82,974 results

  • Community, demagogues and the South Pacific news media

    Robie, D (2012-08-23)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    On 19 October 1995, the Governor-General of Papua New Guinea issued the terms of reference for a Constitutional Review Committee's (CRC) Subcommittee on Media Accountability: to examine 'whether changes need to be made to ensure that, while freedom of the press is maintained, owners, editors and journalists of all elements of the media are accountable and that persons aggrieved by media abuses have reasonable redress'. The CRC held a public seminar in January 1996 to explore the issues and the Media Council of Papua New Guinea held a 'freedom at the crossroads' seminar the following month. Public responses were overwhelmingly in favour of the traditional 'free' press in Papua New Guinea, as guaranteed under Section 46 of the Constitution. The report of the Subcommittee on Media Accountability to Parliament in June 1996 essentially came to the same conclusion. However, the CRC introduced three draft media laws in November which introduced a controversial system involving a Media Commission, registration of journalists, licensing of media organisations and serious penalties for transgressors. The proposed legislation was widely condemned and was eventually shelved in February 1997. A general view is that the media debate was manipulated by a small group of politicians out of self-interest. This paper examines the developments in the context of the erosion of the news media and free expression in the South Pacific generally.

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  • The Health Select Committee's inquiry into Obesity and Type ll Diabetes - examining the Nursing response

    McPherson, Brighid (2012-07-12)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Like almost every developed and developing country New Zealand is faced with an increasing health burden in respect of obesity and type ll diabetes. Physical activity and nutrition initiatives play an increasingly important role in combating the effects of obesogenic environments, yet these approaches fall outside the traditional boundaries of nursing/midwifery practice. The aim of this research was to explore how New Zealand nurses/midwives, who have an interest in the treatment of obesity and associated type ll diabetes, have embraced the importance of physical activity and nutritional interventions and/or if hidden tensions exist within their narratives. In regards to New Zealand obesity and associated type ll diabetes, initiatives have been proposed at an individual, community and population level. The 2006 New Zealand Health Select Committee (HSC) Inquiry into Obesity and Type ll Diabetes was a review of the effectiveness of current strategies and elicited a wide range of submissions. It presented an opportunity to examine nursing and midwifery beliefs on physical activity and nutritional initiatives at all of the above levels. When examining the research on obesity, two main themes emerged. One theme of the literature was from a positivist approach and discussed obesity in terms of crisis and risk with an emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The second theme emerged from the feminist and post-structuralist literature, this discussed obesity in terms of power relationships, Foucault’s ’medical gaze’, and feminine subjectivities. To fully encompass both of these themes, a mixed method approach was employed. The mixed methods approach comprised two studies: a quantitative descriptive analysis, and discursive analysis using a feminist post-structural lens. Study 1 examined submissions to the 2006 New Zealand Health Select Committee Inquiry into Obesity and Type ll Diabetes by nurses/midwives, to determine how holistic and public health orientated their opinion is to proposed nutrition and physical activity solutions to obesity and type II diabetes. Study 2 examined through discursive analysis of the same submissions; objects, subjects and power relationships that manifest the nurses/midwives constructions of obesity and nursing. The descriptive analysis of the nursing/midwifery submissions to the HSC inquiry in Study 1, demonstrated that the nursing submissions were both holistic and public health orientated in their approach. Nutritional initiatives were more widely supported than physical activity initiatives. ‘Children and youth’ were identified as most in need of obesogenic initiatives to reduce future health consequences. The nursing/midwifery submissions further believed that political initiatives would have more impact than other current health modalities. Study 2 suggested that while some of the nursing and midwifery submissions appeared to support improved nutrition and increased physical activity initiatives. Other submissions viewed diet and exercise regimes as regulatory and/or disciplining. Additional the nursing role within the particular subjectivities of the submitters was blurred with the mother’s role this was most evident when the nurse/s submissions spoke as mothers. Implications of the above findings suggest that to create transformational opportunities for vulnerable groups affected by obesity and type ll diabetes, nursing/midwifery practice must continue to lobby cohesively and at a political level. It also presents health policy makers and lobbying groups with an opportunity. If policy makers and lobbyists are genuinely interested in the promotion of physical activity and nutritional initiatives, using the health benefits for women and children as a catalyst, will result in nursing and midwifery practice being more fully engaged with such initiatives.

