85,980 results

  • Sen's capability approach in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes: promoting successful local application through focus groups

    Schischka, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At a theoretical level there has been wide acceptance of Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach (CA) in development. However, questions remain regarding operationalization of the approach within the constraints participants and practitioners and other stakeholders face in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes.

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  • Recognising excellence in student projects

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    We would like to propose the establishment of an annual publication of student projects. This publication would be reviewed by a panel drown from NACCQ and published in association with the annual conference. Submissions would be invited from all tertiary institutions in New Zealand and would take the form of a two page paper, in a design science format that provides a concise summary of the project. The review will be designed to enforce a minimum standard but resubmissions will be invited from those who do not initially meet the standard.

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  • Living in stories: Creative nonfiction as an effective genre to write about death and bereavement

    Arnold, S. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Through the telling of stories and interaction with listener or audience, we give structure to our experience and create order and meaning. Written narrative is, therefore, a medium well suited to exploring the experience of death and bereavement. 'We live in stories, not statistics,' Gilbert says (2002: 223). Parents' stories of their children's deaths serve the same purpose as parents' stories of their living children's ongoing lives. Writing about the death of one's child is a way not only to continue bonds and help other bereaved parents, but also a way to allow the 'wounded storyteller' to give voice to the dead and facilitate catharsis in the teller. Utilising the techniques of creative nonfiction to write such a story, the writer can create a compelling narrative that allows writer and reader to enter 'the space of the story for the other' (Frank 1995: 18). This paper discusses the human affinity with story telling and the reasons the bereaved write their stories. It also defines the genre of creative nonfiction and outlines the history of its development. Finally it examines four creative nonfiction texts that have influenced my own writing on the topic of parental bereavement.

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  • The fate of computing in research performance evaluations: ERA vs PBRF

    Clear, A.; Clear, T. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The prevailing ‘audit culture’ in national governments has seen a global proliferation of research performance evaluation schemes. Most recently the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) results have been published. The results from this bibliometrically based ranking exercise provide an interesting comparison with the earlier results from New Zealand’s Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) exercise. With a focus on the computing disciplines this paper sets these developments in the global context; compares the outcomes under each scheme; the extent to which the prevailing publication cultures have been supported or undermined; the scope for such schemes to render whole sub-disciplines invisible and the potential impacts for the computing disciplines from such exercises.

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  • Enhancing deliberate reflective practice through role play by using situated technology-enhanced learning with tablets

    Chan, S. (2013)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Situated technology-enhanced learning (STL) is a form of mobile learning requiring mobile hardware, storage of user generated data on web-based servers and wireless access to the internet to enhance learning in situated learning environments. The STL project reported in this paper used tablet videoing capability to record role-plays of hospitality students learning and practicing front-office procedures. Check-in and check-out procedures encompass complex customer relationship competencies requiring the learning of specialised practical skills and adoption of dispositional attributes. The pedagogical principles underpinning this project include deliberate practice, reflective learning, learner self-evaluation and appropriate peer or tutor feedback procedures. Effective deliberate practice, as described by Ericsson (2006) requires effortful engagement from learners and precise, timely feedback from peers or trainers. Practice underpinned by learner selfreflection and evaluation and motivation are also important contributors towards transformation of learners’ innate dispositional traits. Workroom / workshop observations, student focus group and evaluations and tutor interviews were conducted as the project progressed. Through analysis of data collated from four courses of the role-playing learning activity, guidelines have been produced. These guidelines assist students’ learning of self-evaluative skills; extend tutors’ use of role-playing as teaching strategy; and inform educational developers on creating appropriate STL activities. This paper represents work most relevant to the conference theme: The impacts of VET research on individual learners and groups of learners.

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  • Computing education for sustainability: Madrid and beyond

    Young, A.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Muller, L. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents a synopsis of the report published in Inroads, December 2008, on work started by an international working group at the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference in Madrid in July 2008 and the continuation of that work in the ensuing year. The report presented a policy on Computing Education for Sustainability for adoption by SIGCSE. The original paper presented “results from a survey of Computing Educators who attended ITiCSE 2008 where such a policy statement was mooted” (Mann et al, 2008). It also sets out an action plan to integrate Education for Sustainability into computing education curriculum. This paper draws heavily on the content of the Working Group report 2008.

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  • Parental bereavement: From grief theory to a creative nonfiction perspective on grieving the death of a young adult child from cancer

    Arnold, S. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Do computing students have a different approach to studying?

    Lopez, M.; Clarkson, D.; Fourie, W.; Lopez, D.; Marais, K. (2009)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Courses in ICT qualifications have a lower pass rate than other qualifications. We postulate that this might be a result of different pedagogy and that such difference might be reflected in student conceptions of learning. We surveyed students (n=218) from two degree programmes (Nursing and Computing) and one sub-degree programme with a questionnaire based on the ASSIST instrument to identify differences in conceptions of learning, preferences for types of learning, and approaches to studying. We report on the differences we found between the fields of study and consider the implications for teaching.

