85,985 results

  • Teaching English literacy to members of the deaf community: insights for bilingual programming

    Thompson, Jackie (2012-12-04)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This study investigated the perspectives of the students and stakeholders involved in a Deaf literacy programme at the Auckland University of Technology. Education practices in NZ and overseas, predominantly determined by hearing professionals, have resulted in the marginalization of many Deaf students. These students have left school dissatisfied generally with their educational outcomes. As a result there is widespread concern within the Deaf community about English literacy levels as for many it is not only necessary for education and employment, but as the primary means of communication with the non-signing majority. The bilingual programme for adults at AUT acknowledges the Deaf as a linguistic and cultural minority and utilizes NZSL to scaffold English language learning in written form. In keeping with this recognition of the Deaf as the primary stakeholders, the emphasis in this study was placed on involving the Deaf students themselves in order to construct an ‘insider’ view of how these needs are being met. The study found that the students valued reciprocity and partnership in the teaching process, and viewed the role of the Deaf Support Tutor as very important. The students also highlighted the necessity for teachers to become fluent in NZSL and to become knowledgeable in Deaf Culture. Finally it was argued that educators of the Deaf needed to work in collaboration with the Deaf Community in the education of their own people. In conclusion the implications of these findings for further programmes are discussed.

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  • Tailoring technology to the urban cyclist

    Barter, Susan (2012-11-16)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This practice-based research investigates the design of jackets for the purpose of urban cycling. The objective of this research is to promote a discussion on the specific functional requirements of a jacket for the increasing number of professional women who are choosing to cycle to their place of work. The research has been motivated by a personal dissatisfaction with the availability of appropriate clothing for female urban professionals, particularly tailored jackets with specific features to wear, not only on the road but also in the office. A critical framework of practice and fit testing for functionality underpins the research and leads to the use of the technology of laser cutting combined with an experimental approach to tailoring and construction. These approaches ultimately changed the design direction that developed into the final selection of woollen jackets created for temporal urban settings.

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  • My own space : a visual exploration of the space between cultures through the application of Arabic calligraphy, Kufi, to English writing

    Mohammed, Al Riyami (2013-01-03)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    My practice-based research investigates a hybrid cultural space that involves a person taking on the values and beliefs of a new culture while still holding onto his or her original culture. My investigation is situated in Turner’s (1967) concept of liminality, which he defines as the ‘betwixt and between’, where limits and boundaries disappear and in which an individual is undergoing continuous cultural change. I approach my investigation of issues surrounding cultural transition and hybrid cultural identities through a creative application of the traditional cultural aesthetics of Arabic calligraphy, Kufi, to an English poem written by Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1866), entitled Between My Country and the Others – a poem that considers negotiation between the original culture and the new one. Kufi is a form of script consisting of straight lines and angles, often with emphasised vertical or horizontal lines. I chose the Kufi script because of its multiple origins – it was developed and perfected aesthetically from different calligraphic scripts, which makes Kufi a hybrid script form in itself. As an Omani national living in New Zealand, the designs of the hybrid artefacts reflect and speak of my own lived experience of the liminal space. My project focuses on my creative process of designing the visual hybrid letterforms, and the process of reproducing the artefacts in the medium of printmaking, as a manifestation of my experience of cultural transition to represent My Own Space.

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  • Comment

    Mitchell, Linda (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This issue of Early Childhood Folio has a diverse range of articles focusing on highly relevant and current pedagogical issues. Several involve case studies, where in-depth analysis enables opportunities for learning and development afforded by pedagogy and the environment to be highlighted. Some offer new methodological approaches, including the use of a “mosaic approach” to investigate “voices” of child and adult participants, kaupapa Māori methodology to illustrate culturally valid forms of assessment within contemporary Māori early childhood settings, and the use of a model of participation in home-based settings

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  • The impact of education and employment on the sport-related drinking motives of professional footballers: a study of National Rugby League and New Zealand Super Rugby players

