88,600 results

  • Creative mourning: the AIDS Quilt Aotearoa New Zealand

    Brooke-Carr, Elizabeth (2000)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 445 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. "November 2000".

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  • 'Blood, sweat and queers' : (re)imagining global queer citizenship at the Sydney 2002 Gay Games

    Burns, Kellie Jean (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xxii, 260 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "September 17, 2007". University of Otago department: School of Physical Education.

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  • No substantial miscarriage of justice : the history and application of the proviso to Section 385(1) of the Crimes Act 1961

    Downs, Mathew David (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 390 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "September 2010. University of Otago department: Law

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  • Educating girls for a healthier Cambodia: The impact of education on girls' health knowledge, attitudes, and practices

    Cousins, Kimberly C (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction In recent decades, studies from developing countries have shown that maternal education is strongly correlated with child health. Many government agencies and non-governmental organisations have used this evidence to emphasise the importance of educating girls and women as an effective means of improving population health in the long-term. The relationship between maternal education and child health, though evident in many studies, is still not clearly understood. The differences between educated women and non-educated women are also indicative of wider socio-economic, cultural, and environmental differences that suggest that educated and non-educated women may be more influenced by other factors besides whether or not they have been to school. Furthermore, the immediate impact of education on girls' health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours, which may eventually affect both maternal and child health, has often been overlooked by researchers. An investigation of health knowledge and practices of young women may offer further insight into the mechanisms which determine their future children's health. As a developing country, Cambodia's leading causes of mortality and morbidity are from communicable diseases. Many of the country's inhabitants have limited access to adequate sanitation and water, health facilities, and schools. Although many humanitarian organisations and government and non-government agencies are working to improve the situation in Cambodia, little research has been conducted to determine effective strategies to improve the present and future health and well-being of young Cambodians. Purpose The purposes of this study were to evaluate the impact of schooling on young Cambodian women's health knowledge, attitudes, and practices, as well as to evaluate the health impact of a specific programme of the Cambodian Arts and Scholarship Foundation (CASF) that provides scholarships to young women. Methods Qualitative and quantitative data were collected using face-to-face interviews following a piloted, structured questionnaire. Three comparison groups were identified: CASF scholarship recipients, non-CASF students, and out-of-school participants. Eligible participants were selected by local informants and interviewed in Khmer or Bunong. Additional information was collected during focus groups with local villagers and interviews with village chiefs. Results Between April and August 2005, data were collected from 82 face-to-face interviews, nine village focus groups, and four interviews with village chiefs, in three Cambodian provinces and Phnom Penh. In-school and out-of-school participants lived in substantially different environments, primarily because in-school participants were more likely to live in rural areas (94.0%) than out-of-school participants (30.0%). Residence was an important determinant for access to hygiene and sanitation facilities, which would affect health practices and outcomes. Health practices improved among in-school participants, both CASF and non-CASF, although in CASF students, these improved practices were not reflected in health outcomes. Despite being in school, CASF students had similar health outcomes to out-of-school participants as regards self-reported health state and recent diarrhoeal disease incidence. Health knowledge of out-of-school participants was better than in-school participants, particularly for tuberculosis transmission and prevention methods. However, better health knowledge did not necessarily lead to improved health practices. Conclusion Although hand washing and other health practices were better and more consistent in the in-school groups, the poor health of CASF students suggests that education and improved health practices may not be sufficient in improving young people's health. Any benefits that may arise from educating girls may be overshadowed by an unhealthy physical environment, such as lack of toilets in communities and schools, inadequate access to safe water, and poor air quality. Socio-economic status also plays a huge role in the health status of young women, which, in the short term, at least is not mitigated by schooling.

