95,838 results

  • New Zealand and capital gains tax: A tax experts' perspective

    Cheng, Alvin; Yong, Sue (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    New Zealand is an interesting country to study capital gains tax (CGT) as it is one of the few OECD countries at present that does not have a formalised capital gains tax. Despite international and political pressures to have a CGT over the last ten years, these attempts to introduce CGT were unsuccessful. The complexity of the tax and a strong public resistance regarding introducing a new and additional tax were the main reasons for not having a comprehensive CGT. Of late, the recommendations from the 2009 Tax Working Group and the 2013 OECD Committee had resurrected the debate to introduce CGT from the Labour and Green parties. The aim of this research is to examine the views of the tax experts’ regarding introducing CGT to New Zealand. The findings showed that tax experts overall did not support CGT for various reasons. They include incurring higher tax compliance costs; difficulty in interpretation the CGT legislation; and self-interest. The current tax regime requires tax experts’ advice in converting taxable incomes to capital gains in order to minimise taxes for their clients. The self interest factor has not been examined in prior studies and this study aims to address this gap.

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  • Is a Capital Gains Tax the Answer to New Zealand's Tax Alchemy?

    Cassidy, Julie; Cheng, Alvin; Yong, Sue (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Unlike most OECD countries, including the United Kingdom and Australia, New Zealand has never implemented a realisation based capital gains tax (‘CGT’). Coupled with the fact that the New Zealand judiciary has steadfastly maintained the income/capital dichotomy, this has extended to certain taxpayers, most notably wealthier New Zealanders, the tax equivalent of alchemy. By making tax free capital gains from capital investments, such persons have truly struck gold! On 14 July 2011 the New Zealand Labour Party released its key tax policies for the then upcoming 2011 election. One of these policies included broadening the New Zealand tax base by introducing a CGT. Post the election, the Labour Party announced on 15 March 2012 that it will retain its plans for a CGT. The background to these announcements are the findings of a number of New Zealand Review Committees which have considered whether the New Zealand tax base should be so broadened by introducing a CGT. The McLeod Review 2001 Issues paper, for example, noted that CGT regimes “tend to be some of the most complex areas of tax law.” The Issues paper raised a number of design issues that lend to the complexity of a CGT, including: • identifying what constitutes an asset, noting that intangible property is particularly problematic; and • determining which methods of transferring full or partial economic ownership of an asset is a ‘realisation event’. Equally problematic is the identification of the acquisition of an asset. This paper looks at these three design features through a comparative analysis of the CGT regimes in the United Kingdom, Australia and South Africa. It concludes that there are many lessons New Zealand can learn from the CGT experiences of these three Nations.

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  • The Effects of Investor Sentiment and the Conditional Volatility in New Zealand Stock Market

    Buranavityawut, Nonthipoth (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Using New Zealand market data, this paper provides additional evidence to support recent studies that investor sentiment moves stock prices and, in turn, influences expected returns. It also adds to a number of previous studies that investor sentiment influences the market volatility, and hence the mean-variance relation. The findings in this study help confirm that investor sentiment is time-varying.

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  • The open

    Austin, Michael (2013-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in Karl Popper’s The Open Society, written during the Second World War in Christchurch. Popper also wrote another major book The Poverty of Historicism, which has been much debated. The history of architecture revolves around the notion of closure. It is concerned with shelter, protection and differentiation. A history of openness in architecture has yet to be written. It does not see origins in the forest or the primitive hut but instead in the ocean and the boat. Open architecture is not concerned with closed rooms courtyards or squares. It is instead about platforms, decks, terraces, and beaches. However in the period of global expansion, the extent of oceanic and continental geography provoked confrontation with the phenomenon of the open. Hodges, the artist on Cook’s first voyage, continued to be confounded by the aesthetic appeal of Pacific and Asian architecture which couldn't be explained by reference to the architectural canon of ancient Greece. Oceanic societies lived in a way that contradicted traditional European architecture. In the extreme case aboriginal architecture was seen as non-existent. This architecture of the new world introduced the notion of the open and provoked the introduction of the modern. The skyscraper, the suburb, the freeway are new world examples of open architecture. The negatives of openness are well known; the boredom of suburbs the waste of the freeway and the banality of the skyscraper city. However the outcomes are sometimes sublime. The architecture of openness endlessly strives for porosity, connection, or view, rather than enclosure, shelter, or containment. The positive story to be written is about the achievement of openness.