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  • Using ontologies to reason about the usability of interactive medical devices in multiple situations of use

    Bowen, Judy; Hinze, Annika (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Formally modelling interactive software systems and devices allows us to prove properties of correctness about such devices, and thus ensure effectiveness of their use. It also enables us to consider interaction properties such as usability and consistency between the interface and system functionality. Interactive modal devices, that have a fixed interface but whose behaviour is dependent on the mode of the device, can be similarly modelled. Such devices always behave in the same way (i.e. have the same functionality and interaction possibilities) irrespective of how, or where, they are used. However, a user’s interaction with such devices may vary according to the physical location or environment in which they are situated (we refer to this as a system’s context and usage situation). In this paper we look at a particular example of a safety-critical system, that of a modal interactive medical syringe pump, which is used in multiple situations. We consider how ontologies can be used to reason about the effects of different situations on the use of such devices.

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  • Microstructure and mechanical properties of TiAl alloys produced by rapid heating and open die forging of blended elemental powder compacts

    Su, Yongjun; Zhang, Deliang; Kong, Fantao; Chen, Yuyong (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Ti-43Al-5V-4Nb (at%) intermetallic compounds were fabricated by a rapid heating and open die forging method using blended elemental powders. The process route consisted of powder blending, compacting, rapid heating, open die forging and heat treatment. During heating there is porosity in the blended and warm compacted powder billets which still persists after the first forging. In order to remove this difficulty a two stage forging process was used. A fully lamellar structure was seen in the TiAl alloy after heat treatment. Overall, the TiAl alloy showed moderately good mechanical properties at room temperature and good mechanical properties, with reasonable strength and good ductility at high temperatures.

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  • AFOMP Policy Statement No. 4: Recommendations for continuing professional development systems for medical physicists in AFOMP countries

    Round, W. Howell; Ng, K.H.; Healy, B.; Rodriguez, L.; Thayalan, K.; Tang, F.; Fukuda, S.; Srivastava, R.; Krisanachinda, A.; Shiau, A. C.; Deng, X.; Han, Y. (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This policy statement, which is the fourth of a series of documents being prepared by the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics Committees Professional Development Committee, gives guidance on how member countries could develop a continuing professional development system for ensuring that its clinical medical physicists are up-to-date in their knowledge and practice. It is not intended to be prescriptive as there are already several CPD systems successfully operated by AFOMP member countries and elsewhere that vary considerably in scope and structure according to local culture, practice and legislation but all of which are capable of ensuring that physicists are up-to-date. It is intended to be advisory and set out options for member countries to develop their individual CPD systems.

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  • Working as a coordinator midwife in a tertiary hospital delivery suite: a phenomenological study

    Fergusson, Lindsay (2009-09-20T23:13:00Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This phenomenological study has been conducted to reveal midwives’ experiences working as coordinator/charge midwives in tertiary hospital delivery suite settings. The methodology is informed by Heidegger’s interpretive phenomenological, hermeneutic philosophy (1927/1962). Data analysis is based on van Manen’s (1990) research methodology. Five coordinator/charge midwives who work at three tertiary hospitals were interviewed. These interviews were tape recorded, transcribed and analyzed to uncover commonality of themes which revealed what it felt like ‘being’ a coordinator/charge midwife. The three themes which emerged and are discussed in the data analysis chapters are: “The performing art of leadership”, “Time as lived” and “In the face of the ‘known’ and the ‘unknown’”. The findings of this study reveal coordinators are the ‘hub’ or the ‘pivot’ at their workplace with their art and soul of midwifery at the very core of their ‘being’. They ‘know’ the unpredictability of childbirth and are regularly challenged by ‘lived time’ as they ‘leap in’ to situations and ‘leap ahead’. Their ability to facilitate teamwork and their resilience in the face, at times, of seemingly insurmountable obstacles shines through.

