88,788 results

  • Macro-social marketing

    Kennedy, A-M

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The theoretical underpinnings for the concept of macro-social marketing are provided in this article. Macro-social marketing seeks to use social marketing techniques in a holistic way to effect systemic change, as opposed to individual level change. The article provides the conceptual roots to the concept from systems theory and institutional theory. It starts by explaining what types of macromarketing issues can be approached using macro-social marketing – dubbed here wicked problems. Systems theory is then used to explain the interconnectedness of wicked problems throughout the social and cultural systems, as well as the material environment and marketing system (Dixon 1984). Institutional theory is then applied to explain how systemic change can be brought about through the use of macro-social marketing. Change at a broader conceptual level is discussed, as well as how this process then trickles down to individual organisations within the marketing system. Lastly, tools and tactics are provided for macromarketers to undertake macro-social marketing, organised under an extended marketing mix including the concepts of people, policy and partnership.

    View record details
  • An assessment of the role of nongovernment organizations in combating trafficking of women and children in Cambodia and Viet Nam

    Gan, Christopher; Ha, N. T. T.; Kao, B.; Poch, K.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Human trafficking in general, and the trafficking of women and children in particular, is a major concern worldwide, including in the countries of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). Many nongovernment organizations (NGOs) in the GMS play an active role in supporting anti-trafficking programs. These include the Save the Children Cross-Border Project Against Trafficking and Exploitation of Migrant and Vulnerable Children, and the Combating Human Trafficking in Vietnam program of the Asia Foundation. Despite many successes, NGOs are still confronted with numerous difficulties in effectively implementing anti-trafficking programs. This study investigates the roles of NGOs in combating the trafficking of women and children in Cambodia and Viet Nam. It assesses the coordination mechanism between the government and NGOs, as well as among NGOs. It also evaluates the NGOs’ effectiveness in combating trafficking in women and children in the two GMS countries. The study uses both primary and secondary data. Primary data were gathered through structured interviews with NGO staff in charge of women and children anti-trafficking programs and projects in Cambodia and Viet Nam. Secondary data include published books, reports, and materials from the government and NGOs. The data are analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively to draw out results and make recommendations.

    View record details
  • Tocopherol content in pumpkin seed oil

    Vanhanen, Leo P.; Savage, Geoffrey P.; Dutta, P. C.

    Conference Contribution - Unpublished
    Lincoln University

    Edible seed oils from cucurbits have a large range of uses, from being consumed directly to being added to foods as a condiment or filler in soups. Recent interest has focused with what types and amounts of nutritionally beneficial compounds can be found in oils, such as phytosterols and antioxidants. Levels and types of these compounds are dependent on the cultivars, environment grown in and the postharvest processing of the seed.

    View record details
  • Invisible Women

    Cooper, Cecilia (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    A qualitative study of educational leaders who are mothers of colour in the context of Aotearoa.

    View record details
  • The Kiwi and the Garuda: New Zealand and Sukarno's Indonesia, 1945-1966

    Lim, Andrew (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis examines New Zealand’s relationship with Indonesia during the Sukarno period, and locates this relationship within the various crucial historical forces, movements, and ideologies of the mid-twentieth century. Indonesia serves as a case study of how New Zealand’s traditional Commonwealth linkages to Britain and Australia, the “winds of decolonization” after the Second World War, and the Cold War shaped New Zealand’s engagement with the newly-independent countries of Southeast Asia. In addition to such international forces, the New Zealand-Indonesian relationship was also influenced by domestic developments in Indonesia and Sukarno’s personal stamp on Indonesian foreign policy. While the focus is on the bilateral political relationship between the two countries, I also examine the New Zealand public debate around two major flash-points in modern Indonesian history: the Indonesian Revolution against the Dutch (1945-1949) and the Indonesian-Malaysian Confrontation (1963-1966)—an aspect of New Zealand-Indonesian relations that has not been well-covered. How did New Zealand’s Commonwealth linkages and its Cold War security policies shape its policies towards Indonesia? How did New Zealand respond to the challenges presented by Indonesian nationalism during the Sukarno period? How did New Zealand’s subordinate relationship towards its main Western allies – Britain, Australia, and the United States – influence its relationship with Indonesia? How does the public debate in New Zealand society around the Indonesian Revolution and the Indonesian-Malaysian Confrontation contribute to our understanding of New Zealand’s response to international issues like decolonisation and the Cold War? To answer these questions, this study draws on a wide range of primary and secondary sources including declassified archival records, government publications, memoirs, scholarly books, journals, and oral recordings.

