82,974 results

  • The dispersal and survivorship of pateke (Anas chlorotis) in relation to experimental release techniques ; supplementary feeding and wing-clipping : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Conservation Biology, Massey University, Auckland

    Rickett, Jennifer (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The pateke, or brown teal (Anas chlorotis), is a cryptic species and this is reflected in the dearth of knowledge regarding their basic ecology and demography. The difficulty in establishing secure self-sustaining breeding populations at historic locations by introducing captive-bred birds is likely a reflection of a lack of knowledge about some aspects of their ecology, and therefore the necessary knowledge for their management. Two major factors appear to inhibit pateke reintroductions, these are dispersal out of predator controlled release areas and the associated mortality before viable breeding populations establish. This study aims to reduce these factors by increasing understanding of the causes, and refining release techniques. Secondary releases of captive-bred pateke to Tawharanui Regional Park and Cape Kidnappers and Ocean Beach Wildlife Preserve (CKOBWP) provided the opportunity to investigate whether populations could establish in the target areas under prescribed management regimes involving supplementary feeding and wing-clipping. Pateke at each site were fitted with radio transmitters to monitor dispersal, and PIT tags to monitor feeder use over 24hrs remotely. Supplementary feeding appeared to increase the time pateke spent at the release site, and in particular decrease the dispersal of male pateke postrelease. Supplementary feeding may also influence survivorship by reducing cases of starvation in newly-reintroduced pateke. Wing-clipping reduced dispersal and there were no apparent negative effects in terms of increased mortality or dependence on supplementary feed. It is hypothesised that wing-clipped birds may even increase residency of fully-flighted birds at release sites by acting as conspecific attractants. In addition to providing baseline data on these populations, the trialing of PIT tag technology on pateke in this study is likely to be significant because it provides an accurate low-labour method of data collection and thus has potential to improve both future studies of the species and the conservation management of pateke.

    View record details
  • Appraisal: a process for control or development?: a study of teacher accountability, power and decision-making with emphasis on the New Zealand context

    Aikin, Sandra Wendy (1994)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This sociological-historical study aims to contribute to the understanding and analysis of the changing pattern of power and decision-making in education apparent in the development of teacher appraisal policy. The study provides an account of the factors influencing the New Zealand teacher appraisal policy draft which at the time of writing is still to be released. A range of considerations to be taken into account is exposed and the signposts for the development of teacher appraisal policy are made explicit. This is achieved by making the process transparent as well as recognising and evaluating the contribution made by participants. A key feature of this study is the examination of the 'policy importation' process as the emerging demand for greater teacher accountability in both the United Kingdom and New Zealand has resulted in the formalisation of the assessment of teachers' professional performance through appraisal policies. This study argues that three perspectives have shaped the debate on teacher appraisal: neo-liberal market; managerial; and professional. It posits that a noticeable shift has been made towards the requirements of managerial accountability and examines the reasons for this.

    View record details
  • The Benefits and Challenges for Cambodian Teachers Implementing Peer Coaching

    Mom, Pheng (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In Cambodia, the professional development of teachers is a priority. Although many training programmes and workshops are provided for teachers to learn new skills and improve practice, the rate of their transferring these learned skills into the classroom is still low. According to the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports (2005) one explanation for this low rate of skills transfer is the lack of collaboration between peers. To address this issue, this thesis explores the benefits and challenges for Cambodian teachers implementing coaching as a way to improve peer collaboration. It seeks to discover their perceptions and experiences in undertaking peer coaching and to find out the strategies that could work for Cambodian teachers when they engage in peer coaching. To address the study’s research questions, action research and a qualitative, interpretive design were used. Six Cambodian teachers teaching English in one school volunteered to participate in this study. Data were collected through reflective notes, seminars, individual interviews, and a focus group. The interview data were transcribed and coded using the inductive content analysis in order to categorise them and draw conclusions. The findings indicate that the implementation of peer coaching was influential in shaping participants’ understanding of current practice and improving their teaching, such as teaching methods, reflections and collaborations. This study found that administrative support, constructive feedback and a change in the peer coaching process could inspire Cambodian teachers to collaborate. It also found that there are some major challenges impacting on peer coaching, including lack of time for undertaking peer observations, lack of teaching resources, big class size, and nervousness of the teachers and students. The study, however, suggests that the success of undertaking peer coaching requires both administrative support and individual teachers’ self-efficacy. Further research into the effectiveness of providing feedback on teachers’ practice needs to occur to see if this phenomenon is widespread.