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  • From Wonder Woman to Aeon Flux : women heroes, feminism and femininity in post-war New Zealand

    Cullen, Lynda (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: v, 140 leaves ; 30 cm. Notes: "March 2007". University of Otago department: Anthropology. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • HIV prevention, treatment, and care in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Crump, Andrew John (2012)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xi, 296 pages : illustrations, map ; 30 cm. Notes: Thesis (M. D.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Amen I say to you: Faith, Understanding and Speaking the Truth in Matthew's Gospel

    Anderson, Carmen Esther (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The concept of telling the truth has, to date, received surprisingly scarce treatment within the area of biblical studies. This thesis makes a move towards filling that scholarly gap by addressing just one aspect of the broader issue. With the chosen context of the Gospel of Matthew, limited to the world of the text, and using a combination of literary and historical critical methods, this study draws back to primarily investigate the inner condition(s) required for successful truth-speaking in Matthew. It asks, “How are people able to tell the truth, as opposed to lie, according to Matthew's text?” To begin this process, “Righteousness: Outflow of Actions in the Context of the Kingdom” offers an introductory treatment of dikaiosunh and righteousness concepts in Matthew. A behavioural focus and Kingdom context are noted, and the Matthean approach of presenting actions (including speech) via the imagery of fruit and natural overflow of the heart is offered as vital to comprehending Matthean righteousness. Matthew 5:33-37 is discussed as a depiction of outflowing righteousness in the particular area of truth-speaking. On this groundwork, “Believing eis eme: Faith as the Right Response to Authority” then leads towards the 'how' by considering the oft-neglected notion of faith in Matthew. Jesus' God-sourced and inherent authority is discussed, as the one teaching and representing the Kingdom; the Greek amhn legw umin formula is analysed, too, as an illustration of Jesus' portrayal as one whose words are trustworthy and correct. Faith is confirmed as the right correlative not only to the authority of God the Father, which is assumed, but also to the authority of Jesus, the one who comes from God to fully live and speak in accordance with the righteousness of the Kingdom. A further, vital element of the truth-telling process appears in “Faith and Understanding: The Imagery of Vision and Hearing.” Via his favoured imagery of vision and hearing, Matthew ties together the two hugely important concepts of (1) faith, the role of which has been affirmed, and (2) understanding. Matthean examples of sensory imagery that relate to this pairing are highlighted for analysis, including that in the parables discourse of chapter 13. It is clearly demonstrated here that this Gospel text sees understanding as coming through faith commitment. Subsequently, faith and understanding are seen in practice in the text through “Following the Disciples: Tracking Our Theme in the Disciples' Journey.” The disciples are presented as the most beneficial focal point for the progressing argument; their story is explored and analysed as it pertains to the faith-understanding link, especially in their portrayal as oligopistoi, and concrete demonstration is given of their development and mixed success in this area – even in their final appearance in Matt 28. Having prepared the way by becoming familiar with and evaluating the disciples in general, the actions of Peter specifically are analysed in “Narrowing Down to Our Most Apt Example: Peter's Ability to Speak the Truth in 26:69-75.” Peter is argued to be a well-grounded Matthean representative of the disciples. Next, a positive example of truth-telling is provided in Jesus' approach to his trial (26:57-68), followed by a distinctly less favourable discussion of Peter's failure in the same (26:69-75). Analysis of Peter's “trial” draws together the argument to this point, and uncovers the entire faith-understanding-truth-telling activity at play: Peter's lack of faith and hence lack of understanding lead to a lack of ability to speak the truth. This study finally revisits the uncertain portrayal of the disciples in Matt 28, and briefly addresses what hope there is for them (and for Peter) as potential truth-speakers at the close of the text.

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  • What can secondary student teachers learn from a day in a primary school? The impact of a primary field observation in secondary initial teacher education

    Fielding, Karyn Ann (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This research examined the effects of a 1-day observation in a primary school for the 2012 (n = 68) and 2013 (n = 65) cohorts of secondary initial teacher education (ITE) students in New Zealand. Reflective journal entries on the field observation and 16 individual interviews yielded 5 themes: The value of an observational visit in a primary setting for secondary ITE students as a representation of practice (Grossman, Compton, Igra, Ronfeldt, Shahan & Williamson, 2009), learner development primary to secondary school transitions, enhancing pedagogical knowledge of group learning, and enhancing pedagogical knowledge of curriculum integration. This sample of secondary student teachers valued observing for a day in a primary school as an opportunity to: consider learner transitions; link theory, teaching techniques, and strategies covered at university to practice in the field; and, affirm career choice. For some secondary student teachers, a day observing in a primary school enhanced their pedagogical knowledge of group learning and curriculum integration. They gained a richer understanding of learner development and transitions from primary to secondary school, and a greater appreciation of the professional practice of teachers in another sector.