    View record details
  • Nutritional assessment of older New Zealand adults in rest homes in Mid Canterbury

    Small, Anna (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: New Zealand has an ageing population. This is accompanied by an increased demand for rest home residency. Malnutrition is a concern in the ageing population as it increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. While overseas studies report high rates of malnutrition in rest homes the prevalence of older adults at risk of malnutrition and nutritional inadequacies within rest homes in New Zealand has not been studied. Objective: The aims were describe the prevalence of inadequate nutrient intakes of selected nutrients and determine the prevalence of malnutrition among rest home residents in the Mid Canterbury region. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 40 participants aged 65 years and over, residing in two rest homes in the Mid Canterbury Region. Demographic, dietary, anthropometric, and biochemical data were obtained, and cognitive and physical function tests were performed. Dietary data were collected with non-consecutive weighed three-day food records. Intake data were matched to nutrient lines in New Zealand Food Composition Tables. Dietary intakes were compared with Australian/New Zealand Nutrient Reference Values to determine the prevalence of participants at risk of nutrient inadequacies. Anthropometric measurements including weight, ulna length and waist circumference were obtained and Body Mass Index (BMI) (kg/m2) was calculated. Cognitive function was assessed using the Clock-Drawing Test and physical function was measured by handgrip strength and a timed walk test. Two malnutrition-screening tools, the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF) and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), were used to assess prevalence of malnutrition among participants. Results: Participants ranged in age from 65 to 97 years, and 72% were women. Average duration of residency was 31 months. The majority (68%) of participants were classified as overweight or obese (BMI>25) and 27% were underweight (BMI 30% of participant’s overall energy intake (p50% of participants. All participants had suboptimal selenium and vitamin D and 88% were prescribed vitamin D supplements. The risk of malnutrition across rest homes was 70% for men and 52% for women. Lastly, 22% of participants were anaemic. Conclusion: These findings indicate our sample of rest home residents are at risk of inadequate intakes of energy, protein and fibre and a number of micronutrients known to play a role in the health and well being of ageing adults. Furthermore, the risk of malnutrition in this population is high. While a larger, more representative study is warranted and additional biochemical analyses are needed to confirm nutritional status, these data highlight the need for future research to assess the possible causes of poor dietary intake and identify strategies to improve diet quality in this population.

    View record details
  • Relationships Matter? Multiple perspectives on children’s attachment experiences in group home settings

    Greer, Andrea (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Children who are admitted into residential care often have a history of abuse, neglect, experienced trauma and have had multiple failed placements. Caring for these children can be challenging due to their complex behavioural issues. Using an attachment framework and the evidence-base of neuroscience, this study looks at what works for children with a history of trauma. This study explores what matters to children living in residential group homes through hearing the voices of eight children residing in three group homes in New Zealand. The children interviewed were within the age group of 10 to 17 years old. Using semi-structured in-depth interviews, children were interviewed regarding their experience of care and the importance of relationships within group homes. In order to gain multiple perspectives on this topic, six biological parents and two legal guardians of children were interviewed and focus group discussions were also held with staff members from the three various group homes. The findings from this study and knowledge from neuroscience indicates that children in residential care need to experience relationships as a secure-base in order to heal from their traumatic experiences. This research recommends the importance of relationship-based interventions and trauma-informed practice while working with children in residential care settings

    View record details
  • Investigation of the design recommendations of reinforced concrete beam-column joints.

