensity was assessed six hours after the study intervention in one study of 48 women. Authors' conclusions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) including aspirin were better than placebo at relieving pain from uterine cramping/involution following vaginal birth. NSAIDs were better than paracetamol and paracetamol was not better than placebo, though numbers of participants for these comparisons were small. Data for opioids compared with NSAIDs and opioids compared with placebo were conflicting, with some measures showing similar effect and others indicating NSAIDs were better than opioids and opioids were not better than placebo. There were insufficient data to make conclusions regarding the effectiveness of opioids at relieving pain from uterine cramping/involution. The median year of publication of included studies was 1981; therefore more research is needed to assess the effectiveness of current pharmacological and non-pharmacological analgesia at relieving pain from uterine cramping/involution following vaginal birth.

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  • A new hypertrichous larval Erythrites (Erythraeinae) from Banks Peninsula, New Zealand

    Clark, J. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Erythrites otamahua sp. n. is described from three unfed larvae recovered from pitfall traps on Otamahua (Quail) Island, Lyttelton Harbour, and Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. This hypertrichous mite bears an idiosoma clothed in 99 dark, dorsal setae; has up to 5 pairs of scutalae all longer than 100 microns and a scutum much wider (W) than long (L), (L:W = 0.673). All legs are long; >800 microns and genua I bears one σ solenidion. It is most similar to Erythrites reginae (Hirst, 1928) and Erythrites urrbrae (Womersley, 1934), both Australian species. It is posited that the hypertrichous idiosoma confers solar gain advantage to these larvae seeking a host at higher latitudes.

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  • Developing and embedding inquiry-guided learning across an institution

    Jenkins, M.; Healey, M. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This chapter presents a case study of how inquiry-guided learning has been developed and embedded within a small university in the United Kingdom. It highlights the different theoretical and conceptual frameworks that contributed to our evolving understanding of inquiry-guided learning and the importance of recognizing and working with disciplinary differences.

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  • Determination of maximal oxygen uptake using the Bruce or a novel athlete‐led protocol in a mixed population

    Hamlin, M.J.; Draper, N.; Blackwell, G.; Shearman, J.P.; Kimber, N (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Treadmill tests for maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) have traditionally used set speed and incline increments regardless of participants training or exercise background. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of a novel athlete‐led protocol for determining maximal aerobic fitness in adults. Twenty‐nine participants (21 male, 8 female, age 29.8 ± 9.5 y, BMI 24.4 ± 3.1, mean ± SD) from a variety of exercise backgrounds were asked to complete two maximal treadmill running tests (using the standard Bruce or a novel athlete‐led protocol [ALP]) to volitional failure in a counter‐balanced randomised cross‐over trial one week apart. We found no substantial difference in maximal oxygen uptake (47.0 ± 9.1 and 46.8 ± 10.7 ml.kg‐1.min‐1, mean ± SD for the ALP and Bruce protocols respectively), evidenced by the Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.93 (90% confidence limits, 0.88‐0.96). However, compared to the Bruce protocol, participants completing the ALP protocol attained a substantially higher maximal heart rate (ALP = 182.8 ± 10.5, Bruce = 179.7 ± 8.7 beats.min‐1). Additionally, using the Bruce protocol took a longer period of time (23.2 ± 17.0 s) compared to the ALP protocol. It seems that using either treadmill protocol will give you similar maximal oxygen uptake results. We suggest the ALP protocol which is simpler, quicker and probably better at achieving maximal heart rates is a useful alternative to the traditional Bruce protocol.

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