88,788 results

  • Problem-based learning in a technical course in computing: A case study

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Problem-based learning has been well-documented, from its early days in the teaching of medical professionals to its more recent use in other disciplines. It has been adopted in many educational institutions because it gives students a realistic problem and provides opportunities to translate knowledge into solutions. This article is a case study of this approach at a second-year technical course, in which members of the class were divided into groups and given a scenario concerning a fictitious organisation about to embark on a major upgrade to its existing and problematic networking infrastructure. The course consisted of two parts. The first group was provided with a set of virtual machines to upgrade, and the second group chose and implemented a major technology on this newly upgraded network. The authors outline how problem-based learning is used in this context in a way that informs the teaching of any technical computing course.

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  • Enablers and constraints to the use of inquiry-based learning in undergraduate education

    Spronken-Smith, R.; Walker, R.; Batchelor, J.; O'Steen, B.; Angelo, T. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study involved a meta-analysis of 10 cases of inquiry-based learning (IBL) in undergraduate education to determine the factors which both enable and constrain its use. The enabling factors were found to include: teacher attributes – being student-centred, reflective but rebellious; course design attributes – questions stimulating learning, collaborative learning, progressive development of inquiry skills, required student preparation and constructive alignment; department and institutional attributes – IBL being more accepted if permeating a whole programme, the pivotal role of supportive senior management and assistance by staff developers. The major constraints were gaining philosophical buy-in to inquiry approaches; supporting transition to inquiry; developing self-reflection skills; and coping with varied assessment products. Departmental and institutional challenges included timetables and room allocation and the difficulty of recruiting teachers in a research intensive environment. Some strategies are suggested to help overcome these barriers.

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  • Dancing to sustainable tunes: An exploration of music festivals and sustainable practices in Aotearoa

    O'Rourke, S.; Irwin, D.; Straker, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Living sustainable lifestyles that meet the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs has become a driving force for social change. Music festivals are contextualized within this setting and can provide both a site to encourage environmentally responsible behaviours and a place for communities of likeminded people to meet. A sense of community and freedom, efficient festival organization, good music, and being in the outdoors are all aspects of positive festival experiences, but so too does caring for the local environment and community. This paper discusses a qualitative research project that investigates the extent and impact of sustainability-related social and environmental aspects of music festival experiences. Tentative conclusions suggest that the way festival organizers plan for social and environmental impacts directly influences the experience of those attending, but also has the potential to instigate social and environmental change in ways which at present are largely untapped.

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  • Social exclusion and poverty: Translating social capital into accessible resources

    Boon, B.; Farnsworth, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article investigates the dynamic multi-dimensional processes through which the poor become excluded from social participation. Drawing on social capital literature, it traces how bridging and bonding capital do not always translate into expected levels of social participation. It does so by detailing research findings from low income focus groups undertaken in Dunedin, New Zealand. These describe the experiences of group members in attempting to manage connections around employment, their own broader social participation or the participation of their children. In each case, the study highlights the difficulties of translation they experienced: in particular, translating available bridging or bonding capital into useful social, cultural or economic resources which could mitigate their social exclusion or enable fuller social participation.

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  • A new sub-alpine mite from New Zealand (Acari: Astigmatina: Histiostomatidae)

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The female, male, tritonymph and hypopus of Histiostoma montanum new species is described and illustrated from the sub-alpine shrub Brachyglottis elaeagnifolia litter at 11001300 m, North Egmont, Mt Egmont, Taranaki, New Zealand.

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  • A new hypertrichous larval Erythrites (Erythraeinae) from Banks Peninsula, New Zealand

    Clark, J. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Erythrites otamahua sp. n. is described from three unfed larvae recovered from pitfall traps on Otamahua (Quail) Island, Lyttelton Harbour, and Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. This hypertrichous mite bears an idiosoma clothed in 99 dark, dorsal setae; has up to 5 pairs of scutalae all longer than 100 microns and a scutum much wider (W) than long (L), (L:W = 0.673). All legs are long; >800 microns and genua I bears one σ solenidion. It is most similar to Erythrites reginae (Hirst, 1928) and Erythrites urrbrae (Womersley, 1934), both Australian species. It is posited that the hypertrichous idiosoma confers solar gain advantage to these larvae seeking a host at higher latitudes.