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  • The City in a Different Light: rethinking the political through education by means of performance by people with intellectual disabilities

    McCaffrey, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    After the fatal earthquake of February 22nd 2011 Different Light Theatre company started meeting again on March 13th. Although the theatre space in which we held weekly classes, workshops and rehearsals was, like a lot of buildings, closed at that time, we were able to meet at the International Buddhist Centre on Riccarton Road. At the time a large part of the motivation for meeting so soon after the quake was in a way an attempt at ‘normalization’ in an extraordinary situation. We felt that the performers needed the routine of the classes or rehearsals to continue, amidst the disruption caused by the quake damage and aftershocks.

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  • Developing and introducing courses on testing and quality assurance

    Joyce, D.; Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reviews the processes involved in developing level 6 and 7 courses on testing and quality assurance. These processes include having the initial idea, conducting market research, deciding to proceed, forming a development team, gathering data, deciding levels and prerequisites, identifying resources, obtaining approvals, and marketing to students. The paper also reflects on the learnings gained from the experience of delivering the level 6 course for the first time.

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  • Estimation of Cronbach’s alpha for sparse datasets

    Lopez, M. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Cronbach’s alpha is widely used to evaluate the internal consistency of a psychometric instrument. Its popularity is largely based on a straightforward interpretation in terms of correlations, its ease of calculation and the guidance it gives to building a single dimensional scale. The standard calculation of alpha, however, requires a complete dataset and can give misleading results with sparse datasets. An alternative method of calculating an equivalent to Cronbach’s alpha is proposed that retains the essence of alpha and can be readily calculated for sparse datasets. A theoretical basis is given and the method is evaluated and validated against generated datasets.

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  • Narrative strategies regarding Japanese ethnic origins and cultural identities in Japanese middle-school history textbooks

    Nishino, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article examines how middle school history textbooks published between 1951 and 1995 explain the origins of the Japanese as an ethnic group (minzoku). The analysis shows that despite the relatively long period from which the sample of textbooks was taken, these texts continue to emphasize two categories of Japanese identity: a biologically heterogeneous people through prehistoric immigration and a unifi ed language. Building on the latter theme, the textbooks continued to treat the innovation of the kana as a quintessential development underlying the Japanese cultural achievement. The analysis reveals that the narrative tone shifted from being emotive in the early 1950s texts to somewhat muted in later decades.

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  • An exploratory study into the impact of NACCQ research

    Clear, T.; Young, A. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary investigation into the impact of research within the New Zealand National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) sector. Using a strategy based predominantly upon keyword search of academic reference databases, the study found that NACCQ projects and publications are beginning to be cited in diverse outlets, and are now making a contribution to the international literature in the computing disciplines. The study and its findings are briefly reviewed and the outlets in which NACCQ research has been cited are tabulated. This paper establishes the first profile of international citations for NACCQ research and provides a replicable baseline for subsequent studies into the impact of research originating in the sector.

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  • Recovery of rowing sprint performance after high intensity strength training

    Gee, T.; Olsen, P.D.; Garland Fritzdorf, S. W.; White, D.J.; Golby, J.; Thompson, K.G. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study evaluated the impact of a high-intensity strength training session on rowing sprint performance. Ten male club rowers performed a baseline counter-movement jump (CMJ) and a 250 m rowing ergometer sprint (250 m). Twenty-four hours after baseline, participants performed a high-intensity strength training session (ST) consisting of multi-joint barbell exercises. At 24 h, 48 h and 72 h post-ST, CMJ and 250 m were repeated alongside assessment of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and perceived muscle soreness. At 24 h post-ST 250 m performance decreased significantly (90% CI: 0.3 – 0.7 s), but returned to pre-test values at 48 h. There was a significant decrease in CMJ height at 48 h post ST (90% CI: -0.7 – -4.1 cm). Perceived muscle soreness was significantly greater than baseline at all assessed time points following ST (p < 0.05). There was a significant increase in CK from baseline to 24 h (90% CI: 146 – 390 U/L). High-intensity strength training was observed to adversely affect 250 m rowing ergometer performance after 24 h and coincided with transient muscle damage.

