82,974 results

  • Strategic planning and quality assurance in private higher education institutions in Muscat, Oman.

    Rutland, P. (2008)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Student's perceptions of effective written feedback in distance teacher education.

    Murphy, T.; Margrain, V. G.; McClew, J. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Student perceptions of support services and the influence of targeted interventions on retention in distance education.

    Nichols, M. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    To improve student retention in distance education, Simpson suggested in 2003 that institutions analyse their own retention characteristics and 'spot the leaks.' In 2008 the Centre for Distance Learning at Laidlaw College, New Zealand, employed two part-time academic support coordinators in an effort to improve student retention and success. This study compares the retention statistics for first-time student outcomes across two semesters, one without and one with specific course retention interventions. Results are benchmarked across national data. Interviews with students who were retained revealed that students frequently attribute their success to their own efforts. Student support services in distance education might therefore be perceived by its beneficiaries as a 'hygiene' factor (Herzberg, 1968, 2008) in that their presence is not generally appreciated by students. However, their absence is noticed. The similarity of this finding with Shin's institutional transactional presence (2002, 2003) is also explored.

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  • Roles, expectations and pedagogical awareness: Cultural influences in Chinese university classrooms.

    Li, M. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper, based on a study carried out by the author, reviews the disparities in role assumptions and expectations that underlie the classroom communication between Chinese learners and expatriate teachers in China. The central issue, the paper argues, is the miscommunication of teacher-student role conceptualisations and expectations. Differing role assumptions pre-date teachers' teaching methods and students' conceptions of learning. Expatriate teachers with little knowledge of the Chinese cultural and educational contexts have difficulty in interpreting their roles as teachers and fulfilling the expectations these roles entail, and therefore have difficulty in finding a 'fit' in their teaching. It is argued that pedagogy is context-dependent. Teaching methods that are recognised as successful in the country where they originate cannot achieve similar results when applied to a culturally different classroom setting that sets different social and psychological dimensions around the teacher-student relationship. It is suggested that expatriate teachers need to develop a repertoire of professional teaching communication skills, especially in language, pedagogies and culture, to enable them to (1) understand their roles as teachers in a cross-cultural setting, (2) examine their cultural values, beliefs and role concepts, (3) adapt their teaching to the needs of the students, (4) establish a cultural synergy, and (5) find a pedagogical fit in intercultural classroom communication.

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  • Stakeholder influences on assessment methodology.

    Warren, J. M. (1998)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This is a Work-in-Progress paper backgrounding a research activity currently being undertaken in New Zealand establishing the requirements for assessment from various stakeholders and comparing to educational philosophies. Part of the initial study investigates the requirements of human resource practitioners, who are registered members of the Institute of Personnel Managers (IPM), when recruiting for management positions. The study contrasts qualifications obtained as certification under the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) unit standards and degrees obtained through universities. This reinforced the tension between the need to provide education at degree level, with aims to develop autonomous decision makers, and the NZQA level 7 which assesses observable competencies in the skills to perform required managerial functions. The research attempts to identify the stakeholders in education including industry, education and training providers, professional associations, and the individual students. There are future plans to extend investigations from New Zealand into Australasian and global requirements. This paper will review earlier philosophical debates between providing education and training and examine works alerting educationalists to the danger of increasingly assessing for diplomas of specific abilities. This and the current concerns still emphasising contrasting concepts of teaching between technocratic-reductionist and professional-contextualist based philosophies will be incorporated into research and the requirements of various stakeholders will be examined. A paper has been presented at the recent ANZAM Conference [Warren, 1997] with a request for interested parties to share information and experiences of the application of competency-based standards within a qualification framework and to share experiences of other frameworks. The next stage of this research is outlined with the preparation and use of questionnaires for identified primary stakeholders.

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  • Struggling talent - Dyslexia in distance tertiary education.

    Goodwin, V. (2009)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Performance-based research fund: PBRF 2012 evaluation.

    Marfell-Jones, M. J. (2010)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Student retention and support in open and distance learning.

    Grote, Bill (2000)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    Tertiary education institutions take the issue of student retention and successful completion of courses and programmes by students very seriously. The substantial literature on this topic suggests that withdrawal and drop-out are particularly prevalent in open and distance learning. However, literature does not appear to offer any clear answers as to the causes of the problem, nor does it present any proven solutions that would reduce the incidence of withdrawal or drop-out. This study, based on a literature survey and experience gained in an open and distance learning environment, finds that much of the completion data cited in the literature has little comparative value. Hence, it is suggested that the 'problem of drop-out' in open and distance learning, relative to that in face-to-face provision, has been overstated and that the two modes of delivering tertiary education cannot be compared directly.

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  • Rate the New Zealand birds: Applying best practice pedagogy to online activities.

    Weaver, N. E.; Peters, H. L. (2009)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses a case study from a distance-learning introductory psychology course. An online activity was developed. The activity was based on recent principles of best practice and learning pedagogy including: fostering a sense of community, encouraging deep level learning, and moving toward mastery of course concepts. Students participated in a formative online task in which they rated New Zealand birds.

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  • Roles, expectations and pedagogies: Cross cultural differences and implications.

    Li, M. (2003)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The baby or the bath water? Computerised technologies, educational provision and social injustice in New Zealand.

    McNally, B. A.; Rutland, P. (2009)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Reports on an exploratory study examining the impact of e-enhanced technologies on equity of access to tertiary distance learning in New Zealand.

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  • Seeing things through different eyes.

    Sevelj, M. (2005)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The essence of technology is nothing technological

    Anon. (2005)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Student diversity in Aotearoa New Zealand: A discourse of deficit.

    Ross, C. (2009)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Nursing registration - a time to celebrate

    French, P. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Students as clients: A client-centred approach to distance learning.

    Weaver, N. E.; Peters, H. L. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Pacific cultural differences: Implications for teaching and learning.

    Miller-Helu, L. (2005)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Open educational resources NZ project.

    Dark, S.; Wyles, R. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The missing universities: Absent critics and consciences of society.

    Hornblow, D. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    With few exceptions, universities have become ineffective in their role as critics and conscience of society. Support for this contention is provided in this paper by addressing the questions: What is the evidence that universities are failing to act as critics and conscience of society? In what ways should universities continue to be the critics and conscience of society? Exemplars and examples of what has been, what is, and what might be are provided. It is posited that as a good critic, a university as a community of learners and leaders should identify and challenge assumptions, be aware of context, seek alternative ways of interpreting situations, remain sceptical about what is seen and heard, and pronounce judgement as appropriate. As a conscience, the university should take into account and articulate the moral quality of the actions and motives of both itself and society, approving the right and condemning the wrong. Also, it is argued that it is essential to have an underpinning philosophy. This could be, for example, social constructivism. Without a philosophy, there can be no conscience. Without a conscience, criticality is of little worth. From a logical perspective it is possible for an institution to be neither critic nor conscience, critic but not conscience, conscience but not critic, or critic and conscience. The point is made that the first two of the four options are unacceptable for a university; the last two apply according to the circumstances.

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  • Preparing a research proposal.

    Thompson, J. (2008)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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