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  • Growing the Business Practitioner: The nature and purpose of legal studies for the non lawyer

    Ayling, Diana; Finlayson, Patricia (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Lyman Johnson explained the tenuous relationship between business people and the law in his paper, Corporate Law Teachers as Gatekeepers (2009). He draws upon the work of Milton Friedman explaining that ‘executives must also conform not only to the law but also to rules “embodied in ethical custom”’. Recent global corporate collapse has demonstrated that while many business practitioners complied with the law, they did not embody the ethical custom of their time. The Global Financial Crisis (GFC) has caused business people, governments and educators to consider the nature of business education and how is serves the wider community. Of particular focus is the nature and extent of ethical education in our business schools. This paper explores the current nature of business education and suggests that future graduate profiles should include statements which reflect the specific behavioural requirements of graduates’ workplaces. Students should be provided with the opportunity to experience and explore values in team learning situations, work integrated learning and significant projects. Teachers are challenged to create assessments which will measure student learning achievement and success in a broader business perspective. This will require a change in curriculum design to incorporate affective behaviours in business practice and embody an ethical framework reflecting society’s growing expectations of a socially responsible business community.

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  • An investigation of the price discovery for cross-listed stocks: Evidence from New Zealand and Australian stock markets

    Dassanayake, Wajira; Li, Xiaoming; Buhr, Klaus (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This study investigates the price discovery of selected cross-listed stocks on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) and the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX). It examines prices and exchange rates over the period 1st January 2008 to 31st December 2011 when both markets were in a bear trading phase. Using intraday data of three Australian stocks and five New Zealand stocks, we investigate the price discovery dynamics by evaluating the vector error correction mechanism (VECM), Hasbrouck’s (1995) information share (IS) and Grammig et al.’s (2005) conditional information share (CIS). Consistent with previous research, we find that the price series of the sample of crosslisted stocks on the ASX and the NZX are cointegrated. We also find that the price discovery takes place mostly on the home market for the Australian domiciled firms and for all but one of the New Zealand domiciled firms. This is true in terms of both Hasbrouck’s (1995) information share and Grammig et al.’s (2005) conditional information share. However, when we evaluate price discovery dynamics over time using the information share approach, our findings differ from those of Frijns et al. (2010). In bull market conditions they find an increasing trend in the significance of the ASX. In a bear market setting, we find the NZX growing in importance with a declining significance for the ASX for the Australian as well as New Zealand domiciled companies.

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  • Students' perceptions of the use of an e-workbook as a revision and learning reinforcement tool in accounting education

    Cheng, Alvin; Hart, Carol (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This study examines students' perceptions of the use of an online accounting eworkbook as part of the blended learning approach in financial accounting. Students in an intermediate financial accounting course were given the opportunity to use an online e-workbook with the aim of reinforcing knowledge and competencies from previous accounting courses and to develop these competencies where needed. At the end of the semester students were surveyed to determine their perceptions of the use of the e-workbook. The survey findings indicate that the majority of students found the e-workbook easy to use and all appreciated the instant feedback they received. Over 70 per cent of students rated it as highly valuable to their learning, with the experience improving their confidence and competencies, and helping them to be aware of their own strengths and weaknesses and learn from the mistakes they made. Overall the use of the e-workbook proved effective and a useful addition to the learning tools used in the course.

