91,089 results

  • Middle managers : managing change in a Lao higher education institution

    Sackdanouvong, Kertmee (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Academic middle managers in Lao higher education have a pivotal role in managing changes and academic curricula. They have become a significant force in the current context of Lao higher education since their expertise and knowledge are utilised to effectively manage change, yet they still have many difficulties and challenges as universities and higher education institutions in Laos have undergone significant changes. This qualitative research investigated the perspectives of senior managers and academic middle managers in relation to the academic middle manager’s role in managing change, the perspectives of successful change, and the challenges that the academic middle manager faces when managing change. Two data gathering methods were employed: a semi-structured interview with five senior managers, and an open-ended questionnaire with forty academic middle managers from five faculties of a Lao higher education institution. The findings of this study revealed three key roles of academic middle managers: taking initiatives to lead change, interpreting strategies, policies and plans into practice, and representing the faculty senior management. The research also showed that successful change management was associated with creating a clear vision, planning, leading, monitoring and evaluating the practice of change regularly, change knowledge and personal capabilities, and communication skills. The research also indicated two major challenges faced by academic middle managers: carrying out the role effectively to interpret strategies and policies into practice, and changing the culture. This research highlights the need for the Lao Ministry of Education, higher education institutions, and senior faculty managers to acknowledge the contribution of academic middle managers as agents of change and to provide them with adequate support. Also, a sound change model is needed for effectively guiding the leadership and management of change in Lao higher education institutions.

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  • Nature and her simple truths

    Gregory, George Christopher (2011)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    How could the 'architect' approach the issue of uniting the site and wider landscape with the imposition of the man made form? ... Buildings that appear to be intrinsically part of their place have an integration which lends them such power that they seem to enhance the human awareness of connectedness to, and understanding of, the world. They even seem to honour human purposes and take humans to levels of profundity that verge upon the sacred. This state of resolution between building and site, once perceived, is so deeply desired that it forms a paramount and overriding design intention. Therefore the purpose of profound architecture is to find its place; it must make us see the inherent character of this place in a new light. Design site: Whangawahia Bay, Great Barrier Island, New Zealand.

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  • Conditional grounds : architecture for the Whangamarino wetland

    Holehouse, Michael (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The connection architecture can make with the ground is rarely given the attention it deserves. It is the first junction that architecture is required to make. The research project selected a diverse and challenging site in order to bring this fundamental connection back into focus. The Whangamarino wetland has currently no means of public access. In the wetland, the ground, the water, and the vegetation are inextricable linked. These three factors combine in different degrees and create a variety of unique conditions for architecture to connect to. It was found that the connection to the ground could be enriched through stereotomic and tectonic expression coupled with the use of datum to emphasise variations in water and vegetation levels. The resulting architectural interventions demonstrate that by engaging with the diverse ground conditions, architecture’s connection to the ground can enhance the visitor’s experience of the Whangamarino wetland. ... The scope of this project is to design an access facility for the Whangamarino wetland. This facility may include a visitor centre, walkways, bridges and viewing structures. The emphasis of the project will be to explore the way in which these facilities will be connected to the ground.

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  • Beyond separatism : how can an understanding of domesticated animal behaviour enhance current models of subdivision design to privilege conservation and biodiversity goals in human settlements?

    Leather, Joanne Margaret (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Traditional approaches to subdivision demonstrate a tendency towards an erasure of nature in favor of human habitation and therefore a trend to separatism. New Zealand's landscape reflects the historical clearing of bush for towns and agriculture generating separation from nature, the result 'separateness", a loss of connectivity in particular to rural and remnant natural landscapes for urban dwellers. The current phase of subdivision design for exampled, Integrated Catchment Management as exercised by D. J. Scott and Associates uses nature as infrastructure e.g. waterways, erosion control planting, recreation corridors. This research investigates the potential for further integration of farming, pet ownership and habitat conservation design into subdivisions and national open spaces linking New Zealanders to their heritage. This thesis uses research by design to investigate the complexity of how the domesticated species we surround ourselves with and human activities such as settlement and production maybe be viewed as a means to achieve an even richer style of subdivision design than existing models upholding a wider goal of sustainability / biodiversity enhancement and not a barrier to it. The contribution I hope to make as a designer (and veterinarian) is to look at the possibility of how an awareness of selected domesticated animal behaviours may add to the current subdivision design methodologies with the aim off generating an economically viable 'Mainland Island Settlement Park'. One, which endeavours to maximize ecological connections, provide safe habitats for threatened species with a ru-urban site that integrates the different aspects of human activities within ru-urban landscapes creating new opportunities for intensified rural settlement and community growth, to achieve sustainability and to add value and moral legitimacy - protecting and promoting the rural landscape providing new opportunities for tourism, recreation, education, rural production and settlement with global and national consumers.