    Hannah, Mark Alexander (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A parametric analysis on 58 beam-column joint specimens has been conducted. The analysis considered 14 fundamental parameters in the design of each specimen and two performance indicators: the horizontal shear strength ratio between the maximum measured strength and the theoretical strength at beam yield, and the nominal curvature ductility of the adjacent beams. Each parameter was varied by a power function, while the linear correlation coefficient between each parameter and performance indicator was recorded. A combined multiple parameter analysis was then conducted to show the interaction of the design parameters and show the representative influences of each parameter based on the magnitude of the applied power functions. Two design equations were constructed from the most influential design parameters, one for each performance indicator. The shear strength ratio was found to be governed by the horizontal joint shear stress, the column axial stress and the yield strength of the longitudinal beam reinforcement. The available curvature ductility of the adjacent beams was also found to be governed by the horizontal joint shear stress, the column axial stress and the yield strength of the longitudinal beam reinforcement, but also the quantity of the horizontal joint shear reinforcement. The influence of the column axial stress on both performance indicators was found to be best represented by a quadratic function. This was because the column axial stress was found to be beneficial up to stress levels of , but axial stress levels exceeding were found to be detrimental to the performance of the beam-column joint, compared to a joint with no axial stress on the columns. The non-linear relationship of the column axial stress agreed with the design assumptions in NZS 3101 for low axial stress values, but at higher axial stress values NZS 3101 assumes a continued performance increase as a result of increasing axial stress, which has been found to be un-conservative. Additionally, an interaction between the column axial stress and the horizontal joint shear stress has been identified. As a result, beam-column joints with high column axial stress levels above 0.40 and horizontal joint shear stress levels in the order of have been shown to fail in a brittle crushing of the concrete in the joint core. Considering this behaviour, it is recommended that the column axial stress levels in earthquake designed beam-column joints should not exceed 0.35 . The results of the parametric analysis were then compared against the current NZS 3101 design equations for conservatism. It was found that a reduction in the horizontal joint shear reinforcement may be possible for beam-column joints incorporating Grade 300 steel in the longitudinal reinforcement of the beams and axial stress levels below 0.25 , but when Grade 500 steel is used or the column axial stress is greater than 0.25 , an increase in the joint shear reinforcement is required compared to NZS 3101. The current NZS 3101 design requirement of at least 40% of the joint shear force, to be resisted by means of joint shear reinforcement, has been found to be appropriate.

    View record details
  • Resourcing of the Canterbury rebuild: Case studies of construction organisations

    Chang-Richards, A.; Wilkinson, S.; Seville, E.; Brunsdon, D. (2013)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Canterbury earthquakes have generated economic demand and supply volatility, highlighting geographical and structural interdependencies. Post-earthquake reconstruction and new developments have seen skills training, relocation, recruitment and importation of skills becoming crucial for construction companies to meet demand and compete effectively. This report presents 15 case studies from a range of organisations involved in the Canterbury rebuild, exploring the business dynamics and outcomes of their resourcing initiatives. A key finding of this research is that, for many construction organisations, resourcing initiatives have become part of their organisational longer-term development strategies, rather than simply a response to ‘supply and demand’ pressures. Organisations are not relying on any single resourcing solution to drive their growth but use a combination of initiatives to create lasting business benefits, such as cost savings, improved brand and reputation, a stable and productive workforce, enhanced efficiency and staff morale, as well as improved skill levels.

    View record details
  • Operator agency in process intervention: tampering versus application of tacit knowledge