    View record details
  • The Politics of Labour Migration and Demographic Change in Contemporary Japan

    Bishop, Andrew (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Japan currently faces a demographic crisis resulting from declines in fertility rates and rapid expansion of Japan’s elderly population. Public pensions will come under immense strain as shrinking numbers of working age people are forced to support ever more retirees. At the same time, declines in fertility and falling population figures threaten Japan’s future economic growth and vitality. This thesis investigates the relationship between the demographic crisis and Japan’s strict immigration policies. Policymakers continue to refuse to allow migration to Japan in order to offset declines in Japan’s own working age population. The thesis aims to explain why Japan remains so reluctant to accept migrant workers from abroad, even though this may offer a solution to the problems of demographic decline and depopulation. I contend that conventional analyses of Japan’s immigration policies do not provide adequate explanations for why Japan continues to exclude foreign labourers. Rather, I argue that Japan’s attitude must be understood in connection with a binary, “us-and-them” mindset toward foreign countries and communities collectively that exists in Japan’s governing and bureaucratic institutions. This mindset is evident in Japan’s practical labour policy implementation, and has important cultural and political implications for Japan’s public discourses of national identity and interests. The thesis argues that Japan remains unwilling to accept migrant labourers because of an immigration policy structure that resolutely adheres to an outdated view of migrants as mere units of labour. This overlooks changed global models of migration that prioritise human rights, proactive social integration and strategic selection of migrants. While Japan could ease the effects of depopulation and demographic decline by revising core policy assumptions in order to effectively integrate migrants into the dwindling national workforce, it has so far failed to engage with newer models of migration. My analysis locates Japan’s crisis within a wider context of global demographic change and transnational population movement in the twenty-first century.

    View record details
  • Tertiary education leadership programmes in Tanzania and New Zealand : higher education for social development : a thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education, Massey University College of Education, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Alphonce, Ndibalema Rwekaka (2000)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis, about educational leadership development, explores selected tertiary programmes of educational leadership in New Zealand and Tanzania. The aim of the study was to explore whether, and how, Tanzanian programme development could benefit from the experience of programme development which has been acquired by New Zealand's tertiary institutions. For the purpose of the study, five programmes offered by tertiary institutions in New Zealand and courses from the, then, only tertiary educational leadership programme in Tanzania, were selected for examination. The study examined the context of educational leadership in both Tanzania and New Zealand, with particular reference to the contemporary reforms in education in the two countries and their influence on educational leadership development in recent years. The specific contents of the programmes were also examined in respect to their organisational, cognitive and affective aspects. Employing an eclectic qualitative research methodology, the study was underpinned by critical theory assumptions in advocating a framework for educational leadership programme development in the context of Tanzania, based on the concept of power diffusion, allowing for a more broad based democratic participation of teachers in leadership programmes. Premised on the assumption that educational leadership is central to the success or failure of any educative process in its conception of leadership, the thesis advocates the development of democratic, dialogic, participative and reflective leadership as opposed to leadership based on autocratic and power-wielding authority. The main thrust of the arguments rest on the understanding that, without the teachers' enthusiasm to teach and the learners' willingness to learn, schools would be nothing but "a wilderness of wasted logic". It is argued that educational leadership can contribute significantly towards the realisation of the ideal, albeit not necessarily clinical, environment for the educative process to take place. It is contended that, in the context of the contemporary social and political structures, especially in developing countries, such as Tanzania, educational leadership can either be for liberation or domination. Based on the findings from various New Zealand and Tanzanian programmes of educational leadership, examined in this study, it is underscored that, in order to be liberative, educational leadership requires the support of a socially critical philosophy. The findings of the thesis highlight the centrality of the role of tertiary education institutions in the development of leadership in educational places. Thus, it is concluded that, for a developing nation, like Tanzania, the need for tertiary programmes for educational leadership cannot be overemphasised.

