88,600 results

  • What is Māori Studies?

    Reilly, Michael PJ (2008)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    This lecture was presented on 17 March 2008 by Professor Michael Reilly as part of the Humanities Open Lecture for candidates applying for the Chair position in Māori Studies at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Pacific Island women, body image and sport

    Schaaf, Michelle R (2005)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This article analyses the representation of Pacific women from an Orientalist theoretical framework. The analysis traces prominent representations of Pacific women within early colonial and Christian discourses, and dominant representations since colonisation. Included in this analysis is a discussion of the fantasy of Western men, that is, of the ‘easy’ Pacific women. One of the central arguments of this article is that the reality of the ideal Pacific female body-shape from a Pacific perspective is not only in stark contrast to the Western ideal, but is also in variance with the imagined erotic archetype of Western men. To locate this analysis within the contemporary diasporic milieu, case-studies of Pacific women in the sport of netball will be used to determine the impact of Orientalist-like representations of body-shape and erotic fantasy on Pacific women now residing in New Zealand, and to highlight the differences between the Pacific and Western body-shape ideals.

    View record details
  • Reweti Kohere's Model Village

    Paterson, Lachy (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    For subscription details and other information please go to the New Zealand Journal of History website: http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/departments/index.cfm?P=5067

    View record details
  • Polynesian rugby player's perceptions and experiences of professional rugby

    Schaaf, Matani (2003-10)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The primary purpose of the present research was to investigate the participation motivation of elite Pacific rugby players. Since the introduction of professionalism into rugby in 1995, increasingly Pacific Island players have viewed rugby as a site where they can achieve success and monetary reward within a mainstream New Zealand context. Indeed, Pacific Island players now dominate Auckland (and to a lesser extent Wellington) rugby, especially, and are more and more gaining All Black honours, to such an extent that for the All Black ‘number one’ 15 who play the South Africans in the World Cup quarter final this weekend, one-third (that is, five) of those players are of Pacific Island descent (excluding Mäori players). This year the Auckland Blues franchise won the Super 12 and for two years running the Auckland NPC side has won the national championship. Moreover, the New Zealand Warriors, who play in the Australian National Rugby League competition, is dominated by Pacific Island players. In all, this means that three of New Zealand’s currently most successful and popular sports-franchises, are heavily manned by Pacific Island players. This phenomena has, in a recent Television 3 documentary, come to be known as the ‘browning of New Zealand rugby.’ The present research, thus, stemmed from one main purpose; essentially, to find out why Pacific Island players were playing rugby or, in more scientific parlance, what was/is the participation motivation of elite Pacific Island rugby players. While there is considerable research in sport psychology on motivation, and some on motivation of elite athletes, there appears to be no research on participation motivation of elite Pacific sports people. Sport participation research has been dominated by western theories and models and have predominantly focused on North American athletes. There is no research that has incorporated a theory or model that encompasses those values that are significant to Pacific Peoples. The lack of research in this area suggests that there is little scientific knowledge, at least, about this phenomena, and that research is needed to identify what specific cultural factors exist that motivate so many Pacific Islanders to play sport. The research is, therefore, based on the assumption that different cultures have variant versions of success and failure, different values, motivations, histories, and attitudes, as opposed to a mono-cultural outlook and, thus, these factors are important to investigate in separation from other cultures. This research is important, therefore, because understanding the culture of Pacific sports people is just one of the new challenges facing coaches, sport managers, sport administrators sport psychologists, physical educators, team and personal trainers, and others who work in the sport industry, in a rapidly changing face of New Zealand sport. Indeed, because of the high-level of Pacific Island involvement in sport it is important for all sports groups in New Zealand to understand how to deal with Pacific Island players in terms of what motivates them to achieve or succeed. What is also of importance is the historical and sociological implications of the so called ‘browning of New Zealand rugby’ and so this will be a secondary issue raised within this analysis. Dissertation summary Consequently, in Chapter 1 the present research initially examines western research on sport participation motivation, finding that while there are useful distinctions such as internal and external motivation, the research is largely mono-cultural in that it fails to acknowledge the role ethnicity and culture plays in determining participation motivation. The second section of Chapter 1, thus, looks at those factors such as family, religion and education, which are central to Pacific Island culture. Chapter 2 provides an historical and sociological contextualisation of Pacific Island sport participation in New Zealand, and briefly examines stereotypes that surround Pacific athletes in relation to similar prejudice shown towards African American athletes in the United States. In Chapter 3, I describe the method employed within this research, that is, semi-structured interviews and narrative. In this analysis I outline the Pacific Island research ethics inherent to the research process. Chapter 4 provides the results of the present research. Here I briefly tell the stories provided by the three participants involved in this study. Because all the participants focused on similar themes, I am able to provide a thematic analysis of each participant under six subject-headings; personal contextualisation; family; education; religion; perceptions of professional rugby; and participation motivation. In the Discussion Chapter (Chapter 5), I conclude this Dissertation by discussing the relevance of the results to the aims of the research, pinpointing family, religion and education as the three most significant cultural factors that affect Pacific Island sport participation motivation. I also provide suggestions to coaches and significant others in the New Zealand sport industry based on these three cultural factors.

