89,490 results

  • A voice of her own : Ethel Smyth and early feminist musicology

    Emerson, Helen Katrine (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 180 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Music.

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  • Conceptions of motherhood and how they affect the way surrogacy is viewed and regulated

    Ericsson, Deborah Nancy (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 99 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "25 March 1999"

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  • "Body snatching" in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand : a legal conflict between cultures

    Brandt, Bettina (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The main purpose of this thesis is to consider whether legal sanctions would be capable of deterring the practice of "body snatching," and, if so, whether the law should be reformed in New Zealand to clarify the legal situation of ownership in, and burial of, a dead body. The project will involve an analysis of existing law, proposed law changes, tikanga Māori, and comparative law elements. It will examine and synthesise primary and secondary legal sources, including relevant case law and statutory law. More specifically, the research aim is to provide an explanation of the legal aspects of the "body snatching" issue within Aotearoa/New Zealand, as it occurs within bicultural Māori and Pākehā families. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • Planning a safe city for women

    Brewster, Karen E. (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 256 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Family inclusive teamwork in mental health : collaborative working partnerships between the patient, family and staff, especially focussed on an acute adult mental health service in Dunedin

    Criglington, Ivan Murray (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xxii, 141 leaves, 33 l;eaves of plates :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 138-140) University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development.

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  • Genetic patterning at Austronesian contact zones

    Cox, Murray Paul (2003)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    x, [2], 277 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department : Biochemistry. "26 June 2003"

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  • The validity of a food frequency questionnaire in assessing the nutrient intake of New Zealand adults

    Bolch, Rachel (1994)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 58, 11, [25] leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Notes: Cover title. University of Otago department: Human Nutrition. Thesis (B.C. Ap. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1995. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Technological change at Hayes Engineering Works, Oturehua, New Zealand

    Edwards, William G (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: vii, 109 leaves: ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Notes: "1 September 2008". University of Otago department: Anthropology. Thesis ( M. A.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The Lotu and the Fa'asāmoa: church and society in Samoa, 1830-1880

    Crawford, Ronald James (1977)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xiii, 455 leaves : maps ; 30 cm. Notes: Errata sheet mounted on fly-leaf. Appendices: I. L.M.S. - Wesleyan comity and Rev. P. Turner. -II. Denominational growth and growth of church membership. Bibliography: p.440-454.

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  • Satire and Dickens

    White, Richard (1997)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    People have a fundamental need to feel good about themselves, and sometimes we can achieve this at the expense of others. If I can laugh at someone who does something stupid, or feel superior to someone who does something unjust, or rebel against an institution which violates some natural law, then so much the better for me. Essentially, this is why I read satire. Until recently this sort of approach does not seem to have appealed to literary critics - perhaps because it demeans their subject matter - but there are many essential human needs which are satisfied by a reader's imaginative response to satire, and there is nothing ignoble in that. Satire allows us to escape the constrictions that society places on us. When we read satire we can behave badly: we laugh at other people, cackle at their stupidity, and snigger at their pomposity or hypocrisy; we revenge ourselves upon people who have bored, annoyed, or cheated us. All of this misbehaviour is sanctioned by moral propriety, and by the figure who establishes what is proper and what is not, the satirist. It is the satirist who sets up little moral victories for us, made possible by satiric attack. However, when satire becomes part of a novel, it must there vie for ascendancy with other guises of the author. The satirist must compete with the moralist, the comic, or the sentimentalist, and when this happens the reader too must evaluate their satiric victories alongside the other emotions they feel when they read other parts of a novel. Charles Dickens has many such guises, and consequently he particularly challenges the reader to cope with many different responses. This is where satire becomes even more interesting, because the victories are tempered by other, perhaps more noble emotions. The novels of Dickens present the reader with a constant battle between good and bad: both the author's and the reader's.

