89,479 results

  • Path dependency and the role of HR

    Plimmer, G. (2014)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Path dependency is used to assess the dynamics and evolution of workplace experiences in both the New Zealand Public Sector, and the marginalisation of the HRM function in the United Kingdom. In the New Zealand public sector a controlling management style, but weak leadership and low organisational capability came from the freedom-to-manage and accountability ethos of the new public management reforms. These current features then became entrenched through processes such as: learning effects and reward systems as a new cohort of managers rose through the ranks; managerial norms and implicit theories of human behaviours that included a disinterest in socio-technical concepts and strategic HRM. A controlling management style and weak leadership complimented other behaviours and practices, such as risk aversion, and the rise of Ministerial policy advice at the expense of other practices such as service delivery. In the case of UK HRM managers, the GFC provided an opportunity for the HRM function to escape from its traditional marginalised role. However GFC induced innovations such as the implementation of e-HR and service centres further removed the HRM function from strategic conversations and left them as contract managers. The paper ends with an outline of further planned research on how HRM can shift toward a more strategic function.

    View record details
  • How information affects attributions for ambiguous behaviours resulting from stroke

    Gallagher, Jake (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Research has shown that when people see young survivors of stroke, they often misattribute the person’s symptoms to other factors (Wainwright et al., 2013). Consequently, these stroke survivors may suffer feelings of resentment towards, and from their acquaintances. They may also struggle to obtain or retain a job. This thesis examines whether these misattributions for stroke survivors’ symptoms are affected by the information people have about the stroke survivor and the rapidity of the change in their behaviours. Experiment 1 investigated if the stroke survivor’s age (72, 32 or unstated) and the level of information (no information, implied stroke or explicit stroke) for their behaviours influenced people’s attributions. Experiment 1 showed that people attributed the behavioural changes to factors other than stroke when no additional information is present, and they attributed the behaviours to stroke when stroke was explicitly described. When stroke was implied, participants rated stroke as the best explanation but only when the target person was 72. Experiment 2 manipulated the rapidity of the stroke survivor’s behavioural changes to assess the effect on attributions. Experiment 2 showed that people attributed the behaviours to stroke more if only one week had passed, and if the target person was 72, but not when he was 32. It was concluded that young stroke survivors may need to disclose their stroke in order for others to correctly attribute their behaviours, as this could improve their rehabilitation.

    View record details
  • People's Supermarket

    Ting, James (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Public markets were once a very important place to a city. However with the growth of the city and heavy usage of traffic, big-box supermarkets start to find its way into the city. The supermarket revolution had overtaken the public markets identity in most urban cities. However, due to recent events known as the supermarket bully-boy tactics, brought an awareness to the public. In result, the public starting to turn away from these chain supermarkets and start to support the local produce. However, even with the support from the public, public markets still find hard to grow within the urban city. This thesis investigates how a hybrid building could be the solution for the public markets in the city from being evicted due to urban land development. This is investigated by incorporating the public market as part of the building’s design development. Besides incorporating the market into the building, the nature of the market as a public place needed to be retained. As the chosen site for this project is situated in an area between two high activity neighborhoods, the project’s design seeks to channel the vibrancy from the surrounding area through the building. The research had identified several public programs other than the market to be integrated into the project’s design. The aim is to design a vibrant urban public place, engaging with the people and building a sense of community within the inner city area. This design-led research thesis breaks-down the project’s complexity into three separate faces to be investigated. The first design phase introduces the overall design scheme and describes the programs relativity to the project. This phase carried on with the investigation and documentation of the form finding process through a series of physical modelling and images. This then led to the second phase of the research involving the market. This phase investigates the physical realms in public market design from a socio-spatial perspective and design principles for making farmer’s markets a public space. The investigation considers the circulation route defined by the promenade and the layout of the stalls. Diagrammatic analysis was conducted throughout these investigations. The outcome of these investigations will reflect on the latter decision for the overall design outcome. The research carried on to phase three where the final design outcome of the design is documented. The design process is generated through the combination of investigation outcomes gathered in phase one and two.