    Van Gestel, P.; Pons, D.; Pulakanam, V. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Statistical process control (SPC) theory takes a negative view of adjustment of process settings, which is termed tampering. In contrast, quality and lean programmes actively encourage operators to acts of intervention and personal agency in the improvement of production outcomes. This creates a conflict that requires operator judgement: How does one differentiate between unnecessary tampering and needful intervention? Also, difficult is that operators apply tacit knowledge to such judgements. There is a need to determine where in a given production process the operators are applying tacit knowledge, and whether this is hindering or aiding quality outcomes. The work involved the conjoint application of systems engineering, statistics, and knowledge management principles, in the context of a case study. Systems engineering was used to create a functional model of a real plant. Actual plant data were analysed with the statistical methods of ANOVA, feature selection, and link analysis. This identified the variables to which the output quality was most sensitive. These key variables were mapped back to the functional model. Fieldwork was then directed to those areas to prospect for operator judgement activities. A natural conversational approach was used to determine where and how operators were applying judgement. This contrasts to the interrogative approach of conventional knowledge management. Data are presented for a case study of a meat rendering plant. The results identify specific areas where operators’ tacit knowledge and mental model contribute to quality outcomes and untangles the motivations behind their agency. Also evident is how novice and expert operators apply their knowledge differently. Novices were focussed on meeting throughput objectives, and their incomplete understanding of the plant characteristics led them to inadvertently sacrifice quality in the pursuit of productivity in certain situations. Operators’ responses to the plant are affected by their individual mental models of the plant, which differ between operators and have variable validity. Their behaviour is also affected by differing interpretations of how their personal agency should be applied to the achievement of production objectives. The methodology developed here is an integration of systems engineering, statistical analysis, and knowledge management. It shows how to determine where in a given production process the operator intervention is occurring, how it affects quality outcomes, and what tacit knowledge operators are using. It thereby assists the continuous quality improvement processes in a different way to SPC. A second contribution is the provision of a novel methodology for knowledge management, one that circumvents the usual codification barriers to knowledge management.

    View record details
  • 1D Nonlinear site response prediction: Analysis of residuals at a large number of Kik-Net vertical seismometer arrays

    Kaklamanos, J.; Bradley, B.A. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Site response models are frequently used in engineering practice to predict surficial ground motions based on a site-specific soil profile and input motions, and site response predictions are especially important for large strains and accelerations, which have a greater damage potential. To characterize nonlinear soil behavior at large strains, a number of constitutive soil models have been developed. However, the application of fully nonlinear time-domain site response analyses remains limited in practice, with the equivalent-linear site response approximation to nonlinear soil behavior, using frequency-domain programs such as SHAKE (Schnabel et al., 1972), still the most common approach. For a particular project, engineering practitioners are therefore faced with the challenge of selecting the appropriate level of model complexity (e.g., equivalent-linear vs. nonlinear). While previous validation studies have attempted to quantify the levels of ground motion for which nonlinear site response analyses are necessary (e.g., Assimaki et al., 2008; Kwok et al., 2008; Kim and Hashash, 2013; Kaklamanos et al., 2015), the assessment of fully nonlinear site response models is often limited to a relatively small number of sites and ground motions. In this study, one-dimensional (1D) total-stress nonlinear, equivalent linear, and linear site response predictions are calculated using an unprecedented number of sites and ground motions, allowing for more statistically significant conclusions to be drawn than in prior studies. This study uses Japan’s comprehensive Kiban-Kyoshin network of vertical seismometer arrays (Aoi et al., 2000), in particular, 5626 ground motions at 114 KiK-net sites are utilized, with 239 ground motions having PGA > 0.3g. Site response predictions are calculated using the program DEEPSOIL (Hashash et al., 2011), and SHAKE for the nonlinear, and equivalent linear analyses, respectively; based on the P- and S- wave velocity profiles, and soil types provided on the KiK-Net database. The Zhang et al. (2005) modulus-reduction and damping curves are used in the equivalent-linear analyses and as the target curves for the nonlinear analyses. This study builds upon prior work (Kaklamanos et al., 2013) in which linear and equivalentlinear site response analyses (but not nonlinear analyses) were performed at 100 KiK-net sites using 3720 ground motions, allowing for broad conclusions on the uncertainty of linear and equivalent-linear site response models. With the large database of nonlinear site response model predictions in the current study, the predictive capabilities of fully nonlinear total-stress site response models relative to linear and equivalent-linear models are assessed. The model residuals assessed in this study are those of the 5%-damped pseudo-acceleration response spectra, calculated as ln(PSAobs) – ln(PSApred), where PSAobs and PSApred are the observed and predicted spectral accelerations at a given period, respectively. From analyzing the trends of the model residuals versus the maximum shear strain in the soil profile, Kaklamanos et al. (2013) concluded that the equivalent-linear model becomes inaccurate when strains exceed 0.1 to 0.4%. In the current study, we find that the model residuals of the equivalent-linear and nonlinear site response models generally do not deviate from each other significantly at large shear strains. For shear strains greater than 0.5% at short spectral periods, both the equivalent-linear and nonlinear model residual plots slope upwards, indicating that these models tend to underpredict large-strain ground motions. However, the nonlinear model residuals do not slope upward as significantly at some spectral periods (for example, for spectral 1 accelerations at T = 0.1 s). Furthermore, the scatter in the equivalent-linear model residuals is greater than that of the nonlinear model residuals at large shear strains, suggesting that the equivalent-linear site response model is less precise at large shear strains. In the aggregate, the linear, equivalent-linear, and nonlinear model biases and standard deviations can be calculated across all sites and ground motions using mixed-effects regression on the model residuals. Comparisons of the model biases and standard deviations indicate that all 1D site response models (linear, equivalent-linear, and nonlinear) are biased towards underprediction of ground motions at short spectral periods, where nonlinear effects are strongest. However, the equivalent-linear and nonlinear model biases are smaller than the linear model bias. The persistent model biases suggest that: (1) many of these sites may experience a breakdown in the 1D site-response assumptions; and/or (2) the site investigation data provided on KiK-net (i.e. velocity profiles and broad soil type) may be over-simplified. With respect to the first point, in particular, the underlying assumptions of 1D site response may have to be addressed in order to make notable prediction improvements, perhaps by incorporation of three-dimensional soil constitutive response and incident ground motion effects. Based on the inter-site residuals, we have also identified some “interesting” sites at which all 1D site response models most strongly overpredict or underpredict ground motions: ISKH05 and KOCH05 are characterized by the strongest underpredictions, and HYGH07, IWTH07, and WKYH01 are characterized by the strongest overpredictions (at different vibration periods, however). Because these site-specific biases are consistent across all 1D site response models, the 1D site response assumption is likely not valid at these sites. Although the nonlinear site response models are shown to offer an improvement over equivalent-linear models, the remaining trends in the nonlinear model residuals suggest that other factors—such as three-dimensional effects—have a significant impact on site response behavior.