    View record details
  • Ko te waihanga me nga wehewehenga o te whaikorero: The structural system of whaikorero and its components

    Rewi, Poia (2004-06)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Prior to European colonisation, the Māori people of New Zealand used whaikōrero1 (oration) as the primary medium for expressing opinion; presenting topics for discussion; and enabling decision-making regarding all matters affecting living arrangements and work, including decisions concerning daily, monthly and annual activities critical to the safekeeping of the people. While Cleve Barlow defines whaikōrero as the “greetings expressed by elders on marae courtyards during assemblies of people,” this is an inadequate description of whaikōrero in that it does not take into account many of its functions and its vagaries. In the 21st century, whaikōrero remains a system pivotal to the operation of Māori culture yet like any system, it is affected by the changing context. This article examines systemic limitations to whaikōrero and how these are manifested duly or unduly within contemporary Māori oration practices. Through several interpretations of whaikōrero provided by a number of kaumātua (Māori elder/s) , this article will discuss the systemic structure of whaikōrero and its components, specifically regarding the system of whaikōrero that occurs during the formal rituals of encounter between tangata whenua (hosts) and manuhiri (visitors); that is, the system of whaikōrero followed by kaikōrero tangata whenua (or the oration of host speakers) and kaikōrero manuhiri (the oration of visiting speakers).

    View record details
  • Maori, European and Half-caste Children; The Destitute, the Neglected and the Orphaned : An Investigation into the Early New Zealand European Contact Period and the Care of Children 1840 - 1852

    Newman, Erica (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    This dissertation explores New Zealand society between the years of 1840 to 1852 in order to ascertain the situation of neglected, orphaned and destitute Maori children within early European settlements. Throughout this research it has become clear that there is limited information regarding Maori children within the colony and that the majority of this information relates to the children from both European and half-caste descent. My aim is to explore this period to obtain an understanding of how it was that Maori children became neglected or destitute, or at least why they were seen this way. In order to do this a wider understanding of both Maori and European societies will be investigated from the period directly prior to contact to the end of the Crown Colony period. Not only will destitution and neglect amongst Maori be examined, but also neglect and destitution within European society itself. At its conclusion, it is intended that this dissertation will provide an understanding of how destitution, neglect and orphaned children within New Zealand, up to the end of the Crown Colony period, were acknowledged and what interventions were put in place in an attempt to rectify this situation.

    View record details
  • Tā te Pūnaha Mātauranga o Aotearoa he Kaikai Haere i te Oranga Tonutanga o te Reo: The Perpetuation of Māori Language Loss in the New Zealand Education System – A Pākehā Perspective

    Naylor, Sarah (2006-02-28)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    MAOR 590 Research Report for a Masters of Indigenous Studies (MIndS)

    View record details
  • Ngā Pūrongo o ia Tari Māori: Reflections on research, teaching, and other developments in Te Tumu

    Reilly, Michael (2008)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Paper presented at Te Kāhui Kura Māori (Schools of Māori Studies Assembly) held at Te Kawa a Māui, School of Māori Studies at Victoria University of Wellington.