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  • The effect of physical activity on serum lipids, lipoprotein, and apolipoproteins

    Shearman, J. P.; Micklewright, D.; Hardcastle, J.; Hamlin, M.; Draper, N. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The aim of this study was to measure apolipoprotein-A1 and apolipoprotein-B serum concentrations during a physical activity program. Serum apolipoprotein concentrations may be a more sensitive indicator of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk than total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins. Design: Thirty-seven sedentary, healthy adult males were randomly allocated to an exercise group (n=20) who underwent 12 weeks of aerobic physical activity or a sedentary group (n=17) who acted as non- exercising controls. Results: The exercise group increased their aerobic capacity (from 33±4 mL•kg-1•min-1 to 40±4 mL•kg-1•min-1) but the sedentary group did not. The percentage of body fat decreased in the exercise group (from 21.8% to 19.5%) but remained unchanged in the sedentary group. Serum cholesterol, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations did not change but serum triglyceride concentrations were reduced in the exercise group (from 1.8±1.3 mmol•L-1 to 1.2±0.4 mmol•L-1, p<0.05) but not in the sedentary group. Conclusion: Apolipoprotein concentrations in sedentary males are no more sensitive than other serum lipid concentrations but are appropriate for monitoring CHD risk-factor change during short-term light exercise interventions.

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  • The EU as a force to ‘Do good’: the EU’s wider influence on environmental matters

    Fini, M. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This research paper examines the capacity of the EU to exercise its influence in relation to environmental matters beyond its Member States. More specifically, this paper identifies that EU law and policy has the potential to influence environmental laws and business practices in New Zealand. Two hypotheses are put forward: first, that the EU can use its market force in such a way as to influence laws in third countries such as New Zealand - that is, relatively small countries seeking economies of scale and for whom the EU represents a valuable market. It is suggested that such influence can be observed in New Zealand through a spill-over effect in product standards for those goods exported to the EU and sold within New Zealand. Secondly, it is argued that the EU overcomes legal jurisdictional limits by relentlessly pursuing the adoption of its environmental policies and practices outside the EU through international consensus.

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  • New erythraeids (Parasitengona) from recent glacial outwash, Southern Alps, New Zealand; Callidosoma, Momorangia, Grandjeanella, and Pukakia gen. nov.; with a description of the deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki

    Clark, J. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Callidosoma susanae sp. nov., Momorangia chambersi sp. nov., Grandjeanella macfarlanei sp. nov. and Pukakia aoraki gen. nov., sp. nov., are described from recent glacial outwash in a braided river bed, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Two species previously placed in Momorangia Southcott, 1972 are removed. Neomomorangia Fain and Santiago-Blay, 1993 stat. nov. from Brazil is given generic status, and a Kenyan species is moved to Charletonia Oudemans, 1910 as Charletonia gabini (Haitlinger 2004b) comb. nov. Grandjeanella emanueli Haitlinger, 2010, Grandjeanella londaensis Haitlinger, 2011 and Callidosoma matsumuratettix Tseng et al. 1976 are left as species inquirendae. Pussardia Southcott, 1961, Harpagella Southcott, 1996 and Pukakia gen. nov. are placed in Abrolophinae, Witte, 1995. New host records are given for Callidosoma tiki Southcott, 1972 and Momorangia jacksoni Southcott, 1972. The deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki is described.

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  • Supporting New Zealand graduate midwives to stay in the profession: An evaluation of the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme

    Dixon,L; Calvert,S; Tumilty, E; Kensington, M; Gray, E; Campbell, N; Lennox, S; Pairman, S (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: the transition from undergraduate midwifery student to working as a confident midwife can be challenging for many newly qualified midwives. Supporting a smooth transition may have a positive impact on the confidence and retention of the new graduates with in the workforce. In New Zealand the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme (MFYP) was introduced in 2007 as a structured programme of support for new graduate midwives for the whole of their first year of practice.The main components of the programme include support during clinical practice, provision of a funded mentor midwife chosen by the new graduate midwife, financial assistance for education and a requirement to undertake aquality assessment and reflection process at the end of the first year. Aim: the aim of this study was to explore the retention of new graduates in midwifery practice following participation in the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme. Method: data was obtained from the register of MFYP participants between the years 2007 and 2010. This data was cross referenced with the Midwifery Council of New Zealand register and work force data for 2012. Findings: between the years 2007 and 2010 there were 441 midwives who graduated from a midwifery pre-registration education programme in New Zealand. Of these 415 participated in the MFYP programme. The majority were of New Zealand European ethnicity with 10% identifying as Māori. The mean age of participants reduced from 36.4 (SD 7.3) in 2007 to 33.4 (SD 8.1) in 2010. The overall retention rate for new graduate midwives who had participated in the MFYP programme was 86.3%, with 358 midwives still pracising in 2012. Conclusion: there is good retention of new graduate midwives within New Zealand and the MFYP programme would appear to support retention.