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  • Educating Architects: Architectural History as Intellectual History

    Mitrovic, Branko (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    All architecture schools teach architectural history. Courses in architectural history are the required parts of curricula that an architecture programme must have in order to be accredited by the Commonwealth Association of Architects or the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. Nevertheless, there is little agreement about the nature of the material that needs to be presented to the students in such courses. According to one view, young architects (unlike young art historians) should study the historical works of architecture qua architectural works: architectural history is relevant insofar as it teaches young architects how to design. According to the other view, historical works of architecture do not really have much to teach the young students; what should be taught in architectural history courses is the cultural context in which these works were produced. By studying architectural history the students should learn to conceptualise their design and ultimately, be able to present it to the general public and clients. After all, Vitruvius famously wrote that architects must know history in order to be able to convince their clients. Teaching antiquated design procedures, from this latter point of view, is of no use in modern times; teaching the students to conceptualise their design, however, helps them get commissions. The origin of this dilemma goes back to the Renaissance. The constitution of architectural history as a discipline that systematically studies historical buildings, their design and architectural procedures that led to their formation was the great achievement of Palladio’s 1570 treatise quattro libri dell’architettura. The fourth book of the treatise presented comprehensive surveys and analyses of more then twenty-­‐five Roman temples, their plans, sections and elevations carefully measured. No Renaissance publication on Roman archaeology or Roman architectural history matches the size and complexity of this collection of surveys of Roman temples—arguably, Palladio’s is in fact the most ambitious project in the history of Roman architectural archaeology. Publications by Palladio’s contemporaries Antonio Labacco and Pirro Ligurio are much smaller and less ambitious in size, whereas the archaeological section of Serlio’s treatise is by far inferior when it comes to stating the dimensions of buildings and their parts. Palladio’s emphasis on sizes and measurements presents the real birth-­‐place of modern scholarly approach to surveying archaeological remains. Whereas the fourth book of Palladio’s treatise contains only his archaeological surveys of Roman temples, in his unpublished drawings one can find extensive surveys of other Roman buildings as well. Contrary to Palladio’s approach is Vasari’s discussion of lives, activities and motivation of great architects in the Vite. What Vasari described was ultimately the cultural context in which architectural works were created; he did not engage with the design procedures that yielded certain spatial or visual properties of architectural works.

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  • A study of development on environmental responsibility accounting in China

    Hao, Gloria (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Increasing major environmental pollution incidents in China have turned public attention to corporate social responsibility and environmental accountability. Pollution has been a major problem in China. The lack of corporate environmental responsibility has not only had negative impacts on the corporate image and its sustainable development, but has also hindered the government’s stated social goals of promoting sustainable ecological development and building a “beautiful China”. This paper will briefly review the development of contemporary environmental responsibility accounting in China. It will provide an analysis of the accounting system and provide possible solutions for enhancing application of environmental accountability in China.

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  • Intentionalism, Intentionality and Reporting Beliefs

    Mitrovic, Branko (2009)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The dominant view of twentieth century analytic philosophy has been that all thinking is always in a language; that languages are vehicles of thought. In recent decades, however, the opposite view, that languages merely serve to express language-­‐independent thought-­‐contents or propositions, has been more widely accepted. The debate has a direct equivalent in the philosophy of history: when historians report the beliefs of historical figures, do they report the sentences or propositions that these historical figures believed to be true or false? In this paper I argue in favor of the latter, intentionalist, view. My arguments mostly center on the problems with translations that are likely to arise when a historian reports the beliefs of historical figures who expressed them in languages other than the one in which the historian is writing. In discussing these problems the paper presents an application of John Searle’s theory of intentionality on the philosophy of history. The debate between the view that all thinking is verbal and always in a language and the view that human beings think independently of any language (using their languages merely in order to express their thoughts) has had an extensive history in the philosophy of language for the past hundred years. It also has numerous implications for the philosophy of history, where the problem can be stated in general terms as the question of whether a historian, when reporting the beliefs of historical figures, reports the thought-­‐contents (conceived as independent of the language in which they were articulated) or the sentences that these people believed to be true or false. Among English-­‐speaking historians of philosophy, the latter view was promoted by Arthur Danto, the former by Quentin Skinner and Mark Bevir. Both positions are reflected in specific problems of history-­‐writing, such as, for instance, the question whether and how a historian can report the beliefs of historical figures who articulated them in languages different from the language in which the historian is writing. Both positions also fundamentally rely on the assumption that it is possible and legitimate to provide translations of sentences from one language to another when reporting the beliefs of historical figures; but, as we shall see, they are not on equal footing when it comes to explaining what counts as a legitimate translation. This paper explores the implications that these two views on the role of language in human thinking have for the philosophy of history. It will show that the view that all human thinking is verbal is not compatible with some fundamental and standard practices of history-­‐writing. Thus, the paper can be seen as a contribution to the debate about intentionalism in history-­‐writing. It argues in favor of the intentionalist approach by introducing new arguments derived from the philosophy of language, while at the same time proposing a formulation of the intentionalist position that relies on John Searle’s philosophical elaboration on the concept of intentionality.

