88,549 results

  • The Hong Kong IPO underpricing phenomenon and the underwriter reputation

    Kuan, Cheah Wai (2000-06-30)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The primary focus of this study is on the underpricing phenomenon in the Hong Kong IPO market. The study examines the link between the reputation of underwriters to an WO issue and the level of underpricing of that issue. To rank each underwriter as one with either a high reputation or low reputation the study uses a sample of 273 IPOs in the Hong Kong market from 1993 to 1998. The main findings of this study are that underwriters with high reputations underprice their IPOs 8.40% more than then low reputation counterparts, on average. This is contrary to the findings of many previous studies but is not statistically significant and indicates that the Hong Kong underwriters of high reputation have a pricing behaviour which is distinct from underwriters in other markets. In addition, the average risk level of IPOs undertaken by high reputation underwriters is not significantly different statistically from that of low reputation underwriters. This study concludes that high reputation underwriters do not necessarily exercise more prudence and tend to be selective in underwriting IPOs, as opposed to low reputation underwriters.

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  • Informal SME networks: A Bourdieu based perspective

    Faul, Jocelyn (2004-05)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the relationship between formal and informal intraorganisational networks. The notion that organisations are made up of interdependent relationships has led researchers to study more carefully the impacts that informal intraorganisational networks have on organisational life. Using a Bourdieu-based theoretical platform, this research investigates the relationship between context and informal intraorganisational networks in small-to-medium sized organisations in a New Zealand setting. An owner-manager perspective is adopted for the study and a qualitative research design is used to investigate the fundamental issue of why the differing contextual environments of organisations should influence the informal networks that exist within organisations. A post-structuralist approach to an interpretive investigation, utilising qualitative interviews, facilitated the reporting of empirical research, and theory development. The Bourdieu platform allows for the exploration of contextual issues using the concepts of field, habitus, and capital. Analysis of both interviews and secondary data concludes that informal intraorganisational networks differ contextually depending upon the type of organisation/industry group in which they are located. Further, elements of field such as traditions, unwritten norms, symbols, and customs also differ contextually in different organisations. Likewise, elements of habitus such as personal perceptions, levels and standards of living, and pride in work differ contextually as do elements of capital such as qualifications, skills, and the value of reputation. By way of example and explanation regarding theoretical properties, a comparison of trades based and non-trades based organisations is undertaken in the interview analysis. The research concludes that context does matter in an investigation into informal intraorganisational networks. Furthermore, networks in trades based businesses are highly predictable, have predictable characteristics and function in a dependable manner. Conversely, networks in non-trades based businesses are less predictable, are based on the personal characteristics of the members, and behave in a less dependable manner. These properties are exposed using the Bourdieu platform. Therefore, in terms of theory development, the results of this study suggest that the Bourdieu notions of field, habitus, and capital provide a sound theoretical platform for investigating informal intraorganisational networks. This is in sharp contrast to the positivist paradigm dominating research in the field to date.

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  • An investigation into the impacts of the one child policy on Confucian family practice in China

