85,983 results

  • The New Zealand/Aotearoa Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative implementation journey: Piki Ake Te Tihi - Strive for excellence

    Martis, R.; Stufkens, J. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched by the World Health Organization and United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund in 1991 following the Innocenti Declaration of 1990, of which New Zealand/Aotearoa was a signatory. After a number of unsuccessful attempts to implement BFHI by breastfeeding advocates, the New Zealand Breastfeeding Authority (NZBA) was established in 1999. Successful BFHI implementation was achieved through a number of factors, including the establishment of a national body (NZBA) with oversight of BFHI facility implementation and auditing, Ma¯ori and consumer participation at all levels, the recertification requirements for midwives of breastfeeding education by the Midwifery Council, and maternity facilities having paid BFHI coordinators. Once the NZBA was established, BFHI accreditation of maternity facilities had a rapid rise from 0% in 2000 to 96.1% in 2011 (74 of 77 facilities). Data collected over this period shows a 28.8-percentage-point increase of exclusive breastfeeding at discharge from maternity facilitates between 2001 (55.6%) and 2011 (84.4%). Future strategies focus on having all relevant community providers achieve Baby-Friendly Community Initiative accreditation and on the NZBA’s lobbying the government for initiatives that support, promote, and protect breastfeeding.

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  • Using ¹³⁷Cs and ²¹⁰Pb to characterise soil mixing by burrowing petrels: an exploratory study

    Hawke, D. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This exploratory study tested the hypothesis that petrels (Aves: Procellaridae) actively plough the soil of their entire breeding colonies, as implied by their well-known burrowing capabilities but contra-indicated by widespread horizonation in colony soil. Two profiles to lithic contact were excavated within a forested Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) colony; one, a ridgeline control without nearby petrel burrows, and the other from a steep slope among petrel burrows. On the ridgeline, 137Cs activities (estimated per volume) steadily decreased with depth as expected. At the burrowed site, a subsurface maximum at 12–16 cm depth indicated a post-1963 burrowing or landslip event. Both 210Pb profiles were successfully modelled (r 2 c. 0.9) using a simple first-order model usually applicable only to undisturbed soils. In this model, mixing is accounted for by radioactive decay and first-order, mm-scale biodiffusion. The results therefore indicated that soil mixing was not dominated by petrel burrowing; rather, petrels confine their burrowing activities to maintenance of their burrows as semi-permanent (decades to centuries) structures. However, further sampling is recommended to confirm this view.

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  • Virtualization in practice: Implementing active directory sites

    Correia, E. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Virtualization has the potential to revolutionise the way networking is taught in higher learning institutions. This article outlines, through the use of a case study, the way in which VMware Workstation and VMware ESX Server are used so that each student in the class runs his or her own set of seven virtual servers, including a Linux router. The Linux router connects virtual networks within the context of student physical machines to one another as well as a lecturer virtual server, which runs on an ESX server. In this way, a class of twenty two students can together run an enterprise-like network comprising of some 177 servers and implement Microsoft Active Directory sites and associated services in order to optimize a specific scenario-based replication topology.

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  • Robust forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes chemically assembled on carbon substrates

    Garrett, D. J.; Flavel, B. S.; Shapter, J. G.; Baronian, K. H. R.; Downard, A. J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) have been chemically assembled on carbon surfaces. The structures show excellent stability over a wide potential range and are resistant to degradation from sonication in acid, base, and organic solvent. Acid-treated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were assembled on amineterminated tether layers covalently attached to pyrolyzed photoresist films. Tether layers were electrografted to the carbon substrate by reduction of the p-aminobenzenediazonium cation and oxidation of ethylenediamine. The aminemodified surfaces were incubated with cut SWCNTs in the presence of N,N0-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC), giving forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs). The SWCNT assemblies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and electrochemistry. Under conditions where the tether layers slow electron transfer between solution-based redox probes and the underlying electrode, the assembly of VACNTs on the tether layer dramatically increases the electron-transfer rate at the surface. The grafting procedure, and hence the preparation of VACNTs, is applicable to a wide range of materials including metals and semiconductors.

