89,482 results

  • From spheres towards spaces in design and creative technology

    Karmokar, S; Connor, AM; Sosa, R

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Knowledge and creativity have always played a key role in the economy and New Zealand is rapidly moving towards a knowledge-based strategy for growth. Increasing prominence has been given to the role of New Zealand’s universities in stimulating economic growth through industry related research, technology commercialisation, high-tech spin-offs, and nurturing entrepreneurial mindsets. Universities are notoriously difficult to change; however the society and culture in which they operate are adapting and accommodate change at a faster pace. Universities in New Zealand have made efforts to see social, government and corporate relationships evolve, however, there are still issues to be addressed and difficulties to be overcome with respect to orthodox disciplines and procedures that need to evolve within the university to facilitate the transition. This paper draws on existing literature related to tri-lateral networks and hybrid organisations to inform the development of a new initiative focused on developing a research system that cuts across both organisational and disciplinary boundaries. The new initiative brings together business, government, researchers, students, and the wider community from the South Auckland region. The initiative is intentionally adaptive, fluid and transient in order to accommodate multiple models of co-evolution of knowledge. The paper sheds new light on the evolving role of university and outlines a future direction for the initiative and a range of measures that can be used to evaluate its successes by presented the initial stages of a longitudinal case study of an emerging initiative. It frames a computational agent-based simulation where alternative architectures can be benchmarked in their capacity to promote entrepreneurial activity.

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  • Ameliorating Systematic Errors in Full-Field AMCW Lidar

    Godbaz, John Peter (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis presents an analysis of systematic error in full-field amplitude modulated continuous wave range-imaging systems. The primary focus is on the mixed pixel/multipath interference problem, with digressions into defocus restoration, irregular phase sampling and the systematic phase perturbations introduced by random noise. As an integral part of the thesis, a detailed model of signal formation is developed, that models noise statistics not included in previously reported models. Prior work on the mixed pixel/multipath interference problem has been limited to detection and removal of perturbed measurements or partial amelioration using spatial information, such as knowledge of the spatially variant scattering point spread function, or raytracing using an assumption of Lambertian reflection. Furthermore, prior art has only used AMCW range measurements at a single modulation frequency. In contrast, in this thesis, by taking multiple measurements at different modulation frequencies with known ratio-of-integers frequency relationships, a range of new closed-form and lookup table based inversion and bounding methods are explored. These methods include: sparse spike train deconvolution based multiple return separation, a closed-form inverse using attenuation ratios and a normalisation based lookup table method that uses a new property we term the characteristic measurement. Other approaches include a Cauchy distribution based model for backscattering sources which are range-diffuse, like fog or hair. Novel bounding methods are developed using the characteristic measurement and attenuation ratios on relative intensity, relative phase and phase perturbutation. A detailed noise and performance analysis is performed of the characteristic measurement lookup table method and the bounding methods using simulated data. Experiments are performed using the University of Waikato Heterodyne range-imager, the Canesta XZ-422 and the Mesa Imaging Swissranger 4000 in order to demonstrate the performance of the lookup table method. The lookup table method is found to provide an order of magnitude improvement in ranging accuracy, albeit at the expense of ranging precision.

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  • Committed Sapiential Circles

    Ritchie, Jenny (2014)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Possibilities for Post/Counter-Colonial Research With Children Early childhood care and education settings are sites of potentiality, of “immense possibility and power” (Batycky, 2008, p. 176), yet situated in contexts imbued with the historicity and legacy of colonization, racism, and cultural and economic inequities. Cannella and Viruru (2004) have explained the pervasive nature of colonialist thinking, and how the constructions of ‘child’ and ‘education’ are implicated within this. They challenge us to construct a ‘postcolonial disposition’ which problematizes the ‘will to power’, ‘othering’, and simplistic interpretations constructed by adults in the name of children (p. 155). This confronts us in regard to our commitment to perform post/counter-colonial research with children, and how we might conceive this research as praxis, that is “reflection and action upon the world in order to transform it” (Freire, 1972, p. 28). In a counter-colonialist praxis-oriented research mode, “children would be encouraged to engage in continual critique of the situations within which we have placed them” (Cannella & Viruru, 2004, p. 155). Further, this ongoing praxis needs to engage with both “local and global community actions” as determined by the children themselves (p. 155). When we view and relate to children as agentic and powerful, we recognize their mana (esteem, integrity) and tinorangatiratanga (self-determination). Our most recent project, ‘Titiro Whakamuri, Hoki Whakamua. We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning’(Ritchie et al., 2010), demonstrated children’s agency, supported through the kaupapa (philosophy) of the research project as enacted and facilitated by committed educator co-researchers. Children demonstrated their empathy and compassion for Papatūanuku (Mother Earth) and Ranginui (Sky Father), and were actively and consciously pursuing practices that would protect Papatūanuku and Ranginui, such as recycling, beach and park clean-ups, tree-planting, gardening and so forth. Parents and communities were also drawn into these activities, demonstrating the catalytic potential of young children, supported by responsive, engaged adults, of revolutionary transformative praxis who were in service of our planet.

