89,483 results

  • Disaster preparedness in the tourism industry: A New Zealand case study of constraints and training response

    Garside, R.; Christianson, A.; Johnston, D.; Graham, L. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Key factors that influence disaster preparedness of organisations at risk from natural hazards are presented in this paper to raise awareness of managers and human resource development specialists. Primary business and regulatory reasons that justify preparedness, and issues that constrain it, are considered from a global and local perspective and applied to a commercial ski area on the slopes of the active Ruapehu volcano in New Zealand. In particular, the case study examines the effectiveness of staff training as an important part of a disaster response plan. Lessons learnt from this case identify a number of points that could be generalised to enhance workplace preparedness capacity in both low and high probability disaster events caused by natural or human-induced hazards.

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  • A Māori approach to management: Contrasting traditional and modern Māori management practices in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Mika, J.P.; O'Sullivan, J.G. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This is a conceptual article located in the discourses of indigeneity, post-colonialism and critical management studies in which we seek to renew interest in Māori management as a distinctive form of management within Aotearoa New Zealand. We discuss defining Māori management and Māori organisations and their relevance for today's organsiations in New Zealand and internationally. We examine differences and similarities between Western and Māori management in terms of the four functions of management adapted from principles first proposed by Fayol in 1949. We propose a theoretical model of Māori management and discuss the implications of Māori management for management research, policy and practice.

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  • Perspectives of new trades tutors: boundary crossing between vocational identities

    Chan, S. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article reports on a study of the perspectives of new tutors teaching traditional vocational trades who recently commenced teaching in the Institutes of Technologies and Polytechnics (ITPs) sector in New Zealand. The perspectives are collated from questionnaires and interviews of 13 tutors, from five ITPs, who have been teaching full-time for two years. In this article, a focus is made on the transformation process from expert trade worker to effective trades tutor, along with suggestions to assist the ‘boundary crossing’ process between two diverse vocational identities. Suggestions include aligning trades tutors’ existing workplace training-based conceptualisations of teaching and learning to extend trades tutors’ teaching craft knowledge, skills, and dispositions.

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  • The progress to digital in New Zealand

    Norris, P. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    New Zealand began the transition to digital television relatively late compared to other developed countries. When the policy framework was established in 2006, it centred on a Freeview model, as a counter to the pay TV platform that had been digital since 1998, achieving considerable penetration in that time. This article will examine the progress of the transition from 2006 to analogue switch-off (ASO) that began in 2012 and is to be completed by the end of 2013. It will note the light-handed nature of regulation and government policy, the impact of a change of government, the ultimate failure of an attempt at a multi-channel strategy and the reduction of public broadcasting.

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  • New mites Terraphagus antipodus gen. n., sp. n. and Neohyadesia minor sp. n. (Acarina: Astigmata: Algophagidae) from islands of the Southern Ocean

    Clark, J.; Andrews, N. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Mites are a diverse and important component in the soils of the Southern Ocean islands, but for many groups, their taxonomy and biogeography is little studied. This paper reports the Algophagidae, a poorly known family, from the New Zealand region for the first time. The study used soil samples from seabird burrows, brackish algal wrack samples and a museum collection to recover specimens. Terraphagus antipodus gen. n., sp. n. is described from grey petrel Procellaria cinerea burrow soil on the Antipodes Islands, New Zealand. The axillary organ is confined to the dorsum; the epigynal apodeme ends are fused with the ends of coxal apodeme II; seta 2a and ω2 are absent, and the famulus is bilobed. Males have the sternum fused to coxal apodemes II; the tarsal setae of legs I, III and IV of the male are modified for mate guarding. The short stout legs I and II end in huge spines in females as e, d, q, s, wa and hT. From brackish algal wrack, Lake Forsyth/Wairewa, Canterbury, New Zealand, another algophagid Neohyadesia minor sp. n. is described and illustrated. The new species is the smallest known algophagid. A neohyadesid collected in 1961 is newly reported here from Eudyptes sp. penguin rookery mud from North Head, Macquarie Island. These records further extend the known microhabitats of the family to the allochthonous marine seabird nutrient flow into islands in the New Zealand region and make Neohyadesia Hughes and Goodman, 1969 present in all Southern Ocean provinces.