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  • The Photochemistry of Organic Materials for Photonic Devices

    Middleton, Ayla Penelope (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Optically active organic chromophores have attracted much interest in recent years for their potential for use in photonic devices. Chromophores such as compound (1) have been found to have a very high second order nonlinear susceptibility ( β ) value of 650 × 10⁻³⁰esu in dimethyl formamide.¹ The performance of 1 in a polymer film is much lower than this due to the formation of aggregates which hinder the poling process necessary to ensure a noncentrosymmetric arrangement of the molecules in order to display second order nonlinear behaviour. The molecular aggregation behaviour of a set of second order nonlinear compounds based on compound 1 have been studied in this thesis. These compounds share the backbone shown in figure 1 with pendant groups added to the R₁ R₂ and R₃ positions, with the aim of finding substituent groups that can be added to the optically active merocyanine backbone that reduce the aggregation and increase the solubility of the compounds. This in turn will make them more suitable for use in photonics devices. It was found that a C₁₁H₂₃ alkyl chain added to the R₃ position made the largest contribution to decreasing aggregation. Bulky groups on the R₁ and R₂ positions also reduced aggregation. As a result compounds 5 and 8, with R₃ = C₁₁H₂₃ and bulky groups attached displayed the least aggregation of the compounds studied. ¹ See Figure 1 (pg. i): Merocyanine backbone with substituent positions marked.

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  • Stratigraphy, facies architecture and emplacement history of the c. 3.6 ka B.P. Ngatoro Formation on the eastern flanks of Egmont Volcano, western North Island, New Zealand