    Luck, Micheal (2013-03-12)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The Athlete Drinking Scale (ADS) measures an athlete’s sport-related motives for drinking alcohol (Martens, Watson, Royland & Beck, 2005). To date this scale has only been utilised with collegiate athletes. This study examines the validity and reliability of Martens et al.’s (2005) ADS in a professional sport context, identifies the sport-related drinking motives (SRDM) of professional rugby union players in New Zealand and rugby league players in Australia and New Zealand, identifies differences in the sport-related drinking motives of rugby union and league players, and identifies the impact of education, current non-sport employment, current education activity, age and experience on a professional athlete’s sport-related drinking motives. Using an expert panel, a modified version of the ADS was developed to suit the professional sport context. This survey also included questions that asked participants about their education history, current activity, current employment activity, year of birth and their debut year in their respective competitions. A sample of professional rugby union and league players (n = 193) were recruited from the National Rugby League or one of the five New Zealand Super Rugby franchises. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the reliability and validity of the ADS in this setting. Two further rounds of CFA, along with a thorough examination of the theoretical background of the ADS, produced a three factor, nine-item scale. Mean difference testing identified only three statistically significant results. Compared to rugby league players, rugby union players reported higher levels of both positive reinforcement and team/group motives. The other statistically significant result was that players who were currently not involved in education reported higher positive reinforcement scores than players involved currently in education. The revised ADS was proven to be an effective measurement tool for measuring the SRDM of professional rugby league and union players. After the analysis, the respondents of this study were found to have identified SRDM consistent with previous uses of the scale in different settings. Whilst rugby union players cited positive reinforcement and team/group motives significantly higher than their rugby league counterparts, little evidence has emerged from this research project that links respondent’s education history, along with their education and employment activity to their SRDM.

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  • Supporting Focus and Context Awareness in 3D Modeling Using Multi-Layered Displays

    Mohd Yusof, Azmi (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    Although advances in computer technology over the past few decades have made it possible to create and render highly realistic 3D models these days, the process of creating these models has remained largely unchanged over the years. Modern 3D modeling software provide a range of tools to assist users with creating 3D models, but the process of creating models in virtual 3D space is nevertheless still challenging and cumbersome. This thesis, therefore, aims to investigate whether it is possible to support modelers more effectively by providing them with alternative combinations of hardware and software tools to improve their 3D modeling tasks. The first step towards achieving this goal has been to better understand the type of problems modelers face in using conventional 3D modeling software. To achieve this, a pilot study of novice 3D modelers, and a more comprehensive study of professional modelers were conducted. These studies resulted in identifying a range of focus and context awareness problems that modelers face in creating complex 3D models using conventional modeling software. These problems can be divided into four categories: maintaining position awareness, identifying and selecting objects or components of interest, recognizing the distance between objects or components, and realizing the relative position of objects or components. Based on the above categorization, five focus and context awareness techniques were developed for a multi-layer computer display to enable modelers to better maintain their focus and context awareness while performing 3D modeling tasks. These techniques are: object isolation, component segregation, peeling focus, slicing, and peeling focus and context. A user study was then conducted to compare the effectiveness of these focus and context awareness techniques with other tools provided by conventional 3D modeling software. The results of this study were used to further improve, and evaluate through a second study, the five focus and context awareness techniques. The two studies have demonstrated that some of these techniques are more effective in supporting 3D modeling tasks than other existing software tools.

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  • A systematic mapping study on dynamic metrics and software quality

    Tahir, A; MacDonell, SG (2013-03-12)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Several important aspects of software product quality can be evaluated using dynamic metrics that effectively capture and reflect the software's true runtime behavior. While the extent of research in this field is still relatively limited, particularly when compared to research on static metrics, the field is growing, given the inherent advantages of dynamic metrics. The aim of this work is to systematically investigate the body of research on dynamic software metrics to identify issues associated with their selection, design and implementation. Mapping studies are being increasingly used in software engineering to characterize an emerging body of research and to identify gaps in the field under investigation. In this study we identified and evaluated 60 works based on a set of defined selection criteria. These studies were further classified and analyzed to identify their relativity to future dynamic metrics research. The classification was based on three different facets: research focus, research type and contribution type. We found a strong body of research related to dynamic coupling and cohesion metrics, with most works also addressing the abstract notion of software complexity. Specific opportunities for future work relate to a much broader range of quality dimensions.