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  • Open school : learning and exchange in the city

    Galvez Soliva, Mary Joselle (2011)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project investigates the design of an urban school programmed using alternative modes of learning relevant to a knowledge driven society. The knowledge society, or knowledge economy, is a mode of thinking which is redefining established notions of knowledge. A knowledge driven society perceives knowledge as a significant resource and a key component in innovation. This understanding is important to education for it stimulates creativity and ingenuity. The shift sees knowledge being understood as a process. Within the discipline of education, “a knowledge society is really a learning society”. Learning becomes flexible and informal, where multiple disciplines overlap. Learning sees itself expand outside the boundaries of the school. Technology is supplementary both to the knowledge economy and learning. It facilitates the ease of participation through easy information access and distribution. In education, it allows multimedia modes of learning supplementing traditional forms of communication. It questions the role of the classroom as the sole place for learning. These issues have implications to the design of schools. Economy and efficiency have been the driving forces in the design of public schools, where the built form correlates with the industrial age mode of education still imbedded within the public system. The combination of shifting paradigms in education and ways of learning within the urban context provides the foundation from which to conduct this design project.OBJECTIVES I. Discover, how a school should be architecturally defined and programmed according to changing defintions of knowledge and use of digital technology. II. Construct a design system where a school becomes a place of exchange utilizing the potentials of the urban fabric. SITE: The site chosen for the school is a defunct filling station in Grafton, Auckland bounded by the Auckland Domain on the north side of the site, in its heart is the Grafton Train Station. This urban setting will directly influence the programme. The programme will be composed of the school, a public library, retail facilities and the train station. The school programme will house 250 students, age 14 -18, and 20 – 30 staff. The public library and the train station are important elements in allowing this school to be socially and spatially permeable by the community, facilitating exchange.

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  • Dromoscopic adaptation : realising the potential of spaghetti junction and obsolescent infrastructure

    Manning, Scott (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The significance of the proposal stems from changes being made in contemporary society. Ideals of densification and the attempt to provide working and living facilities within walking distance of each other minimize the required use of the car. This coupled with increasing oil prices currently being experienced after reaching peak oil in 2006, brings into question the feasibility of the personal car of the future. Living in neighborhoods which are connected by reliable, predictable and sustainable public transportation is the desired and potentially required solution for the future. With this in mind, the redundant Nelson Street off ramp could foreshadow the future of our car biased infrastructures. What is to become of the large structures that dominate our modern cities? Are they to be left to become a ruin, a glorified modern day aqueduct or a brutal reminder of past decisions? Is there more potential for future use of these infrastrucural monoliths? This project seeks to explore one potential option for the adaptations that can be made for the benefit of a car-biased city.

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  • Identity and architecture : the impact of urban intensification

    Howdle, Natasha (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project investigates the impact urban intensification in Auckland suburbs has on the social aspects of identity (the individual and the community). The scheme, a medium or higher density infill housing development for a non-profit housing association, is proposed on an undeveloped site in Auckland. The project tests the principles of increasing densities to satisfy both the sustainability objectives of current planning policies and the social and spatial needs of residents. It also studies ways of using vacant sites that have not been previously developed for urban use. These sites are left undeveloped because they have been deemed too difficult for the standard low-density suburban housing model that has always been preferred in Auckland. Factors such as slope, aspect, access and drainage are the main reasons for these sites being left unoccupied. Policies to intensify Auckland continue to dominate strategic planning therefore; these undeveloped sites become significant and attract attention because of their ability to increase the density of an area without interfering with the current living conditions of built suburbia. Where they occur within walking distance of a town centre and good public transport nodes a design-led approach to suitability for housing use provides the basis for this study.SITE: Pleasant Road in the suburb of Glen Eden.