    View record details
  • Mountain bikers' attitudes towards mountain biking tourism destinations

    Moularde, Julie (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis, grounded in consumer culture theory, delves into the sociocultural dynamics involved in tourist attitude content and formation. It addresses gaps in special interest tourism, sports tourism and tourist attitudes towards destinations literatures and further knowledge of mountain biking tourism, a niche, but growing, market. Qualitative methods grounded in interpretivism were used to understand how mountain bikers purposefully traveling to mountain bike tourism destinations form attitudes towards these destinations. Twenty-five mountain bikers from Wellington who qualified as serious leisure participants and had previously travelled for the primary purpose of mountain biking were interviewed. Social influence – through social ties, interactions and subcultural involvement – plays a central role in the respondents’ travel motivations and information search process, and thus influences attitude formation, strength and content. Therefore, the respondents are grouped based on centrality of mountain biking identity and subsequent desire to align with the subculture, and differences in attitude formation processes are highlighted. The respondents hold positive attitudes towards most destinations, emphasizing the need to investigate attitude strength and degree of positivity. Four main evaluative dimensions of attitudes are detailed (adventurous, natural, social and utilitarian). It is established that attitudes towards tourism destinations are (1) a qualitative evaluation of the experience anticipated or enabled rather that a quantitative appraisal of attributes, (2) continuously adjusted from the point of naïve awareness onwards, and (3) most relevant and revealing when operationalised as holistic summary evaluations rather than interrelated components. Based on an increased understanding of attitudes towards mountain biking tourism destinations, their formation and mountain biking subculture, recommendations are drawn to better design, maintain and promote sites.

    View record details
  • Portfolio of Compositions: Systematic composition of cross-genre hybrid music

    Mayall, Jeremy Mark (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    The research focus of this PhD thesis is the development of a new technique for composing original musical compositions in which elements from different musical genres are hybridised. The innovative aspect of achieving balanced hybridity is the development of a systematic approach to selecting and synthesising or hybridising key musical elements across a range of different genres. The major component of this submission is a portfolio of nine original works with attached CD/DVD recordings. 1. Tracking Forward for viola, backing track and video 2. The Long White Cloud for chamber band and electronics 3. ‘Colorless green ideas sleep furiously’ for orchestra 4. Push for Miles for electric bass and backing track 5. Norse Suite for viola and cello 6. The Foggy Field a studio construction 7. Into the Nocturnal Sunshine for flute, viola, cello, drums and electronics 8. One Night, New Breath for taonga puoro, viola, drums and electronics 9. Sketches of an Intergalactic Earworm for piano trio and boombox The accompanying documentation clarifies, and contextualises the creation and presentation of these works; and illuminates the aesthetic underpinnings and compositional techniques developed and utilised as a part of this hybrid-genre compositional approach. The structure of the supporting exegesis is in two parts: the methodology of practice-based research, and reflective investigation. Part One (Chapters 1 and 2) is an introductory overview; an observation of the existing literature and related work, relevant creative practice in the composer’s previous work; and the compositional methodology – including an explanation of the genre matrix. Part Two (Chapters 3 to 12) analyses the use of genre, the balance of hybridity, and relevant compositional techniques utilised in the development of each individual piece.

    View record details
  • Age, growth and feeding ecology of five co-occurring fishes in southern New Zealand

    Jiang, Weimin (2002)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 340 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marine Science

    View record details
  • Pavlova and pineapple pie : mixed parentage and Samoan-Pakeha identities in New Zealand

    Keddell, Emily (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 168 leaves :ill., forms ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Community and Family Studies

    View record details
  • Foregone profit in the wine industry

    Neuninger, Rosemarie; Mather, Damien William; Duncan, Tara (2015-06-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Background and Aims: Wine awards are frequently used as extrinsic cues for wine categories. The aim of this paper is to show the forgone profit arising from failures to make optimal use of awards when positioning wine brands to consumer segments. Methods and Results: Four award statuses were tested: a well-known award, multiple awards, a fictitious award used as a control (an award without consumer trust) and, no award. Participants tasted eight wine samples: the first four without extrinsic cues; the next four used extrinsic cues with varying award status. Each sample was rated for liking, likelihood to buy and price willing to pay. Low-involvement consumers’ perceived liking and price willing to pay were improved by multiple (real gold) awards compared to high-involvement consumers. Conclusions: Trust in awards increased the price consumers were willing to pay for wine with an award. For high-involvement consumers who distrusted awards, multiple wine awards and fictitious awards negatively influenced perceived liking, likelihood to buy and price willing to pay. Significance of the Study: This is the first study to report on the combined influence of wine awards and consumers’ sensory perceptions of wine on perceived liking, likelihood to buy and price willing to pay.