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  • Evaluating stepped care in the Waitemata District Health Board Mental Health Service: implementation of the stepped care model of healthcare provision

    Bunting, Andrew James (2013-03-14)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This thesis aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the stepped care model of healthcare provision for psychological therapies in the secondary mental healthcare sector in New Zealand over a nine month period. It follows an earlier literature review of stepped care and the collaborative creation of a research design with the Waitemata District Health Board (WDHB) mental health service. The Waitemata District Health Board mental health service aims to increase access to psychological therapies for those seeking help with mental health disorders, without increasing existing resources. Evidence from overseas studies of stepped care in primary care mental health support, suggest that this model shows the potential to increase access to psychological therapies without sacrificing quality of care. The literature review revealed no published research evaluated the implementation of stepped care in the secondary mental healthcare sector or from the perspective of all stakeholders. The guidelines of programme evaluation were used to evaluate the implementation from the perspective of all stakeholders and to allow barriers to the implementation of stepped care or data collection to be highlighted and addressed over the evaluation period. A research design was collaboratively created with the WDHB mental health service; a three month prospective cohort study followed by a six month experimental case control. Stepped care was introduced in the Rodney Adult District Mental Health Services (RAMHS) and North Shore Team One (NS1) was used as control in both the prospective cohort study and experimental case control. Several barriers to the use of outcome measurement and the introduction of stepped care were found and discussed. The stepped care model was not introduced in its proposed form by the end of the evaluation and all evaluation strategies were unable to be carried out as proposed Results suggested that the stepped care model increased access to psychological talking therapies without sacrificing quality of care. The use of outcome measurement was found to be a good fit with stepped care guidelines and continued support for this may continue to improve client outcomes, support therapists and enable the WDHB mental health service to target support in appropriate areas.

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  • Master of Music in Composition

    Connors, Teresa Marie (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This portfolio of compositions involved the creation of multimedia works within the context of collaborative artistic practice. This interest has resulted from my increasing participation in multidisciplinary collaborative projects in recent years as a composer and singer. In the portfolio of works I have drawn on a range of theoretical texts from the fields of cognitive science, psychology, sociology and spirituality to develop a supportive discourse with which to reflect on the creative intersection of activities. Five collaborative compositions were created and realised. These range from a self-generative installation to a traditional film score. To examine the creative process, I have constructed a continuum that situates each piece between polarities of product or process-driven work. On one side of this continuum is Beads, a generative sound/video installation which explores video tracking as a compositional agent. At the opposite pole is The Old Woman in the Woods, a typical cinematic film score. Situated between these two extreme points are Terroir, Let It Go, and Aspects of Trees. Aspects of Trees is a hyperimprovisational system for visual projections, live cello, and software application. Let it Go explores the balance between improvisation, composition and “composed” instruments. Terroir is a fixed media experimental film which uses a single data source collected from an old cell phone.

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  • Minimum viable product (inside game)

    Schroder, Mark Bernard

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Minimum Viable Product (Inside Game) is an installation based research project focused on the creation of amalgam environments. Such environments function as contradictory transitory heterotopia. Sourced, initially, from both heterotopic spaces and generic non-places – motel rooms, supermarket aisles, suburban gardens, hotel lobbies, waiting rooms, parking buildings, locker rooms, shopping malls and airport terminals – these environments juxtapose objects and subjects in spatial visual form in order to explore notions of control and the ambiguous relationships between site and non-site, failure and success, the ‘real’ and the ‘virtual’, and the smooth and striated. Through this exploration, environments of ‘excess’ are created where time functions non-dialectically, allowing for the fragmented consideration of concerns including ownership and (de)colonisation; consumerism, consumption and addiction; access to resources and environmental degradation; and the diminishing space between the public and private spheres.

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  • Ion parallel viscosity and anisotropy in MHD turbulence

    Oughton, Sean (1996)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    We report on results from direct numerical simulation of the incompressible three- dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, modified to incorporate viscous dissipation via the strongly anisotropic ion-parallel viscosity term. Both linear and nonlinear cases are considered, all with a strong background magnetic field. It is found that spectral anisotropy develops in almost all cases, but that the contribution from effects associated with the ion-parallel viscosity is relatively weak compared with the previously reported nonlinear process. Furthermore, and in contrast to this earlier work, it is suggested that when B₀ is large, the anisotropy will develop and persist for many large-scale turnover times even for non-dissipative runs. Resistive dissipation is found to dominate over viscous even when the resistivity is several orders of magnitude smaller than the ion parallel viscosity. A variance anisotropy effect and anisotropy dependence on the polarization of the fluctuations are also observed.