    View record details
  • The Cataloguing and Shelving of Graphic Novels: A Comparison of Public Librarian and Patron Perceptions

    Cunningham, Donald Philip (2012)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    With the recent rise of pop culture, the graphic novel has sought its place in our public libraries. There have always been issues over where to place, and how to classify and shelve this often troublesome format. Although there has been much discussion, very little research has been done into this field, and the opinions of those who use graphic novel collections, as well as those who do not, have not been sought in the past. This project aimed to compare the opinions of three groups in regards to the placement and classification of graphic novels in public libraries; public librarians, graphic novel readers, and those who do not read graphic novels. In order to do this, a mixed method approach was taken. Four public librarians from around Otago and Southland were interviewed in order to learn their opinions, while a survey of library patrons was undertaken in order to discover how graphic novel readers and non-readers felt about this topic. This survey targeted users of the same libraries the interviewees worked at, and overall 41 useful responses were collected. The research found that librarian’s opinions were not the major factor to effect how libraries dealt with graphic novel collections. They were more likely to be influenced by other factors, like space restrictions. Librarian’s opinions also tended to align with those of graphic novel readers, rather than non- readers. The research also provides a strong mandate for public libraries to build separate graphic novel collections, with both readers and non-readers agreeing that public libraries should have graphic novel collections.

    View record details
  • Regulation of paxilline biosynthesis in Penicillium paxilli : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular Genetics at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Telfer, Emily Jane (2000)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    Production of the indole-diterpenoid paxilline was examined in the filamentous ascomycete Penicillium paxilli. Paxilline is a secondary metabolite, that is synthesised via a specific secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathway. The primary precursors of paxilline biosynthesis, mevalonate and isopentenyl pyrophosphate, are synthesised via the isoprenoid pathway and the paxilline biosynthetic pathway branches from isoprenoid biosynthesis after the synthesis of farnesyl pyrophosphate. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co) reductase is the rate limiting step of the isoprenoid biosynthesis. Genes for (hmg) and β-tubulin (tub-2), were isolated from a genomic DNA libray and characterised by DNA sequencing and RT-PCR. The steady state mRNA levels of hmg and tub-2 were compared with genes isolated from the paxilline biosynthetic gene cluster, using a semi-quantitative RT-PCR gene expression assay. A distinct pattern of expression was identified for genes involved in the biosynthesis of paxilline. Increased expression of these genes occurs 36 h prior to the detection of paxilline in liquid culture. P. paxilli physiology and paxilline production was analysed in liquid culture after the development of reproducible growth conditions that results in the formation of homogeneous loose hyphal fragments and detectable paxilline after 72 h. The morphology of P. paxilli in paxilline-inducing media was examined microscopically and key physiological markers, culture pH and biomass accumulation, were also analysed. Paxilline levels in both mycelia and culture supernatant were analysed with HPLC and TLC. This confirmed that paxilline is not released into the media until 144 h when large scale autolysis is observed. Initial experiments to examine paxilline production in cultures supplemented with a biological buffer suggest that phase switching between primary growth and secondary growth may be triggered by changes in ambient pH. The presence of alternative carbon sources also affected the rate of paxilline production and preliminary results indicate that biosynthesis of paxilline may be under carbon catabolite repression by glucose. Levels of HMG CoA reductase are known to be regulated at many levels, including mRNA transcription, protein inactivation and protein degradation, in response to excess sterols. A number of putative sterol response elements (SRE), which control transcription of hmg in higher eukaryotes, where identified in the 5' UTR of hmg from P. paxilli. In higher eukaryotes, the extremely complex 5' UTR of hmg has been proposed as the site of regulation for biosynthesis of non-sterol end-products. This complexity appears to be conserved in the 5' UTR of hmg from P. paxilli and another filamentous fungus Neotyphodium lolii Lpl9. Intronic sequences are spliced from the 5' UTR of both genes and there are additional intronic sequences present that could produce alternative transcripts. At least two different hmg transcripts were identified from P. paxilli with 5' RACE. The mechanism by which these alternative transcripts arise is unclear at present, but could involve alternative splicing of the 5' UTR intron or initiation of transcription from alternative start sites.