    View record details
  • Copyright Payments in Eighteenth-Century Britain, 1701–1800

    Fielding, David; Rogers, Shef (2015-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • 11 week Beta-Hydroxy beta-Methylbutyric acid (HMB) supplementation: Effects on body composition and exercise performance in trained athletes.

    McIntosh, Nicholas Dean (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: Originally used in the farming industry to ‘bulk up’ cattle, interest in the leucine metabolite, beta-hydroxy beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), has been growing following a clinical trial which demonstrated significant improvements in strength and body composition in humans. Subsequent trials reaffirmed that previously untrained individuals benefitted from supplementation. However, trials involving athletes have demonstrated mixed results with short (0.05), nor was there a statistically significant difference with respect to skin fold measurements (p>0.05). Conclusion: The increase in body mass found in this study is consistent with other long term (>6 week) HMB supplementation studies. These gains in body mass may have influenced running performance as a larger mass is required to be moved. As no significant differences in body composition or strength were seen, the findings of this study suggest caution needs to be taken when supplementing with HMB as negative performance effects may occur. Therefore close attention to the type of activities required by the athlete needs to be considered prior to supplementation.

    View record details
  • Understanding the Etiology of Electoral Violence: The Case of Zimbabwe

    Fielding, David (2015-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Recent theoretical and empirical work indicates that incumbent governments are likely to attempt to influence election outcomes by violent means (rather than by bribery and fraud) when their level of popular support is relatively low. However, evidence also suggests that in some countries electoral violence can be quite easy to thwart through peaceful means. This may seem surprising when the incumbent has control over an extensive and well-equipped state security apparatus. The analysis of Zimbabwean data in this paper suggests an explanation: the incumbent prefers to avoid the direct involvement of the state security apparatus when intimidating voters (perhaps because such involvement would undermine the incumbent’s legitimacy abroad), and relies instead on informal groups with very limited organizational capacity. One consequence in Zimbabwe is that the intimidation is heavily focused in places where the incumbent is relatively popular, ceteris paribus.

    View record details
  • Does Charity Begin at Home or Overseas?

    Knowles, Stephen; Sullivan, Trudy (2015-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    We conduct a field experiment to analyse whether a representative sample of the population has a preference for giving money to an international development charity or to a charity helping families in need in the home country. The majority of participants reveal a preference for giving to the local charity, rather than the international development charity. Participants were given the option of commenting on why they chose the charity they did, and we conduct a qualitative analysis of these responses. We also analyse quantitatively whether participants’ individual characteristics are correlated with the choice of charity.

    View record details
  • The Role of Planning in Contemporary Urban India: Consequences and Lessons from the Hyderabad Metropolitan Rail: Telangana, India

    Whitworth, Joseph James (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Rapid urbanisation in India has led to its cities becoming increasingly fragmented and subject to massive congestion. Further, the agencies in control of urban development have been widely criticised in planning literature for their role in poor governance processes, corruption and public exclusion. Hyderabad, the largest city and capital of Andhra Pradesh (now Telangana), has suffered from these same issues and its residents endure increasingly poor mobility. In line with Central Government policy which advocates for metro rail as an urban transport solution, Hyderabad has entered into the world’s largest Public Private Partnership (PPP) to develop and begin implementing the Hyderabad Metro Rail (HMR). Given the scale and significance of the project, and the various stakeholders involved, the HMR provides an interesting insight into the current state of planning and urban development in India. This research addresses the implications of the planning process in Hyderabad, and how these are manifesting in the Metro Rail project. The thesis focusses on the role planning plays, and the degree to which it is used in the project. Specifically, the thesis analyses the impacts of the planning process on the wider public, and communities in the city. Further, the research addresses implications on the HMR as a result of broader failures in the planning and regulatory frameworks in the city. Based on intensive fieldwork amongst bureaucrats, planners, non-governmental organisations, academics, journalists, religious communities and business communities the thesis finds that poor planning frameworks have led to underutilisation of, and inadequacies in, the planning process. Further, it shows that the interaction between master planning and regulation falls significantly short of the necessary level for such a large project. In addition, coordination between urban local bodies is lacking, and the understanding of each agencies role in the project is minimal. This planning process has led to inadequacies in consultation with citizens, and exacerbation of impacts on low and middle class communities in the city.