    Lees, Daniel (2003-10)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The objective of this thesis is to determine if the one-child policy, enacted as a fertility limitation in 1979, (Wan, Fan, Lin, & Jing, 1994) has affected Confucian family practice in China. It is proposed that because certain aspects of Confucian heritage are specific to sibling relationships decreasing family size as a result of the policy warrants investigation. The case study method has been used in which the primary research source were Ethnographic interviews, conducted in China. Respondents were asked about their views on changing family sizes, Confucian practice, roles in the family, and their feelings about generational differences or similarities. A variety of interviews were conducted with youths from single-child families, youths from sibling households, as well as parents and grandparents. The findings from these interviews were compared and contrasted with previous studies on one-child policy effects in China. A theory was developed in order to give additional insights into existing literature, so that converging lines of inquiry could be drawn. Within the theoretical framework, aspects of the Chinese cultural context were taken into account, and integrated. This included the use of Pierre Bourdieu's (1977) Theory of Practice, George Mead's (1934) Symbolic Interactionism, and pragmatic thought. Insights from these areas were combined in order to give greater depth of understanding to possible social changes. The results indicate that for single and sibling youth, Confucian inspired practice remains an important part of their lives. There was no perceived difference in the strength or commitment these youths had for the Confucian inspired practice of filial piety. There were, however, certain aspects of only youths responses that indicated their sense of filial piety was more emotionally focused and less compliance based. Future responsibility for care of parents also meant some only youths saw themselves as their families hope, indicating a somewhat stronger sense of obligation for only children. Policy effects on gender relations were also important. Opportunities for females were found to be greater due to the absence of brothers to compete with. Another significant finding was that Confucian naming practices are still relevant for Chinese youth, although not necessarily recognised as such. Evidence of this was found with respect to those from both sibling and single child backgrounds. Certain sibling youths did identify the significance of brotherhood or sisterhood in relation to Confucian practice. One of the most interesting findings pertains to how traditional Confucian practices are mediated through personal contexts and changing social conditions whilst also retaining distinct traditional elements. This finding has been made productively clear through the use of a praxis-centred account of human agency, informed by the work of Bourdieu, and pragmatic thought, which will be useful to researchers and sociologists interested in Chinese culture. The conclusion of the study is that the one-child policy has not led to a decline in Confucian practice; rather it has contributed to a remediation of this dynamic. Subsequently, for sibling and singleton youth, the degree to which Confucian practice held significance did not differ, yet the direction and value of these practices had varying foci. For siblings, responsibility for younger brothers or sisters meant a relatively multidirectional focus, whilst for single youths, the prospect of future care of parents without sibling support was significant.

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  • Computerized information systems and general practice

    Grant, Craig (1999-01)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This case study is being framed primarily as one in Labor Process analysis, looking at the impact of computerized information systems in control over work conducted in a general practice setting. The health care sector has undergone continual change in the past 10 years but since the introduction of the Health and Disabilities Act 1993 has moved progressively towards market orientated methods of funding. This has bought about a central change in the work practices of general physicians, facilitated in part by the use of computerized information systems.

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  • Environmental values of consumptive and nonconsumptive marine tourists in the South Island of New Zealand

    Dawson, Jackie (2003-02)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    180, [95] p. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Tourism. "February 2003".

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  • An exploration of global sourcing in the New Zealand manufacturing industry – A case study analysis

    Barns, Peta (1998-11)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Global sourcing and its impact upon organisational competitiveness is an issue which has yet to be examined in the New Zealand context. The aim of this research project is to investigate the effect of global sourcing for manufacturing organisations in New Zealand. In order to generate raw data for the research, the global sourcing practices of ten manufacturing companies were studied. To further explore the impact of the use of global sourcing, factors such as the benefits and challenges which have arisen for manufacturing firms in New Zealand were examined. In addition, a comparison between global sourcing experiences of manufacturing firms in New Zealand and internationally was completed in order to provide further analysis. As a result of the analysis of the raw data which emerged from the global sourcing experiences of the participants, eight areas of improvement were identified. These recommendations are not a prescriptive guide to implementing a global sourcing programme, rather they are areas which can be used to improve the effectiveness of global sourcing in a manufacturing organisation in New Zealand.