    View record details
  • The effect of bounds on magnitude, source-to-site distance and site condition in PSHA-based ground motion selection

    Tarbali, K.; Bradley, B.A. (2015)


    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper, the effect of using bounds on magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site condition of prospective records for the purpose of ground motion selection based on probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is investigated. Although it is common in ground motion selection to consider bounds on these causal parameters, there is no consistent approach for setting the bounds as a function of the seismic hazard at the site, and no guidance exists on how the bounds should be set considering the distribution of causal scenarios affecting PSHA results. 36 PSHA cases are considered in this paper to empirically illustrate the effects of alternative bounds on the characteristics of selected ground motions, which cover a wide range of deaggregation distributions and site conditions. The obtained results indicate that the use of excessively narrow bounds encompassing only the dominant causal scenario can lead to ground motion ensembles with a biased representation for the target hazard. In contrast, the use of relatively wide bounds results in ensembles with an appropriate representation for the target intensity measure distributions. Quantitative criteria for determining such bounds for general problems are provided, which are expected to be sufficient in the majority of problems encountered in ground motion selection for seismic demand analyses.

    View record details
  • High-resolution surficial soil velocity models in the Canterbury, New Zealand basin

    Bradley, B.A.; McGann, C.R.; Cox, B.R.; Wotherspoon, L.M.; Wood, C.M.; Lee, R.L.; Teague, D.P. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    This presentation summarizes the development of high-resolution surficial soil velocity models in the Canterbury, New Zealand basin. Shallow (<30m) shear wave velocities were primarily computed based on a combination of a large database of over 15,000 cone penetration test (CPT) logs in and around Christchurch, and a recently-developed Christchurch-specific empirical correlation between soil shear wave velocity and CPT. Large active-source testing at 22 locations and ambient-wavefield surface wave and H/V testing at over 80 locations were utilized in combination with 1700 water well logs to constrain the inter-bedded stratigraphy and velocity of Quaternary sediments up to depths of several hundred meters. Finally, seismic reflection profiles and the ambient-wavefield surface wave data provide constraint on velocities from several hundred meters to several kilometres. At all depths, the high resolution data illustrates the complexity of the soil conditions in the region, and the developed 3D models are presently being used in broadband ground motion simulations to further interpret the observed strong ground motions in the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence.