    View record details
  • Water wharf : rediscovering the natural processes that support urban life

    Geary, Whitney (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    There is an urgency to find intelligent solutions for supplanting and diversifying water treatment to stop polluted water reaching our oceans. In New Zealand, soil run-off is the largest threat to our marine ecosystem and urban landscapes contribute litter, sediment, harmful chemicals, heavy metals and nutrients to the mix. Auckland City has very little infrastructure in place to treat its urban run-off, thus it was suggested as a pilot location for this project. This project envisions an environmentally friendly and aesthetically compelling urban run-off treatment facility that will enhance the development of urban communities. A proportion of the city’s stormwater pipes are intercepted and redirected to a treatment facility in the Viaduct Harbour; a location chosen for its conspicuity, its predisposition for receiving gravitational water flow, and for its established pedestrian accessibility. The process of water purification acts as a connective tissue through an environment that provokes a renewed relationship to water. As the water reaches its final stages of treatment, it becomes an interactive element in the form of fresh water streams, remediation wetlands, recreational estuarine pools and habitats for marine life. The water treatment facility supplies clean water to a freshwater habitat, with the aim of recovering whitebait populations; as well as returning purified water to the harbour. The mechanistic infrastructure of waterworks is transformed into an interactive and sensory series of purification strategies. Combined with platforms, piers, water tanks, restaurants, recreational pools and channels; water-based landscapes become organisational moments for community awareness. The proposed site is the area of Auckland City’s Viaduct Harbour intended for the extension of Halsey Wharf. It lies between the original Freemans Bay and Commercial Bay.

    View record details
  • Development and evaluation of CPT-Vs correlation for Canterbury, New Zealand soils of the shallow Christchurch and Springston formations

    McGann, C.R.; Bradley, B.A.; Cubrinovski, M.; Taylor, M.L.; Wotherspoon, L.M. (2014)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Efficiency of the New Zealand annual catch entitlement market

    Stewart, James; Leaver, Jonathan (2015-05)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Balancing catch with annual catch entitlement (ACE) is crucial both for the financial viability of fishers and for the efficient operation of the New Zealand quota management system (QMS). This study examines the information channels that are used by fishers to search for ACE availability, and notes how these channels differ between large and small fishers. Special attention is given to the viability of small independent fishers whose participation in the fishery is dependent on their acquiring ACE in the open ACE market. An ACE market survey along with extensive consultation captured the views of fishers, fish processors, and quota brokers. These sources provide valuable insights into the day-to-day operation of the ACE market. They suggest that while elements of market power are evident in the ACE market there are also characteristics of an efficient market.

    View record details
  • Field Study for Evaluating Winter Thermal Performance of Auckland School Buildings

    Su, Bin (2015-02)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Auckland has a temperate climate with comfortable warm, dry summers and mild, wet winters. An Auckland school normally does not need air conditioning for cooling during the summer and only needs heating during the winter. The Auckland school building thermal design should more focus on winter thermal performance and indoor thermal comfort for energy efficiency. This field study of testing indoor and outdoor air temperatures, relative humidity and indoor surface temperatures of three classrooms with different envelopes were carried out in the Avondale College during the winter months in 2013. According to the field study data, this study is to compare and evaluate winter thermal performance and indoor thermal conditions of school buildings with different envelopes.

    View record details
  • Worm on the Run – A versatile force-sensing platform for the study of freely moving nematodes

    Nock, V.; Alkaisi, M.M.; Wang, W.; Johari, S. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Model-specific tests on variance heterogeneity for detection of potentially interacting genetic loci

    Hothorn, L.A.; Libiger, O.; Gerhard, D. (2012)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Background: Trait variances among genotype groups at a locus are expected to differ in the presence of an interaction between this locus and another locus or environment. A simple maximum test on variance heterogeneity can thus be used to identify potentially interacting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results: We propose a multiple contrast test for variance heterogeneity that compares the mean of Levene residuals for each genotype group with their average as an alternative to a global Levene test. We applied this test to a Bogalusa Heart Study dataset to screen for potentially interacting SNPs across the whole genome that influence a number of quantitative traits. A user-friendly implementation of this method is available in the R statistical software package multcomp. Conclusions: We show that the proposed multiple contrast test of model-specific variance heterogeneity can be used to test for potential interactions between SNPs and unknown alleles, loci or covariates and provide valuable additional information compared with traditional tests. Although the test is statistically valid for severely unbalanced designs, care is needed in interpreting the results at loci with low allele frequencies.

    View record details
  • Exploring the engagement of New Zealand diagnostic radiographers with research

    Haven, Jennifer (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Research question: To what extent are New Zealand diagnostic radiographers engaged with research and why?

    View record details