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  • Empathetic kinaesthesia : sport within architecture

    Eisenhauer, Jürgen (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Auckland would be an obvious choice as a host city within New Zealand. It has previously hosted two Commonwealth Games, the Asia Pacific Games, the World Masters Games, the 2012 Triathlon World Championships as well as both of the semifinals, the bronze final and final of the 2011 IRB Rugby World Cup. Auckland recently looked at putting in a bid to host the 2018 Commonwealth Games and former mayor, John Banks even hinted at possibly bidding to host the 2020 Olympic Games. The other aspect this Olympic stadium could provide for Auckland is an iconic architectural landmark as well as stepping beyond simply being a building, but also integrating itself into the surrounding context and community, creating job opportunities and being a much needed new high performance venue in Auckland.The project is clearly divided into two parts; the first (chapters 1-2) dealing with the site and masterplanning of the Auckland Olympic Park, whilst the latter (chapters 3-5) deals with a particular chosen facility, the Auckland Olympic Stadium. How [willl] the new facilities will be used after the Games. Legacy is an ever expanding term associated with large scale sporting events. SITE: Manager Inlet.

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  • Urbane graffiti

    Watson, Kirsty (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project will explore a site in need of urban revitalisation, analyse the existing buildings on the site, and design an architectural strategy for the regeneration of the area. I will explore architecture that occupies, exists and builds upon existing urban conditions, but also look at new strategies that may replace the existing. The project will look at the multitude of options for the common urban problem of what to do with dilapidated, run-down buildings in the city centre. SITE: Yates Building, is, infamously, Auckland’s most graffitti’d building. This site is in a prime location, within minutes of Britomart (the Auckland central train station), and on Albert Street which runs parallel to Queen Street, Auckland CBD’s main commercial road. There are actually three buildings on the site:The Yates Building (part of which is known as Challenge House), the Food Alley building and Link House.

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  • Contemporary echocardiography in non-ST elevation myocardial Infarction

    Smith, Nicola Jayne (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    BACKGROUND: Non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) has only recently been included in the definition of acute myocardial infarction and literature is limited regarding the usefulness of echocardiography as a diagnostic tool in this setting. Since analysis of regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMAs) by standard echocardiography is highly reliant on observer experience, advanced modalities are suggested as possible complementary methods to perform quantitative RWMA assessment and observe underlying coronary artery disease (CAD); however, their utility has not been widely tested in a clinical setting. AIM: The aim of this thesis was to explore the usefulness of echocardiography for determining systolic and diastolic dysfunction post NSTEMI and compare the results to coronary angiography. The viability and accuracy of utilising the advanced echocardiography modalities of tissue velocity imaging and speckle tracking derived velocity, strain and strain rate as novel indices for quantifying regional dysfunction and determining underlying CAD was also explored. CONCLUSIONS: The role of echocardiography in NSTEMI provides important information concerning systolic and diastolic dysfunction. We found excellent correlation between coronary angiography, clinical parameters and echocardiographic parameters. In general, the advanced imaging modalities correlated with both the presence of regional dysfunction and underlying CAD, however, there was overlap and variation within the data sets. With further technical and clinical refinement, these modalities may be useful supplementary tests to quantitatively evaluate RWMAs and to determine underlying CAD.

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  • Ecology via architecture : an answer to our future cities

    Thomas, Duncan (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This thesis project is an architectural response to constructing a more ecologically achievable way of living in our growing urban environments. Global issues such as climate and economic changes and unsustainable resources usage are becoming more a part in todays society. These issues are only going to intensify over the coming years. Society must act now in and response to this. We as architects should become more aware of what is around the corner... The problem with modern urban dwelling, I believe, is the lack of green space (both public and private), which makes the urban centre lose its sense of community and social awareness. To combat this, I propose creating a sustainable hub within the heart of Auckland on the western fringe of the Central Business District (CBD). This will create a greater sense of community for the urban city users. .. The site is situated on the western edge of Auckland CBD, in the newly zoned Victoria Quarter block. Currently the site houses the old Auckland City Council’s Works Depot as well as a large number of rental car parks. The Works Depot sheds were designed and built by Ewen Wainscott and opened in 1968.