    View record details
  • He Kura Māori, he Kura Hāhi

    Matthews, Nathan (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Church initiated and operated Māori secondary boarding schools have existed in Aotearoa in various forms since the arrival of the missionaries in the early 19th century. Unfortunately, these schools have contributed to the colonization process, as they have in many other parts of the world, accelerating assimilation of the Indigenous people and the rapid decline of the Indigenous language, in this case, te reo Māori (Māori language). One of the Church boarding schools primary roles in Aotearoa is to act as a vehicle for the proliferation of Christian beliefs. As a result many educationalists have proposed that the “civilizing” intentions of the missionaries was to colonise Māori children. However, I propose that the amalgamation of both the Church schools and Māori communities created a hybrid of Māori culture; a Māori Catholic culture. As a result I propose that these schools, since their inception, have contributed significantly to the development of Māori society, particularly in the production of dynamic Māori leaders who have had a compelling influence on their Māori communities and Māori society and in some instances on the nation state. Therefore, this paper will examine the development of Māori leadership within the Church secondary boarding schools. It will discuss the way in which these schools have, or have not, responded to the constantly changing social and political conditions, in which they exist. The ability to respond to these changes determines the type of leadership that is produced and how effective it is. Hato Paora College, a Catholic Māori boy’s school in Feilding, will be used as an example of this type of schooling. The way in which it has attempted to adapt to meet the social, educational and cultural needs, of its students and their communities in producing effective Māori leaders will be reviewed.

    View record details
  • Tōku Haerenga

    Ngarimu-Cameron, Rokahurihia (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    In her master’s project entitled TŌKU HAERENGA, Rokahurihia Ngarimu-Cameron reveals through her writing the intrinsic weaving inheritance she has acquired, as her project engages with the translation of traditional Māori off-loom handwoven garments into a contemporary arts practice in Western loom weaving to bring the two cultures of Aotearoa together. This dissertation commences with an introduction in which the key components of the dissertation are briefly discussed and in which a selection of practices are included with which Ngarimu-Cameron’s work is aligned in various ways. The introduction is followed by a section entitled “Excursus”. This section includes Ngarimu-Cameron’s own personal background and her connections with whānau and others as well as the genesis of her practice in her own personal context – a context in which issues of resilience and cultural survival played important roles. Subsequent chapters explores Ngarimu-Cameron’s actual artistic output in five parts: 1) Korowai: Te Haraawaka and Puketeraki; 2) Rāpaki: Southern Man and Puna Taonga; 3) Kahu Kererū: Aotearoa and Otu Kapuarangi/Te Tarata; 4) Kaitaka: Whero and Manono; and 5) Plaid: Lochiel and Bonnie Prince Charlie. The body of work created by Ngarimu-Cameron as discussed in these chapters demonstrate her alignment with the current weaving renaissance in Te Ika a Māui and Te Waipounamu.

    View record details
  • Voice and the Postmodern Condition

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this article from the Junctures editorial board.

    View record details
  • Poia mai taku poi: Unearthing the knowledge of the past

    Paringatai, Karyn (2004-07)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The primary objective of this thesis is to review literature written about poi in order to construct an historical overview of poi from pre-contact Māori society until the 1920s. The mythological and Polynesian origins of poi, traditional and contemporary materials and methods used to make poi, early travellers, explorers, and settlers accounts of poiand two case studies on the use of poiin the Taranaki and Te Arawa areas will be included in this thesis. The information will be used to show the changes in poi that have occurred since Mäori and European arrival to New Zealand until the 1920s.

    View record details
  • Personality characteristics and self-reported oral health