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  • Acute cardiac admissions after natural disasters - Insight from the Christchurch earthquakes

    Chan, Christina Wei-Hsin (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction It is known that acute cardiovascular events can be triggered by external factors among susceptible individuals. Previous studies have shown an increased risk of acute cardiac events following psychosocial and environmental triggers such as warfare, national sporting events and natural disasters. Earthquakes are well documented to cause cardiac complications. This topic is perhaps the hardest to study due to the unpredictable nature of the disaster. Often, severe destruction of the infrastructure and medical facilities hinders stringent study methodology. Christchurch, New Zealand, was struck by 2 major earthquakes at 4:36am on 4 September 2010, magnitude 7.1 and at 12:51pm on 22 February 2011, magnitude 6.3. Both events caused widespread destruction. Christchurch Hospital, the region’s only acute care hospital, was fortunate to have escaped major damage. It remained functional following both earthquakes. We sought to examine thoroughly the effects of the 2 earthquakes on acute cardiac presentations and their sequelae. We hypothesised that there would be an increase in overall chest pain admission, a surge of acute myocardial infarction and stress cardiomyopathy cases and that major earthquakes of different intensity, occurring at different times of the day would result in different cardiovascular presentation patterns. Methods Patients admitted under Cardiology in Christchurch Hospital 3 weeks prior to and 5 weeks following both earthquakes were analysed, with corresponding control periods in September 2009 and February 2010. Patients were categorised based on diagnosis: ST elevation myocardial infarction, Non ST elevation myocardial infarction, stress cardiomyopathy, unstable angina, stable angina, non-cardiac chest pain, arrhythmia and other. A sub-group analysis as well as a follow up study at 12 months was done for patients who presented with stress cardiomyopathy following the February 2011 earthquake. Results In the first 2 weeks following the early morning September earthquake, there was a significant increase in overall cardiovascular admissions (mean 75 admissions per week during the control periods, 120 admissions in week 1 and 100 admissions in week 2, p=0.003), ST elevation myocardial infarction (mean 5 cases per week during the control periods, 9 cases in week 1 and 11 cases in week 2, p=0.016), and non-cardiac chest pain (mean 29 cases per week during the control periods, 46 cases in week 1 and 36 cases in week 2, p=0.022). This pattern was not seen after the early afternoon February earthquake. Instead, there was a very large number of stress cardiomyopathy admissions with 21 cases (95% CI 2.6-6.4) in 4 days compared to only 6 stress cardiomyopathy cases after the first earthquake (95% CI 0.44 – 2.62; p<0.05). At 12 months, a follow-up study of the 21 patients with stress cardiomyopathy triggered by the second earthquake showed 100% survival rate with the majority free from cardiovascular, other medical or psychological sequelae. Conclusion The early morning September 2010 earthquake triggered a large increase in ST elevation myocardial infarction and a few stress cardiomyopathy cases. The early afternoon February earthquake, although smaller in Richter scale, was far more destructive compared to the first event given its shallow depth and closeness to the city centre. It caused significantly more stress cardiomyopathy in an already vulnerable population that may have been sensitised by the first earthquake. Two major earthquakes of different intensity, occurring at different times differed in their effect on acute cardiac events. Patients who had stress cardiomyopathy as the result of earthquakes had excellent prognosis in the intermediate follow-up period.

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  • The influence of Gremlin-induced BMP inhibition and subsequent associated genetic interactions in Xenopus laevis limb development