    Dixon, Benjamin John (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The Ngatoro Formation is an extensive volcaniclastic deposit distributed on the eastern lower flanks of Egmont Volcano, central North Island, New Zealand. Formally identified by Neall (1979) this deposit was initially attributed to an Egmont sourced water-supported mass flow event c. 3, 600 ¹⁴C years B.P. The Ngatoro Formation was subsequently described by Alloway (1989) as a single debris flow deposit closely associated with the deposition of the underlying Inglewood Tephra (c. 3,600 ¹⁴C yrs B.P) that had laterally transformed into a hyperconcentrated- to- flood flow deposit. Such water-supported mass flows have been well documented on volcanoes both within New Zealand (i.e. Mt Ruapehu) and elsewhere around the world (i.e. Mt Merapi, Central Java and Mt St Helens, Washington). This thesis comprises field mapping, stratigraphic descriptions, field and laboratory grain size and shape analysis, tephrochronology and palaeomagnetic analysis with the aim of refining the stratigraphy, facies architecture and emplacement history of the c. 3,600 ¹⁴C yrs B.P. Ngatoro Formation. This study has found that the Ngatoro Formation has a highly variable and complex emplacement history as evidenced by the rapid textural changes with increasing distance from the modern day Egmont summit. The Ngatoro Formation comprises two closely spaced mass flow events whose flow and emplacement characteristics have undergone both proximal to distal and axial to marginal transformations. On surfaces adjacent to the Manganui Valley on the deeply incised flanks of Egmont Volcano, the Ngatoro Formation is identified as overbank surge deposits whereas at the boundary of Egmont National Park it occurs as massive, pebble- to boulder-rich debris flow deposits. At intermediate to distal distances (17-23 km from the modern Egmont summit) the Ngatoro Formation occurs as a sequence of multiple coalescing dominantly sandy textured hyperconcentrated flow deposits. The lateral and longitudinal textural variability in the Ngatoro Formation reflects downstream transformation from gas-supported block-and-ash flows to water-supported debris flows, then subsequently to turbulent pebbly-sand dominated hyperconcentrated flows. Palaeomagnetic temperature estimates for the Ngatoro Formation at two sites (Vickers and Surrey Road Quarries, c. 10 km from the present day Egmont summit) indicate clast incorporation temperatures of c. 300°C and emplacement temperatures of c. 200°C. The elevated emplacement temperatures supported by the Ngatoro Formation’s coarse textured, monolithologic componentry suggest non-cohesive emplacement of block-and-ash flow debris generated by the sequential gravitational collapse of an effusive lava dome after the paroxysmal Inglewood eruptive event (c. 3,600 ¹⁴C yrs B.P.). The occurrence of a prominent intervening paleosol between these two events suggest that they are not part of the same eruptive phase but rather, the latter is a product of a previously unrecognised extended phase of the Inglewood eruptive event. This study recognises the potential for gravitational dome collapse, the generation of block-and-ash flows and their lateral transformation to water-support mass flows (debris, hyperconcentrated and stream flows) occurring in years to decades following from the main eruptive phase. This insight has implications with respect to the evaluation of post-eruptive hazards and risk.

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  • The experiences of Korean immigrants settling in New Zealand: a process of regaining control

    Kim, Hagyun

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The success of all immigrants is significant to the harmony of New Zealand society since the government’s goal is to build an inclusive society. For many Korean immigrants, however, settling in an unfamiliar environment potentially disrupts familiar routines, with deleterious effects on almost all aspects of their well-being. Despite Koreans being the fourth largest group of Asian immigrants, their experiences of settling in this country have been unheard. The purpose of this study is to listen to the voices of Korean immigrants and provide information to the receiving society that will assist with developing ways to make a Korean presence part of the cultural diversity in society. This qualitative, grounded theory study included semi-structured interviews with 25 adult Korean immigrants living in the North Island of New Zealand. Theoretical sampling was used to collect data, which were analysed using methods of constant comparative analysis, conditional matrix and memoing. Through three stages of coding, data were fractured, conceptualised, and integrated to form a substantive grounded theory which has been named; A Process of Regaining Control: A Journey of Valuing Self. Upon arrival, participants confronted circumstances that made realising the anticipated benefits of immigration difficult. They experienced a loss of control in performing previously valued activities. Language barriers and limited social networks, compounded by prejudiced social reception, were associated with their decreased involvement outside the home, leading to fewer options for acquiring knowledge necessary to function autonomously in their new environment. In response, participants worked on Regaining Control by exercising choices over what they do through opting for enacting ‘Korean Ways’ or ‘New Zealand Ways’. They initially sought a culturally familiar environment in which they engaged in activities that involved drawing on previous knowledge and skills. Continuing with accustomed activities utilising ethnic resources provided a pathway to learning about their new surroundings and thus increasing their feeling of mastery in a new country. This experience strengthened participants’ readiness to engage in activities reflective of New Zealand society. The significance of this study is that it discovers that Valuing Self is what the participants wish to accomplish, beyond the scope of mastery in a new environment. Participants continually search for a place whereby they can be accepted and valued as members of society. However, this study reveals that prejudice and discrimination towards immigrants set constraints on engagement in occupations of meaning and choices. Immigrants face socio-environmental restriction when they continue with necessary or meaningful activities, even when they have the ability to execute a particular activity. This finding makes it clear that occupation is inseparable from the societal factors in which it occurs. Further research is necessary to explore societal contexts to enrich knowledge of human occupation and how immigrants’ full participation in civic society can be promoted. Specifically, it is recommended that researchers examine what makes Korean immigrants feel valued as members of society, from the participants’ point of view, in order to assist with the development of the settlement support policy and services that best facilitates their journeys of Valuing Self in New Zealand.