    View record details
  • The Value of Verbal Praise and Recognition Amongst New Zealand Library Staff

    Jenkins, Adrian Giles (2012)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Research Problem Today, more than ever, library and information centre managers are looking for the best way to motivate their staff and to keep them motivated. One of the easiest ways to do this is by verbally praising or recognising one’s staff, but is it effective? This research report examines the extent to which New Zealand library staff are motivated by verbal praise and recognition from their manager. There is a significant amount of literature on the value of praise and recognition and on motivation of staff in general in other work sectors, but little in the library and information world. What does exist is mostly centred on North America, the UK and Europe. There appears to be no prior research on the value of praise and recognition amongst New Zealand library staff – a gap this research fills. Methodology This quantitative cross-sectional research was conducted by means of an online questionnaire during March 2012. 436 library staff, working under a manager, in a variety of libraries throughout New Zealand, responded. Some of the research sample was gathered by means of purposive convenience sampling, using contacts of the researcher. Other respondents were attained via random sampling. An incentive prize draw was offered to encourage New Zealand library staff to complete the questionnaire. Results The research found that while New Zealand library staff value verbal praise and recognition from their managers, they are more motivated by financial rewards, promotions and professional development opportunities. Words of thanks and acclaim from their manager are welcomed, but this needs to be followed up with something more tangible. When New Zealand library managers do verbally praise their staff, they should ensure that they are sincere in giving praise, and that the praise is timely and specific. They also need to be aware that some staff are uncomfortable with being praised or recognised in public. When praise is given appropriately, it has a significant impact upon many New Zealand library staff, motivating them to look for opportunities to grow in their work, to give more effort to their work and to develop a culture of appreciation in the workplace. Implications With increased knowledge about their staff, managers in New Zealand libraries can act in ways that will increase the motivation of their staff and lead to a positive result for all. This research assists New Zealand library managers better to understand the value of verbal praise and recognition for their staff. It also gives them important tips on how the verbal praise and recognition that they do give, can be most effective. To increase the knowledge bank of New Zealand library staff further, other researchers could do qualitative research to provide a more in-depth understanding of the value of verbal praise and recognition. It would also be interesting to focus on other ways New Zealand library staff are motivated and also to replicate the present research amongst library staff in other countries.

    View record details
  • The State of Play: An Exploration of Games and Their Value in museum Exhibitions

    Berndt, Anton (2011)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In the field of museum studies there has been very little consideration of games and their application to exhibiting practice. This represents a significant gap in the theory on current museum practice given the frequency of games in exhibitions and the scale of the commercial games industry in contemporary culture. This study begins to redress this issue by exploring how a significant and influential museum operating within the paradigm of the new museology views the role of games in its exhibitions. The thesis considers the central research question: what do practitioners currently think about games in museum exhibitions and how could museum games be improved. Following an interpretivist methodology the study seeks to answer this question through a case study of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. Seven practitioners affiliated with this museum were interviewed about their understanding of games and their application in a museum context. The research findings illuminate the current understanding of games held by these practitioners and factors that inhibit the successful implementation of games at Te Papa. It was found that the practitioners’ opinions had not been influenced by the available theoretical literature on games. It was also found that practitioners thought games in exhibitions at the museum have not been particularly successful in achieving either the goals of exhibitions or the potential that games offer. It is concluded that the introduction of theories on play and on games into museum theory and practice has potential for significant advances in this area of exhibition development. In contemporary museums there is a shift away from presenting absolute, positivist understandings of knowledge toward the subjective, construction of meaning. Museums are also increasingly required to maintain economic efficacy while offering a valuable service to the populace. This thesis responds to this situation by proposing that a greater knowledge and utilisation of games in exhibitions offers a valuable approach in negotiating these two trends. By presenting an understanding of games, their potential value for museums and perspectives on what currently inhibits their successful application this research offers the field of museum studies a basis from which to develop knowledge of this under-theorised aspect of museum practice.