    View record details
  • A high-resolution shear wave velocity model for near-surface soils in Christchurch

    McGann, C.R.; Bradley, B.A.; Cubrinovski, M. (2015)


    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper summarizes the development of a high-resolution surficial shear wave velocity model based on the combination of the large high-spatial-density database of cone penetration test (CPT) logs in and around Christchurch, New Zealand and a recently-developed Christchurch-specific empirical correlation between soil shear wave velocity and CPT. This near-surface shear wave velocity model has applications for site characterization efforts via the development of maps of time-averaged shear wave velocities over specific depths, as well as use in site response analysis and ground motion simulation.

    View record details
  • How Can Professional Learning and Development for Science Teachers accelerate outcomes for Priority Learners?

    Cleary, S.; Conner, L. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Science teaching has come under scrutiny in the last three years in New Zealand as a result of disparities in participation and achievement of Māori and Pasifika learners, those from low socio-economic backgrounds, learners with special education needs and English language learners. This paper draws on professional learning and development (PLD) for science teachers to accelerate the outcomes for these priority learners in 48 high schools. Three case studies of science teachers highlight changes to pedagogy. The key success factors of the PLD were: teachers establishing positive relationships with their learners; use of multiple forms of formative assessment; and strategies to support learners with literacy in science.

    View record details
  • The classification of frequencies in the gamma Doradus/delta Scuti hybrid star HD 49434

    Brunsden, E.; Pollard, K.R.; Cottrell, P.L.; Wright, D.J.; De Cat, P.; Uytterhoeven, K. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Hybrid stars of the γ Doradus and δ Scuti pulsation types have great potential for asteroseismic analysis to explore their interior structure. To achieve this, mode identifications of pulsational frequencies observed in the stars must be made, a task which is far from simple. In this work we begin the analysis by scrutinizing the frequencies found in the CoRoT photometric satellite measurements and ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy of the hybrid star HD 49434. The results showalmost no consistency between the frequencies found using the two techniques and no characteristic period spacings or couplings were identified in either data set. The spectroscopic data additionally show no evidence for any long-term (5 yr) variation in the dominant frequency. The 31 spectroscopic frequencies identified have standard deviation profiles suggesting multiple modes sharing (l, m) in the δ Scuti frequency region and several skewed modes sharing the same (l, m) in the γ Doradus frequency region. In addition, there is a clear frequency in the γ Doradus frequency region that appears to be unrelated to the others. We conclude HD 49434 remains a δ Scuti/γ Doradus candidate hybrid star but more sophisticated models dealingwith rotation are sought to obtain a clear picture of the pulsational behaviour of this star.

    View record details
  • Evaluation of CryoSat-2 derived sea-ice freeboard over fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    Price, D.; Beckers, J.; Ricker, R.; Kurtz, N.; Rack, W.; Haas, C.; Helm, V.; Hendricks, S.; Leonard, G.; Langhorne, P.J. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Using in situ data from 2011 and 2013, we evaluate the ability of CryoSat-2 (CS-2) to retrieve sea-ice freeboard over fast ice in McMurdo Sound. This provides the first systematic validation of CS-2 in the coastal Antarctic and offers insight into the assumptions currently used to process CS-2 data. European Space Agency Level 2 (ESAL2) data are compared with results of a Waveform Fitting (WfF) procedure and a Threshold-First-Maximum-Retracker-Algorithm employed at 40% (TFMRA40). A supervised freeboard retrieval procedure is used to reduce errors associated with sea surface height identification and radar velocity in snow. We find ESAL2 freeboards located between the ice and snow freeboard rather than the frequently assumed snow/ice interface. WfF is within 0.04m of the ice freeboard but is influenced by variable snow conditions causing increased radar backscatter from the air/snow interface. Given such snow conditions and additional uncertainties in sea surface height identification, a positive bias of 0.14m away from the ice freeboard is observed. TFMRA40 freeboards are within 0.03m of the snow freeboard. The separation of freeboard estimates is primarily driven by the different assumptions of each retracker, although waveform alteration by variations in snow properties and surface roughness is evident. Techniques are amended where necessary, and automatic freeboard retrieval procedures for ESAL2, WfF and TFMRA40 are presented. CS-2 detects annual fastice freeboard trends using all three automatic procedures that are in line with known sea-ice growth rates in the region.