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  • Effective performance appraisal: Asking the right questions

    Cardno, Carol (2014)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Organisations invest considerable time and effort in systems for performance to be appraised People invest considerable energy and emotion in appraising others or being appraised (or trying to avoid it) Shouldn’t we be asking ourselves how effective this investment is? There is a small literature about appraisal in higher education settings but it does not reflect the challenges or the tensions we all know are barriers to effectiveness So – here’s an opportunity to do some useful research to add to what is already known

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  • Children's art, children's languages: A Mirror of the "hundred languages" of children, in and through their creative expressions.

    Clark, Beverley; de Lautour, Nicky (2014)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This research has at its core a deep respect for children and artistic, non-verbal and linguistic expression. It seeks to explore the depth and complexity in the artwork particularly the visual arts that may reveal a sense of identity (as distinct from othernesss) and community (connection with others). It acknowledges that children's artistic expression stands on its own, it has its own place without explanation or interpretation but that additionally children's voices and non- verbal expression (such as body language) as well as linguistic expression; can offer insight into the meaning of both the experience and the outcome. Rather than the window into children's art which McArdle cautions against (2008), we regard this research as a mirror which reflects the child's thinking and knowing in relation to artistic expression, and reflects their sense of identity and their connection with others.

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  • The see-saw of visual arts in early childhood education: Are we up, down or somewhere in-between?

    Wrightson, Helen (2014)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Current context of early childhood visual arts education in Aotearoa / New Zealand. Recognising, promoting and maintaining indigenous visual arts in an early childhood setting.

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  • Modelling Stormwater Contaminant Loads in Older Urban Catchments: Effects of Climate Influences on Selecting Management Options

    Charters, F.; O'Sullivan, A.; Cochrane, T. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    An event-based contaminant load model was developed to identify spatial patterns of stormwater total suspended solids (TSS) and heavy metal loads and assess potential reductions in contaminants loads by implementing various stormwater management options. The GIS-Excel based model estimates contaminant loads from an individual storm event based on different contributing impervious surfaces and key climate characteristics (rainfall intensity, duration, pH and antecedent dry days (ADD)). It then calculates the reduction in contaminant loads that could be achieved through source reduction (e.g. green roofs, repainting) as well as from treatment (e.g. raingardens (bioretention basins), wet ponds) applied to different surfaces within the catchment. The model was run for a case study catchment in Christchurch, New Zealand, to identify where ‘hotspots’ occurred for each contaminant. Model simulations of targeted management options were run, which predicted effective reduction of both TSS and heavy metals could be achieved with a strategy of combined source reduction and downstream treatment.

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  • Inference of shock rate and power on effective and efficient kidney stone fragmentation with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL)

    Hayes, J.; Kirk, R.; Richardson, A. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Strategy, Governance, Ecosystem: Guiding Principles of the UC CEISMIC Digital Archive

    Smithies, J.D. (2014)

    Oral Presentations
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The SPHERE study follow up

    Leathem, C.S.; Murphy, A.W.; Smith, S.M.; Murphy, E.; Byrne, M.; Gillespie, P.; Newell, J.; Scarrott, C.J.; Vellinga, A.; Cupples, M.E. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Assisting Self-Managing Rebuilding Owners in New Zealand to Rebuild their Homes: Lessons for New Zealand from the 2009 Victoria Bush Fire Recovery

    Wilkinson, S.; Chang-Richards, A. Y.; Seville, E.; Brunsdon, D. (2014)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    After a disaster, many people are faced with damage to their properties, and a need to rebuild their homes. In Christchurch a significant number of people will be rebuilding their homes or building new homes on recently purchased land. There are many ways in which a person can approach a building project including: - employ a volume builder, architect, builder or project manager to manage the whole building process (design through to completion) or substantial parts of the project; - decide to self-manage the building project stages whilst employing different professionals for the different stages of the building; - if they are particularly skilled, with the correct qualifications, such as being a Licensed Building Practitioner, they could manage and build the property themselves. - choose to undertake the work themselves through applying for an Owner-Builder exemption. This bulletin focusses on those people who choose to self-manage the building project stages whilst employing different professionals for the different stages of the building. For this report, these people are termed “self-managing rebuilding owners”. The bulletin draws on lessons from five years of research tracking the rebuilding of Marysville and Kinglake in Victoria following the bush-fires of February 2009.