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  • The relations between indigenous and western leadership systems at the local level in the contemporary governance systems of Papua New Guinea

    Ambang, Tabian (2005-07-06)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The philosophy of the 'Melanesian Way' was strongly reflected in the report of the Constitution Planning Committee (CPC), which provides the basis for PNG's independence constitution. A section in the final report (1974) titled: Papua New Guinea Ways, endorses: "those practices of participation, of consultation, and consensus and sacrifice for the common good which attribute to traditional societies". Papua New Guinea should take pride in promoting its indigenous leadership systems, sense of identity, culture and purpose in nation building. Many former colonies of the European empires adopted Western leadership and governance systems after becoming independent, claiming that these systems were appropriate to enhance and facilitate growth and development in their countries. However, the relationship between indigenous leadership and adopted Western leadership systems is not well understood in the leadership literature, particularly its implications on the development process. This study was conducted in Papua New Guinea (PNG) to explore the relationship between indigenous leadership systems (tribal leadership) and the adopted Western leadership and governance systems (European structures and institutions) in the development process of PNG's contemporary governance systems. PNG is one of those countries that had been colonised by European imperial powers. Its current government systems are based on European structures and institutions which the country adopted after becoming independent, while village social structures, in which the majority of the population live, are based on local tribal leadership systems. The aim of the study is to understand the problem of unstable leadership in the current governance systems in the Western Province of PNG. Unstable leadership is a problem affecting good governance and development and seems to be a common issue throughout PNG since independence. Leadership and good governance are important issues in all three levels of the governance systems in PNG, the national, provincial, and district level. This study focuses on the district level where the development policies are implemented. It argues that unstable leadership is the result of tensions between indigenous and Western leadership systems when leaders in the current governance systems fail to perform to the expectations of the people, which are based on traditional values. This study also argues that the Western leadership system of electing leaders through a district-wide election process is not appropriate for local governance systems in PNG, because it is contributing to the decline of the authority and influence of tribal leaders. This results in lack of effective community mobilisation, involvement and participation in the development process. The election process also causes tensions, conflicts and tribal warfare when people elect their leaders based on tribal social structures in Western leadership systems. The current governance system based on Western structure is failing to enhance effective and efficient leadership at the village and local level thus resulting in a lack of effective development. To solve these problems, this study suggests that local level governance systems in PNG should be based on indigenous leadership structures which enable tribal leaders and the people to be actively involved and participate in the development process. The involvement of tribal leaders would provide influential leadership at the village and community level in the development process, something that which is lacking.

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  • Barriers to export trade and investment in Latin America

    Wiig, Hamish (2004-08)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    233, 69, 16, [10] p. :ill. (some col.), maps (some col., some folded) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographies. University of Otago department: Marketing. "August 2004".

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  • Impacts of religious tourism in Thailand

    Baedcharoen, Isaree (2000-04)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Tourism is an increasingly important component of the economies of many countries. For some countries including Thailand, it is a major source of income and overseas investment. Tourism expansion creates both positive and negative impacts on the destination area and the host country. It is a major source of revenue for Thailand and important to the Thai economy (TAT 1998). The purpose of this study is to understand the resident attitudes' to the economic, sociocultural and physical impacts of tourism development in Buddhist temples and the cities in which they are located. The Temple of the Emerald Buddha in Bangkok, The Ayutthaya temple, The Phra That Doi Suthep Temple in Chiang Mai and The Luang Paw Sothorn Temple in Chachoensao were chosen for this study. They are famous religious shrines that have continued to attract both pilgrims and tourists. A survey was conducted during October - November 1999 in Bangkok, Ayutthaya, Chiang Mai and Chachoensao. Among a random sample of residents from those cities, 296 questionnaires were colected with a response rate of 92.5%. The results show that respondents strongly agree with the idea that tourism provides many economic and sociocultural benefits, but the residents are ambivalent about its costs. It was found that residents' attitudes toward tourism are not related to the degree of tourism development within the host community. Moreover, respondents agree that all types of religious shrines have received similar tourism impacts. It was found that residents tend to recognise tourism benefits and are less interested or concerned with its costs. This study recommends that since local residents express a high degree of positive feeling about tourism impacts, study on negative impacts is necessary. Residents' concern for the negative impacts perhaps lack, priority against the need for employment and economic benefits. People in developing countries tolerate the negative impacts. Education would encourage a greater understanding of tourism development and therefore would create a better understanding of tourists and tourism issues. Also, sustainable tourism, which aims to overcome the impacts and satisfy the needs of both tourists and the host community, is seen to be a good direction for Thai tourism. The government and TAT should not ignore the attitudes of the Thai people toward tourism. The findings from this research are valuable in helping to develop strategic management plans and make developmental decisions regarding the future of tourism management planning in Thailand.