    View record details
  • Examining speech production using masked priming

    Davis, C.; Shaw, J.; Proctor, M.; Derrick, D.; Sherwood, S.; Kim, J. (2015)


    University of Canterbury Library

    The time to initiate naming a printed target word is reduced when preceded by an identical masked prime (match prime) or by one that has the same initial letter (onset prime) compared to an all letter different control. Masked priming has been examined using vocal response time but offers an opportunity to examine speech production dynamics before the onset of speech acoustics. We tracked tongue-dorsum, tongue-tip and lip motion from four participants pronouncing 19 targets in match, onset and unrelated control prime conditions. Control primes were selected so their articulation involved a different tongue gesture than the target. Prime influence was measured by tongue-dorsum height at gestural onset and peak velocity of the subsequent gesture. Results showed that relative to targets in the match condition, control targets had a significantly different tongue dorsum height and the peak velocity was greater when the subsequent gesture was achieved.

    View record details
  • Quo Vadis Transformative Service Research?

    Kuppelwieser, V.G.; Finsterwalder, J. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Application of Community Based Participatory Research to the Creation of a Diabetes Prevention Documentary with New Zealand Maori.

    Farmer, A.; Gage, J.; Kirk, R.; Edgar, T. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    I Want to walk With my Moko is the result of a collaboration between an EMMY award winning documentary filmmaker and a team of Māori health communication professionals and community members based in Christchurch, New Zealand. The objective was to utilise a Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach to create a culturally relevant documentary resource for Māori at risk for Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is almost three times more common in the indigenous people of New Zealand (Māori) than non-Māori. Māori are diagnosed younger and are two to three times more likely to develop complications such as eye disease, kidney failure, strokes and heart disease. Mortality rates for Māori with type 2 diabetes are seven times higher than for non-Māori. Prevention, detection and management of diabetes have become a health priority. This is a significant challenge given the low level of diabetes knowledge and awareness in the Māori community. Further, despite the high rate of Type 2 diabetes, little is known about their personal understanding or experience of the disease. Several studies of Māori health identify a need for new health communication approaches to diabetes prevention in order to reduce the wide gap between Māori and non-Māori disease rates. There is both an absence of theoretically grounded audio visual materials focusing on Māori health and a lack of academic studies on diabetes prevention and mediated health communication. This is particularly true of studies utilising and evaluating documentary narratives. A CBPR approach to the documentary was appropriate because intervention strategies designed following its principles will reflect the cultural values and behavioural preferences of the participating community. A CBPR approach provides a strong model for enacting local action oriented approaches in the creation of a diabetes documentary that reflects Māori cultural beliefs, practices, and a narrative tradition. Documentary video can be an effective health communication tool because it allows for innovative ways to document and represent people and issues while accommodating power differences between researchers and the community. It can give voice to participants who are not typically engaged in research. Utilizing documentary is a way for communities to prioritize their own health issues and for participants to share their own health narratives. Working directly with the affected communities can help privilege traditional knowledge. Narrative is particularly important in indigenous populations where it is customary to receive information by listening and watching rather than reading. And documentary is well suited for encouraging behaviour change because it can be employed to demonstrate social modelling or observational learning as outlined in Social Cognitive Theory.

    View record details