    Keenan, Samuel Rhys (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The tetrapod limb is one of the most extensively studied organs within the field of developmental biology, due to its highly conserved development involving key molecular pathways (Jones et al. 2013). The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling cascade is an example of such important developmental pathway, known to induce apoptotic activity and skeletal element formation within developing limbs (Chen et al. 2004). Gremlin (grem1), a BMP antagonist, is known to regulate the fibroblast growth factor-sonic hedgehog (FGF-shh) signalling loop, which controls the early outgrowth and termination of tetrapod limbs, including Xenopus laevis (Christen et al. 2012; Zeller et al. 2009). As tetrapod limb development is a tightly controlled process, modification to associated gene expression can alter downstream signalling and subsequent limb development, giving rise to limb abnormalities (Jones et al. 2013). This project aims to investigate the genetic and developmental effects that ectopic grem1 overexpression has in X. laevis limb development, focused on abnormality development, and the expression intensity and distribution of specific BMP and limb pattern marker genes. Transgenic X. laevis containing a heat shock-inducible grem1 gene, were induced to ectopically overexpress grem1 at various limb development stages. Samples were allowed to develop, skeletal elements were counted, and resultant limb developmental effects were contrasted to wild type samples using cartilage and bone staining, and in situ hybridisation methods. Grem1 overexpression during stage 49 samples, where the hindlimb bud was within the early propagation phase, was shown to have the significantly highest abnormality diversity and proportions when compared to other limb development stages. This was possibly due to decreased limb BMP activity, and subsequent increased FGF (cell proliferation) and decreased sox9 (cartilage formation) activity, resulting in limb bifurcations and truncations, respectively. Significantly fewer digits developed in stage 49 limb samples, with digit IV having significantly fewer phalanges than other digits. Earlier stage grem1 overexpression resulted in more proximally located abnormalities, such as formation of ectopic limbs, showing a time-dependent effect of grem1 within limb development. The in situ hybridisation data showed grem1 overexpression to decrease specific BMP expression intensity; increase proximodistal limb axis FGF expression distribution; increase anteroposterior limb axis shh expression distribution; and increase chondrogenesis-associated sox9 expression distribution. These results concurred with a tetrapod limb developmental model based on chick and mouse data (Verheyden & Sun 2008; Zeller et al. 2009). In conclusion, this work summarised the tetrapod limb development literature, which detailed the importance of regulated grem1 and specific BMP pathway gene expression in regards to the complex normal limb development process in the amphibian model. It also demonstrated possible means of limb abnormality development amongst the tetrapod group, such as differences between serial and mirror bifurcations, which could be useful for experimental and clinical cases. The use of a heat shock technique to overexpress a gene of interest has been proven successful. Grem1 function within X. laevis when compared to chick and mouse models was similar based on relevant studies, but not identical, suggesting limb development needs many models rather than the more extensively researched chick and mouse models. The BMPs inhibited by grem1 were not exclusive to grem1, as they are also inhibited by other BMP inhibitors, but rather the binding efficiency and timing to specific combinations of BMPs differentiates BMP inhibitors.

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  • Geology of the southern portion of the Greenhills ultramafic complex

    O’Loughlin, Benjamin (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Exposed along a three kilometre stretch of coastline on the southern extremities of the South Island, New Zealand are a suite of calc-alkaline to tholeiitic ultramafic and gabbroic rocks which form the southern portion of the Greenhills Ultramafic Complex (GUC). This complex consists of a layered series of dunite, wehrlite, olivine-clinopyroxenite and gabbro of Earliest Triassic age (247Ma), which intrude Lower Permian meta-sedimentary lithologies of the Greenhills Group. Accompanying the intrusion of the complex is a narrow contact metamorphic aureole which decreases rapidly in grade from pyroxene-hornfels facies metamorphism, directly adjacent to the body, to regional prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism, with distance from the contact. The layered series of the GUC is stratigraphically divisible into an upper gabbroic portion of both non-cumulate and cumulate gabbroic rocks, and a lower ultramafic portion of dunite, wehrlite and olivine-clinopyroxenite. The lower ultramafic portion shows well-developed accumulate structures and textures that are typical of stratiform cumulate intrusions. Widespread slumping in the layered series in addition to discrete zones of intense brecciation, faulting, and multiple phases of dyke injection indicate recurring conditions of instability during the evolution of the complex. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical evidence suggests that two gabbro suites comprise the upper gabbroic portion. Namely, a cumulate suite (Shipwreck Gabbro) that is closely related to the lower ultramafic portion, and a non-cumulate (Barracouta Point Gabbro) suite, which is thought to have crystallised from a mixed magma. Whole rock chemistry of the layered series indicates a clear magmatic fractionation trend through dunite to gabbro, consistent with chemical fractionation from a basaltic parental magma. This trend is characterised by a systematic decrease in magnesium content with a concordant increase in silica, aluminium, calcium, and alkalis. A similar fractionation trend is exhibited by the evolution of the primary mineral phases olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase through the layered series. The theory that the GUC may have been derived by dry partial melting of the mantle wedge is supported by the similarity in trace element chemistry between the GUC and N-type Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB). Similarly, the trace element chemistry correlates well with recent basalts and basaltic andesites from the Tonga-Kermadec Island Arc, indicating that present day active ocean-ocean island arc subduction zones may serve as closely representative models for the evolution of remnant arcs such as that inferred for the GUC. The development of a strong tholeiitic to calc-alkaline island arc chemistry in the GUC is typical for magmatic bodies throughout the Brook Street Terrane, which are thought to represent the remnant of an ancient island arc system. A comparison of chemistry between the GUC and that of the Blashke Islands Alaskan-type intrusion from SE Alaska, indicates that these two bodies have been de1ived by fractional crystallisation of a closely similar parental magma, and thus, the GUC can be classified as a Alaskan-type Intrusion. The Greenhills Ultramafic Complex was produced as the result of crystal settling during fractional crystallisation of a basaltic parental magma produced by dry melting of the mantle wedge in an ocean-ocean island arc subduction zone. Modification of the layered body by magmatic slumping, mingling and brecciation and faulting depict recurring conditions of instability within the pluton which is considered typical of island arc subduction zones.