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  • The animal-human bond in the psychotherapy relationship: as a bridge towards enhanced relational capability

    Emmens, Joanne (2009-06-22T01:45:23Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This study reviews the use of the animal-human bond in the psychotherapy of clients who, as a result of early environmental failure have developmental deficits in their ability to form satisfying relationships, yet have been able to ‘bridge’ this gap by their attachment to an animal (or animal symbol). The concept of animal-human relationships is explored in relation to Winnicott’s (1971) theories on object use and transitional phenomena. The role of pets as attachment figures is also examined. Existing theoretical conceptualisations of animal-human bonds within psychoanalytic writing are explored. This has been a neglected area, to date. I discuss the resistance to and associated ‘cringe factor’ associated with this material, which I noted throughout the research for this dissertation. Within the psychotherapy relationship, I explore the clinical implications of working directly with understanding the client-pet relationship, and the question of whether this can be used to enhance the relational capacity and general well being of the patient. I propose that pet relationships can evoke early and regressive parts of us that are outside our full awareness. That as psychotherapy is interested in the continuing integration of different parts, as well as ways of bringing them into the psychotherapy, that working with a patient’s pet relationship can contribute significantly to the relational development and well being of the patient.

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  • Shorty

    Botur, Michael Stephen (2009-09-22T20:51:24Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The eight short stories in Shorty examine themes including racism, oppression, conflict, social perception, miscommunication, struggles over meaning, truth and ethnic identity. New Zealand is a country reinventing itself from its colonial past (Wyn 2004 p. 277); identity-making in this country is a ‘dynamic process’ (Liu et al. 2005 p.11) which generates new cultural forms and practices. The concept of culture and subculture links the aforementioned themes in Shorty.

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  • Benthic invertebrate assemblages and sediment characteristics

    Boyd, Sheree (2009-09-23T04:04:00Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Cold seep ecosystems in the deep sea are fuelled by chemosynthetic processes based on methane emission to the sediment surface from gas hydrate disassociation, methanogenesis or thermogenic processes. While cold seep ecosystems have been studied in the last three decades worldwide, little is known about New Zealand’s cold seep habitats and associated fauna. A joint German-New Zealand cruise to the Hikurangi Margin in early 2007 enabled biological and sediment sampling to investigate the biological and sedimentological relationships and variability of seeps and their faunal diversity. Multi-disciplinary approaches were employed that included Xray radiography, stratigraphic descriptions, lebensspuren traces analysis, sediment grain size analysis, determination of total organic content, carbonate content and its stable isotopic composition, and analysis of benthic invertebrate assemblages of seep habitats. The results of this study revealed three distinctive habitats and associated fauna based on the sediment characteristics and faunal type. Habitat 1 includes all sites pertaining to Omakere Ridge, a seep-related habitat comprised of layers of very poorly sorted, sandy silt, shell hash and bands of methane-derived authigenic aragonitic carbonate nodules with low total organic content (TOC). Due to the characteristics of the sediments and death assemblages of molluscs, it is inferred that Habitat 1 methane seepage is actively diffusive, waning or dormant. Habitat 2 describes sites that are either non-seep or relic and applies to those at Bear’s Paw and Kaka. Habitat 2 constituted of shell hash overlain with very poorly sandy silt, and low carbonates content and low to medium TOC. Habitat 3 describes non-seep related habitats, and includes all sites of the Wairarapa region and one reference site from Kaka also falls into this category. Sediments for Habitat 3 constituted poorly sorted silt with high TOC and low carbonate content which can be explained by their close proximity to land and converging sea currents. The mineral components of the background siliciclastic sediments for all sites studied originated in the Tertiary mudstone of the East Coast Basin. The characteristics of seep habitats of the Hikurangi Margin were comparable to that of the Northern Hemisphere modern seep counterparts, although the abundance and distributions of seep fauna were low. Results from this research have enhanced our understanding on the spatial and variability of methane fluxes and their affects on the duration of cold seep ecosystems, especially for New Zealand. However, more such studies are essential to increase our understanding of seep sediments and explain disturbance-sediment-benthic invertebrate interactions.