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  • An approach for intelligent image collection navigation and semantic analysis

    Zhang, Jianhua (2005-02-28)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    With the growing use of multimedia such as images and videos in industries as well as in our daily life, image retrieval has become a vital technology for users to consume the valuable multimedia resources effectively and efficiently. For example it is not easy to browse or search a large image collection. Content-based image retrieval has achieved limited success in multimedia asset management and rapid information retrieval based on low-level visual features. However, humans normally access multimedia assets by semantic concepts. There is a significant semantic gap existing between low-level visual features processed by machines and semantic concepts interpreted by humans. It is generally understood that the problem of image retrieval is still far from being solved. As indicated by literatures, image semantic analysis and visualisation are well known research areas to overcome this gap and to enhance the capability of content-based image retrieval systems. This thesis proposes an approach for intelligent image collection navigation and semantic analysis to bridge the gap between visual features and semantics. Some of MPEG-7 colour and texture descriptors based on global and local visual features are selected as multiple representations of images, as they have been intensively and successfully evaluated in many of image retrieval experiments. Taking a pattern classification approach for image semantic analysis, two types of classifiers are designed according to the different characteristics of global and local visual features to classify images into the predefined classes. Combination classifications are investigated in this study. Leave-one-out cross-validation is employed to evaluate their performances using different visual features and combination schemes. In order to increase the impact of the classifiers with high precisions in the final classification decision, the precision-based combination rule that weights each classifier based on its precision in the combination of the results is proposed. For the visualisation of image collections, an intelligent image collection navigation system is developed by joining the SOM-based image visualisation based on visual feature spaces together with semantic concepts extracted from semantic analysis. Experiments show that the proposed approach is successful in improving the accuracy of indoor and outdoor scenes classification and revealing image collection structure both in the visual feature spaces and on the semantics level. With further works on this study the system is able to assist users to develop automatic interpretations to the image collection and navigate and access images of interests much more easily.

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  • Wine club members' enduring involvement toward winery visitation, wine drinking and wine club participation.

    Christensen, David (2004-06)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Although an interest in, passion for, and fascination with wine has existed for centuries, in some parts of the world, for example New Zealand, this interest, passion and reverence for wine is relatively new. How New Zealanders choose to engage with their newfound wine passion is unclear, as is the importance they place on wine within their lifestyle. A wine lifestyle is emerging as a means of individual's engaging in their fascination with wine. This wine lifestyle exists within New Zealand wine clubs, and comprises wine habits such as wine drinking, wine purchasing, wine cellaring and wine knowledge extension as well as wine club participation and winery visitation. The importance level of these lifestyle components is unknown. Therefore, the primary objective was to ascertain which aspects of this lifestyle have the most importance placed upon them. Decanter Club members participated in an online questionnaire, built in Macromedia's 'Dreamweaver' package, and attached to a Structured Query Language (SQL) database. The final analysis of respondent data was undertaken in SPSS, with Cronbach's Alpha coefficients being used to determine adequate data reliability. The concept of enduring involvement (EI) was used to determine exactly how individuals engage with their interest in wine. Higie and Feick's (1989, p.690) definition of enduring involvement suggests that it is "a stable trait that represents an individual’s degree of interest or arousal for a product on a day-to-day basis; an ongoing, long-term interest". This definition, along with Higie and Feick's (1989) Enduring Involvement Scale (EIS) were adopted as integral components of this research. Higie and Feick's (1989) EIS measures an individual's level of EI through 'hedonic' (pleasure-seeking) and 'self-expression' attributes. These are combined to give an overall level of EI. Three specific components of the wine lifestyle, winery visitation, wine drinking and wine club participation, were chosen as the means of measuring an individual's EI. Wine drinking was found to evoke the highest levels of EI, followed by wine club participation and winery visitation. Wine drinking also recorded the highest hedonic and self-expression scores, providing the most pleasure for the club member, and as the most appropriate avenue through which the member can portray their sense of self. Neither gender differences, nor varying levels of cellar size, wine knowledge levels or wine club participation resulted in significantly different levels of EI. However, a small but important sub-group of respondents did display higher levels of EI. This group, the wine specialist, not only displayed higher EI, but participated more often in wine club activities, had higher levels of wine knowledge, spent more per month on wine, had larger wine cellars, and were more likely to drink wine daily than the Decanter Club member on the whole. A secondary objective of this research was to investigate the impact of winery visitation on post-visit purchasing behaviour. Although prior research suggests that winery visitation has little impact upon future sales activity, this claim was not supported in the Decanter Club setting. In fact, a substantial proportion of members either had made a repeat purchase of the winery's wines subsequent to the visit, or expressed an intention to do so.