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  • High-Rate Space-Time Block Codes in Frequency-Selective Fading Channels

    Chu, Alice Pin-Chen (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The growing popularity of wireless communications networks has resulted in greater bandwidth contention and therefore spectrally efficient transmission schemes are highly sought after by designers. Space-time block codes (STBCs) in multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) systems are able to increase channel capacity as well as reduce error rate. A general linear space-time structure known as linear dispersion codes (LDCs) can be designed to achieve high-data rates and has been researched extensively for flat fading channels. However, very little research has been done on frequency-selective fading channels. The combination of ISI, signal interference from other transmitters and noise at the receiver mean that maximum likelihood sequence estimation (MLSE) requires high computational complexity. Detection schemes that can mitigate the signal interference can significantly reduce the complexity and allow intersymbol interference (ISI) equalization to be performed by a Viterbi decoder. In this thesis, detection of LDCs on frequency-selective channels is investigated. Two predominant detection schemes are investigated, namely linear processing and zero forcing (ZF). Linear processing depends on code orthogonality and is only suited for short channels and small modulation schemes. ZF cancels interfering signals when a sufficient number of receive antennas is deployed. However, this number increases with the channel length. Channel decay profiles are investigated for high-rate LDCs to ameliorate this limitation. Performance improves when the equalizer assumes a shorter channel than the actual length provided the truncated taps carry only a small portion of the total channel power. The LDC is also extended to a multiuser scenario where two independent users cooperate over half-duplex frequency-selective channels to achieve cooperative gain. The cooperative scheme transmits over three successive block intervals. Linear and zero-forcing detection are considered.

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  • Collateral exposure: the additional dose from radiation treatment

    Fricker, Katherine (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    For patients receiving radiation therapy, there is a risk of developing radiation induced carcinomas, especially if they have a long life expectancy. However, radiotherapy is not the only contributor of radiation exposure to healthy tissue. With the introduction of highly conformal treatment techniques comes the increase in pretreatment imaging necessary to accurately target tumour volumes and consequently, radiation exposure to healthy tissue. In this work the radiation dose delivered to radiosensitive organs from a number of treatment planning techniques was evaluated and the risk of radiation induced cancer was assessed. MOSFET detectors and Gafchromic film were used to measure the accumulative concomitant dose to the thyroid and contralateral breast from early stage breast carcinoma radiotherapy and to the contralateral testis from seminoma radiotherapy, with dose contributions from CT imaging for treatment planning, pretreatment imaging (CBCT) and treatment delivery peripheral dose. To the author's knowledge this is the first work investigating the total concomitant treatment related dose and associated risk to these treatment sites. Peripheral dose contributed the largest concomitant dose to the healthy tissue, measuring up to 0.7, 1.0 and 5.0 Gy to the testis, thyroid and contralateral breast, respectively. The highest testicular, thyroid and contralateral breast carcinoma risk was found to be 0.4, 0.2 and 1.4%, respectively. In conclusion, the risk of radiation induced carcinoma to the assessed radiosensitive tissues was found to be minimal, however, when considering treatment techniques and/or introducing pretreatment imaging protocols, the dose to the normal tissue should be kept as low as reasonably achievable.