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  • Researching the toxicity of party pills

    Gee, P.; Richardson, S. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Party pill use is on the increase. A research study at Christchurch Hospital's emergency department is tracking the adverse reactions to ingestion of these substances, which in New Zealand are freely availabe to any one aged over 18.

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  • Insurance: Its role in recovery from the 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence

    King, A.; Middleton, D.; Brown, C.; Johnston, D.; Johal, S. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Earthquakes generate loss only when assets are near enough to be significantly shaken. When communities are highly insured, much of that loss transfers to the insurer. Many events in the 2010–2011 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence were sufficiently shallow and close to (or under) Christchurch to subject the city to very intense shaking (V: 1.7 g; H: 2.2 g). Shaking damage was extensive, exacerbated by the city's setting wherein the eastern suburbs were built on low-lying flatlands (formerly swamp) where liquefaction was widespread, and the southern suburbs, on the flanks of the now-dormant Lyttelton/Akaroa volcano, experienced boulder roll and landslide effects. There were 17 events in the sequence that resulted in insurance claims. The interval between damaging events was insufficient to enable the widespread damage to be assessed or repaired. Furthermore, the combination of tectonic subsidence and liquefaction ejectile lowered the land surface, creating unacceptable flood risk. This paper provides a snapshot of the most complicated insurance settlement program experienced anywhere.

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  • A history of avalanche accidents in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Irwin, D.; Owens, I. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is based on a study for the New Zealand Mountain Safety Council which investigated the circumstances contributing to the deaths of 128 people in avalanches between 1863 and 1999. The study identified a trend of high fatalities during European settlement followed by a lull in fatalities early last century and then an increase in recent decades similar to other recently colonized countries. Similar to other studies, most victims were in their twenties and shift from work-to recreation-based activities has occurred from a century ago to recent times. Comparison with other studies of more specific activities involved in recent decades showed that alpine climbing, people on training courses and in area skiers and patrollers were over-represented while out of area ski/boarders and snowmobilers were under-represented. The geographic distribution of fatalities is concentrated in the South Island reflecting the preponderance of terrain for climbing and skiing.

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  • Against the odds: Community access radio broadcasting during the Canterbury earthquakes: Some reflections on Plains FM 96.9

    Pauling, B.; Reece, N. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Plains FM is a community access radio station in Christchurch, New Zealand. Access radio is a particular form of community radio that provides an alternative outlet for organisations, groups and individuals for whom traditional media outlets are difficult to access. For twenty-five years PlainsFM has provided a voice for hundreds of programme-makers, broadcasting in many different languages, offering a diversity of content that permits the public expression of a wide range of ideas, opinions and beliefs. Editorial control lies with the programme-makers, not the station management. Plains FM is the source of many interesting, often compelling, stories. In the hours after the September 2010 earthquake Plains FM was the only local radio station actually on air. This paper draws on the memories of staff, volunteers and broadcasters to consider the unique role of the station as a media outlet during and immediately after the traumatic events of September 2010 and February 2011. It also attempts to locate those stories within the concepts of civic engagement, social utility and media theory.

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  • Where are they now? Making the transition - three years on

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    366 Where are they now? Making the Transition - Three Years On. Three years ago, the author presented a paper on a pilot project for senior high school students (McCarthy 2002) that provided a programme for transition to tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. As a result of this project, CPIT believed it had “captured” a potential market of students better prepared to handle the demands of tertiary study. Those students appeared better informed as to their options and more able to make informed choices and it was thought they might prove to be better equipped to survive in tertiary study. The initial project has since initiated a great deal of interest within other Technical Institutes both here in New Zealand and, at least one overseas institution, and has also spawned several successors, including a full-scale ICT-orientated senior high school – unique in New Zealand. This paper re-examines the pilot scheme, and its successors, and follows the relevant tertiary experiences of the students involved in the past three years.