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  • Determining the feasibility of a translocation by investigating the ecology and physiology of the threatened Hochstetter's frog (Leiopelma hochstetteri)

    Easton, Luke (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Habitat modification is one of the largest threats to amphibians worldwide, yet research investigating habitat modification impacts and management responses is often limited. Consequently, there is a necessity to address such issues, particularly for rare Hochstetter’s frog (Leiopelma hochstetteri) populations that inhabit mature pine plantations in New Zealand. Fortunately, small populations at Torere Forest (Bay of Plenty, North Island) have received conservation attention following concerns over future pine harvesting. Possible management options are still in their infancy, but it is likely that a mitigation translocation via assisted colonisation will be required, even though a large-scale translocation for Hochstetter’s frogs has not occurred before. Orokonui Ecosanctuary (Dunedin, South Island) was selected as a potential translocation site primarily because future global warming scenarios suggest that southern regions may become more favourable for Hochstetter’s frogs than in their northern current distribution. However, the current cool climate at Orokonui Ecosanctuary is a concern as studies have concluded that Hochstetter’s frog populations are strongly associated with warm climates that frequently reach 20˚C or more. Therefore, the aims of this thesis were to investigate how Hochstetter’s frog populations and individuals are influenced by a modified environment and to assess whether a translocation to Orokonui Ecosanctuary is indeed feasible regarding identifying suitable areas of habitat and the effect of a cool climate on frogs. In order to address these aims, this study examined population parameters and individual fitness, and the resource selection of Hochstetter’s frogs between mature pine plantations and native forests, followed by identifying suitable areas of habitat in Orokonui Ecosanctuary. The quality of the thermal environment at Torere Forest and Orokonui Ecosanctuary was also measured, along with the thermal preference and physiology of captive frogs exposed to cool temperatures. Overall, there were no differences in population parameters and individual body condition between the habitats, which suggested that mature pine plantations may not negatively affect populations and might even provide essential habitat. As for resource selection, the most important resources used by Hochstetter’s frogs were cobble habitat and logs, particularly in pine plantations. These resources were available in Orokonui Ecosanctuary, thus suitable areas of habitat were predicted to be present. However, results from the lab suggested that the thermal environment at Orokonui Ecosanctuary may be thermally challenging for Hochstetter’s frogs, particularly considering captive frogs mainly preferred temperatures between 15.3 - 20.9 ˚C (central 50%) and were unable to digest slaters in cool conditions. Digestion of crickets and locusts did occur however, whilst temperatures were reduced during the acclimation period. Furthermore, gut retention times and weights increased in cool conditions, which highlighted that temperature largely influences these physiological responses. Nevertheless, studies have shown that Hochstetter’s frogs may exhibit thermoregulatory behaviour to optimise the thermal environment. Such behavioural responses are useful as Hochstetter’s frogs often inhabit shallow substrata where thermal conditions are possibly near or at equilibrium with cold temperatures during winter. Moreover, given their generalist diet and often low proportions of slaters ingested, results from this study suggest that energy uptake may occur during winter and that digestion of major dietary components might not be largely affected by cold temperatures. A translocation to Orokonui Ecosanctuary therefore seems feasible, but further investigations are necessary. Further, management tools such as long-term monitoring, trial transfers, and continued stakeholder support are essential for conserving the Hochstetter’s frog populations in Torere Forest. In doing so, the management of these populations will provide a foundation for the future conservation of this threatened species, especially regarding translocations that are yet to occur.

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  • The loop model : modeling consumer interactivity in campaigns coupling simultaneous media

    Davis, Robert (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Based on the responses of 506 consumers, this research models the consumers’ experience of interactivity when interacting with campaigns simultaneously coupling the ubiquitous mobile channel with other channels of response. In Study 1 (RQ1) support was found using structural equation modeling (SEM) for the conceptual model that related the consumers’ experience of interactivity with channel purchase and usage. In Study 2 (RQ2) the significance was assessed of alternative simultaneous channel couplings with purchase frequency. Support was found for up to 5 channel configurations but only when combined with the Internet, mobile and/or television media. The research implications are discussed.