    Ibrahim, Hadeel (2014)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Background Research has shown that a link exists between certain psychological traits and subjective (that is, self-assessed) health. Recent work in health psychology has clearly associated health perceptions with personality characteristics, most notably with the negative emotionality dimension of personality. The degree to which this personality trait influences self-reported oral health is yet to be determined. This study investigated the influence of personality on subjective oral health. People with certain personality traits (specifically negative emotionality) tend to rate their own health differently to others. Oral health is no exception to this. Those who ”view the glass as half empty” are more likely to be more distressed and unsatisfied with any given situation or state; they also tend to amplify negative experiences, and view the negative side of the world, others, and themselves. The degree to which this personality trait influences self-reported oral health is yet to be determined. In New Zealand, findings from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study suggested that personality characteristics have an effect on the way individuals perceive their oral health (Thomson et al., 2011a). Investigating the relation between personality and oral health will assist in understanding a public health burden, since substantially more dental visits could be expected from people with these characteristics. This study looked at the role of personality as a modifying factor when subjective oral health measures are being investigated. Objectives The objectives of this study were to: (1) Describe the prevalence of xerostomia and dental anxiety, and determine their influence on OHRQoL; (2) Investigate the association of personality characteristics with OHRQoL, xerostomia, and dental anxiety; (3) Test the validity of using a short personality scale (the PANAS) alongside other measures of oral health; and (4) Test the validity of a new dental anxiety measure (the IDAF-4C) in New Zealand. Methods A cross-sectional study of a representative adult New Zealand sample was undertaken. The questionnaire was mailed to 523 randomly-selected participants. The questionnaire was sent with the cover letter, information sheet, and a free-post envelope. The cover letter requested that the participant be able to read and answer the provided questionnaire and was in the target age range for the study, which was 35-54 years. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, oral and general health care, oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), xerostomia, dental anxiety, and the personality characteristics of positive and negative affect (PA and NA, respectively). A total of 253 questionnaires were completed and returned, yielding a 51.8% response rate. Results The prevalence of xerostomia was 7.8%. More than half of those with xerostomia reported one or more OHIP-14 impacts “often” or “very often”. The prevalence rates for dental anxiety were 18.6% using the DAS (cut-off point 13), and 13.0% using the IDAF-4C (cut-off point 3). The overall prevalence of 1+ OHIP-14 impacts was 24.1%, while the mean OHIP-14 score was 10.8 (SD=8.1). The highest and most prevalent subscale impacts were those pertaining to psychological discomfort. Those scoring higher on Negative Emotionality were more likely to report 1+ OHIP-14 impacts. They also had a greater risk of reporting xerostomia or dental anxiety. There was support for the validity of the IDAF-4C in its associations with not only the DAS scores, but also with the various aspects of dental visiting and self-reported oral health. Conclusion Responses to self-report measures can be influenced by particular personality traits. Therefore, it is important to consider this when using and interpreting such measures.

    View record details
  • The Dissipation of Indigeneity Through Religion

    Te Rire, Jonathan H A (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    MAOR 590 Research Report for a Masters of Indigenous Studies (MIndS) - http://www.otago.ac.nz/minds/

    View record details
  • Individual identification, population dynamics and moult of the New Zealand sea lion at Otago.

    McConkey, Shaun D (1997)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    A photographic record was kept of all New Zealand sea lions seen at seven study sites in Otago, New Zealand, throughout 1995. Seventy-nine sea lions were individually identified using distinctive features on the flippers, face and body such as rips, nicks and surface scars and estimates of age class. The most commonly used features were those found on the periphery of both the fore and hind flippers. Over 90% of individual sea lions seen were identifiable. The computer program written in this study to improve the speed and accuracy of identifying sea lions was found to vary in effectiveness depending on the experience of the researcher. Using the program experienced researchers correctly matched animals more rapidly and more frequently than inexperienced researchers. Approximately 75% of animals identified at Otago Peninsula were present for at least six months of 1995. All individuals identified in 1994 were also seen in 1995, indicating a majority of resident animals. Numbers of sea lions ashore reached a maximum during spring and autumn and a minimum during winter and summer. Low numbers during summer were related to an absence of older animals. Low numbers during winter appeared to be due to a change in haul-out behaviour. Diurnal activity was investigated via the presence and absence of one-year old male sea lions at Roaring Bay, South Otago. Arrivals and departures peaked at mid-morning and mid-afternoon, behavioural activity peaked at 1400h, and the animals showed virtually no nocturnal activity. Only three females were present at Otago Peninsula during the study period: a breeding female and her two offspring, the first pups to be born on the mainland of New Zealand in recorded history. The timing and pattern of moult was recorded for male sea lions. Younger males moulted first with two-year olds beginning in December- January. Generally moult occurred later for each successive age class. Animals older than four began moulting in March- April. The exception was the one-year old age class, which moulted at a similar time to animals five years and older, but only went through a partial moult.

