88,549 results

  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Hutt Valley DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Midcentral DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Lakes DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Taranaki (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Whanganui DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Northland (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Nelson Marlborough (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Waikato (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Waitemata DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Bay of Plenty (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • Exploring geometrical structures in high-dimensional computer vision data

    Fu, Xiping (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    In computer vision, objects such as local features, images and video sequences are often represented as high dimensional data points, although it is commonly believed that there are low dimensional geometrical structures that underline the data set. The low dimensional geometric information enables us to have a better understanding of the high dimensional data sets and is useful in solving computer vision problems. In this thesis, the geometrical structures are investigated from different perspectives according to different computer vision applications. For spectral clustering, the distribution of data points in the local region is summarised by a covariance matrix which is viewed as the Mahalanobis distance. For the action recognition problem, we extract subspace information for each action class. The query video sequence is labeled by information regarding its distance to the subspaces of the corresponding video classes. Three new algorithms are introduced for hashing-based approaches for approximate nearest neighbour (ANN) search problems, NOKMeans relaxes the orthogonal condition of the encoding functions in previous quantisation error based methods by representing data points in a new feature space; Auto-JacoBin uses a robust auto-encoder model to preserve the geometric information from the original space into the binary codes; and AGreedy assigns a score, which reflects the ability to preserve the order information in the local regions, for any set of encoding functions and an alternating greedy method is used to find a local optimal solution. The geometric information has the potential to bring better solutions for computer vision problems. As shown in our experiments, the benefits include increasing clustering accuracy, reducing the computation for recognising actions in videos and increasing retrieval performance for ANN problems.

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  • Trends and age profile of 0–24 year olds hospitalised with gastroenteritis

    Oben, Glenda; Simpson, Jean (2015-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background Hospitalisations for gastroenteritis have been increasing internationally. New Zealand rates were 6.0 per 1,000 0–14 year olds in 2006–2010. Yet hospitalisation for gastroenteritis is potentially avoidable. For example, rotavirus is one of the main causes of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of under 5 year olds. In New Zealand, rotavirus accounted for 1 in 52 children being hospitalised before they were three years. The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in the US reduced the hospitalisation rate of children. Aim To determine overall and age-specific rates of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of 0–24 year olds in New Zealand and identify the ages at greater risk. Methods A retrospective analysis of acute and semi-acute in-patient hospitalisations of 0–24 years with a primary diagnosis of gastroenteritis extracted, for the period 2000–2014, from the National Minimum Dataset. Results During 2000–2014, the gastroenteritis hospitalisation rate increased from 3.6 per 1,000 0–24 year olds (n=5,028) in 2000 to 5.3 per 1,000 (n=8,151) in 2014. The highest rates were for 0–4 year olds, and in particular those under two years of age. Non-specific gastroenteritis (45.7%), viral enteritis (32.9%), and nausea and vomiting (presumed non-infectious; 15.5%) were the predominant forms of gastroenteritis diagnosed as the reason for hospitalisation. Those aged under one year had the highest hospitalisation rates for the various forms of gastroenteritis, with the exception of rotavirus where the highest rates were for one year olds. Conclusion In New Zealand, hospitalisation rates of gastroenteritis have been increasing since 2000, particularly for 0–4 year olds. The high rates for those under two years is consistent with other research. The highest hospitalisation rates were associated with non-specific diagnoses, particularly notable within viral diagnoses, where‘other viral enteritis’ increased while the rotavirus and norovirus rates appeared stable.

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  • Masculinites, Performativity, and Subversion: A Sociological Reappraisal

    Brickell, Chris (2005)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    The study of masculinities has not escaped the influence of Judith Butler’s writings on gender, performativity, and subversion. However, this article suggests that Butler’s formulations of performativity and subversion express a lack of clarity and engender a number of problems with respect to agency, action, interaction, and social change. This article argues for reformulating performativity and subversion in a more explicitly sociological frame to render the concepts more useful for examining agency and subjectivity in the study of masculinities. The writings of Erving Goffman suggest ways to reclaim the socially constructed agency of “performance” from the mire of “performativity,” with the latter’s apparent disappearance of subjective action. This article suggests reworking subversion away from parody and resignification toward a consideration of resources for subjectivity and challenges to prevailing social structures. In this way, performativity and subversion may be set more convincingly within a sociologically informed study of masculinity.

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  • Traveling Orthodoxies?: Sexuality and Political Correctness in New Zealand

    Brickell, Chris (2004)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    In the English-speaking world during the 1990s, the mass media contained much discussion of political correctness. Cultural politics in general, and ques- tions of gender, ethnicity, and sexuality in particular, have since been bound up in debates around political correctness. However, we might understand the term political correctness not as a description of a phenomenon but as a signifier that has traveled—from nation to nation and context to context—in search of a signi- fied. Here, Said’s discussion of traveling theory informs an investigation of the ways in which political correctness appeared in the New Zealand mass media during the 1990s and was applied to debates over sexuality in particular. I sug- gest that the particularities of this process reflected a dovetailing of (1) the dif- ferential cultural positions afforded to homosexuality and heterosexuality and (2) the discursive logics informing uses of the term political correctness.