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  • Suburban interventions : understanding the values of place and belonging through collaboration

    Woodruffe, Paul; Unitec Institute of Technology. The everyday collective laboratory (2012-05-23)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    How can a socially defined project facilitate meaningful knowledge transfer between community, corporate and institution? In order to address this question, this paper focuses on an ongoing live project in suburban Auckland New Zealand begun in 2010, undertaken by a post-graduate student and researcher collective. The collective currently creates subtle interventions sited within local cyberspace, and through this current project will employ impermanent and small-scale design to advocate for a series of neglected and disputed sites. It explores the impact and value the presence of artists and designers working within local communities can have, and “champions the role of the artist in the development of the public realm, and their intuitive response to spaces, places, people and wildlife” (Wood 2009, p.26). The significance of this project is that it promotes a collaborative and multidisciplinary methodology that works with community groups to advocate to corporate entities for a wider social and environmental awareness of specific sites. This paper aims to explain the processes and findings of the project to date through both its successes and failures. It also proposes the possibility of the methodology being transferred to undergraduate and post-graduate study as a tool to promote multi-disciplined collaborate project briefs that focus on community well being ... One of the most important findings from the first project in Memorial Avenue was the fact that the local residents had a complete aversion to what they perceived as a “design” proposition. The notion of a designer coming into their neighbourhood with a plan to place a design into or onto the landscape without their request was unacceptable to them. So the document prepared for the heritage walkway proposal contained nothing that could be called landscape design for construction, and it was vital that no sense of urgency or externally driven timetables were introduced to the process, and that the document was seen as a gift and a celebration of their landscape, culture and heritage instead of a plan and an agenda for development.

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  • Learning for the long haul : developing perceptions of learning affordances in CALL teachers

    Haines, Karen (2015)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This presentation reports on an investigation into situated teacher learning and their developing understandings of the affordances of new computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools. In-service teachers need to identify the affordances that a new tool offers for language learning in order to make decisions about which technologies they will choose to support their teaching practice. While general typologies of affordance have been identified for technology use in learning, the kinds of affordance that language teachers perceive in technology have not been specified. Sixteen tertiary teachers in Australia and New Zealand were interviewed over a period of fourteen months with reference to the knowledge they acquired around the use of new technologies in their classrooms. The term ‘learning affordance’ was coined to describe ways in which teachers perceived use of CMC tools promoted language learning in the classroom. Participants identified that new tools allowed students to engage not only with the traditional content of language learning (language skills and learning about the L2 culture) but also to engage with the processes of learning language (in relation to communication, affective factors and autonomy). Teachers also saw affordances for their teaching in relation to these areas. Implications for in-service teacher development include supporting participatory activities for on-going teacher learning such as inquiry, observation and reflection.

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  • The complexity of distributed forms of leadership in practice

    Youngs, Howard (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Distributed leadership is a free-floating concept that is often oversimplified as a mode of leadership and development suitable for twenty-first century organisations, particularly in education. This paper provides an alternative view. It draws on observations of leadership practice to provide a re-conceptualisation to distributed forms of leadership. These forms reveal the complexity of how positional authority and symbolic power co-exist in hybrid configurations to reflect day-to-day practice and provide a deeper sociological frame that can be applied to leadership development.

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  • Imparting China: some reflections on five decades of Chinese language teaching in New Zealand

    Gong, Hong-Yu (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Since its introduction in the mid- 1960s , the teaching of the Chinese language in New Zealand has staked a claim at the table of arts and humanities by emphasizing , first , the importance and antiquity of Chinese civilization and then China's political and economic relevance. In spite of the increasingly close ties between the two countries, Chinese language teach­ing in New Zealand seems to be at odds with the direction of the country it­self. One glaring puzzle has been the ebb that followed the surge in Chinese language teaching and related initiatives in the mid to late 1990s.Why is this so? A historical survey of a half-century of Chinese language teaching .in New Zealand may help to explain the conundrum.

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  • Pocket auteurs : student uptake of an international collaboration in wireless moviemaking

    Wagner, Daniel (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In March 2012, students in New Zealand, England and France teamed-up (virtually) to create globisodes (globally-constructed movies shot on mobile phones). Employing Web 2 platforms to collaborate across both space and time, these international teams (each containing members from all three countries), created work exploring environmental sustainability. The international project was called Entertainment Lab for the Very Small Screen (ELVSS). This paper explores the outcomes of this ongoing trans-national experiment - focusing on its successes, and on its opportunities for improvement - both practically and pedagogically – with particular emphasis on the students’ experience. Did the way the module was structured influence what the students got out of it? How were their working relationships affected by differences in cultural mores; in time zones; in communication styles; in the subjects the students were specialising/majoring in during their “regular” school hours? What types of insights did they achieve on this groundbreaking project? How do they imagine the international course should be run differently? Finally, the paper will synthesise some of the suggestions made by the students for ELVSS-13, and, from those ideas, chart a direction forward.