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  • Training in crisis communication and volcanic eruption forecasting: Design and evaluation of an authentic role-play simulation

    Dohaney, J.; Brogt, E.; Wilson, T.M.; Lindsay, J.M. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    We present an interactive, immersive, authentic role-play simulation designed to teach tertiary geoscience students in New Zealand to forecast and mitigate a volcanic crisis. Half of the participating group (i.e., the Geoscience Team) focuses on interpreting real volcano monitoring data (e.g., seismographs, gas output etc.) while the other half of the group (i.e., the Emergency Management Team) forecasts and manages likely impacts, and communicates emergency response decisions and advice to local communities. These authentic learning experiences were aimed at enhancing upper-year undergraduate students’ transferable and geologic reasoning skills. An important goal of the simulation was specifically to improve students’ science communication through interdisciplinary team discussions, jointly prepared, and delivered media releases, and real-time, high-pressure, press conferences. By playing roles, students experienced the specific responsibilities of a professional within authentic organisational structures. A qualitative, design-based educational research study was carried out to assess the overall student experience and self-reported learning of skills. A pilot and four subsequent iterations were investigated. Results from this study indicate that students found these role-plays to be a highly challenging and engaging learning experience and reported improved skills. Data from classroom observations and interviews indicate that the students valued the authenticity and challenging nature of the role-play although personal experiences and team dynamics (within, and between the teams) varied depending on the students’ background, preparedness, and personality. During early iterations, observation and interviews from students and instructors indicate that some of the goals of the simulation were not fully achieved due to: A) lack of preparedness, B) insufficient time to respond appropriately, C) appropriateness of roles and team structure, and D) poor communication skills. Small modifications to the design of Iterations 3 and 4 showed an overall improvement in the students’ skills and goals being reached. A communication skills instrument (SPCC) was used to measure self-reported pre- and post- communication competence in the last two iterations. Results showed that this instrument recorded positive shifts in all categories of self-perceived abilities, the largest shifts seen in students who participated in press conferences. Future research will be aimed at adapting this curricula to new volcanic and earthquake scenarios.

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  • First steps in translating human cognitive processes of cane pruning into AI rules for automated robotic pruning

    Saxton, V.; Botterill, T.; Green, R. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    Cane pruning of grapevines is a skilled task for which, internationally, there is a dire shortage of human pruners. As part of a larger project developing an automated robotic pruner, we have used artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to create an expert system for selecting new canes and cutting off unwanted canes. A domain and ontology has been created for AI, which reflects the expertise of expert human pruners. The first step in the creation of an expert system was to generate virtual vines, which were then ‘pruned’ by human pruners and also by the expert system in its infancy. Here we examined the decisions of 12 human pruners, for consistency of decision, on 60 virtual vines. 96.7% of the 12 pruners agreed on at least one cane choice after which there was diminishing agreement on which further canes to select for laying. Our results indicate that techniques developed in computational intelligence can be used to co-ordinate and synthesise the expertise of human pruners into a best practice format. This paper describes first steps in this knowledge elicitation process, and discusses the fit between cane pruning expertise and the expertise that can be elicited using AI based expert system techniques.

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  • A family of 2-dimensional Minkowski planes with small automorphism groups

    Steinke, Günter F. (1994)


    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper concerns 2-dimensional (topological locally compact connected) Minkowski planes. It uses a construction of J. Jakóbowski [4] of Minkowski planes over half-ordered fields and applies it to the field of reals. This generalizes a construction by A. Schenkel [7] of 2-dimensional Minkowski planes with 3-dimensional kernel. It is shown that most planes in this family of Minkowski planes have 0-dimensional and even trivial automorphism groups.

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  • Application of community based participatory research to the creation of a diabetes prevention documentary with New Zealand Maori

    Farmer, A.; Gage, J.D.; Kirk, R. (2015)

    Oral Presentations
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Assessing Impacts of Volcanic Ashfall

    Stewart, C.; Wilson, T.M. (2012)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Volcanic ash may not be the most spectacular or lethal product of an explosive volcanic eruption, but it is the most widespread, and the most likely to affect towns, cities and farmland in the North Island. Freshlyerupted ash contains a range of potentially toxic soluble elements, which are released either rapidly or more slowly upon contact with water or body fluids. Following an eruption, it is normal for the public, civil authorities and agricultural producers to have concerns about the effects of ashfalls on human and animal health, drinking water supplies, crops and soils. In addition, ashfalls can interfere with the functioning of critical lifelines such as electricity and drinking water supplies.

