82,954 results

  • New Zealand internet websites, information transfer and rural education.

    Burtenshaw, M. K. (2001)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    New Zealand has a relatively high living standard, a well-educated rural population and a relatively high usage of computers and the Internet. These factors mean that many farmers and horticulturists now use the Internet websites for information access and education purposes. Using examples of rural focused websites this paper illustrates some ways the Internet is used for informal and formal education in the rural community. Telecommunication access problems and possible future solutions are outlined. Potential of rural Internet website use for education and human resource development are briefly considered.

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  • Managing self-presentation in e-learning and other online environments.

    Bowker, N.; Brown, C. (2010)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Playcentre: Free play radicals?

    Fagan, T. J.; Manning, S. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Playcentre has been a unique early childhood service in Aotearoa/New Zealand for over 60 years, yet many parents in New Zealand do not know it exists and many people working in the early childhood sector have a lack of knowledge or misunderstanding about how it operates. Drawing on Playcentre texts (Densem and Chapman, 2000; Stover, 1997) and the authors' current involvement with Playcentre, this presentation outlines the beginnings of Playcentre and the concepts on which it was founded, such as family involvement where parents learn alongside their children, child-initiated play and mixed age sessions where children from birth to school-age interact together.

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  • Matters of life and death: The mercenaries, missionaries, multiversities and misfits of tertiary education in the 21st century.

    Hornblow, D. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The implications for science education of the hermeneutic philosophy of science.

    Shaw, R. (2010)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper introduces a modern philosophical tradition and indicates its implications for science education. The hermeneutic philosophy of science is the tradition of Kant, Heidegger, and Heelan. Essential to this tradition are two concepts of truth, truth as correspondence and truth as disclosure. It is these concepts that enable access to science in and of itself. Modern science forces aspects of reality to reveal themselves to human beings in events of disclosure. The achievement of each event of disclosure requires the precise manipulation of equipment, which is an activity that depends on truth as correspondence. The implications of the hermeneutic philosophy of science for science education are profound. The paper refers to Newton?s early work on optics to explore what the theory implies for teaching. Science is about a relationship between each student, equipment, and reality. Science teachers provide for their students access to truth and they may show how their discipline holds a special relationship to reality. If the aim of science teaching is to enable students to disclose reality, the science curriculum will challenge some of the current practices of schooling. If teachers base science teaching upon the hermeneutic philosophy of science, science will assert itself as the intellectual discipline that derives from nature, and not from the inclinations of human beings. It will become apparent that science teachers teach nature?s own science.

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  • Older workers and intergenerational workplaces: Implications for management educators

    Bourke, J.; Bourke, D. (2010)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Increased workforce participation by older workers is an emerging reality. Older workers are often perceived as reluctant learners unable to adapt to new technology, but both research and empirical evidence suggest that this stereotyping is not valid. Where managers hold to this view they create the reality of aged-based cohorting by denying older workers training in technology, which in turn leads to reduced technological skills. Consequently, older workers will be denied positions where technology skills are important. Yet, as producers and consumers, older workers can only remain valuable economic contributors if managers better understand how to encourage them to change and (re)train. The limiting factors in developing workers are attitude and aptitude, not age. Discrimination on age-related grounds can distract the debate from the real management issues around maintaining a competent workforce. Training and development in the workplace is about developing workforce skills. Managers cannot expect optimal performance in a changing workplace unless investment is made in developing workers hand-in-hand with investment in technologies. Stigmatising a worker cohort on the basis of age is counter-productive to this process. This paper reports an analysis made of relevant New Zealand Diploma in Business courses to establish the extent to which learners are introduced to management of intergenerational workplace issues. The conclusion reached is that no learning outcomes address these issues, and raises the question of whether management educators are permitted sufficient flexibility to introduce emerging workplace issues in this programme.

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  • The power of learning communities: Enabling learners to take real-life opportunities while earning academic credit

    Hornblow, D. (2007)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Practice-based research.

    Fisher, R. M. (2009)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Recognition of prior learning in New Zealand: What has been, what is, and what might be.

    Hornblow, D. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper traces the history of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) in New Zealand from the beginning of the 1990s to the present day. It draws upon a case study from the early years, a wide range of the literature, advice from experts in the field, and personal experience of the author in presenting at conferences, both nationally and internationally, and in facilitating candidates through RPL processes. In terms of what has been and what is, benchmarks of inspiration, frustration and celebration are indicated. Looking to the future, it suggests that RPL policy and principles rest easily within the concepts of flexible assessment and open learning. To help put strategies for recognising prior learning in place, a convenient way of categorising tertiary educational institutions in terms of both their accessibility to learners for RPL and their related economic viability is presented. 'Lo-Lo' (that is, low in accessibility and low in economic viability, respectively), 'Hi-Lo', 'Lo-Hi' and 'Hi-Hi' organisations are identified and described. Overall, the author proposes a 'Flexible Assessment Model' involving partnerships among learners, education and training providers, industry, unions and government. This model, from the perspective of education providers, incorporates a cyclical process of: (1) pre-entry counselling, (2) referrals between institutions as appropriate, (3) learner profiling, (4) negotiation of learning and assessment options, (5) assessment, (6) granting of credit, and (7) consideration of new learning opportunities.

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  • Your books are in the mail: Fifty years of distance library service at Massey University

    Clarke, P. S. (2011)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Moderation practice.

    Kane, K. (2009)

    Seminar
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Fat taxes: A proportionality approach.

    Barrett, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Refereed jounal article.

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  • Quality assurance in open and distance learning - Making it work in the digital age.

    Rutland, P. (2009)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper discusses a number of aspects of quality assurance (QA) related to Open and Distance Learning (ODL) in the digital age.

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  • Yikes! I can't do this! Helping students overcome reading overload.

    McCombie, J.; Upsall, D.; Midgley, D. (2006)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Measuring for Sport and Health.

    Marfell-Jones, M. J. (2012)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    International conference presentation not published.

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  • Democratic discourse, taxation and hypothecation.

    Barrett, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The practice of learning advising: How do learning advisors practise?

    Ross, C. (2012)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    Conference presentation not published.

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  • Charities' tax privileges in New Zealand: A critical analysis.

    Barrett, J.; Veal, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Refereed journal article.

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  • Moving Mountains?: CERRA and the re-building of Christchurch.

    Strongman, L. (2012)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    National conference presentation. Abstract only published in proceedings.

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  • Women learning in community.

    Ross, C. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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