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  • Structure and function of food webs in acid mine drainage streams

    Hogsden, Kristy Lynn (2013)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a significant environmental issue worldwide, which often causes severe contamination and marked species losses in receiving streams. However, little is known about how this stress alters food webs and ecosystem function. I conducted a literature review, which revealed that AMD-impacted streams generally had depauperate benthic communities dominated by a few tolerant species and impaired ecosystem processes. Next, using survey and experimental-based approaches, I investigated food web structure and energy flow in these highly stressed streams, which typically have low pH (< 3), high concentrations of dissolved metals (Al, Fe), and substrata coated with metal hydroxide precipitates, on the South Island, New Zealand. Inputs of AMD caused substantial loss of consumers and reduced the overall number of links between species generating small and simplified food webs, with few invertebrates and no fish. Comparative analysis of food webs from a survey of 20 streams with either anthropogenic or natural sources of acidity and metals, indicated that anthropogenic sources had a stronger negative effect on food web properties (size, food chain length, number of links); an effect driven primarily by differences in consumer diversity and diet. However, the presence of fewer trophic levels and reduced trophic diversity (detected using isotopic metrics), were common structural attributes in AMD-impacted webs along a pH gradient, regardless of impact level. Furthermore, complementary dietary analyses of consumer gut contents and stable isotope signatures (δ13C and 15N) confirmed that primary consumers fed generally on basal resources and that there were few predatory interactions, which reflected low densities of small-bodied chironomids. This suggests that food quantity was unlikely to limit primary consumers but that reduced prey availability may be an additional stressor for predators. In these radically re-structured food webs, trophic bottlenecks were generated at the primary consumer level and energy flow to higher consumers was disrupted. However, streams still retained some limited function, including slow leaf litter breakdown, which provided detrital resources and supported the small food webs. Overall, my findings have furthered our understanding of these highly stressed stream ecosystems by providing new insights into interactions among species and trophic levels that structure food webs and enable function.

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  • A correlational study of cough sensitivity to citric acid and radiographic features of airway compromise

    Moore, Sara Louise (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Patients with an impaired reflexive cough response are at increased risk of pneumonia. This study examined the correlation between cough sensitivity to citric acid and radiographic features of airway compromise. Eighty patients referred for a radiographic assessment of swallowing at an acute hospital over an 8-month period participated in the study. Nebulised citric acid diluted in 0.9% sodium chloride was inhaled through a facemask at four concentrations to assess cough sensitivity. These data were then compared to Penetration Aspiration Scale scores based on radiographic swallowing studies. There was a statistically significant correlation between cough response/lack of response and the radiographic features of airway compromise; that is, patients who had a weak or absent response to inhalation of citric acid were also likely to aspirate silently during radiographic assessment. Sensitivity for identifying absent cough was found to be high at all 4 concentrations (0.750, 0.833, 0.941, 1.000), however specificity was consistently quite low (0.344, 0.456, 0.238, 0.078). The significant findings of this research suggest that clinicians adopting cough reflex testing into their clinical practice will have a reliable screen for silent aspiration at bedside. Clinicians will be able to identify patients who require instrumental assessment and are at high risk of pneumonia. This will likely, in turn, decrease length and cost of hospital admissions as well as decrease aspiration pneumonia related morbidities.

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  • God wills it? A comparison of Greek and Latin theologies of warfare during the Medieval period.

    Newman, Timothy John (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The history of the Church’s participation in, and attitudes towards warfare have been well-documented in several fields of research. The development of the doctrine of just war and the medieval crusades within Western Christianity, have been the subject of a considerable amount of scholarship. There has also recently been an increasing amount of research done by historians, theologians and political theorists comparing the status of warfare within the Christian and Islamic traditions. However, the current state of the historiography is focused almost entirely on Western Christianity, and does not address in any depth the attitudes toward warfare present in Eastern Christianity within the Byzantine Empire in the Middle Ages. This thesis seeks to address this historiographical imbalance by comparing the development of the Eastern and Western Church’s positions on warfare throughout the medieval period. The thesis examines the factors that led to the divergence of the two Churches’ attitudes towards warfare, and the development and impact of their differing theologies during the medieval period. It is argued that the fundamental point of divergence between the Eastern and Western Church’s attitude to warfare is linguistic and theological in nature. The linguistic differences between the Greek and Latin Churches, led to different theological interpretive frameworks regarding the subject of warfare. These different fundamental theological assumptions would lead the two Churches down different developmental paths and would prevent the development or acceptance of Western theories of just war and holy war in the Eastern Church.