    View record details
  • From Writer to Reader: An Examination of the History of New Zealand Comics Online and How Web-Based Tools Facilitate the Interaction of Communities

    Milligan, Briar Ruth (2012)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Purpose: This research project has focused on examining the developments of web-based texts and the ways people use these tools to socialise and communicate. It is hoped to provide valuable information on the impact of digital technologies on communication history. Design/methodology/approach: This project involved a micro analysis on New Zealand comics websites. Qualitative content analysis was used to examine a sample of seven topics and 31 websites. Data was collected at various points over an 11 year time span, with the majority of data collected from historical websites archived in Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine. Findings: Web-based communication follows a similar cycle to that proposed by Darnton (1993); however there have been significant changes in how New Zealand comics websites are produced, disseminated and received. These changes have altered the way writers and readers communicate, allowing readers greater power to influence creators’ work, reorganise and even alter online texts. Research limitations/implications: Despite the small sample size and impact of researcher interpretations, this project has provided valuable information on the communication processes which take place in both print and digital forums, and will interest scholars and practitioners in the library and information studies fields, along with others interested in the dynamics of human communication. Originality/value: Very little research has been conducted on this topic. The findings of this project reinforce the conclusions made by previous theorists, as well as contributing findings which may be explored in future research.

    View record details
  • Repatriation in Practice: A Critical Analysis of the Repatriation of Human Remains in New Zealand Museums

    O’Hara, Coralie (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The repatriation of human remains from museum collections is becoming increasingly common in museums around the world and particularly in New Zealand. Even the most amicable repatriation cases are complex, requiring a substantial commitment of time, energy and resources from museum staff involved in the negotiation process, to successfully overcome any issues that arise. Although it is known that the repatriation process can be challenging, the literature on the subject in museum studies and related fields focuses on the beneficial outcomes of successful negotiations, rather than explaining what difficulties can be encountered and how they can be solved. This research asks how problems in the repatriation process can be overcome to create mutually rewarding relationships between museums and others involved in the repatriation of human remains. This problem was addressed through a case study of the Karanga Aotearoa Repatriation Programme at Te Papa and three examples of their work: the Natural History Museum in Rouen, France; the British Museum in London; and the Rangitāne o Wairau iwi in New Zealand. Documentary evidence relating to these three repatriation examples was reviewed and the insights of museum staff have been captured through interviews with professionals from Karanga Aotearoa, Auckland Museum and Tairāwhiti Museum in Gisborne. Together these methods provided data that presented a more detailed and rounded picture of the current New Zealand situation regarding the repatriation of human remains. The dissertation concludes by assessing the difficulties in the practical repatriation process and how they have been overcome in New Zealand museums. I argue that repatriation practice, as an important area of museum practice in its own right, requires a flexible approach based on the principle of open-minded engagement with the perspectives of others involved in repatriation negotiations. This approach, focusing on relationships rather than transactions, is a marked departure from more traditional museum practice.

    View record details
  • Gray Mass: a Critical Engagement with John Gray's Political Philosophy and the Role of Christian Eschatology