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  • Models to improve the productivity of core workers: strategic considerations.

    Greene, Belinda (1999-03)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Employer responses to a changing business environment usually involve measures to reduce labour costs. There are several models that an organisation may adopt to improve labour productivity. These include contracting out activities to external providers/suppliers, and the 'conversion' of employees into independent contractors. These options achieve cost reduction and transfer risk to the contractor(s). It is suggested that the conversion of employees into independent contractors is a trend that will continue. The use of independent contractors may be perceived as 'easier' than the task of improving employee productivity. A model that represents a compromise between the use of independent contractors and the 'status quo' is one that retains the workforce as employees but forces them to compete for work. Case Studies explore the experiences of two organisations in the same industry that adopted different models to reduce costs and improve labour productivity and efficiency. One retained its workforce as employees but exposed them to competitive pressure. The other 'converted' its employees into independent contractors. The Case Study organisations' adoption of these models is particularly significant as the workers involved perform a core and essential activity requiring skills that are not readily available elsewhere. Both organisations effectively created a competitive market using their own skilled employees. Although both models may achieve cost reduction, they also involve risks and disadvantages. The use of contractors has been associated with compromised quality and health and safety. Skills training is often neglected in the drive for cost reduction - this is not limited to the adoption of a competitive model. A sustainable level of competition in the market is paramount. Where an organisation has contracted out, it is exposed to market forces; an organisation that retains employees retains control. From the perspective of workers, independent contractor status is often attractive and preferred. However, if a contractor is dependent on one employer, their ability to profit may be eroded to a point where they are in a position that demands some form of protection. This study concludes that any decision of this kind must be made on a strategic basis with consideration for future implications. The risks and disadvantages of a competitive model and the use of contractors suggest that where core or essential skills are involved, retaining workers as employees may be the strategic choice. The trend of converting employees to contractors may be mitigated by long-term strategic considerations.

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  • Detecting instruments in classical music: A view on timbre, musical features, and classification

    Simmermacher, Christian (2005-11-23)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis describes research on recognition of classical instruments from isolated tones and musical passages. The intention is to evaluate the robustness of the features and the efficiency of the data analysis methods to classify instruments in a dynamic environment. The information extracted from the samples is based on relevant works in instrument detection and timbre studies, and on knowledge about instrument characteristics. For a better understanding of the perceptual derived features, the human auditory system is briefly reviewed and some perceptual phenomena are mentioned. Different feature extraction methods are chosen without applying sound source separation techniques. These methods are based on auditory models and filters and are widely used for simulation of the human perception and speech detection. Furthermore, a standardised set of features from the MPEG-7 Instrument timbre description scheme is calculated from the harmonic spectrum of a sound. It is especially designed to capture the timbre of instrument tones. Two experiments are discussed in this thesis. The first experiment is used to evaluate features and classification methods on a dataset of single tone samples from 20 instruments. A combination of perceptual features shows the highest accuracy with around 90% and a reduced collection of selected features proves most efficient. The second experiment is similar to the first, but it processes musical passages to distinguish between instruments from four major instrument families. Spectral features are predominantly used for this task. Nineteen features combined from the Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients and the MPEG-7 standard achieve an accuracy of around 94%. In both experiments a multilayer perceptron shows the best generalisation for the test set. The dataset from the second experiment is also used for a user interface that implements the most robust feature extraction technique and the fastest data analysis method. It detects the dominant instrument in a ten second long passage and annotates the calculated information in XML-format.