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  • Can a cross training program improve rugby skills in adolescent male rugby players?

    Marnewick, Michel (2009-09-30T20:16:33Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The purpose of this study was to find whether cross training could improve male adolescent rugby skills. Three major sports (soccer, basketball and wrestling) were selected to form the base of the cross training intervention program. Pre- and post-tests were performed with the entire rugby squad (24 participants) prior to and at the conclusion of the intervention program. After pre-testing, the participants were grouped into either the intervention (12) or the control group (12). Supervised cross training sessions were performed twice a week for 10 weeks as well as traditional rugby training twice a week for 10 weeks with the intervention group. The control group performed supervised conventional rugby training twice a week for 10 weeks. All participants (24) played in a rugby match once a week during the 10 week period of the study.

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  • “It’s my think”: exploring critical literacy with low level EAL students

    Harison, Rosemary (2009-10-08T02:37:38Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This study explores the use of a critical literacy approach in a class of language learners who had low levels of literacy. The particular focus was on the teacher‟s role in the process and how she could implement this approach in such a way that the students would benefit. The study records the exploration of the relevant literature, the planning and implementation of the lesson, and her reflection on the process. The students had all arrived in New Zealand as refugees. They had limited English proficiency and were enrolled on a Training Programme at the Auckland University of Technology. The aim of this programme is to help students enter gainful employment or continue with their studies. To this end great emphasis is placed on students improving their English proficiency and entering the workforce or engaging in further study. Many of the texts employed in the classroom context underline the desirability and praiseworthiness of these goals. In this study 15 students drawn from a variety of sociocultural backgrounds were asked to deconstruct a text of a type often employed in the classroom and explore their reaction to it. Two experienced observers provided feedback on the lesson and the way in which it was implemented. The students worked in groups, where possible in their first language, and answered a series of questions on the text. They were also asked to write individual texts in response to the teaching text. The researcher then conducted interviews with the students which afforded them the opportunity to expand on and clarify these responses. The study concludes that classroom exercises such as these can be meaningful and empowering particularly when students assume the roles of narrators and advisors. However such lessons need to be carefully designed and structured if students are to gain real benefit from such as approach.

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  • The shaping of decision-making in governance in the New Zealand Public Healthcare Services

    Mathias, Wanda Lee (2009-08-19T20:35:46Z)

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The study explores what shapes decision-making in governance in the New Zealand public healthcare services. It contributes to the understanding of the impact of the beliefs, perceptions and roles of the decision-makers and the tensions in public healthcare services in New Zealand. The focus was on ascertaining the characteristics of the people as individuals and as members of groups, their skills, preparation and the experience required to make governance decisions in healthcare services in New Zealand. The research analysed data from interviews with individuals in senior positions in public healthcare services in New Zealand, focus groups made up from those individuals and observations of formal District Health Board (DHB) meetings. The context for the study is the New Zealand public healthcare services within the DHB model. This study focuses on the organisational and operational aspects of governance from the socio-anthropological viewpoint of Pierre Bourdieu. Bourdieu’s methodology was chosen as it highlights the interaction of power and the management of tension between individuals and groups in different, but abutting, fields of practice. Using Bourdieu’s methodology the researcher has placed healthcare services in an economy of political power where the capital individuals and groups bring to an environment is demonstrated through their power and influence within a particular field of practice. In this study the field of practice is governance in New Zealand public healthcare services. The method involved purposive sampling of participants from three DHBs. The participants included appointed and elected members, chairmen, chief executives and senior clinicians from medical and nursing cohorts. The participants identified 22 abstracts which determined the shape of their decision-making. Through analysis and reflection these 22 determinants were organised into groups reflecting the generic principles of governance identified in the literature. The study concludes that decision-making in governance is shaped by the concepts of professional maturity, quality and safety, power and tension and fiduciary duty within the context of structure and time. The scope of governance is connected across healthcare organisations by the tension of power manifested through the capital individuals and groups bring to the interaction or field of practice. The study also found that there are two aspects to decision-making in governance which allow transferability of the concepts of governance across healthcare service organisations. Firstly, governance is decision-making in good faith with independence of mind and with the appropriate skills, diligence and care on behalf of others. Secondly, the structures of governance operationalised in audit, laws, guidelines, codes and principles support the decision-making on behalf of others. Consequently, the rules of decision-making in governance in healthcare services are the same whether the decision is being made in a clinical or corporate environment. They are enacted differently because of the different contexts. The study brings together the determinants in their concept groups into a framework in the context of structure and time. Use of the framework will enable those with governance responsibilities to shape their governance decision-making from an informed and common base which recognises the tensions in the field of healthcare services governance.