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  • The effects of audit committee characteristics on the value relevance of accounting information-in New Zealand

    Rani, Mona (2011-06-17)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The purpose of this Dissertation is to examine the link between the characteristics of an audit committee and the value relevance of accounting information. The study is carried out in with a sample of 105 companies listed on the New Zealand Stock Exchange during 2007-2009. This study uses primary variables audit committee financial literacy and audit committee independence to answer the research question - what is the effect of audit committee expertise on the value relevance of accounting earnings. Value relevance is measured by regressing stock prices on earning and book values following the Ohlson's Model (1995) that has established an ideal relationship between share prices and accounting measures. Findings from the present study of pooled regression do not support Ohlson's hypothesis. Instead, they reveal a lack of affiliation between audit committee characteristics and the value relevance of accounting information in New Zealand. The results show no positive effect of audit committee expertise on the value relevance of accounting earnings.

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  • Distributed incremental data stream mining for wireless sensor network

    Sabit, Hakilo (2013-04-08)

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) despite their energy, bandwidth, storage, and computational power constraints, have embraced dynamic applications. These applications generate a large amount of data continuously at high speeds and at distributed locations, known as distributed data stream. In these applications, processing data streams on the fly and in distributed locations is necessary mainly due to three reasons. Firstly, the large volume of data that these systems generate is beyond the storage capacity of the system. Secondly, transmitting such large continuous data to a central processing location over the air exhausts the energy of the system rapidly and limits its lifetime. Thirdly, these applications implement dynamic models that are triggered immediately in response to events such as changes in the environment or changes in set of conditions and hence, do not tolerate offline processing. Therefore, it is important to design efficient distributed techniques for WSN data stream mining applications under these inherent constraints. The purpose of this study was to develop a resource efficient online distributed incremental data stream mining framework for WSNs. The framework must minimize inter-node communications and optimize local computation and energy efficiency without compromising practical application requirements and quality of service (QoS). The objectives were to address the WSN energy constraints, network lifetime, and distributed mining of streaming data. Another objective was to develop a novel high spatiotemporal resolution version of the standard Canadian fire weather index (FWI) system called the Micro-scale FWI system based on the framework. The perceived framework integrates autonomous cluster based data stream mining technique and two-tiered hierarchical WSN architecture to suit the distributed nature of WSN and on the fly stream mining requirements. The underlying principle of the framework is to handle the sensor stream mining process in-network at distributed locations and at multiple hierarchical levels. The approach consists of three distinct processing tasks asynchronously but cooperatively revealing mining the sensor data streams. These tasks are the sensor node, the cluster head, and the network sink processing tasks. These tasks were formulated by a lightweight autonomous data clustering algorithm called Subtractive Fuzzy C-Means (SUBFCM). The SUBFCM algorithm remains embedded within the individual nodes to analyze the locally generated streams ‘on the fly’ in cooperation with a group of nodes. The study examined the effects of data stream characteristics such as data stream dimensions and stream periods (data flow rates). Moreover, it evaluated the effects of network architectures such as node density per cluster and tolerated approximation error on the overall performance of the SUBFCM through simulations. Finally, the QoS or certain level of guaranteed performance that is supported by the WSN architecture for applications utilizing the framework was examined. The results of the study showed that the proposed framework is stream dimension and data flow rate scalable with average errors of less than 12% and 11% in reference to the benchmarks, respectively. The node density per cluster and local model drift threshold showed significant effects on the framework performance only for very fast streams. The study concludes that the network architecture is an important factor for the quality of mining results and should be designed carefully to optimally utilize basic concepts of the framework. The overall mining quality is directly related to the combined effect of the stream characteristics, the network architecture, and the desired performance measures. The study also concludes that WSNs can provide good QoS feasible for online distributed incremental data stream mining applications. Simulations of real weather datasets indicate that the Micro-scale FWI can excellently approximate the results obtained from the Standard FWI system while providing highly superior spatial and temporal information. This can offer direct local and global interaction with a few meter square spaces as against the tens of square kilometers of the present systems.

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  • Human-centred workplace: Re-finding physical document in an office workplace

    Dighe, Amay (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Today’s typical busy schedules make it difficult for people to keep track, organize and search the documents they keep in their own office workplace. The consequences of less organized offices are often that people lose more time in searching for paper documents. To avoid the consequences of losing documents, some archive their physical documents according to their use and others place documents in highly visible areas. These strategies offer some comfort when searching the document, but the practice demands people to be somewhat organized. Even digital support for finding physical documents typically requires some organisation and order has observed. In this thesis, we describe a project that created a system, which does not require people to be orderly and aims at freeing people from the time-consuming job of sorting or sequencing their documents. The system generates and prints passive tags (Quick Response Code) on documents and uses cameras in the office to track changes in the document locations. The thesis describes the design, implementation and initial evaluation of the system ‘Human-centred workplace (HCW).’