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  • A preliminary investigation into pre-competitive mood states of advanced and novice equestrian dressage riders

    Wolframm, I.; Shearman, J.; Micklewright, D. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emotional composure is considered critical in equestrian sports. The aim of the study was to investigate pre-competitive mood states in dressage riders. Thirteen advanced and 13 novice British riders completed the Profile of Mood States Questionnaire (POMS) prior to competing. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was performed to test for a main effect of mood states on competence levels, with subsequent investigation for significant differences of individual mood states using Bonferroni adjusted alpha levels. Levels of confusion were nearing significance between advanced and novice riders, suggesting greater processing efficacy and task-specific concentration for more advanced riders. Sport psychological interventions for equestrians should focus on lowering levels of confusion and increasing task-orientated focus in novice riders.

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  • Psychodrama at distance: Effective supervision practice using communication technologies

    Farnsworth, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Psychodrama and electronic technologies seem unlikely bedfellows. As this paper demonstrates, they are, in fact, made for each other though surprisingly little has been written about their combined potential. Drawing on vignettes and case examples as illustration, John Farnsworth demonstrates how effective supervision can take place in the absence of a physical psychodrama stage. He describes the way in which he uses all aspects of the psychodrama method via email, phone, digital and online communications, to create warm, functional working relationships. Psychodramatists are invited to reflect on the way that psychodrama can and will be used in the emerging vibrant electronic worlds of the future.

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  • Constructing ePortfolios with mobile phones and Web 2.0

    Chan, S. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper provides rationalisation, description and evaluation of a project using mobile phones and web 2.0 sites to collate eportfolios. The paper will firstly provide a brief introduction to the context in which the project has been carried out. An overview of what has taken place in mlearning, eportfolios and web 2.0 that is relevant to this project will then be discussed. Reports on the various parts of the project, findings and results then follow. The paper concludes with a summary of the future work on mlearning pedagogy.

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  • Skeletal muscle fat metabolism after exercise in humans: influence of fat availability

    Kimber, N.E.; Camerson-Smith, D.; McGee, S.L.; Hargreaves, M. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The mechanisms facilitating increased skeletal muscle fat oxidation following prolonged, strenuous exercise remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) availability on intramuscular malonyl-CoA concentration and the regulation of whole-body fat metabolism during a 6-h postexercise recovery period. Eight endurance-trained men performed three trials, consisting of 1.5 h high-intensity and exhaustive exercise, followed by infusion of saline, saline + nicotinic acid (NA; low FFA), or Intralipid and heparin [high FFA (HFA)]. Muscle biopsies were obtained at the end of exercise (0 h) and at 3 and 6 h in recovery. Ingestion of NA suppressed the postexercise plasma FFA concentration throughout recovery (P < 0.01), except at 4 h. The alteration of the availability of plasma FFA during recovery induced a significant increase in whole-body fat oxidation during the 6-h period for HFA (52.2 ± 4.8 g) relative to NA (38.4 ± 3.1 g; P < 0.05); however, this response was unrelated to changes in skeletal muscle malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)β phosphorylation, suggesting mechanisms other than phosphorylation-mediated changes in ACC activity may have a role in regulating fat metabolism in human skeletal muscle during postexercise recovery. Despite marked changes in plasma FFA availability, no significant changes in intramuscular triglyceride concentrations were detected. These data suggest that the regulation of postexercise skeletal muscle fat oxidation in humans involves factors other than the 5′AMP-activated protein kinase-ACCβ-malonyl-CoA signaling pathway, although malonyl-CoA-mediated regulation cannot be excluded completely in the acute recovery period.

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  • Tenuous affair: Environmental and outdoor education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Straker, J.; Irwin, D. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The relationship between outdoor education and environmental education in Aotearoa New Zealand has undergone many changes since formal education began in early colonial times. Discussion draws from qualitative doctoral research undertaken by the authors that investigated education for sustainability in outdoor education and howmeaning is ascribed to outdoor experiences. The article describes how environmental education and outdoor education had common historical roots in nature studies that eventually were teased apart by the development of separate agendas for learning and assessment, coupled with the political context of the 1970s and 1980s. The article finds that contemporary forces relating to the economy, society and the environment are now driving a re-engagement of the two discourses in Aotearoa New Zealand at a variety of levels, from schools to national bodies, and that this re-engagement signals a positive outcome for addressing key environmental issues and engaging students in the outdoors.