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  • Decoherence : Mount Albert Science Center

    Storrie, Alastair (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Philosophy, Science and Architecture have ever been engaged in serious interdisciplinary discourse. In various and profound ways, each discipline derives insight from the others. The discoveries and insights held between this triumvirate provide today's *developed* world an unprecedented degree of productive and creative potential, comfort and recreational pleasure. But as each discipline necessarily becomes increasingly specialised the ability for discourse becomes imperilled, for the ability to apprehend the internal language of each becomes correspondingly more difficult. The confusion described in the mythical Tower of Babel comes to be understood as an emergent property of humanity's acquisition of insight. To ensure the continuation of the discourse therefore, effort must be made to facilitate it. SITE: Mount Albert Science Center.

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  • Communicating an organisation’s identity to library users : a case study within the New Zealand community library sector

    Owens, Coralie (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore the identity of a community library from the perspectives of the organisation’s management and customers, and then to determine whether the perceived identity aligns with the projected identity of the organisation. Qualitative methodology was utilised by means of a case study on a New Zealand community library organisation with seven branches. Interviews and focus groups were conducted to gather data over the course of six weeks. Semi-structured interviews occurred with management personnel while three focus groups were conducted with library customers. A secondary source of documentary data collection was also used for the triangulation of data collection methods in order to increase credibility. Key findings, grouped around three themes of image and identity, customer service and technology, have indicated that the internal organisational identity as communicated by managers differed to various extents between branches, depending on external perceptions held by respondents. Greater organisational identity alignment appeared to exist in branches where individuals felt there was a higher degree of social inclusion with their community library. This research, supported by the literature, found that the organisation’s identity has sustained significant changes as society has changed, from its inception by early settler volunteers as an unstructured community run entity, to the present centralised local governance model which provides services for citizens to meet their social, cultural and information needs. There appears to be a disjuncture between organisational level and branch level. However, the ethos to help build stronger communities has endured. Participants view branches as comfortable community spaces that provide excellent customer service and resources. However, the findings also revealed that participants were often unaware or uninspired by the array of services offered, for instance, the Maori culture book section, electronic resources and guest speaker events. Participants were mystified as to how they could use many of the library’s online resources. The accessibility of the electronic library interface was considered important, but as the library environment becomes more sophisticated and offers more services, it is evident that communities want to preserve face-to-face customer service in future community library models.Another key finding that has emerged from this research is the effect of technology. As the library organisation has become technologically advanced, especially in the virtual sense, more focus needs to be placed on educating the customer in order to keep abreast of technology. Participants indicated that the basic role of the library as a provider of information and a public space has remained constant; however, transformations are occurring such as the change in form of the traditional book to the electronic book. Therefore, to avoid becoming obsolete in the future, the library must change along with customer needs.

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  • Created for a purpose : implementation and evaluation of the Lighthouse Programme. Student talent identification and exploration as a means of increasing collaboration and lifting academic self-concept

    Harnell, Teri Ann (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    ‘Lighthouse’ is a strengths-based programme aimed at students with 9 – 13 year old cognitive learning levels which, through the use of a Lighthouse metaphor representing self, leads students through a nine week journey of discovery, designed to expand thinking around their natural talents, aid the development of those talents into strengths and collaboratively encourage enhancement of student academic self-concept within a classroom environment. The programme applies [George] Gallup’s philosophy within its creative methodology as means of developing student strengths and improving academic self-concept. The traditional paradigm of perceiving the process of teaching as the imparting of knowledge from one more knowledgeable source to another has been challenged. The research undertaken demonstrates the power of student self-talk around talent and how raising student voice from its obscure status to its utilisation in building collaborative classroom relationships, benefits students, teachers and the learning process. As results of this evaluative research indicate, connections between student perceptions of talent and the formation of academic self-concept are strong and highlight the need to reject single minded focus on subject performance in favour of the Lighthouse Programme’s balanced approach where talents are used as a potential pathway to address behavioural and academic standards required for development of healthy, happy, collaborative and resilient young people.