    Arcus, Benjamin David (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Contemporary political philosopher John Gray has recently asserted: “modern politics is a chapter in the history of religion.” Gray demonstrates how the roots of modern political violence can be traced back to Christianity. Furthermore, he sees Utopianism, “the Enlightenment project”, anthropocentrism and any notion of human meaning as all originating in the Christian notion of “salvation”. Gray argues that all of these ideas are disproven by values pluralism – the idea that human life consists of an incommensurable range of values. Gray is also critical of human beings technological appropriation of the world and the ecological crisis that this consciousness has precipitated. Gray claims that all forms of universalism are mistaken because they privilege a particular set of values at the expense of others. Gray offers a modus vivendi as a political construct that can appropriate the insights of values pluralism, without privileging any particular set of values. Despite considering Christianity (and its offspring) illusory, Gray asserts that the “myth of human meaning” is a “necessary illusion”; it is one that human beings cannot live without. Gray’s argument, however, is beset with inconsistencies, including an implicit teleology, despite his explicit rejection of all teleology, and the tendency of his thought toward nihilism, undermining his proposal of a modus vivendi. In his own constructive proposal Gray inadvertently privileges values of peaceful coexistence and human flourishing. His own political vision has some similarities with the Christian vision of the ideal human life. Christian eschatology is examined through the work of Jürgen Moltmann, and the values of hope and love are highlighted as the ethical consequence of Christian eschatology, as opposed to the violence that Gray claims has been generated from it. Moltmann’s thought also reveals the resources present in a theological perspective that are able to resolve some of the contradictions between individuality and sociality and between human beings and nature. This has significant implications for the ecological crisis, which is also one of Gray’s central concerns. Finally, Martin Heidegger’s concept of Gelassenheit is examined as a point of common ground between Gray’s thought and a theological approach to the world of politics and nature.

    View record details
  • Incipient action : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Philosophy at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Melser, Derek James (2000)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    We conceive of thinking as a process which occurs inside our heads and we assume some entity or organ in there responsible for this process — hence, 'mind'. Thinking is a 'mental' process. Nowadays, most philosophers believe that the mental is explicable in terms of the neurophysiological, and that the entity or organ responsible for thinking is the brain. However, neither mind nor brain is responsible for thinking. No entity or organ is responsible for it. This is because thinking is not a 'process' in the first place. Thinking is an action we perform. Nor is there any specific body part associated with the act of thinking, as lungs are with breathing, say, or lips with smiling. Thinking is no more associated with a particular part of the body than mimicking or playing make-believe is, or being careful. Part One argues that our conception of thinking as an inner process — operations in or of the mind (or brain) — stems from our habituation to certain figures of speech. Endemic in the colloquial vocabulary for talking about thinking is a particularly deceptive type of figurative expression, in which metaphor is used in conjunction with a nominalised verb. We unwittingly take these expressions too literally. Part Two reviews action-based theories of thinking by Ryle, Vygotsky and Hampshire. Although none manages entirely without 'mind', all are precursors of the present work. Part Three identifies the core action in thinking as 'incepting'. Incepting is 'making as if to' do something. One readies oneself to perform a given action, and maintains this readiness, while stopping oneself overtly commencing the action. The incepting of an action can be deliberately ostentatious. However, the 'thinking' kind of incepting is usually an extremely subtle and covert performance. Covert incepting is a constantly useful skill. With adult help, we begin in infancy to learn how to covertly incept actions. After years of practice we get very good at it. It becomes second nature to us. Interestingly, the activity incepted during thinking is always social — and based on concerted, shared activity. Most often, thinking is incepted conversation.

    View record details
  • Effects of environmental factors on heat-induced [beta]-lactoglobulin fibril formation : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Technology in Food Technology, Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

    Wang, Xiangli (2011-04-12)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The heat-induced fibrillar aggregation of β-lactoglobulin was studied under various environmental conditions. The formation of β-lactoglobulin fibrils was monitored by Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and their morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Amyloid-like fibrils were formed under standard conditions (pH 2.0, 80°C and low ionic strength). The β-lactoglobulin fibrillation kinetics exhibited sigmoidal behaviour, and the two-step autocatalytic reaction model fitted ThT fluorescence data well. The studies of the individual effect of pH, temperature, NaCl, CaCl2 on β-lactoglobulin fibril formation showed that decreasing pH (2.4 - 1.6), increasing temperature (75 - 120°C) and increasing salt concentration (NaCl 0-100 mM; CaCl2 0-100 mM) accelerated the fibril formation process and altered the morphology of fibrils. The two-step autocatalytic reaction model did not fit the ThT fluorescence data well at higher temperature (>100°C) or at low pH (1.6). The effects of the four factors (pH, temperature, NaCl and CaCl2) on β-lactoglobulin fibril formation were studied by using a central composition design (CCD) experiment. Results showed that the four main and some of the non-linear effects were significant (95%) on fibril formation, including fibrillation time and the fibril yield. Taking all results together, it can be implied that β-lactoglobulin fibril formation can be promoted by choosing the external incubation conditions. This study is the first step towards the application of protein fibrils as texture-modifying ingredients in food systems.