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  • Contemporary and paleo-rockfalls as proxies for strong ground motions

    Quigley, M.; Borella, J.; Mackey, B.; Sohbati, R.; Bradley, B.A.; Sean, M.A.; Vick, L. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    A major hazard accompanying earthquake shaking in areas of steep topography is the detachment of rocks from bedrock outcrops that subsequently slide, roll, or bounce downslope (i.e. rockfalls). The 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence caused recurrent and severe rockfall in parts of southern Christchurch. Coseismic rockfall caused five fatalities and significant infrastructural damage during the 2011 Mw 6.2 Christchurch earthquake. Here we examine a rockfall site in southern Christchurch in detail using geomorphic mapping, lidar analysis, geochronology (cosmogenic 3He dating, radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz, infrared stimulated luminescence from K-feldspar), numerical modeling of rockfall boulder trajectories, and ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Rocks fell from the source cliff only in earthquakes with interpolated peak ground velocities exceeding ~10 cm/s; hundreds of smaller earthquakes did not produce rockfall. On the basis of empirical observations, GMPEs and age chronologies we attribute paleo-rockfalls to strong shaking in prehistoric earthquakes. We conclude that earthquake shaking of comparable intensity to the strongest contemporary earthquakes in Christchurch last occurred at this site approximately 5000 to 7000 years ago, and that in some settings, rockfall deposits provide useful proxies for past strong ground motions.

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  • The 2015 Gorkha Nepal Earthquake: insights from earthquake damage survey

    Goda, K.; Kiyota, T.; Pokhrel, R.M.; Chiaro, G.; Katagiri, T.; Sharma, K.; Wilkinson, S. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The 2015 Gorkha Nepal earthquake caused tremendous damage and loss. To gain valuable lessons from this tragic event, an earthquake damage investigation team was dispatched to Nepal from 1 May 2015 to 7 May 2015. A unique aspect of the earthquake damage investigation is that first-hand earthquake damage data were obtained 6–11 days after the mainshock. To gain deeper understanding of the observed earthquake damage in Nepal, the paper reviews the seismotectonic setting and regional seismicity in Nepal and analyzes available aftershock data and ground motion data. The earthquake damage observations indicate that the majority of the damaged buildings were stone/brick masonry structures with no seismic detailing, whereas the most of RC buildings were undamaged. This indicates that adequate structural design is the key to reduce the earthquake risk in Nepal. To share the gathered damage data widely, the collected damage data (geo-tagged photos and observation comments) are organized using Google Earth and the kmz file is made publicly available.

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  • A stress-strain description for saturated sand under undrained cyclic torsional shear loading

    De Silva, L.I.N.; Koseki, J.; Chiaro, G.; Sato, T. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    A constitutive model to describe the cyclic undrained behavior of saturated sand is presented. The increments in volumetric strain during undrained loading, which are equal to zero, are assumed to consist of increments due to dilatancy and increments due to consolidation/swelling. This assumption enables the proposed model to evaluate increments in volumetric strain due to dilatancy as mirror images of increments in volumetric strain due to consolidation/swelling, thus simulating the generation of excess pore water pressure (i.e., reduction in mean effective principal stress) during undrained cyclic shear loading. Based on the results of drained tests, the increments in volumetric strain due to consolidation/swelling are evaluated by assuming that the quasi-elastic bulk modulus can be expressed as a unique function of the mean effective principal stress. On the other hand, in evaluating the increments in volumetric strain due to dilatancy, a normalized stress–plastic shear strain relationship is employed in combination with a novel empirical stress–dilatancy relationship derived for torsional shear loading. The proposed stress–dilatancy relationship accounts for the effects of over-consolidation during cyclic loading. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model can satisfactorily simulate the generation of excess pore water pressure and the stress–strain relationship of saturated Toyoura sand specimens subjected to undrained cyclic torsional shear loading. It is found that the liquefaction resistance of loose Toyoura sand specimens can be accurately predicted by the model, while the liquefaction resistance of dense Toyoura sand specimens may be slightly underestimated. (i.e., the liquefaction potential is higher). Yet, the model predictions are conservative.

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  • A Global Perspective: Current Trends and Issues in ICT for 21st Century Education.

    Schrum, L.; Davis, N.E.; Jacobsen, M.; Lund, A.; Ferhan Odabasi, H.; Voogt, J.; Way, J. (2015)


    University of Canterbury Library

    Around the world educators, policy makers, and others share a universal goal to ensure that all learners reach their full potential; we seek best practices to prepare educators and leaders to improve student learning, prepare learners for their futures, maintain current educators’ knowledge and skills, increase student engagement, and integrate learning technologies into their curriculum. Questions have been raised regarding the role of practicum, appropriate curriculum, and use of technology in this preparation and for ongoing professional development. The discovery and sharing of a purposeful and systemic plan will require many educators to work together, share lessons learned, and invest energy in promoting policies to bring about changes. This paper brings together updates from experts from around the globe; each contributor has extensive experience and knowledge to share from his/her country’s perspective. The purpose of this paper is to share what these individuals know from their experience, and to generate a discussion within our educational community on questions of future research, learning from each other, and identifying opportunities for collaboration.

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