85,985 results

  • Clusters and Hubs: toward a regional architecture for voluntary adaptive migration in the Pacific

    Burson, B; Bedford, R

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Shooting the messenger, Pacific style

    Robie, D

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Media freedom as an issue in the Pacific has been defined in far too narrow terms, as if Big Brother governments and politicians ignorant about the role of media are the only problem. Of course, they’re not. There are many other issues that are vitally important in the region that impinge on media freedom yet are rarely mentioned – such as self-censorship, media ownership and convergence, poor qualifications and salaries for many journalists (which make them potentially open to undue influence and bribery) and lack of education.

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  • Food design thinking

    Zampollo, F

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • The potential of things: from objects to sculptural things

    Bartleet, Alexander

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project is a practice-based exploration of how a work of art emerges from within a field of signs that are givens brought to the art-making process. In particular it explores the use of utilitarian objects as sculptural materials, where the given signs relate mostly to their past utility. The art-making process then involves a clearing of such givens so that new modes of signification can emerge, as sculptural works of art. Here, the process of making is simultaneously the process of clearing. Various strategies for using these materials are explored, including means to rupture or attenuate associations that objects hold (that we hold for them) with the past. Consideration is given to how, through such means, fresh possibilities might emerge from any material used in the work of art.

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  • Ideal Leader in the Perception of Employees From Lithuanian Health Care

    Endriulaitienė, A; Stelmokienė, A; Minelgaitė-Snaebjornsson, I; F. Littrel, R

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    The main aim of the article is to disclose employees’ expectations towards their ideal leader in Lithuanian health care organizations. According to the results of the empirical research, employees from health care organizations perceive the task-oriented leaders who are also able to perform a representative role as ideal ones.

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  • From 'ambiguously gay duos' to homosexual superheroes: the implications for media fandom practices

    Corin, Gemma (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Despite traversing the fine line between homosocial and homosexual (Brooker, 2000) in his controversial text Seduction of the Innocent, Fredric Wertham's (1954) description of Batman and Robin as a 'wish dream of two homosexuals living together' (Lendrum, 2004, p.70) represents one of the first published queer readings of superhero characters. This text can also be interpreted as the commencement of, and subsequent intense interest in the way superhero characters often portray a 'camp' sensibility (Medhurst, 1991) representative of a queer performative identity (Butler, 1993). This is most evident today within comic book fan-communities online where the sexual identity of popular superheroes are continuously explored and debated in discussion forums and expressed through the production of slash fiction and queer-themed fan art. Indeed, the ambiguity inherent in superhero comics has traditionally allowed and encouraged fans to operate as 'textual poachers' (Jenkins, 1992) appropriating these texts for their own means. Today, however, there exist a new generation of comic book superheroes, in the form of the Young Avengers, Uncanny X-Men and The Authority, which contain established 'out' gay characters. This paper will examine the implications of these series on the practice of fandom by analyzing fan reactions and responses to the manner in which the industry has opted to present a gay relationship between its superhero characters Wiccan and Hulkling and, Apollo and The Midnighter. The meaning of the shift from the 'implied' to 'actual' is examined in terms of fans' acceptance, resistance and desire to further appropriate the text.

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  • Design and Evaluation of a Mobile Photo Gallery in TIP

    Wang, Yi (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    As a part of the Tourist Information Provider (TIP) system, this project focuses on creating a photo gallery service in the TIP system, which allows users to share, browse and categorize their photos. The core of this project is to provide users a location-based photo browsing. The system provides photos which are taken in the current user's location. We considered privacy control on photos that users uploaded. A photo owner is able to sign an access level to each of their photos and permit different users to access them. We also considered reusing resources. The system allows a user to use an URL of a photo in the system in stead of uploading the photo from the local computer. The system also provides a URL of each photo in order to use the photo on other web places, e.g., Blogs. We use tags and photo metadata Eixf to categorize photos.

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  • Investigating impulse buying and variety seeking: towards a general theory of Hedonic Purchase Behaviors

    Marshall, R; Sharma, P; Sivakumaran, B (2012-01-28)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although impulse buying (IB) and variety seeking (VS) are both low-effort feelings-based behaviors with similar underlying psycho-social processes, there is no general theory to explain such hedonic purchase behaviors. This paper explores similarities and differences between these behaviors using a conceptual framework incorporating three relevant consumer traits – consumer impulsiveness, optimum stimulation level and self-monitoring. The findings from two studies across student and retail customer samples, show that consumer impulsiveness and optimum stimulation level influence both behaviors positively, whereas self-monitoring influences IB negatively and VS positively. Self-monitoring also moderates the influence of consumer impulsiveness and optimum stimulation level on purchase decisions, negatively for IB and positively for VS.