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  • Managing a complex environment — Social cultural perspectives the case of Indonesia

    Sunaryo, Lenny (2005-04-05)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The study explores social institutions of Chinese-managed organisations in Indonesia as products of their social-cultural values and historical trajectory developments using information (knowledge) management perspective. For comparison analysis, Chinese managed organisations are compared to Javanese-managed organisations as the latter being the dominant cultural group in the country. This study is approached based on the idea that agents' social cultural values have impacts on their managerial values and preferences as well as business practices, which are reflected in their social institutions as strategies in dealing with complexity of information processing activities – as proposed by Boisot and Child (1999). I find this concept interesting and very useful in enhancing our understanding of various strategies in managing a complex environment that arises out of social interactions among agents of different social cultural backgrounds. However, the concept has never been empirically studied in the Indonesian context. Therefore, a study was carried out in Jakarta in July 2004 using questionnaire as the main survey instrument. A sample of Indonesian managers (n=334) was selected representing different social-ethnic groups, professions, and organisations in Indonesia, and 66.17% (n=221) questionnaire was returned. Data is processed by SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) and analysed using exploratory factor analysis to discover the main constructs or important dimensions of managerial values and business practices in Chinese and Javanese-managed organisations. Because there was no instrument available that tap the exact same construct needed to be measured, the questionnaire used in this study was constructed based on a similar instrument developed by Adam G. and Vernon H. (2004) on business cultures and practices in Thailand with some modifications. The study shows that while Chinese tend to engage in clan/network social institution - as suggested by Boisot and Child (1999); Javanese tend to engage in fief social institution as their strategies in dealing with a complex social environment. This suggests Chinese and Javanese managers have different strategies in managing the complexity of information (knowledge) exchange, which arises in social interactions. This may be used to explain why Chinese in Indonesia tend to be more successful economically. In general, statistical findings did not appear to show significant results. Both Chinese managed and Javanese-managed organisations share similar characteristics in almost very aspect of their managerial values and preferences and business practices. The only factor that has statistical significant difference is factor: "Prestige and security,' suggesting that this variable is more important for Javanese than Chinese mana gers (for example, 'to work in an organisation that is large, well-known and prestigious'). However, the discovery of similar cultural issues between the two social cultural groups also provides an important unexpected finding for future studies. Hence, the idea of social institutions as products of social cultural values helps us understand why managers of different social cultural values have different organisational strategies. Hopefully, the study may also be helpful for enhancing our understanding on business practices in the socio-cultural perspectives that prevail in Indonesia as such that it may be used for future research to build dimensionality of business practices in different contexts.

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  • Foreign sourcing behavior of New Zealand retail SMEs