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  • Going commercial: Navigating student radio in a deregulated media marketplace

    Reilly, B.; Farnsworth, J. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article describes an unusual form of student instructional radio, which is organized to run as a fully commercial broadcaster. Drawing on the case of a New Zealand student station, Mode 96.1FM, we look at how it functions in a highly competitive commercial environment. The student-run station reformats itself every year and attempts to emulate the styles and success of much larger national and local commercial music stations. We investigate two aspects. First, the tensions this creates between commercial, industry and educational objectives. Second, how students become located within the commodified speech practices intrinsic to marketing and branding. We also discuss how the station attempts to reconcile these in terms of seeking out diverse listening publics.

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  • Soil selenium in a forested seabird colony: distribution, sources, uptake by plants, and comparison with non-seabird sites

    Hawke, D. J.; Wu, J-R. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Seabirds vector selenium (Se) into terrestrial ecosystems in Antarctica and on tropical coral islands, but factors controlling distribution within affected soils are unknown, especially in temperate regions. At a Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) breeding colony on mainland New Zealand, the concentration of Se in petrel guano (3.6 mg kg–1) exceeded soil parent material (0.8 mg kg–1) and in all but two soil samples (range 1.2–4.2 mg kg–1; n = 52). External Se (Se not derived from parent material) accounted for 649% (means.d.) of soil Se. Measurements were also made at a former seabird breeding site, and at a site with no Holocene seabird breeding. Median surface-soil Se concentrations (mg kg–1) were in the order burrow soil (2.6) > adjacent forest floor (2.2) > former breeding site (1.0) > control site (0.2), with significant differences between burrow soil and (1) the former breeding site and (2) the control site. In a linear regression model, soil pH, and d15N were the only significant predictors of external Se in colony soil. The correlations are consistent with seabird input driving both the Se supply and increased sorptive uptake in an environment acidified by seabird guano. Despite the enhanced Se in colony soil, median foliage concentrations (tree fern 0.05 mg kg–1, nikau 0.08 mg kg–1) were close to the accepted minimum for herbivore nutrition. Seabirds therefore contribute significant Se to breeding colony soils in temperate areas, but this is not necessarily transferred to plant foliage.

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  • Digital children's channels: A comparative analysis of three locally launched channels

    Zanker, R.; Lustyik, K. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There are over two billion children worldwide under the age of 18, who are targeted by an increasing number of television channels solely dedicated to them. As such globally circulated programmes and networks expand their reach using digital platforms, is there a need – and room for – locally produced television content for young people? From the perspective of national media policy advocates, locally developed, produced and broadcast programmes can provide children with a sense of their own place in an increasingly complex globalized media landscape and ensure that programmes are developed with the interest, perspective and views of local children in mind. This article explores the dichotomy between ‘local’ and ‘global’ television content targeting children in the context of debates on media globalization. Our three case studies from radically different media policy environments, focus specifically on locally produced content offered on dedicated national children‘s digital television channels launched locally to promote the cultural heritage of a specific nation or region. They provide concrete examples of how local content is conceptualized and what types of content children have to choose from. Our findings are paradoxical. Although each channel has been created to speak back to dominant audio-visual children’s flows from the periphery, our findings are that the better funded nationally based dedicated children’s channels have grown into successful market players beyond original national boundaries. The first case study examines dedicated local children’s provision in New Zealand, focusing on TVNZ6, a digital children‘s channel that operated as part of the public service broadcasting sector. The second case study focuses on children‘s television content in Hungary and uses the case of Minimax network Hungary, an Eastern European regional commercial targeting children growing up in a dynamically transforming post-communist media system. The third case study looks at television content produced in the Middle East by focusing on Al Jazeera Children’s Channel (JCC), a pan-Arabic non-commercial edutainment channel established in Qatar and funded by the Qatar Foundation.