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  • Learning and teaching experiences in an offshore programme : challenges and strategies

    Wu-Ross, Li Jun (Ann) (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This study examines the experiences of learners and lecturers undertaking a computing degree delivered offshore by lecturers from a New Zealand university to students in Vietnam in 2012. It focuses on the learning and teaching issues encountered and the strategies adopted by students and lecturers taking part in the course. The research methodology was an interpretivist case study and involved semi-structured interviews with New Zealand lecturers and reflective journals blogs recorded by the Vietnamese students over a period of six weeks between the end of May through to early July 2012. Thematic analysis was used to synthesize important aspects of the intercultural context. The findings highlight difficulties with the English language, teaching approaches and problems associated with distance learning, communication and cultural issues for both students and lecturers. Students and lecturers noted significant differences in teaching and learning approaches in the universities between Vietnam and New Zealand. English language skills presented communication challenges for students and this impacted negatively on their overall satisfaction of the learning experience. Students and lecturers described distance teaching and learning as requiring more effort than their face-to-face learning and teaching. Lecturers noted that Vietnamese students enjoyed socialising with their lecturers and preferred a closer working relationship than their Western counterparts. Vietnamese students enjoyed group learning situations and preferred in-direct communication. To address the learning and teaching challenges students and lecturers adopted a range of strategies which included practising English with lecturers, online English activities and reading widely. Teachers also attempted to use a range of technologies such as video conferencing, wikis and blogs to assist students. Some also attempted to modify their course delivery methods and to utilise the Vietnamese teaching assistants to support student learning. The findings of this research demonstrate key issues facing teachers and learners undertaking degree level courses in offshore contexts. The communication and language issues facing both lecturers and students have implications for the delivery of courses to students in diverse cultural contexts. This study establishes a first step in understanding the learning and teaching experiences of Vietnamese students and their New Zealand lecturers in the offshore programme, it presents the learning and teaching challenges the learners and lecturers faced and strategies they adopted to overcome the issues.

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  • Un-common boundaries : an architectural interface between experience & protection

    Newman, Neil (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    With its isolated location, and variation in climate and land formations, New Zealand is privileged with an abundance of wildlife unique to these islands. Our indigenous flora, fauna, and the environment they inhabit, make up the wealth and depth of our natural heritage. These natural elements are a privilege to experience. However the act of visiting them can threaten their existence, and therefore issues of protection arise. “How do we ensure that we don’t love heritage to death? Un-common Boundaries is an investigation into the role architecture can perform as an interface between visitor experience of natural heritage, and its protection. This project is first and foremost an exploration, applying both the review of current knowledge (theoretical and practice), and design process methods to examine this paradoxical relationship in the context of an architectural response. SITE: Waipoua Kauri Forest Sanctuary, Northland New Zealand, Tane Mahuta

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  • Sustainable housing for ordinary households : a design study for Auckland's shortage of affordable housing, Geddes Terrace, Avondale

    Yelavich, Nicole (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project explores the issue of housing affordability and living quality for median range income households as it is this demographic which has the most potential for home ownership. The aspect of ‘affordability’ is identified, creating a model for housing affordability for ordinary households. The history and impacts of Auckland’s urban growth are discussed, including urban sprawl and the effects it has had on current infrastructure, in addition to projected infrastructure developments for the metropolitan region. The project explores housing in relation to the kiwi lifestyle and residential requirements in Auckland at medium urban densities and looks at the sustainability of Auckland’s future through the introduction of environmental sustainable principles and green construction in the residential sector, in addition to the importance in the development of efficient public transport for Auckland’s overall urban sustainability. The final design aims to introduce the accustomed suburban ideologies to a more urban environment with the intension to minimise the downfalls and reconceptions of typical higher density housing developments in Auckland, by maintaining pre-established values of individuality, privacy, security, belonging, and the freedom to wholly inhabit a dwelling. It challenges existing medium density housing developments in Auckland, other new developments on the current urban fringe of the metropolis, and some aspects of the Auckland Plan in an effort to acquire functional housing realistic and suitable for Aucklanders and the kiwi lifestyle at a medium urban density. It provides a design study and architectural response considering all researched elements, which aims to present Aucklanders with a good quality of living that correlates to the kiwi lifestyle and housing desires and attempts to ensure social acceptance of medium density housing in Auckland. SITE: Geddes Terrace. Avondale, Auckland.