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  • Fostering online student interaction using the OB3 web application for online study

    Daellenbach, R.; Davies, L.; Kensington, M.; Tamblyn, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The School of Midwifery at CPIT in Christchurch is undertaking an action research study on midwifery students and blended learning that commenced in 2010. This paper focusses on one aspect of this research which is the student’s experience of social isolation whilst working through the online component of the blended delivery. In response the teaching team initiated an intervention as a result, and replaced the existing content authoring software tool with a system that enables students to engage and interact with each other more effectively. We subsequently adopted the OB3 web application which has ameliorated this problem to a large extent. This paper sets out to explain why the OB3 web application was chosen and what effect this has had in terms of the student’s learning and the educators’ teaching experiences. Keywords: Asynchronous discussions, blended learning, cooperative learning, online learning

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  • Export barriers and path to internationalization: A comparison of conventional enterprises and international new ventures

    Kahiya, E. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Twenty years after the seminal work on rapid and early internationalization, export barrier research remains detached from this path of internationalization. Thus far, export research has largely disregarded the relationship between path to internationalization and the influence of export constraints. This paper opens a new thoroughfare of inquiry by distinguishing international new ventures from conventional enterprises on the basis of the export barrier construct. Using a sample of 129 small multinational enterprises, our logistic regression model separates international new ventures from conventional enterprises, with accuracy approaching 80 % on the basis of eight underlying export barrier factors. Our results convey two dynamic implications: In the realm of export research, we demonstrate that export barriers can indeed predict the path to internationalization. Thus, gradual internationalization is induced by skill and knowledge shortages, while rapid internationalization ensues from positive managerial orientation and lack of confidence in the host market. From a policymaking perspective, this study provides a basis for predicting the international new venture-to-conventional enterprise ratio within the population as well as an instructive basis for needs-based targeting of incentives.

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  • Audit committee members: What goes on behind closed doors?

    Wu, J; Habib, A; Weil, S (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Using a qualitative research paradigm, this study examines audit committee effectiveness from the perspective of audit committee members of New Zealand listed companies. The findings reveal that audit committee members perform a range of overlapping tasks and justify their existence in their audit committees by fulfilling the ‘expectations’ that are placed on them. Many quantitative research studies have examined the association between different dimensions of audit committee inputs and financial reporting outputs. The empirical evidence, however, is mixed and remains far from conclusive (Bédard and Gendron 2010). One of the primary reasons for the inconsistent findings is the lack of understanding of the actual process by which audit committees perform their responsibilities. Using a qualitative research paradigm, this study examines audit committee activities, processes and effectiveness from the perspective of audit committee members of New Zealand listed companies. The study argues that performing audit committee duties is an intended process, whereby audit committee members justify their actions and the effectiveness of their audit committees. The paper contributes to the limited literature on how audit committees operate and, by doing so, provides possible explanations for the inconsistent findings of the quantitative audit committee research. In particular, the paper invites further discussion on whether audit committee members can be (or should be assumed to be) independent when discharging their role of overseeing auditing and financial reporting-related matters.

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  • Nurses' views of family nursing in community contexts: An exploratory study

    Yarwood, J. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is chosen as it provides a community nurses' perspective about family nursing, of which there is a dearth of understanding both in New Zealand and abroad. The qualitative exploratory study was designed to give voice to community nurses views about working with families and to encourage debate and discussion about the possibilities of family nursing in nursing practice this country. To do this and to ensure it reached academic and clinical nurses to inform practice, it was important this article was published in the only national, well recognised scholarly, peer reviewed nursing journal, that focusses on nursing research, Nursing Praxis in New Zealand. This article was recently picked up internationally and cited in a literature review 'Study of the implementation of a new community health nurse role in Scotland' URL http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/03/1388/13.

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  • Early attrition among first time eLearner: a review of factors that contribute to drop-out, withdrawal and non-completion rates of adult learners undertaking eLearning programmes

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The problem of dropout rates in eLearning programmes has been argued over at length without any consistent conclusions about the degree of the problem, or a clear understanding of what factors contribute to learners dropping out, withdrawing or not completing eLearning courses. In examining the factors that affect attrition among distance online learners this paper focuses on the distinctive characteristics of mature adult learners undertaking part-time education by distance eLearning course for the first time. The available research suggests that attrition among mature adult online learners is affected by sociological, psychological, technical and cognitive factors, critical features of which are the notions of cognitive load and locus of control. This paper argues that first time eLearners often experience cognitive overload, (as described in Cognitive Load Theory), in the early stages of an online course and it is suggested that this is a likely contributor to high drop out rates, particularly in terms of those withdrawing within the first few weeks of the course start.