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  • Poipoia te tamaiti ki te ūkaipō

    Gabel, Kirsten (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis explores traditional philosophies of Māori motherhood. Drawing from traditional accounts of our cosmologies, from mōteatea, whakatauki and pakiwaitara, it seeks to uncover aspects of our maternities that for many Māori mothers today have become buried under the plethora of Western maternal knowledges. Māori maternities represent a conflicted space for Māori women and whānau in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand. Colonisation has acted to significantly corrupt a traditionally empowering and healthy philosophy of Māori motherhood. Successive legislative and social interventions have, over many generations, served to undermine the powerful position of the maternal in Māori society, to denigrate the sanctity of the Māori maternal body and to destroy a collective and supportive approach to raising children. This thesis draws on Māori and indigenous legal theories, on mana wahine theories and on kaupapa Māori theories in its analysis. It unpacks some of the specific legislative and policy initiatives introduced by the state that have served to undermine traditional Māori maternities. In the face of a comprehensive and targeted colonisation process, Māori maternities have survived and continue to be a site of resistance and empowerment for Māori whānau. Despite the best attempts of the state to undermine Māori maternities, Māori whānau have continued to mother in ways that reflect our traditional philosophies of mothering. Finally, this thesis also proposes a theory of Māori motherhood that is grounded in our traditions, philosophies and ideologies. It concludes that Māori maternities are a significant space of resistance and tino rangatiratanga for Māori today.

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  • The geochemistry of soluble salts in the Wright and Taylor Valleys, South Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Field, Adrian Bruce (1975)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Samples of salt deposits, snow, meltwater and soils were collected in the Wright and Taylor Valleys, South Victoria Land, during the summer field season of 1973-74. The primary aim of the work carried out was to demonstrate the application of chemical techniques to geological problems in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. Salt samples identified by X-ray diffraction patterns were halite, thenardite and mirabilite. Snow, ice and groundwater samples were analysed for Na⁺, Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺, K⁺. Cl⁻ and SO₄²⁻. The results show that atmospheric transport from the sea is probably the most important source of supply of salts to the Dry Valley system, with saline groundwater flows as important means of transport of salts to the Dry Valley lakes.

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  • Larval development of the New Zealand mussel Perna canaliculus and effects of cryopreservation