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  • Walls that speak: creative multivocality within Tangatarua

    Thyne, Debbi (2009-11-18T20:34:29Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research posits art as an encounter, an encounter between the conceptual worlds of artists and of viewers. It acclaims the respective art skills within the marae (communal meeting place) named Tangatarua at Waiariki Institute of Technology, Rotorua. Tangatarua Marae is a place of bicultural encounter. This writing includes readers in the social relations of this encounter. This is a qualitative study that uses an interpretive epistemology to examine some of the art forms of Tangatarua. My focus is on micronarratives - that is, on intimate, improvised meanings generated by some of the small artworks. These reference and affirm the symbolism of the carvings but are less visible due to their lesser scale and interstitial placement within the interior architecture. They are rendered more visible through the phenomenological detail of participant accounts as well as the positivism of a formalist critique. I posit art as a dialogical activity, inseparable from the phenomenological conditions that precede and inform it, and inseparable from the emergent meaning that is forged at its encounter. I contend that the collaborative mode of art production within Tangatarua embodies this dialogical model. I amplify some of the tangible art forms of Tangatarua by dismantling the intangible discursive forms that have impinged on them. These include aspects of the political context of the establishment of the marae, Waiariki Institute of Technology’s bicultural framework, and the pedagogy of its Art School. My writing is underpinned by a participatory paradigm acknowledging my situatedness as an artist participant within Tangatarua, a woman of Ngai Tahu descent, and art tutor at Waiariki Institute of Technology. This study similarly acknowledges the multifaceted, experiential transactions between those artists whose small collective gestures have informed and transformed the interior of Tangatarua.

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  • Talanoa: a contribution to the teaching and learning of Tongan Primary School children in New Zealand

    Latu, Makelesi (2010-06-18)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Tongan migrants migrated to New Zealand with specific purposes in mind. One purpose is for Tongan children to gain the benefits of good education that New Zealand has to offer. However, there is a growing concern for Tongan parents and New Zealand teachers and schools about the quality and impact of education Tongan children receive. The study is titled, “Talanoa: A contribution to the teaching and learning of Tongan Primary School children in New Zealand” centres on Tongan parents who are recent migrants from Tonga and have primary school children. The research focuses on alternative approach in teaching and learning pedagogies of Tongan children in New Zealand. The research approach is drawn from Tongan language and cultural practices called talanoa, a communal act of social, political and critical dialogue for a purpose. The methodology is qualitative in design, drawing extensively from Tongan language and culture to research the koloa (values) of talanoa that Tongan parents practise at home. The method of data collection employed is talanoa (critical dialogue) conducted in groups with Tongan parents to capture their perceptions, views and experiences of talanoa in their various homes. In examining this unique context, data is analysed using the Tongan concept koloa. The values of talanoa when explored from the participant’s perspective are more clearly understood. The findings of the study indicate that Tongan migrants’ home practice of talanoa offers a teaching and learning pedagogy which is valued as a best approach in teaching their children. The findings further indicate that talanoa can be extended beyond the homes and into many classroom environments.