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  • Analysing group dynamics within the focus group

    Farnsworth, J.; Boon, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Focus groups are routinely used as a research tool in a wide variety of settings. Based on recent experience with poverty research, we argue this method needs to be problematized and further rethought. The article draws on focus group studies conducted over seven years to argue that the method routinely excludes a key area of group interaction: group dynamics. Our work underlines how these are central to shaping group participation as well as the themes, absences and forms of reporting in studies. We employ Whitaker and Lieberman’s (1964) focal conflict theory as a methodology to follow the configuration of these dynamics within a group setting. Drawing on this analytic framework, and examples from the study, we argue that an orientation to group relations is essential to expanding the method’s sensitivity as an effective research procedure.

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  • Outdoor learning in Aotearoa New Zealand: Voices past, present, and future

    Cosgriff, M.; Legge, M.; Brown, M.; Boyes, M.; Zink, R.; Irwin, D. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Many of the principles and practices that have influenced outdoor education in Aotearoa New Zealand find their genesis in the United Kingdom and North America. In recent times, many of these foundational assumptions have been called into question. This paper highlights how emerging ‘local’ voices are questioning and reframing how outdoor education is conceptualised and practiced. In large part this is due to a sense of distinctiveness borne from the bicultural foundations that underpin governance and policy-making. This paper explores how outdoor educators are developing pedagogies that acknowledge the particularities of our context, particularly the bicultural foundation of Aotearoa New Zealand. The paper highlights how social and cultural influences shape educational policy and how outdoor educators are responding, both theoretically and practically, to meet the needs of learners in an increasingly diverse society.

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  • Crafting an occupational identity: Learning the precepts of craftsmanship through apprenticeship

    Chan, S. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The term craftsmanship is associated with pre-industrial craft work with inferences to skilled artisanal manufacture of bespoke products. Apprenticeship learning is often perceived to be synonymous with learning craftsmanship. How then is the trait of craftsmanship through attainment of specific artisanal approaches conveyed and learnt through apprenticeship? This article presents and discusses processes imposed on and utilised by apprentices to attain precepts of artisanal approaches. The dispositional and skill elements of craftsmanship are proposed to be adopted through engagement with and development of craft and workplace specific approaches to contend with aspects of Pye’s (1968) conceptualisation of ‘workmanship of risk’ or the article’s proposed term of ‘artisanal approach of risk’.

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  • Applying user interface guidelines to the development of educational software for equation solving

    Robson, D.E.; Abell, W; Boustead, T. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Creating educational software requires a thorough understanding of several key areas: pedagogy, software development and user interface design. This study, which is part of a larger investigation into the impact on learning of educational software for learning equation solving, focuses on user interface design and its relationship to pedagogical principles. User interface features considered include: nature of feedback, screen layout, metaphors, instructions, buttons, and score. This paper is based on trials with real users of educational software at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology and provides practical information for computing students designing user interfaces.

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  • Engaging software engineering students with natural numbers

    Sarkar, A.; Lopez, M. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    According to Kronecker, a famous European mathematician, only natural numbers, i. e. positive integers like 1, 2, and 3… are given by God or belong to nature. All other numbers, like negative numbers, fractional numbers, irrational numbers, complex numbers, etc. , are creations of the human mind. It is important to notice that all these other numbers are created using the natural numbers. Natural numbers have very interesting patterns and those patterns are elegantly simple and hence simply beautiful. The idea of this paper is to explore different patterns that are created with natural numbers, to demystify the connection of the natural numbers with nature, and then to use them to teach important concepts of software engineering. We will take various examples, discuss the teaching methodology used to teach them, and uncover different software engineering concepts and best practices. The examples that we will use are the Fibonacci sequence and other natural number patterns, and we will connect them with software engineering concepts like loop patterns, recursion, refactoring and decomposition. For the last few years we have used this in our software engineering classes with much success, particularly in relation to student engagement and helping students to think creatively. We are confident that this type of teaching approach can be seamlessly integrated in tertiary as well as in high school software engineering curricula and has no geographical boundaries. This novel teaching approach is ready to be tested in different cultural settings. Finally, we conclude the paper with a desire for future research in cross-cultural, multi-institutional and multi-national settings.

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  • Work-life balance: What Generation Y nurses want

    Jamieson. I.; Kirk, R.; Andrew, C. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During 2009/2010, a nationwide online survey was undertaken with 358 Generation Y (Gen Y) New Zealand registered nurses to elicit their views about nursing, work, and career.1 The 358 nurses were mostly female (94%), New Zealand European (74.2%), with a mean age of 25 years. The majority (54%) had worked as a registered nurse for less than 1 year, whereas others (36%) had worked between 1 and 4 years. A minority (10%) had worked between 5 and 8 years. This article reports on a small section of the survey related to the Gen Y nurses' views about the notion of a work-life balance. Gen Ys were defined as those born between 1980 and 1994.