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  • Reduction of fouling in falling-film evaporators by design

    Morison, K.R. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    Falling-film evaporators are widely used for the concentration of liquid foods, especially milk prior to spray drying. Given that an evaporator is a heat exchanger, it is often assumed that fouling is similar in heat exchangers and evaporators. This paper describes a number of features of falling-film evaporators that have been studied in recent years, and hence it seeks to show that attention to design detail should lead to lower rates of fouling. Typically fouling is due to poor liquid distribution to the tubes, which leads to drying of the milk films, or causes increases in viscosity to the point where flow stops. The minimum flow rates required to ensure wetting of tubes and flow into the tubes have been established but distributor holes must be correctly sized and drilled to give equal flow to all evaporator tubes. Blockage of distributor holes during operation can be avoided by installation of filters. Vapour flows from flashing or from unequal evaporation in the multiple passes of the same effect can interfere with the liquid flow from distributor plates but this can be overcome by the installation of vapour tubes in distributor plates. When correctly designed and fabricated, it is likely that falling film evaporators can operate in excess of 20 hours without excessive fouling or bacterial growth.

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  • Experimental studies on cyclic behaviour of steel base plate connections considering anchor bolts post tensioning

    Borzouie, J.; MacRae, G.; Chase, G.J.; Clifton, C. (2014)


    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper presents the experimental tests on cyclic behaviour of the base plate connections that are connected to the foundation with and without fully post tensioned anchor rods. The main aim is to evaluate these connections that are designed with available design procedures from the low damage aspect. Also, the effect of post tensioning on the seismic performance of this type of connection is presented. To characterize the base plate connection damageability, each column base was designed for a particular major inelastic deformation mode such as anchor rod yielding, yielding of the column, or column and base plate yielding. It is shown that considered joints are not able to be categorized as “a low damage”. Also, post tensioning of the base plate increases the rotational stiffness of the base, and results in more ductility of the column with low axial force

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  • Predation risk and the evolution of odours in island birds

    Thierry, Aude (2014)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    It is only recently that studies have explored the use of olfaction in birds. Birds are now known to use odour cues for navigation, and locating food. Odours produced by the birds themselves can also function in nest recognition and even mate choice. The odours of most birds stem from the preen wax produced by the uropygial or preen gland. The wax is comprised of a complex mixture of esters and volatiles, and is known to vary in some species with age, sex, season, or environmental conditions. Its function has been associated with feather maintenance, but it may also play a role in sexual selection and chemical communication. In this thesis, I used the preen gland and its preen wax to perform comparative studies on the evolution of odours between island birds and their continental relatives. I used the birds of the Oceania region as a model system, where most passerines originated from continental Australia but have colonised numerous surrounding islands such as New Zealand and New Caledonia. As islands generally lack mammalian predators, and have less parasites and less interspecific competition than continents, these differences in environmental conditions likely shaped functional differences in the preen gland and its products. I measured the size of the preen gland and collected preen wax from a variety of forest passerines in Australia, New Zealand and New Caledonia. I found that island birds have larger preen glands and therefore likely produce more preen wax than their continental relatives. I also found that the preen wax composition differed among species, with a shift to birds on islands producing disproportionately lighter and more volatile compounds. I suggest that selection favoured the gain of more volatile molecules in island birds as they were released from the constraint to camouflage their odours that is imposed by mammalian predators on continental areas. It is possible that this also allowed greater communication through olfactory channels in island birds, and such communication is enhanced through the use of more volatile compounds. To support this hypothesis I showed that the South Island robin (Petroica australis) was able to detect and react to the odour of a conspecific (odours produced by preen wax) in the absence of any visual cues. From a conservation perspective, increased volatility of the preen waxes of island birds might place them at increased risk from introduced mammalian predators that use olfaction to locate their prey. However, in both laboratory tests using Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus), a common exotic predator, and in field trials using rodent tracking tunnels, I found only limited evidence to suggest the odour of island birds places them at greater risk, and more experiments are needed to test this hypothesis. Finally, my findings of more conspicuous odours in island birds suggest new avenues of research for their conservation, including whether island species that seem especially prone to predation have preen waxes (and thus odours) that are also especially attractive to exotic mammalian predators. Conservation programmes to protect endangered island birds may even benefit from considering whether olfactory cues can be minimised as a method of reducing predation risk.