    View record details
  • The Effects of Trace Metal Cations on the High Temperature Reactions of an Halloysite Mineral

    Maciver, Susan Margaret (1965)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis describes a kinetic study of the high temperature solid state reactions of a well characterized halloysite mineral and five of its cation-saturated forms, the cations used being sodium, calcium, manganese, copper and iron (Ill). The reaction sequence may be represented by the idealised equations: The formation of mullite from metakaolinite has been studied in the temperature range 1020° - 1200°C, by X-ray analysis. Comparison of the experimental data with several theoretical models suggests that up to 90% conversion the reaction takes place by exponential nucleation followed by crystal growth. There is, however, some evidence for diffusion occurring as a rate controlling process, especially at high degrees of conversion to mullite. The rate constants and experimental thermodynamic functions have been evaluated for all halloysite samples. The free energies of activation (111-128 k cal.mole-1) and the rate constants are independent of the starting materials, but the enthalpies of activation (51-118 k cal.mole-1) and the entropies of activation (0 to -50 cal.deg.-1 mole-1) are not.

    View record details
  • Teaching tradition : investigating potential teaching tools for the preservation of Kyrgyz textiles traditions : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Design in Textiles at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Rosenthal, Jennifer (2010)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    No abstract available

    View record details
  • Tangible Lighting Controls

    Dugar, Amardeep Mohanlal (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    'Tangible lighting controls' is used as an umbrella term to describe lighting control systems that are easy to understand and pleasurable to use by end-users. The crucial question posed is, what is the nature of interface designs sought by end-users for maximising interaction with lighting control systems? The manner in which this question is posed implies a fundamental assumption that improved usability and end-user experience are the primary goals. The concept of end-user understanding of lighting control interfaces is proposed as a basis for improving the usability and end-user experience of lighting control interfaces. Usability engineering methods involving survey research, experimental mock-ups and prototyping have been used to enable end-users to design and evaluate lighting control interfaces. The essential difference is to include end-users' point of view about ease of understanding control functions and pleasure of performing control tasks along with a technical point of view about meeting required standards. Manufacturers' claims about the effectiveness of existing lighting control interfaces are challenged, and an entirely different way of thinking about interface design is revealed. Such a change of thinking may be seen as a new framework for improved designs of lighting control interfaces as well as evaluation of their usability and end-user experience.