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  • Testing the diagnostic efficacy of the iPad2 for emergency radiologic consultation in rural New Zealand

    Hayes, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the diagnostic accuracy of handheld computing devices is comparable to that of monitors that might be used in emergency teleconsultation. Subjects and Methods: One handheld device, an Apple iPad2 was studied. The diagnostic efficacy of this device was tested against that of secondary-class monitor - the reference standard (primary class being clinical workstation display) for images of slices from CT of the brain. Participants read 100 brain images looking for a specific abnormality (example: fresh intracranial bleed) and rated their confidence in their decisions. Participants were timed but told that the timing was for statistical purposes only, so we could compare the time taken to read images on both monitors. Readings were by Intensive Care physician consultants. These consultants were selected as they were the ideal professional to review images of CT heads with the ability to take part in study. Results: Despite experiencing slower workflow, clinicians evaluating patients for injuries reported similar diagnostic performance regardless of whether they read images from Apple's iPad2 or a traditional LCD monitor. The results are encouraging and indicate that from a hardware perspective, the iPad2 display is suitable for preliminary emergency interpretation.

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  • Ayersacarus, an endemic mite genus from Zealandian seabird nest environments: revision, with four new species (Acari: Mesostigmata: Leptolaelapidae)

    Clark, J. M.; Hawke, D. J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Four new species of Ayersacarus Hunter (Acari: Mesostigmata: Leptolaelapidae) are described: A. hurleyi sp. n. from Stephens I./Takapourewa (Cook Strait, New Zealand); A. forsteri sp. n. from Pitt I./Rangiauria, Chatham Is.; A. knoxi sp. n. from Snares Is./Tini Heke; and A. savilli sp. n. from Stewart I./Rakiura (New Zealand). Prestacarus gen. n. is proposed with Ayersacarus tilbrooki Hunter, 1967 from South Georgia as the type species. This restores Hunter's original 1964 conception of the genus and leaves Ayersacarus with nine species confined to Zealandia. A key to the females of all nine Ayersacarus species is included. All Ayersacarus and Prestacarus species are restricted to seabird nests and their immediate environs.

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  • Developing and embedding inquiry-guided learning across an institution

    Jenkins, M.; Healey, M. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This chapter presents a case study of how inquiry-guided learning has been developed and embedded within a small university in the United Kingdom. It highlights the different theoretical and conceptual frameworks that contributed to our evolving understanding of inquiry-guided learning and the importance of recognizing and working with disciplinary differences.

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  • Analgesia for relief of pain due to uterine cramping/involution after birth

    Deussen, A.; Ashwood, P.; Martis, R. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: Women may experience differing types of pain and discomfort following birth, including cramping after birth pains associated with uterine involution. Objectives: To assess the effectiveness and safety of analgesia for relief of after birth pains following vaginal birth. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 December 2010) and the reference lists of trials and review articles. Selection criteria: All identified published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing two different types of analgesia or analgesia with placebo or analgesia with no treatment, for the relief of after birth pains following vaginal birth. Types of analgesia included pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. Main results: We have included 18 studies (involving 1498 women) in this review. However, only nine of the included studies (with 750 women) reported 24 comparisons of analgesia with other analgesia or placebo and had data that could be included in our meta-analyses. The majority of studies investigated pharmacological analgesics and these were grouped into classes for this review. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were significantly better than placebo at relieving pain from uterine involution as assessed by their summed pain intensity differences (SPID) (mean difference (MD) 4.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.87 to 5.82; three studies, 204 women) and summed pain relief scores (MD 5.94; 95% CI 3.83 to 8.01; three studies, 204 women). NSAIDS were compared with opioids in one small study of 23 women reporting SPID and summed pain relief and found no difference. A larger study of 127 women found NSAIDs to be significantly better than opioids at reducing pain intensity six hours following study intervention (MD -0.70; 95% CI -1.04 to -0.35). Opioids were compared with placebo in three studies that could be included in meta-analyses; one small study of 23 women reporting SPID and summed pain relief and found no difference. One study of 95 women found no difference in pain intensity six hours following the study intervention. A third study of 108 women found significantly more women in the placebo group reported no pain relief than women in the opioid group (risk ratio 0.10; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.23). Aspirin was significantly better than paracetamol when pain intensity score was assessed six hours after study intervention (MD 0.85; 95% CI 0.29 to 1.41; one study 48 women) at relieving pain from uterine involution. Paracetamol was not better than placebo when pain intensity was assessed six hours after the study intervention in one study of 48 women. Authors' conclusions: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) including aspirin were better than placebo at relieving pain from uterine cramping/involution following vaginal birth. NSAIDs were better than paracetamol and paracetamol was not better than placebo, though numbers of participants for these comparisons were small. Data for opioids compared with NSAIDs and opioids compared with placebo were conflicting, with some measures showing similar effect and others indicating NSAIDs were better than opioids and opioids were not better than placebo. There were insufficient data to make conclusions regarding the effectiveness of opioids at relieving pain from uterine cramping/involution. The median year of publication of included studies was 1981; therefore more research is needed to assess the effectiveness of current pharmacological and non-pharmacological analgesia at relieving pain from uterine cramping/involution following vaginal birth.