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  • Introduction

    Barnard, Roger; Burns, Anne (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The book aims to fill the gap between conventional research methodology books and published reports of research such as are found in academic journals. While volumes on methodology may explain how and why a particular approach to data collection should be used, they tend not to give specific and detailed examples of the 'messiness' of research - what may go wrong and how to overcome the obstacles that invariably get in the way of a smooth research journey.

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  • A multi-discipline approach linking related disciplines and stakeholder communities to develop business expertise for the new technological environment

    Petrova, K.; Sinclair, R. (2010-04-12T20:55:33Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although teaching institutions are typically well behind business in adopting new technologies, an attempt is being made at the Auckland University of Technology to introduce a new field of study and a new technological environment for its delivery - a comprehensive programme in eBusiness studies. The university works very closely with its stakeholder communities particularly in identifying new programme needs to ensure a balance is achieved between technical skill and business focus. As a result of this collaboration an operational model comprising a total of eight modules was constructed with the aim of integrating the proposed eBusiness qualifications within the structure of an existing Bachelor of Business degree. This paper discusses the background and development of a module called "Electronic Transactions and Security" and the interrelationship between other modules within the eBusiness field of study. The module comprises transaction processing, transaction security and risk management and has evolved into a multi-discipline partnership between the Accounting and Finance and Information Technology business disciplines. New digital technologies - such as on-line collaboration and on-line resource sharing and exchange will be an integral part of the teaching and learning process.

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  • The imagined life of an Otaku collector, or to be a Cosplay star

    Watts, Mark Leonard (2009-10-18T20:03:21Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project explores my relationship with elements of Japanese culture. Central to the project will be the Japanese practice of cosplay (dressing in costume), otaku (geek) subculture and their influences in the worlds of Japanese manga comic books and animated films. It will focus on the importance of kawaii (cute) in Japanese culture. The artworks will explore notions of identity and the ‘space between’. I shall do this through the gathering of Japanese objects which will be fused with my own image. I shall use photography, print and digital manipulation finishing in a sculptural installation referencing pop culture and commercial display. This project will constitute 80% practical work to be presented in a final exhibition piece accompanied by 20% written exegesis.

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  • Information and communication technology for development in Samoa: exploring the interaction between the local traditions and information found on computer technology

    Sao, Faumalevai Margaret (2013-04-30)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    In 2005 telecentres were introduced in 12 rural villages of Samoa, as part of the national Information and Communication Technology (ICT) strategy for development. The aim for the telecentres is to ensure the people of Samoa can be connected locally and globally. The telecentres provide access to ICT tools in villages where many have never seen a computer before. Reports indicate that villagers take pride in their telecentre, praising the convenience of its services to the local people. However, the introduction of ICT raises some concerns, especially having access to the internet. Compared with before, local villagers now have the potential to access a vast amount of information. While we cannot discount the fact that the internet enables villagers to access information which they see as useful to their daily life actions, the question of how and to what extent this computer-mediated information may affect local traditions deserves some attention. Will local villagers use these services to access information which will help develop their communities or will the information they access compromise their cultural values? This research, adopts a qualitative approach, focuses on the interaction of three rural villages in Samoa with the telecentres. Seventeen semi-structured interviews were conducted among residents from three villages. Data was also collected by observing the context of each village lived by the villagers. Together these methods collected rich data that was later analysed in an inductive fashion. The findings provide an insight into the encounter between the global environment and the local values, customs and beliefs of Samoans. This led to the identification of five categories of impact: expanding skills and capabilities, efficient tool for document production, panopticon-surveillance, virtual connection and community networks. The one theme emerging out of these five categories was that ICT is entwined in the social fabric of the Samoan culture.