    Rusk, Adam Brett (2013-04-09)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The New Zealand green-lipped mussel, Perna canaliculus, is an important aquaculture species. This commercially attractive mussel species contributes over 70% of total aquaculture in New Zealand, with exports in excess of $NZ 220 million. This industry relies heavily on wild-caught spat, which accounts for about 80% of seed requirements in mussel farming. This source of wild spat is unreliable and unpredictable. As a consequence, recent research focus has been directed at successfully rearing larvae to spat within hatchery settings. Previous research has been focussed at achieving high settlement rates, but this is highly variable due to seasonal variations and inconsistent rearing parameters. An alternative approach to utilising seasonally viable larvae is to cryopreserve (freeze) healthy Perna canaliculus larvae and thaw them on demand for hatchery production. This allows a year-round spat supply without the need to condition broodstock for out of season production. However, the success of this method also has been variable, often resulting in low survival rates. Part of the reason for this lack of success is that little is known about the thawing and post-thawing effects on larval viability and subsequent development. Overall, knowledge about the intricate developmental processes involved within the embryo or larval stages is lacking, and no detailed study has characterised these stages of larval development. Therefore, this study is the first to describe, in detail, larval development of Perna canaliculus from embryogenesis through to settlement in a hatchery environment. This project also included the first comprehensive investigation of the effects of cryopreservation for post-thawed trochophore (16 hours post-fertilisation) and D-stage (48 hours post-fertilisation) larvae through subsequent larval development. A multi-technique approach involving visual observations, scanning electron microscopy, histology, and immunochemistry were performed on larval samples collected daily through all stages of larval development over a 21-day rearing period. Cryopreserved and normal larvae were assessed daily through survivability, shell length, feeding consumption, shell morphology, organogenesis, and neurogenesis. Normally reared larvae had decreasing percent survival with the lowest survival values occurring at the pediveliger and post-settlement stage. Feeding consumption also varied over the 21-day rearing time period with a typically high feeding rate up to 15 days post-fertilisation to metamorphosis. Shell length was positively linear with little deviation except near the settlement stage where variations in shell growth were apparent. A low larval density (< 4%) was observed through to settlement and substrate attachment stages, which normally indicates competent settlement behaviour. For these normally reared larvae, embryogenesis was followed to a gastrula stage at 18 hours post-fertilisation, with the appearance of a blastopore, apical sense organ, and enclosing vegetal pole. D-stage larvae had limited organogenesis with the development of an alimentary and nervous systems. Shell morphology on D-stage larvae (2 days old) revealed a flat hinged, pitted punctuate prodissoconch I shell, followed closely by commarginal growth lines within the prodissoconch II shell at 4 days old. The umbo stage (7–17 days old) had further organogenesis development with a protruding beating velum, a well-developed posterior and adductor muscle, velum retractor muscles, and further dissoconch II secretion of the shell with a more rounded umbonate appearance. Neurogenesis had significantly progressed at this stage with paired cerebral, pedal, and visceral ganglia observed. Pediveliger larvae (18 days old) developed a complete nervous system with more innervations and fibres extending throughout the larva. During pediveliger development, a rapid metamorphosis transition occurred with the development of a gill rudiment, eye spot, and functioning foot. The first appearance of a dissoconch shell layer appeared during this transition. Within the cryopreservation study, results showed that there were significant differences in survivability, shell length, and feeding consumption between controls (not cryopreserved) and frozen (cryopreserved) treatments, but no comparable differences were observed among both frozen treatments (cryopreserved at the trochophore stage and cryopreserved at the D-stage) throughout the 21-day development period. At 18 days post-fertilisation, ~23% of control larvae had progressed to competent pediveliger, while <1% of both frozen larvae stages survived. Those larvae that survived were unable to develop to competent pediveliger or post-larvae. Settlement was achieved in ~9% of control larvae at 21 days post-fertilisation with most individuals developing eye spots. Significant differences were observed in neurogenesis between frozen trochophore larvae and controls. Conversely, frozen D-stage larvae did not differ greatly to controls, and differed slightly to trochophore larvae. Characterisation of shell morphology revealed abnormalities to larvae on both frozen treatments. Frozen trochophore larvae showed the greatest shell abnormalities, which suggests that cryo-damage to the shell gland had occurred. Organogenesis was delayed in larvae within both frozen treatments with no larvae within frozen treatments developing an eye spot. However, larvae in controls successfully made the transition to settlement. This delay in organogenesis and overall developmental characteristics were indicative of cryo-injuries sustained at a cellular level. The relevance of this work ultimately fills existing gaps in larval development of Perna canaliculus in normal and cryopreserved larvae. Characterisation of both viable and abnormal larvae through development is of benefit in reducing commercial hatchery costs and understanding the biology of Perna canaliculus larvae.

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  • Intranasal Fentanyl is an effective first line analgesia for pain management in the Children's Emergency Department

    Britnell, S (2014-04-14)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Rapid and effective analgesia is important particularly when intravenous (IV) access is unavailable. Children present unique challenges and achieving effective analgesia and this may often be delayed due to staff skill and availability, patient and caregiver anxiety combined with varying responses to pain and difficult IV access. Fentanyl is a rapid acting medication which takes 2 minutes to reach serum therapeutic levels. This makes it a viable choice of analgesia while longer term pain relief options are considered. The decision to utilise the IV route and administration of Fentanyl is nurse initiated on triage in CED in collaboration with medical staff who prescribe the medication, this is commenced at triage to decrease the time to analgesia.

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  • Payment frequency discount vs. payment amount discount: the framing effect on preference reversal

    Jhang, JH; Kim, J (2011-09-23)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    The article discusses the difference between payment frequency discount and payment amount discount. It explores the preference reversal between these payments as well as the importance of framing effect in price discounts. It also examines the impact of framings on consumers's preference towards payment frequency discount and the amount discount.

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  • Probabilistic estimation of software project duration

    Connor, AM (2014-04-11)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper presents a framework for the representation of uncertainty in the estimates for software design projects for use throughout the entire project lifecycle. The framework is flexible in order to accommodate uncertainty in the project and utilises Monte Carlo simulation to compute the propagation of uncertainty in effort estimates towards the total project uncertainty and therefore gives a project manager the means to make informed decisions throughout the project life. The framework also provides a mechanism for accumulating project knowledge through the use of a historical database, allowing effort estimates to be informed by, or indeed based upon, the outcome of previous projects. Initial results using simulated data are presented and avenues for further work are discussed.

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