85,988 results

  • Copyright and commercial slogans.

    Barrett, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the issue of commercial slogans and copyright, and critically discusses the Sunlec case.

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  • Post-modernism, the return to ethics and the crisis of socialist values.

    el-Ojeili, C. (2003)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Quality of life in end-stage renal disease

    McLachlan, K. (2010)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Self-gifting and the metro-rural idyll: An illusio of ideal reflexive individualism.

    Howland, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Self-gifting is a performative process in which commodities purchased by an individual are 'gifted' to themselves. In negating the assumed necessity of transacting (but not necessarily witnessing) others, self-gifts challenge notions that gifting is minimally dyadic and characteristically results in enduring relationships of mutual reciprocity and obligation. Self-gifting shadows the post-industrial regimes of commodity economics and interpersonal gifting, casting the individual as an exemplary free agent and thus functioning as an illusio of ideal reflexive individuality. Tourists holidaying in Martinborough, a popular 'wine village', also indulged in self-gifting. Within the metro-rural idyll of a Martinborough holiday the tourists' self-gifting was doubly idealised and expressed a nexus of middle class distinction, dialogic selfhood, and ideal reflexive individuality.

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  • The New Education Fellowship Conference, 1937.

    Adams, P. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the New Education Fellowship Conference, held 1937. It was organized by NZCER and was NZ's largest educational event with thousands of public and teachers attending sessions in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin.

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  • The phenomenology of democracy.

    Shaw, R. (2009)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • When earth and sky almost meet: The conflict between traditional knowledge and modernity in Polynesian navigation.

    Strongman, L. (2008)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The benefits of anthropological approaches for health promotion research and practice.

    Krumeich, A.; Weijts, W.; Reddy, P.; Meyer-Weisz, A. (2001)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The nature and status of public relations practice in Africa

    Skinner, C.; Mersham, G. M. (2009)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Using Belbin team roles as an indicator of organisational and national culture.

    Bathurst, J. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Team-based creative learning and social science.

    Howland, P.; Taylor, D. (2010)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Frustrated by high student attrition and failure rates - both course-specific and overall within Victoria University of Wellington's (VUW) Level 4 bridging programme - I introduced team-based, creative learning exercises and assessments into the social science elective (UP016) within VUW's University Preparation programme. The introduction of team-based, creative learning (TBCL) has resulted in improved student retention and course pass rates for UP016 and has had positive socio-educational outcomes for both students and teachers. This paper discusses the rationales behind the introduction of TBCL; the operational mechanics (e.g. group formation) of TBCL; problems encountered and consequent refinements made; and the comparative success of TBCL within UP016.

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  • A cultural-based achievement framework: Its significance on indigenous engagement and retention in education.

    Miller-Helu, L.; Morete, R. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Reconstructing the origins and dispersal of the Polynesian bottle gourd (Langenaria siceraria)

    Clarke, A. C.; Burtenshaw, M. K.; McLenachan, P. A.; Erickson, D. L.; Smith, B. D.; Penny, D. (2006)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Sex ratios, fruit set and size-class structure in the threatened, gynodioecious, sand-dune species Pimelea arenaria (Thymelaeaceae) from New Zealand.

    Merrett, M. F. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Pimelea arenaria sens. str. Cunn. is one of a small suite of native species that occur exclusively on unconsolidated sand dunes and in dune hollows of the North Island and Chatham Islands of New Zealand. It has become extinct at several beaches, and is currently listed in the Gradual Decline category of threatened plants. Eighteen populations of P. arenaria from throughout the North Island of New Zealand were investigated to determine sex ratios, fruit set and population size-class structures. Sex ratios were variable among the 18 study populations; the proportion of females was higher in populations in the northern half of the North Island (15.9�45.5%) than in populations from Kawhia southwards (0�12.7%). Females were absent from three south-western coastal populations. Although fruit set was relatively high, averaging 47% for female and 68% for hermaphroditic plants, recruitment failure was evident at most of the 18 sites surveyed. There was no evidence that sex ratios or fruit set were factors contributing to recruitment failure. Although most of the populations surveyed are not under immediate threat, lack of recruitment could affect population persistence in the long term.

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  • Towards the implementation of sustainable business practices in New Zealand organisations: A review of current activities and new trends such as the Natural Step framework.

    Gehrke, T. (2000)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current business practices of organisations that are working towards environmental sustainability in New Zealand, and to note new trends. Business managers are aware of the competitive advantage they may gain through such practices and a number of New Zealand businesses have taken up the challenge of implementing sustainable practices over the last decade. International companies and local businesses reliant on overseas markets are in the forefront of combining regulatory compliance with meeting additional environmental performance criteria. However, there are a number of New Zealand businesses that restrict their efforts to regulatory compliance only. Small businesses, in particular, perceive that long-term investment may need to precede any expected gain and, as a result, are reluctant to commit to environmentally sustainable practices. In New Zealand, local government is a major driver of the move towards sustainable business practices. It is raising awareness and fostering business involvement through local award schemes, coordination services, and having field officers work directly with businesses to assist them with sustainable business practices, such as waste management. There are a number of initiatives from which businesses can choose if they wish to operate in a more environmentally sustainable way, ranging from cleaner production and process-oriented changes to the introduction of an environmental management system (EMS). There is however, a lack of coordinated and subsidised advice to businesses, particularly small businesses, on the range of sustainable business practices available to them. There is also a need for education to reinforce the fact that many businesses can achieve financial gain from very little investment in sustainable practices (often time only). For example, a quick waste stream analysis undertaken to determine what wastes are being generated where in a production process is likely to give rise to alternative cost- and environment efficient practices. In this light, The Natural Step concept (TNS) can be examined as a possible overarching strategy that businesses may apply when developing sustainable business practices. TNS is a framework that provides direction and context for initiatives towards environmentally sustainable business practices. It consists of four scientifically accepted system conditions that are deemed necessary for sustaining the environment?s life support systems. The Natural Step concept originated from a consensus process among Swedish scientists in the 1980s and has since been adopted by many scientists, businesses and local governments throughout Scandinavia, North America, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. Companies that have introduced TNS into their operations include IKEA Furniture, Scandic Hotels, Interface Carpet, Electrolux, and the Collins Pine Company. The Warehouse and Phoenix Foods, a small New Zealand-based company, are currently working towards meeting the TNS four-system conditions. The TNS concept could be used to foster a more coordinated and national approach for New Zealand businesses wanting to move towards sustainable practices, as it allows for a degree of freedom that can be tailored to the requirements of particular industry and business operations to combine profitable business activities and processes with sustainable practices.

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  • Prehistoric human contact between Polynesia and South America? DNA Analysis of the bottle gourd.

    Clarke, A. C.; Burtenshaw, M. K.; McLenachan, P. A.; Erickson, D. L.; Smith, B. D.; Penny, D. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Storage practices and environmental conditions in a contemporary rua kumara at Oamio, Eastern Bay of Plenty

    Burtenshaw, M. K.; Tawhai, W.; Tawhai, T.; Tomlin, T. (2009)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The writing-up stage.

    Merrett, M. F. (2009)

    Seminar Paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Rural enterprise diversification in New Zealand.

    Burtenshaw, M. K. (2004)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Teach yourself.

    Morris, L. (2003)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

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