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  • The role of local food in Maldives tourism: a focus on promotion and economic development

    Amira, Fathimath (2009-10-20T01:54:34Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    In the fiercely competitive globalized tourism industry, where there is growing concern for the development of sustainable tourism, tourism stakeholders are confronted with the challenge of creating innovative product differentiation and effective marketing that will increase yield and promote sustainable tourism development. Food is a fundamental part of the tourist experience. Increasingly, local food is used in tourism as an integral part of the visitor attraction to enrich tourist experiences. Local food acts as a differentiating feature for destinations and can play an important role in increasing visitor yield, stimulating growth in other economic sectors and promoting sustainable occupations. The close relationship between local food and culture enables the promotion of cultural heritage by promoting local food. Thus, linking local food and tourism has the potential to create more sustainable tourism practices and outcomes. This study evaluates the role of local food in tourism promotion. It also focuses on economic development, exploring the potential for creating linkages between local food and tourism in the context of sustainable tourism practices. The research is based on a case study of the Republic of Maldives, a country which has gained success in the international tourism market by promoting the natural beauty of its tropical islands. Like many Small Island Developing States (SIDS), tourism is the key to the Maldives’ economic development. But a heavy reliance on imports and a large expatriate labour force cause a significant leakage of tourism revenue. Tourism has been developed under a one-island-one-resort concept. This has created tourist enclaves that limit distribution of tourism benefits among local communities. Hence, Maldives’ tourism needs ways to broaden economic linkages and increase tourism yield. Broader visitor experiences that enhance product attractiveness in ways that still conserve and protect the fragile ecosystem are also required. This research utilized content and discourse analyses and surveys in a mixed-methods approach. Content analysis of printed and web-based tourism marketing materials reveals that food is not featured prominently as a tourist attraction in the Maldives. Surveys conducted among operators and experts indicate considerable support for and the potential benefits of, linking food to tourism; these stakeholders also state that they believe there is a strong desire on the part of tourists to experience local food. A range of issues and constraints that work against linking local food and tourism are revealed; these include under-developed transportation and logistics, shortages of skilled staff, and a lack of communication between producers and tourism operators. A variety of suggestions on linking local food to tourism are presented with recommendations of potential local foods and food-related events that could be successfully integrated into the tourist experience.

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  • That’s no way to say goodbye: exit interviews and employee turnover in New Zealand hotels

    Williamson, David (2009-11-10T23:06:36Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The hospitality and tourism industry is an increasingly important part of the New Zealand economy, contributing almost nine percent of the Gross Domestic Product in 2008. One of the key concerns regarding this part of the economy is the impact of a tight labour market and intense skill shortages on its ability to maximise returns from tourists. Labour turnover rates have been extremely high in the hospitality sector over the past few years and this has contributed to the intense labour market pressures affecting this industry. Hotels have suffered particularly high turnover rates in the past few years and exit interviews have been one of the tools that Human Resource Managers used to try and gain data about employee reasons for leaving. This study looks at exit interviews as a source of data on the causes of labour turnover in two New Zealand hotel chains. The aim of this study was to analyse hotel exit interview data in order to identify significant patterns that might illuminate the causes and potential moderating factors of labour turnover in New Zealand hotels. In addition, the study aimed to analyse the processes used to gather exit interview data in order to evaluate the efficacy of exit interviews and see if any practical recommendations could be made regarding the use of exit interviews to address labour turnover. A qualititative, triangulated research methodology was applied in order to analyse the data generated from over 4500 exit interviews, from 17 hotels, in two New Zealand hotel brands. The interviews cover six years of exit interview gathering. In addition, in depth semi-structured interviews with six hotel Human Resource Managers were used to gain insight into the practice and perceptions around exit interviews. The study found that despite considerable application of time and resources, hotels gain very little benefit from the exit interview process. Several issues are identified as bringing the efficacy of exit interviews into question, including power imbalance between interviewees and interviewers, language and cultural concerns, and the impact of psychological contract breaches on the employment relationship. In addition, the study found that even when opportunities for organisational improvement did arise from exit interviews, little or no action was taken by the hotels in question. The study concludes that there is insufficient benefit to the hotels given the costs of exit interviews and suggests that other forms of employee feedback, such as engagement surveys may be more efficacious in addressing labour turnover.

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