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  • Sexology, the Homo/Hetero Binary, and the Complexities of Male Sexual History

    Brickell, Chris (2006)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article re-evaluates the emphasis on the ‘homo/hetero binary’, which appears in many discussions of sexuality since the late 19th century, by exploring several key European sexological texts and their classifications of sexual desire between men. It suggests that these writers offered not so much a nascent binary between ‘homosexual’ and ‘heterosexual’ individuals, but a complex and contradictory set of sexual ontologies that encoded liminality as well as notions of innate sexual perversion. A strand of sexual fluidity lived on through the 20th century, forming a counternarrative to the notion that individuals could be assigned to either a heterosexual or a homosexual subject position. Such a rereading of important sexological writings offers us one way to complicate current assumptions about the birth and subsequent influence of ‘the homosexual’ and the prevalence of the ‘homo/hetero binary’. This impels us to more closely investigate the spaces lying between and around the poles of this binary.

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  • Prevalence of congenital anomalies typically requiring surgery in New Zealand

    Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Gardner, R. Mac (2014-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background: The indicator “congenital anomalies typically requiring surgery” (CARS) has not previously been documented for New Zealand, yet such anomalies place considerable burden on families and the health sector, for example, from lengthy stays in hospital or high fiscal costs. If treated with cost-effective surgical procedures, children with these anomalies have an improved long-term prognosis. This study describes the prevalence of CARS among total births (livebirths and fetal deaths) in New Zealand for the years 2000–2011. Methods: Information held in the National Minimum Dataset and the National Mortality Collection was used to identify cases of CARS. The selection comprised babies born live in hospital or fetal deaths with an ICD-10-AM diagnosis of: craniosynostosis, gastroschisis, omphalocele, severe congenital heart disease, digestive system malformations, or orofacial cleft. These anomalies were defined by EUROCAT (European network for the surveillance of congenital anomalies) for having a high pregnancy survival rate and a high requirement for surgery before the age of one year. Results: The birth prevalence of CARS was 4.11 per 1,000 births for 2000–2011. The most common CARS were orofacial clefts, severe congenital heart disease, and digestive malformations. The temporal trend was essentially stable for CARS, and only gastroschisis was significantly higher in 2011 than in 2000. Conclusion: The prevalence of CARS in New Zealand is comparable to rates observed for the English EUROCAT registers; however, the stable trend contrasts to the decreases seen for Europe. The requirement for paediatric surgical services is not presently monitored for New Zealand. This study highlights the continued need for these services; in particular, the increasing need for urgent post-delivery surgery for babies born with gastroschisis. This study reports CARS as diagnosed at birth, and consequently may underestimate prevalence. Extension of the indicator criteria from birth to diagnosis up to one year of age, and identification of terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly, warrant further investigation.

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  • Iconographies of 'The House' and the Political Imagination in 1940s New Zealand

    Brickell, Chris (2003)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article examines the ways in which various images of ‘the house’ were constructed with the support of the state in New Zealand in the late 1940s. The context for these constructions was a large-scale public housing scheme, the influence of international modernism, questions about the role of the architect in public cultural education, and increasing demands for housing and consumer goods following the end of the war. It is argued that these factors were condensed into particular images of the house, and such images were integral to construction of differences between the Labour Party government and the parliamentary opposition National Party. Through an examination of housing imagery and political difference it is possible to consider how house design can be understood symbolically, as integral to political debate as well as wider imaginings of social context and social change.

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  • Sex Education, Homosexuality and Social Contestation in 1970s New Zealand

    Brickell, Chris (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This essay examines the relationships between homosexuality and sex education in New Zealand during the 1970s. It argues that reading sex education debates and resources provides a useful way of exploring connections between the ontologies and politics of sexuality at that time. In particular, the advent of social movements concerned with sexual issues marked a turning point in homosexuality's appearance within formal and informal modes of sex education. During the 1970s, sex education and related debates became a key site at which various conceptualisations of homosexuality were constructed and contested. By analysing the struggles between radical and conservative perspectives, we can see how same‐sex desire came to symbolise changing sexual mores, as well as broader ideas about social order and social change.

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  • Sex Instruction and the Construction of Homosexuality in New Zealand, 1920-1965

    Brickell, Chris (2005)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Historical analysis of sex education materials, as well as of the debates that surround them, can shed light upon the construction of sexuality in particular contexts. This article examines some of these materials and debates as a window into the construction of ‘homosexuality’ and ‘the homosexual’ in mid‐twentieth century New Zealand. It is argued that ‘the homosexual’ as a category was not clearly demarcated during this period, and that ‘heterosexuality’ per se did not appear in debates over ‘sex instruction’ until the 1950s. Earlier notions of self‐control were reasserted during the post‐war moral panic over young people's sexuality, and homosexuality was sometimes regarded as a symptom of social rebellion and thus a universal potential as much as a characteristic of a fixed sexual minority. Contemporary psychology and responses to the war blurred the boundaries between ‘homosexuality’ and ‘normal’ sexuality, ensuring the ongoing instability of what has more recently been termed the ‘homo/hetero binary’.

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