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  • An exploration into the ways in which multi-generational Samoan households contribute to the development of societal and collective values about Aiga / families in contemporary New Zealand / Aotearoa/Niu Sila

    Ledoux-Taua’aletoa, Selina Malama (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This autobiographical/collective biographical research examines the ways that the multigenerational (m/g) household contributes to the development of societal and collective values around Samoan aiga in Aotearoa/New Zealand. There are several global trends impacting on Aotearoa/New Zealand. These trends include but are not exclusive to the housing shortage, an ageing population coupled with longer life expectancies, and the on-going impact of the global recession. Multigenerational households are the norm in collective societies such as traditional Samoan society, in Aotearoa the multigenerational household is an anomaly. Policy design does not necessarily include the multigenerational household during the inception process of policy relating to aiga. Through the exclusion of the multigenerational household in the consideration of policy the strengths and potential that the multigenerational households have to offer Aotearoa are not fully explored or supported. The research explored whether Samoan participants felt that living in the multigenerational household in Aotearoa is a valuable experience and how they felt that their life realities are received by peers and colleagues as a positive life experience. What was found is that attitude towards the living situation had a profound impact with regards to how the individual assessed their experience within the multigenerational household, even though in some cases upon reflection participants felt that they enjoyed many advantages in the multigenerational household that are no longer available to them. Through this autobiographical/collective biographical research project narratives and life stories were shared discussing such issues as shared parenting and child care, transference of knowledge such as culture, religion, spirituality and parenting skills. Through the narratives/biographies of the participants it was found that there is potential within the multigenerational household that if supported can possibly provide services that currently fall upon the State.

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  • “Should I stay or should I go?” : first semester students’ experiences in a tertiary institution in New Zealand

    Malcolm, Janet (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    “Should I stay or should I go”, a song by The Clash (1982) sums up the dilemma some students face when they begin their journey in tertiary study. This research explores the experiences of a group of students from one cohort in their first semester of a Bachelor Degree programme for early childhood education. In particular it examines what enabled the students to be successful, what barriers they faced and what motivated them to keep going. This qualitative single case study utilised a range of data collecting tools. The methods used were a questionnaire for students; a student focus group and an academic staff focus group. Each data method was analysed, coded thematically and reported separately before being discussed in themes. The findings of this research reveal that the participants experienced some challenges that were predominately external to the institution. What kept them in the programme was the significant level of support received from their Academic Advisor; the academic staff, their peers, the cohort system and their families. The students’ motivation to stay was primarily intrinsic in nature. Their positive attitude towards their studies and pride in their progress enabled them to keep going. The main barriers identified by the students were related to personal circumstances and were often a combination of factors rather than one single factor. However, there were also a number of institutional barriers identified. These were the perceived differences between the satellite campus and the main campus regarding the levels of support; joining an existing cohort of students; and the differences between the student’s cultural capital and the cultural capital the institution trades in. Amongst the implications for this research is that support is critical to retention and success. Therefore it is recommended that this institute conducts a feasibility study to investigate the cost of providing this level of support against the cost of attrition and a centralised support system. Pastoral care plays an important role in retention and success. An indication from this research is that first year students need lecturers who are pastorally minded and are culturally responsive to their needs. Another recommendation is that professional development be provided for staff regarding supporting students with serious personal issues. This research has also shown that there is a need to address the issues students face when they cross-credit into the programme from another institution, specifically in relation to the induction process.

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  • Today’s absence tomorrow’s presence

    Daniel, Sullivan (2013)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Light has fascinated mankind throughout history, and is the single component that makes all things visible, without it, visual perception is mute. Light is more than that, it also provides warmth, separates day from night, work from rest, sowing and reaping, life and death; it is no wonder then, that light is an integral part of culture and society. Light plays a key role in the visual perception of architectural space, defining size, giving shape, providing colour and highlighting material texture, contributing to the emotional feeling and physical awareness of the space - the atmosphere. However, in contemporary times, there seems to be a growing misconception in society that the perception of light is purely a functional requirement that has little concern with the atmosphere it produces, unless the function is to actually enhance the atmosphere, such as in an art gallery. The project seeks to determine how the qualities of light – its luminance, contrast, colour, direction and distribution affect the visual perception of space. Further to this understanding, the development of the project is to pursue and explore different innovative techniques to manipulate precessional light, the visual awareness of the trajectory of sunlight as it moves across the sky, which results in altering light compositions and effects in order to modify the visual perception of space. And whether the constantly changing nature of precessional light allows a constantly changing perception of space. PROJECT SITE: Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) fight club situated on Captain Cook's Wharf, in the Auckland CBD. The design of the architectural proposition, specifically takes five sequential spaces that are key in leading spectators on a journey through the building, and manipulating them to get the best shaped space to receive light. Each of the five spaces will use a different technique in manipulating light that not only best suits the function of the space, but demonstrates the variety of different ideas made from the discoveries of the previous chapters.

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