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  • Non-probative Photos Promote the Truth of Positive Claims

    Cardwell, Brittany A. (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    People’s judgments are prone to the influence of feelings, even cognitive feelings such as the ease with which related information comes to mind (Alter & Oppenheimer, 2009; Schwarz & Clore, 2007). In 14 experiments, we¹ found evidence that non-probative photos — ones that relate to what people are evaluating, but that provide no relevant information for their task — produce cognitive feelings that lead people to evaluate claims more positively. In Part 1, we examined the extent to which photos promote the truth of positive and negative claims. People saw the names of several fictitious wines. Some wine names appeared with a photo that depicted the noun in the name; other wine names appeared without a photo. For each wine people decided whether a positive or a negative claim about it was true. Photos selectively promoted the truth of positive claims, did so most when they could help people comprehend wine names, and swayed people’s judgments about the taste of wines. In Part 2, we showed that those findings translated to when people judged claims about their own (and other people’s) experiences. People “interacted” with several unfamiliar animals (on a computer). Later, people saw the animal names again, sometimes with a photo of the animal and sometimes alone, and decided whether it was true that they (or other people) had positive or negative experiences with the animals. Photos selectively led people to think positive claims were true, and exerted their strongest effects when they could most help people bring related thoughts and images to mind². ¹ Although the research in this thesis is my own, I conducted it in a lab and supervised a team comprised of research assistants and honors students. I also received advice and direction from my supervisors. Therefore, I often use the word “we” in this thesis to reflect that fact. As you will also see, I use the word “we” in a different context to refer to what is known (or not known) in the wider scientific community. ² Portions of this thesis were adapted from: Cardwell, Newman, Garry, Mantonakis, & Beckett (manuscript under review). Photos that increase feelings of learning promote positive evaluations. Cardwell, Henkel, & Garry (manuscript in preparation). Non-probative photos lead people to believe positive claims about their recent pasts. But I have expanded on the introduction, results and discussion.

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  • Revenue-Maximising Tax Rates in Personal Income Taxation in the Presence of Consumption Taxes: A note

    Sanz-Sanz, José Félix (2015)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This note computes revenue-maximising tax rates in personal income taxes in the presence of consumption taxes. It finds that the traditional Laffer analysis, which neglects the effects of marginal tax rates on consumption, overestimates the magnitude of revenue-maximising tax rates. The bias caused by this oversight is computed.

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  • An interpretative phenomenological analysis of 'being religious' in emerging adults within a tertiary education setting

    Dravitzki, Thomas (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Research in the last 30 years has shown that young people have been increasingly turning away from religion during the period of emerging adulthood, despite the benefits that religious people experience. The present hermeneutic phenomenological study explored the meaning of young adults’ experiences of being religious in a New Zealand tertiary education setting. Phenomenological interviewing was used to capture the experiences of 10 religious students, including how they practise their religion and what they believe, with the aim of developing a deeper understanding of what being religious meant for them. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) of the findings showed that being religious meant: having a relationship with God, being different to one’s secular peers, experiencing challenges, and that being religious was ultimately constructive. Many of the students experienced challenges to their religious beliefs and identities from fellow students, teachers and at an institutional level. The benefits of being religious outweighed the challenges and included: praying being therapeutic, religion providing support and helping define the students’ life purpose and identity. The implications of the study are discussed in relation to raising awareness about the importance of mutual respect, moving beyond religious tolerance to fully inclusive education and improving the integration of religious students in tertiary environments through curricular and co-curricular activities and programmes. Recommendations for future research include a greater focus on assessing the extent of the challenges religious tertiary students’ experience, and examining whether students of particular religious traditions experience unique challenges and benefits.

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