    View record details
  • Mai i Aotearoa – From New Zealand: The effects of living in Australia on Māori identity

    Sullivan, Courtney (2008)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    It is estimated that one in every five people that identify as Māori were either born or is currently living in Australia. The large Māori population that currently resides in Australia has forced the question ‘Does living in Australia affect one’s Māori identity?’ to be asked and if it does how so. This dissertation begins by looking at the causes of Māori migration from New Zealand to Australia and the experiences involved in doing so. It looks at Māori integration into an Australian environment, what experiences impacted on a migrant’s identity as a Māori person and the ways in which a Māori identity is maintained whilst living in Australia. This research also aims to show how some key Māori values such as tūrangawaewae, ahikā, whānau and tikanga have been adapted to suit the Australian Māori community whilst still maintaining those core philosophies that make these concepts uniquely Māori. This dissertation uses the experiences of five people who have migrated to Australia and have been living there for over ten years. This research provides an opportunity for their journey of identity formation and maintenance to unfold.

    View record details
  • Evaluating the impact of a National Hospital Pharmaceutical Strategy in New Zealand

    Tordoff, June M (2007)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: In September 2001, in addition to their existing management of primary care pharmaceutical expenditure, PHARMAC, the New Zealand government's Pharmaceutical Management Agency, was authorized to manage pharmaceutical expenditure in public hospitals. In February 2002 PHARMAC launched a three-part Strategy, the National Hospital Pharmaceutical Strategy (NHPS), for this purpose. The Strategy focused on Price Management (PM), the Assessment of New Medicines (ANM), and promoting Quality in the Use of Medicines (QUM). Major initiatives planned were: for PM, to negotiate new, national (as opposed to current, local) contracts for frequently used pharmaceuticals; for ANM, to provide economic assessments of new hospital medicines; and for QUM, to coordinate activities in hospitals. Aims: To assess the impact of each of the three parts of the National Hospital Pharmaceutical Strategy, and assess any impact of the Strategy's new contracts on the availability of those medicines. Methods: Price Management was assessed in 2003, 2004 and 2005 using data from eleven selected hospitals to estimate savings for all 29 major hospitals, and by tracking hospital pharmaceutical expenditure from 2000 to 2006. For other aspects, cross-sectional surveys were administered to chief pharmacists at all hospitals employing a pharmacist; 30 hospitals in 2002, 29 in 2004. Surveys were undertaken in 2002 and 2004 to examine ANM and QUM activity in hospitals before and after the Strategy. Surveys were undertaken in 2004 and 2005 to examine any changes in the availability of medicines on new contracts, in hospitals. In 2005 a survey was undertaken of opinions on PHARMAC's specially-developed pharmacoeconomic (PE) assessments. Results: PM results indicated that, by 2006, savings of $7.84-13.45m per annum (6-8%) had been made on hospital pharmaceutical expenditure, and growth in inpatient pharmaceutical expenditure appeared to slow for all types of hospitals in 2003/4. ANM surveys indicated that, by 2004, hospital new medicine assessment processes, predominantly formal, became more complex, more focused on cost-effectiveness, and the use of pharmacoeconomic information increased. The PE survey indicated that PHARMAC's economic assessments of new medicines were mainly viewed favourably but were not sufficiently timely to be widely used in hospital formulary decisions. Availability surveys indicated that new contracts occasionally caused availability problems e.g. products that were "out of stock", or products considered inferior by respondents. Problems were usually resolved within weeks, but some took over a year. QUM activities showed little change between surveys, but during the period an independent organisation was formed by the District Health Boards of New Zealand, with representation from PHARMAC, to coordinate the Safe and Quality Use of Medicines in New Zealand. Conclusion: The National Hospital Pharmaceutical Strategy has been moderately successful in New Zealand. Savings of NZ$7.84-13.45m per annum were made, and growth in inpatient pharmaceutical expenditure appeared to slow in the year following the Strategy's launch. The study has indicated some important short-term effects from the Strategy, but further research is needed to ensure that favourable effects are sustained and unfavourable effects kept to a minimum. Similar, centralized, multifaceted, approaches to managing pharmaceutical expenditure may be worth considering in other countries.

    View record details
  • The Death of Koro Paka: “Traditional" Māori Patriarchy

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this article from The Contemporary Pacific editorial board.

    View record details
  • Indigenous Language Print Culture: Colonial Discourses and Indigenous Agency

    Paterson, Lachy (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    As this file is rather large it is advisable that you download the video to your computer in order to view it.

    View record details
  • The Māori All Blacks and the Decentering of the White Subject: Hyperrace, Sport and the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism

    Hokowhitu, Brendan; Scherer, Jay (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this article by Human Kinetics, the publisher of Sociology of Sport Journal.

    View record details