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  • The Carich Affair: Picking up the "pieces" (students) and moving on

    McCarthy, C.; Roberton, G.; Jull, C.; Potgieter, C. (2004)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In recent years Private Training Enterprises (PTEs) started teaching diploma programmes at levels 5 and 6 in full competition with Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITP). ITPs became increasingly concerned about the ability of PTE students to pathway into higher level ITP programmes, so as to continue with their studies. The National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) had done considerable work to map the unit standards contained in the national diplomas to their qualifications and this exercise drew into question the perceived value of the PTE levels 5 and 6 diplomas from the perspective of ITPs (Ross & Roberton, 2003). In the event, these concerns became less relevant when a major player in the PTE domain collapsed. In October 2003 Carich were forced to close business down and suddenly the future of their students, including a major cohort from the international market, was in serious jeopardy. The New Zealand government requested higher education institutions to rescue students, recognizing the negative impact that the collapse of Carich would have on students. They also coordinated the re-assignment of students to institutions who volunteered to help. This paper is written as an opinion piece to explain how Wintec and CPIT handled the situation, which occurred at an extremely busy time of the year for ITPs. It discusses the associated problems, the benefits that accrued as a result of the successful rescue operation, and lessons learned from the experience.

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  • A new histiostomatid mite (Acari: Astigmatina: Histiostomatidae) from blue penguin burrows

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Histiostoma mantelli new species is described and illustrated from females and males collected from moulting burrows of blue penguin Eudyptula minor at Tongaporutu, North Taranaki, New Zealand.

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  • Techniques for aligning IT education with industry demand

    Asgarkhani, M.; Clear, A. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Organizations rely increasingly on Information Technology (IT) solutions for day to day operations and as such IT solutions play a significant role in efficiency, effectiveness and innovation of processes in design, development and delivery of products and services. IT is a business enabler and has revolutionized the ways in which various sectors of the industry operate. Various reports and published research suggest that worldwide, IT skills are in short supply and high demand. Universities and other tertiary institutions play a key role in developing skilled IT workforce to meet these skills shortages. The use of most IT solution platforms is global. If language and cultural issues (that can potentially impact nature of design) we put aside, skills related to solution development processes and technology deployment are mostly common worldwide. IT is now a global industry. Therefore it is critical to align skills development strategies adopted within educational programs (offered by educational institutions) with realistic and relevant needs for the global market. Tertiary educational institutions make use of a variety of techniques and frameworks for aligning their programs with IT skills needs. Based on review of cases and previous research, this paper presents an overview of techniques deployed by tertiary educational institutions to ensure relevance and currency of their programs for developing skilled IT workforce.

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  • Perspectives of new trades tutors: boundary crossing between vocational identities

    Chan, S. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article reports on a study of the perspectives of new tutors teaching traditional vocational trades who recently commenced teaching in the Institutes of Technologies and Polytechnics (ITPs) sector in New Zealand. The perspectives are collated from questionnaires and interviews of 13 tutors, from five ITPs, who have been teaching full-time for two years. In this article, a focus is made on the transformation process from expert trade worker to effective trades tutor, along with suggestions to assist the ‘boundary crossing’ process between two diverse vocational identities. Suggestions include aligning trades tutors’ existing workplace training-based conceptualisations of teaching and learning to extend trades tutors’ teaching craft knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

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  • Identification of an optimal sampling position for stable isotopic analysis of bone collagen of extinct moa (Aves: Emeidae)

    Holdaway, R.; Hawke, D.J.; Bunce, M.; Allentoft, M. E. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Stable isotopic (δ13C; δ15N) analysis of bone collagen and other refractory biological materials is a mainstay of palaeoecological research, but comparability between individuals depends on homogeneity within the sample specimens. Long bones of extinct New Zealand moa display lines of arrested growth that reflect prolonged development over several years, leading to potential systematic inhomogeneity in stable isotopic enrichment within the bone. We tested whether the isotopic content within a Euryapteryx curtus tibiotarsus is homogeneous by measuring δ15N and δ13C values in 6 adjacent 1cm-diameter cortical bone cores arranged along the bone axis from each of the proximal and distal ends. We then measured isotopic ratios in 5 radial slices of a core from the mid-shaft of a Pachyornis elephantopus tibiotarsus to see if there was any depth (ontogenetic) effect at a single sampling point. The δ13C value increased with distance from the proximal bone end, but neither δ13C nor δ15N values in samples from the distal end of the bone were correlated with position. Within mid-shaft cortical bone, the δ13C value decreased with depth but δ15N values were constant. Sampling the entire depth of cortical bone from the caudal surface at the distal end of the tibiotarsus, if feasible, therefore provides a spatially homogenous material, free of maturation effects on stable isotopic composition. If for any reason that position cannot be sampled, the outer (radial) layer at the mid-shaft can be substituted.

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  • A new sub-alpine mite from New Zealand (Acari: Astigmatina: Histiostomatidae)

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The female, male, tritonymph and hypopus of Histiostoma montanum new species is described and illustrated from the sub-alpine shrub Brachyglottis elaeagnifolia litter at 11001300 m, North Egmont, Mt Egmont, Taranaki, New Zealand.

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