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  • Influence of wastewater treatment process and the populationsize on human virus profiles in wastewater

    Hewitt , J.; Leonard, M.; Greening, G; Lewis, G. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Human adenovirus (AdV and AdV species F), enterovirus (EV) and norovirus (NoV) concentrations entering wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) serving different-sized communities, and effectiveness of different treatment processes in reducing concentrations were established. Data was combined to create a characteristic and unique descriptor of the individual viral composition and termed as the sample virus profile. Virus profiles were generally independent of population size and treatment process (moving bed biofilm reactors, activated sludge, waste stabilisation ponds). AdV and EV concentrations in wastewater were more variable in small (130,000 inhabitants) plants. AdV and EV concentrations were detected in influent of most WWTP (AdV range 1.00e4.08 log10 infectious units (IU)/L, 3.25e8.62 log10 genome copies/L; EV range 0.7e3.52 log10 plaque forming units (PFU)/L; 2.84e6.67 log10 genome copies/L) with a reduced median concentration in effluent (AdV range 0.70e3.26 log10 IU/L, 2.97e6.95 log10 genome copies/L; EV range 0.7e2.15 log10PFU/L, 1.54e5.28 log10 genome copies/L). Highest culturable AdV and EV concentrations in effluent were from a medium-sized WWTP. NoV was sporadic in all WWTP with GI and GII concentrations being similar in influent (range 2.11e4.64 and 2.19e5.46 log10 genome copies/L) as in effluent (range 2.18e5.06 and 2.88e5.46 log10 genome copies/L). Effective management of WWTP requires recognition that virus concentration in influent will vary -particularly in small and medium plants. Irrespective of treatment type, culturable viruses and NoV are likely to be present in non-disinfected effluent, with associated human health risks dependent on concentration and receiving water usage.

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  • Survey of evidence-based practice use and understanding among final (5th) year medical students in South-East Asia

    Martis, R.; Ho, J.; Crowther, C. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The SEA-ORCHID project (South East Asia - Optimising Reproductive Child Health in Developing countries) initiated a survey among undergraduate medical students at five South-East Asia universities to ascertain their understanding of evidence-based practice, information seeking practices, access to Information Technology and evidencebased databases as well as their understanding of clinical practice guidelines. The survey took place during August to December 2006 and was completed by 172 fifth year undergraduate medical students. The findings from this survey indicate that fifth year undergraduate medical students from the participating five South East Asian universities need to be well equipped in knowing what databases exist, how to search these and how to critically appraise the information obtained. This need, plus a lack of exposure to clinical practice guideline appraisal and development, highlights some of the issues medical students encounter when attempting to learn and practice evidence-based practice effectively.

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  • Problem-based learning in a technical course in computing: A case study

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Problem-based learning has been well-documented, from its early days in the teaching of medical professionals to its more recent use in other disciplines. It has been adopted in many educational institutions because it gives students a realistic problem and provides opportunities to translate knowledge into solutions. This article is a case study of this approach at a second-year technical course, in which members of the class were divided into groups and given a scenario concerning a fictitious organisation about to embark on a major upgrade to its existing and problematic networking infrastructure. The course consisted of two parts. The first group was provided with a set of virtual machines to upgrade, and the second group chose and implemented a major technology on this newly upgraded network. The authors outline how problem-based learning is used in this context in a way that informs the teaching of any technical computing course.

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