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  • Social Media and Online Activism in Kazakhstan: A New Challenge for Authoritarianism

    Beisembayeva, Dila; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Kolesova, Elena (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The internet provides new channels for citizen voices, expression of minority viewpoints, and political mobilisation. In Egypt, Russia, Syria and China, blogs, online forums, Facebook and Twitter already provide citizens with a new form of public sphere and alternative source of news and information, which are seen as a new platform for exchanging news.This research paper is drawing data from blogging sites and printed media which reported on the worst civic conflict in the post-soviet history of Kazakhstan. During the celebration of the 20th anniversary of Kazakhstan's independence, oil workers in the town of Zhanaozen clashed with the state police. This sparked an increased online activity of Kazakh bloggers and political activists. As a result of this engagement, the Kazakh officials took the county's top bloggers to the town itself in the hope of getting some positive feedback online. Consequently, many of them backed the government's assertions. This example signified both the importance of the active online Kazakh community and the government's realisation of the importance of online engagement with its citizens.What can we learn from the Zhanaozen case about the role of online social media in political transformation in Kazakhstan? What is the role of the Kazakh government in controlling the political dissent using the cyberspace? This research will contribute to a better understanding of the current political processes in Kazakhstan, and will demonstrate the relation between the increased use of online social media and the political activism in Kazakhstan

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  • Composite slab effects on beam-column subassemblies: Further development

    Chaudhari, T.; MacRae, G.A.; Bull, D.; Chase, J.G.; Hobbs, M. (2014)


    University of Canterbury Library

    Composite slab construction is gaining popularity in New Zealand. These slabs may influence the beam column joint subassemblies as they exposed to earthquake induced shaking. However several design issues with composite slabs need to be addressed so that they can be used to their full advantage in design. These relate to the ability to consider the slab effect on the beam design strength, the likely statistical variation of beam and slab under strong seismic shocks that will affect the column joint demand and the resistance of the panel zone. In this paper, the experimental test setups are described which considers slab isolation, beam overstrength, full depth slab around the column, low damage connection, and demand on the panel zone. A new concept of slab confinement using a shear key will be presented to form a force transfer mechanism to avoid failure of concrete either in crushing or spalling. Also the development of a non-prying sliding hinge joint low damage connection and its performance under composite slab is discussed. The outcome of this will be useful to develop simple design recommendations for the New Zealand steel standard.

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  • “Cool” Asia in a local context: East Asian popular culture in a New Zealand classroom

    Kolesova, Elena (2013)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    What does consumption of East Asian popular culture really mean? What does it tell us, not only about the popular culture itself, but about us as consumers of this culture? How do we understand different popular culture genres produced in a very different and unfamiliar cultural context? Do these cultural differences manifested in popular culture matter for my students? My aim was to unpack students’ reading of popular culture texts, and to identify possible links between the text and their cultural identity

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  • Intenzív osztályon ápolt betegek szoros vércukorszabályozása

    Benyo, B.; Homlok, J.; Ilyes, A.; Szabo Nemedi, N.; Shaw, G.M.; Chase, J.G. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Invited presentation, abstract made of presentation notes by organisers - Thus, the presentation IS the abstract

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