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  • Facilitating learning by using case studies

    MacGregor, A.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A number of issues can result in institutions seeking alternatives to industry based capstone projects in the final semester or year of three year qualifications in information and communications technology (ICT), whether they be three year degree programmes or diploma programmes such as the level 7 Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT – Level 7), formerly called the National Diploma in Business Computing (NDBC). One issue documented has been large numbers of international students as documented by a number of writers including Chard and Wempe (2004), Baker and Nesbit (2006). The issue giving rise to this paper is where a small institution has built links with industry based clients through the offering of DipICT Level 7 projects, but due to a decline in student numbers has ceased the offering of the DipICT Level 7 programme. There was however a desire to maintain the relationships that had been built with the industry based clients. The aim of this paper is to investigate the pitfalls and promise of using client case studies in a simulated work environment to fulfil learning outcome requirements in DipICT Level 6 courses so that these relationships can be maintained with industry based clients. The framework used is small classes, full work days, multiple courses being taught at the same time and multiple clients. The framework used is described. A trial implementation is reported on, and feedback analysed from client, student, tutor and administrative views. Given this feedback, modifications to the process are suggested. The paper then discusses whether there is promise for investigating using these methods in a larger situation.

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  • Optimal handlebar position for track cyclists

    Underwood, L.; Jermy, M. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on seven male and seven female track cyclists and the drag measured for their current favoured racing position and for different handlebar height and separation combinations deviating from their current favoured position. The handlebars were raised or lowered using spacers on the stem, and the elbow pads were placed wider apart or closer together using the adjustment slots on the pads. The degree to which adjustments were made was dependent on the equipment used, as not all handlebars had the same amount of adjustment. The drag area was calculated from the measured drag force and the results for drag area plotted for each athlete in each position to identify the optimal handlebar position for each athlete. The results showed that the handlebar height had a greater influence on the drag area compared to handlebar separation, but that there was a high degree of variability between athletes as to the optimal handlebar position.

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  • Electrochemical detection of wild type Saccharomyces Cerevisiae responses to estrogens

    Baronian, K. H. R.; Gurazada, S. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The presence of an estrogen binding protein (EBP) and an endogenous ligand in three yeast species was first reported in 1982/1983. The ligand was shown to be 17-estradiol and the binding affinities of EBP were demonstrated to be similar to those of rat estrogen receptors. This report describes detection of the behaviour of a putative estrogen binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a double mediator electrochemical detection system. The response to estrogen is shown to be quantitative with signals detectable from 10-8 to 10-14 M. An incubation period of 5 hours is established and a method to block electrochemical signals produced by the catabolism of exogenous substrates is demonstrated to be effective. The system provides a method that permits the use of wild type S. cerevisiae to quantify estrogens.

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  • Health assessment and its relationship to nursing practice in New Zealand

    Milligan, K.; Neville, S. (2001)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Health assessment has been an integral component of nursing education in Australia for over a decade. New Zealand has only recently embarked down this path and might benefit from the Australian experience. This article will discuss health assessment in the context of three issues currently topical in nursing in New Zealand. The issues are annual registration based on evidence of competence to practice, a review of undergraduate curricula, and the development of nurse practitioner/advanced nurse practitioner roles. The meaning of the concept ‘health assessment’ is also clarified in order to provide consistency as new initiatives in nursing are currently being developed.

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  • Making the transition - Year 13 computer studies at Burnside High School: a case study

    McCarthy, C. (2002)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes a process that provides a transition programme for senior high school students towards tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. The paper examines the case study of the introduction of this pilot project and follows the experiences of a cohort of students.

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  • Fluorinated analogues of biological molecules: accessing new chemical, physical and biological properties

    Edmonds, M.; Peddie, V. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The introduction of fluorine into biological molecules often results in significant changes in their chemical, physical, and biological properties. As such, fluorinated analogues of biological molecules provide useful tools for probing and modifying the functions of biological systems. Where such modifications are beneficial to humans the fluorinated analogue becomes a potential therapeutic agent.

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