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  • A home away from home? : the transitions of older people within two new zealand retirement villages.

    Hayward, Christine R (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study explores the experiences of retirement village residents as they move from an independent to a supported living environment within a retirement village. It focuses on residents’ perceptions of their transitions and adopts a qualitative approach to understand the nature of their transitions and the way in which they are experienced. A grounded theory framework is used in order to capture the meanings that participants apply to concepts such as home, and to the physical, social, personal and veiled spaces in which they live. The findings from the study reveal that as residents’ health fails, the impact of increasing dependence is such that their sense of social and personal autonomy is gradually eroded. The research also provides insights into residents’ expectations and fears surrounding end of life. In many ways the experiences of the residents in supported living environments do not differ greatly from those of residents in any aged care facility. One major finding of this research, however, is the debilitating impact on well-being that occurs as a consequence of these transitions from independent to supported living, taking place within one physical location – the retirement village – a physical space which promises prospective residents the opportunity for active and positive ageing.

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  • Communicating social change : politics and immigrants

    Cruickshank, Prue (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Immigration is a complex, dynamic global phenomenon which impacts irrevocably on both immigrants and the receiving society. Immigration policies, reflecting governments’ political and economic intentions, significantly influence successful immigration and settlement. Immigrants’ success in meeting governments’ and their own expectations are influenced by the political, economic, regulatory and social conditions of the host society they enter. Developing communication strategies to prepare a population for a change in immigration policies would be advantageous for social cohesion. However, the introduction of radical economic change intended to restructure business and society at the same time was not conducive to smooth, social immigrant integration. This paper explores the communication dimensions of an immigration policy set within the context of national political and economic restructuring. It does this by tracing the process and impact of the introduction of neo-liberal policies on New Zealand society without prior political debate. The economic and social consequences of neo-liberal reforms affected the reception and opportunities encountered by newly arrived business immigrants. To contextualise the discussion, the effects of neo-liberal policies on the New Zealand economy and society, including its immigrant communities, are traced from their inception in the 1980s through the 1990s. Introducing an economic and political change process which enables people to connect and participate, requires leaders who can articulate a vision to persuade people it is in their best interests to incorporate the change (Shockly-Zalabak, 2009). An opportunity for political debate on the impending neo-liberal changes arose during the 1994 New Zealand election campaign but was deliberately ignored (Jesson, 1999). An unexplained change in the social contract potentially creates a sense of betrayal and unfocused anger (D’Aprix, 1996). Subsequently, as the neo-liberal structural reforms were introduced, communities reacted in confusion, anger and scepticism.

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  • Introduction : representation and voice in a complex communication environment

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Representation is, of course, a central analytical concept with media, communication and cultural inquiry. The centrality of representation – of expression, mediation, institutional form and cultural negotiation - to issues of public debate and engagement, the quality of our media and to the measure of human agency and of our institutions is a notion that grounds our research and inquiry at Unitec. Representation is a central foundation of our research strategy and a central theme of this collection. A parallel interest and sensitivity to the place of voice within contemporary communicative practices provides a second foundational concept for our research activities. With an interest in voice we are focusing our attention on individuals, agencies and institutions and processes of ‘self’ and ‘collective’ representation that voicing implies, particularly in response to experiences or conditions of marginality (Couldry, 2010). Here, voice is understood as capacity and agency, in as much as it implies the communicative or representational act itself. Likewise, representation is an important way in which our voice can be heard. We feel strongly that how voices are intervening from the margins within contemporary New Zealand is a centrally important dynamic to be analysed and understood. We feel our Department is strongly placed to make significant contributions in this area and this collection stakes this claim.

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  • Preface. In Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand: a collection of research essays.

    Bossio, Diana (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of this collection is to showcase Unitec’s Department of Communication engagement with contemporary communications issues and this collection presents a rich and diverse response. From questions of race, multiculturalism and cultural politics, to case studies discussing questions of digital accessibility, governance and organisational communications, the research highlights a specifically New Zealand context, but is applicable to global understandings of communications.

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