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  • High-intensity activity profiles of elite soccer players at different performance levels

    Bradley, P. S.; Di Mascio, M.; Peart, D.; Olsen, P.; Sheldon, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The aims of the study were to (a) determine the high-intensity activity patterns of soccer players at different performance levels and playing positions, (b) investigate temporary and end game fatigue in elite domestic and international soccer matches, and (c) quantify acceleration and maximal running speed profiles of elite soccer players. Elite domestic (n = 100) and international (n = 10) soccer players were analyzed using a multicamera computerized tracking system. No differences were found for high-intensity running distance (2,520 ± 678 vs. 2,745 ± 332 m), mean recovery time (67 ± 15 vs. 71 ± 26 seconds), or maximal running speed (7.76 ± 0.31 vs. 7.66 ± 0.34 m·s−1). The distance covered in high-intensity running irrespective of playing level was 18% lower (p < 0.05) in the last than in the first 15-minute period of the game (391 ± 117 vs. 478 ± 141 m). The decline in high-intensity running immediately after the most intense 5-minute period was similar between international (222 ± 33 vs. 109 ± 37 m or 51% decline) and elite domestic (243 ± 81 vs. 114 ± 51 m or 53% decline) players. Wide midfielders, central midfielders, fullbacks, and attackers covered a greater (p < 0.01) distance in high-intensity running than central defenders (3,243 ± 625, 2,949 ± 435, 2,806 ± 408, 2,618 ± 745 vs. 2,034 ± 284 m). Results demonstrate that high-intensity running is reduced during various periods of elite soccer matches, and high-intensity activity profiles and fatigue patterns are similar between international and elite domestic players but vary markedly between playing positions. These data provide valuable information to the fitness coach regarding the high-intensity active profile of elite soccer players that could be used to develop soccer-specific training drills.

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  • A time motion analysis of bouldering style competitive rock climbing

    White, D. J.; Olsen, P. D. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Limited research has been performed on competitive bouldering. The aim of this study was to quantify the movement dynamics of elite boulder climbers. Six climbers were filmed during a national competition consisting of 5 novel climbing problems or routes. Two problems were randomly selected and film footage was analyzed using Kandle Swinger Pro software to determine type and duration (seconds) of bouldering movements. All subjects provided consent, and the study had ethical approval. The mean ± SD were determined for number of attempts per problem, duration of attempt, time on hold, and time to reach between holds. Exercise:recovery ratios were also calculated. On average, climbers attempted a problem 3.0 ± 0.5 times, with an attempt lasting 28.9 ± 10.8 seconds and rest periods of 114 ± 31 seconds between attempts. Average time gripping holds was 7.9 ± 1.3 seconds, with approximately 0.5 ± 0.1 seconds recovery between reaching for holds. The exercise-to-recovery ratio was ∼1:4 for attempting a problem and ∼13:1 for forearm muscles during climbing. The exercise-to-recovery ratios allow sufficient time for recovery during and after a problem. However, the prolonged contraction of forearm muscles indicates the importance of strength and endurance in these muscles. Video analysis was found to be a useful tool for the quantification of movement characteristics of competitive elite boulders. Data collected could be utilized in the design of sport-specific tests and training programs. Future research could examine a larger number of athletes and problems and help develop performance tests and training interventions for bouldering.

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  • Product development: An integrative tool and activity research framework

    de Waal, A.; Knott, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The paper addresses research issues in new product development (NPD) activity, practices and tools, in particular the need to integrate the set of tools practitioners use with the praxis of how they use these tools in day-to-day activity. It draws on the strategy-as-practice literature to derive a model that integrates the concepts of NPD practices, practitioners an praxis. It then draws on a systematic review and synthesis of existing NPD literature to develop a generic multi-stage, 12-perspective organizing framework for NPD activity, and provides examples from the literature of twelve corresponding classes of NPD tools. The literature currently lacks such a framework and hence uses indivdually defined schemes, resulting in a fragmented and incomplete picture. We have designed our generic framework so that it can both integrate existing findings and stimulate research that overcomes this fragmentation. We use the framework and our model of NPD practitioners, practices and project execution to articulate a comprehensive set of research challenges in NPD took adoption and use. Our 12-perspective framework could also provide a basis for practitioners to develop or redesign NPD processes for specific situations and purposes.

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  • The ethnography of mobile worlds? Following the case of global poker

    Farnsworth, J.; Austrin, T. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article relates the current transformation of ethnographic practice to the emergence of new media technologies. It contrasts multi-sited ethnography with actor network theory’s method of following the construction of new media worlds through chains of mediators. The authors exemplify this through the extraordinary emergence of global poker and its shifting constitution across the entire spectrum of traditional and new media technologies. They argue that poker vividly illustrates how following makes sense of these emergent new worlds while at the same time it is an excellent vehicle for problematizing key issues of ethnographic practice.

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