    Brown, Fleur Ana (2004-06)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Foreign sourcing is a tool used by many organisations to improve competitive advantage. This study builds upon foreign sourcing theory by examining the foreign sourcing behaviour of small to medium retail enterprises (SMEs). To provide a holistic understanding of foreign sourcing behaviour, six constructs were investigated; these include motivations, benefits, barriers, supply chain management, purchasing strategy and mode selection. This study also identifies significant relationships between constructs' previously not identified in the literature. This research enquiry uses an inductive theory-building approach. This approach overcomes the confines of current theory which include; the limited context within which past studies have been conducted (predominately multinational manufacturers), the treatment of constructs in isolation, and, the dominant use of deductive theory-building research approaches. Seventeen retailers participated in this study across three retail sectors, jewellery, gift/homeware and delicatessens. Information was gathered Using a combination of semi-structured interviews and shop observations. Findings indicate that the foreign sourcing motivations and benefits of retail SMEs are largely consistent with those of manufacturing multinational enterprises (MNEs). Foreign sourcing barriers, however, differ based on both organisational size and industry. Supply chain management, purchasing strategy and made selection are also dependent on organisational size and industry, as well as the individual retailer's desired level of commitment and risk. The most notable relationship between the six foreign sourcing constructs is the influence that the choice of sourcing mode has on both foreign sourcing benefits and barriers. Furthermore, testament to the inductive research design, five factors also emerged that had previously not been identified in the literature. These include the motivator of gap in the market, the two benefits of point of difference and supplier knowledge, and the barriers of lack of information and education of customers. The findings of this study make a contribution to foreign sourcing theory. They also provide guidance for retail SMEs when selecting their foreign sourcing mode, and suggest innovation as a means for New Zealand manufacturers to improve their competitiveness against foreign imports.

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  • MBO liklihood and firm characteristics: Evidence from a data envelopment analysis

    Hoult, Regan B (2000-02-20)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The source(s) of wealth created by managers taking a public company private in a Management Buyout (MBO) are not well understood. This study uses Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to empirically test two theories on these wealth gains, Jensen's Agency Cost of Free Cash Flow theory and the Asymmetric information theory. Prior research on these two theories has failed to produce conclusive results. The DEA analysis used here finds some support for the predictions of the Agency Cost of Free Cash Flow theory, but little for the Asymmetric Information theory.

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  • A framework to analyse 'Internationalisation in higher education'

    Devjee, Faiyaz H (2004-09-15)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vi, 108 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Management. "September 15, 2004" -- T.p.

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  • Exploring career: A study of career meanings in changing workplaces

    Walton, Sara (2000-02-01)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 206 ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Management. "February 1st 2000."

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  • Operationalising the ecotourism opportunity spectrum (ECOS): Case examples from China

    Bi, Ying Lian (2005-06)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 64 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Tourism. "June 2005".

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  • Managing tourism in Antarctica : A framework for the future

    Maher, Harry (2005-12-19)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Antarctic tourism has been the subject of significant debate in recent years, not only within the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS) but also in the wider community. A relatively recent but now well-established industry, tourism in Antarctica is characterised by high regional growth rates and the potential for significant impacts on the environments where it occurs. This thesis addresses the research question ‘Is the current regulatory system for managing tourism in Antarctica adequate to protect the Antarctic environment?’ It examines the general theories of management of tourism and recreation in protected and wilderness areas. The importance of the relationship between site values, tourism activities, impacts and management responses is highlighted. It is noted that contemporary protected area managers inevitably put in place robust and binding legislation, site-specific management plans, and management interventions to manage wilderness areas. The tourism management framework for Antarctica is presented, in both its historical and contemporary contests. The historical and current size and nature of the Antarctic tourist industry is analysed and presented, along with an in-depth examination of the values and attributes of the sites where that activity occurs. The actual and potential impacts of tourism in general and of the current levels of tourism in Antarctica are then discussed. A discussion regarding the adequacy of the current ATS tourism management regime is presented. The system is found to be inadequate across a range of critical factors. The current system is characterised as reactive, legally uncertain, technically-focussed and almost totally lacking in strategic approach. Adequate protection of the sites where tourism occurs is not certain. A range of improvements to the management of tourism in Antarctica is presented. Chief amongst these are the development of strategic policy for the sites subject to tourism, the development of management plans for key tourist sites, and the use of specific intervention tools at sites to achieve management planning objectives.

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