    View record details
  • An Architectural Dialogue with the Eleatic Stranger

    Squire, Christian Jacob (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Reports throughout New Zealand have highlighted a chronic and growing problem in our urban centres – the effects of alcohol abuse and binge drinking leave our youth vulnerable and unprotected. The results can sometimes be catastrophic. Makeshift paramedic tents have recently been erected in Wellington to provide aid and retreat, but these are temporary structures and only available two nights per week. The vulnerability of New Zealand’s youth occurs not only on nights with too much alcohol, but also in response to the daily stresses brought on by contemporary urban life. New Zealand youth suicide rates are the highest out of 30 OECD nations and more than twice the OECD average (Chapman). Likewise the secularization of contemporary urban society has resulted in the loss of spiritual retreats previously found within churches and religious centres. This thesis examines the need for a permanent urban retreat for all those who are temporarily vulnerable. The thesis investigates how architectural form can provide a new approach to urban retreat by critically engaging analogous theories found in the writings of Plato and Louis Kahn. Both Plato’s theory of Forms (discussed in Plato’s “Dialogues”) and Louis Kahn’s 1961 essay “Form and Design” are centred on the idea of achieving an enlightened state of mind, freeing the mind from the physical realm. Plato’s theory of Forms posits that the universe is separated into two realms: an intelligible realm and a sensible realm. All objects that exist in the sensible realm – perceivable to us by our senses – are merely imperfect shadows of their essences or Forms. By understanding this, we can free our minds from the distractions of life which so often lead to stress and despair. Plato’s theory of Forms has many parallels with the architectural theory of Louis Kahn, as evidenced in Kahn’s “Form and Design”. Kahn describes the ‘measurable’ and ‘immeasurable’ realms, which are analogous to Plato’s sensible and intelligible realms. This thesis critically engages these analogous theories of Plato and Kahn – achieving an enlightened state of mind, freeing the mind from the physical realm – to establish how architectural form can provide urban retreat for those who are temporarily vulnerable. The site for the design research investigation is the nameless alleyway in the Courtenay Place precinct which separates Wellington’s historic St James Theatre from The Mermaid bar and brothel – a site which symbolizes the conflicting stimuli to which our urban residents are now continually exposed.

    View record details
  • The Effects of Primary Students' Mathematics Self-efficacy and Beliefs about Intelligence on Their Mathematics Achievement: A Mixed-methods Intervention Study

    Bonne, Linda (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    A mixed-methods quasi-experimental methodology was used to identify relationships between primary-school students' beliefs about intelligence, mathematics self-efficacy, and achievement, by investigating the effects of two interventions. One intervention aimed to strengthen students' mathematics self-efficacy, and the other aimed to develop in students' an incremental theory-of-intelligence – a belief that intelligence is malleable. In one group, teachers implemented both interventions with their students; in a second group, teachers implemented only the mathematics self-efficacy intervention, and the third (control) group were involved in no intervention. Year 4 and 5 students (n = 152) completed a questionnaire on three occasions, at intervals of about 7 months, to measure their theory-of-intelligence and their mathematics self-efficacy. Students made self-efficacy judgments in relation to specific number problems, which they were subsequently required to solve for the mathematics achievement measure. Both achievement and self-efficacy were then calibrated for each participant using the difficulty parameters for test items. Teachers completed questionnaires about their theory-of-intelligence and self-efficacy for teaching mathematics. Sub-samples of teachers and students were interviewed to develop a deeper understanding of what their questionnaire responses signified. The combined interventions had no significant effect on students' beliefs about the malleability of intelligence, mathematics self-efficacy, or achievement. In contrast, positive effects on students' mathematics self-efficacy and achievement were evident for students who experienced only the self-efficacy intervention. Teachers in this intervention group reported increased use of three strategies aimed at building students' mathematics self-efficacy: providing students with strategies for coping when learning became difficult; increasing their use of descriptive teacher-student feedback; and increasing their use of similar peers as models. For the self-efficacy intervention group, increases in students' mathematics achievement and self-efficacy appeared to be reciprocally related. The combined quantitative and qualitative evidence from the study showed that the complexity of some students' and teachers' beliefs about increasing intelligence was not reflected in their total scores on the theory-of-intelligence items used widely in earlier studies. In interviews, all students and most teachers described intelligence as malleable to varying degrees, which did not support previous dichotomous interpretations of theory-of-intelligence data. From students' definitions of intelligence, two related dimensions were established, one a fairly stable capacity for acquiring knowledge and skill in a given domain, and the second, the more malleable rate at which such knowledge and skill can be acquired. A variety of beliefs were expressed by students about which of these dimensions intelligence includes, and about how malleable the dimensions are. The findings raise questions about the value of advocating an incremental theory-of-intelligence for all students, regardless of their ability and how they conceptualise intelligence.

    View record details
  • An intimate spectacle : dispersing the theatre : an essay presented in partial fulfillment of the degree of Master of Design, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Burrell, Sarah (2011)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Sound files available with hard copy

    View record details