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  • The irreverent form

    Mills, Rohan Hartley (2013-11-25)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This is a practiced based research project that inquires into the language of contemporary abstract painting. My painting practice focuses on questions around the renewal and repetition of historical forms. Examining the re-calibration of everyday imagery into a studio context while delimiting previous concerns regarding painting technique, work ethic and the provisional. The objective in this investigation is to gain further understanding of my own studio methodology. I outline the processes and strategies that successfully generate painted forms with a relationship to current dialogues in abstract painting.

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  • Solvability of a hybrid model for a vertical slender structure

    Labuschagne, A; van Rensburg, NFJ; van der Merwe, AJ (2011-07-28)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    We consider the solvability of a hybrid model for the vibration of a vertical slender structure mounted on an elastic seating. The slender structure is modeled as a Rayleigh beam and gravity is taken into account. The seating and foundation block are modeled as rigid bodies connected by elastic springs with damping mechanisms. We show how an existence result for a general linear vibration problem in variational form may be applied to the weak variational problem for this system.

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  • Hospitality report: reporting on New Zealand's hospitality industry 2013

    Williamson, D; Neill, L; Kruesi, M; Waldren, N (2013-07-10)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Embracing innovation and gaining ‘ownership’ of the social studies exemplars: A classroom based study

    Ramsbottom, Rosamund (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This research supports the on-going national research that has accompanied the development and implementation of the New Zealand Ministry of Education's social studies curriculum exemplars (2004). A social studies exemplar is a sample of authentic student work annotated to illustrate learning, achievement and quality in relation to levels 1- 5 of Social Studies in the New Zealand Curriculum (SSNZC, 1997). The aim of the research was to support teachers to implement the social studies curriculum exemplars in informed ways by encouraging and promoting the use of the social studies exemplars as models of quality social studies teaching. This small scale qualitative research was undertaken by a syndicate of four Years 5/6 teachers and the researcher. The four primary teachers assumed roles of teacher-researchers and worked together collegially with the researcher within a community of practice to co-construct the research process. The research involved incorporating aspects of the exemplars into their social studies programmes during 2006. The community of practice engaged in regular collegial conversations relating to the exemplars. Three of these narratives were taped semi-structured conversations captured in situ. Transcripts of student-teacher conversations were collected, analysed and commented upon to provide some information about student learning outcomes in relation to the exemplars. The notion of reciprocity underpinned this research, since it involved the researcher being willing to contribute to the research in return for the teachers' time and involvement in the study. The support and guidance provided by the researcher was provided as an outcome of her experience in teaching social studies for the School of Education. The research takes into account contemporary ideas about learning and teaching theory, as well as the nature of social studies pedagogy. It examines the implications of sociocultural processes for learning with its emphasis on interaction and collaborative learning iv environments. The research context and the methodology were informed by new understandings about the empowerment of teachers implementing their own professional development and conducting research into their own practice. This research makes a contribution to the field of social studies curriculum and wider professional contexts by informing pre-service teachers' understandings of the intent and use of the New Zealand Ministry of Education's social studies curriculum exemplars. Additionally, it supports in-service social studies professional development, illustrates processes around communities of practice and exemplifies social studies pedagogy.

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  • The Role of Indigenous Knowledge in Biodiversity Conservation: Implications for Conservation Education in Papua New Guinea

    Tiu, Sangion Appiee (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The research reported in this thesis focussed on exploring existing indigenous environmental knowledge of two indigenous communities in Papua New Guinea and how this knowledge was acquired, interpreted and disseminated to the next generation. The relevance of indigenous environmental knowledge in the promotion of biodiversity conservation efforts was investigated. This research was conducted within an interpretive paradigm. A naturalistic/ethnographic methodology was used. Data was collected through semi structured interviews and observations. Participants in this case study were representatives of the community and included elders, adults, teachers and students. The findings in this study revealed indigenous environmental knowledge as useful for biodiversity conservation and promotes sustainable practices. It showed that indigenous family knowledge is essential for claiming land inheritance and indigenous environmental practices are consistent with sustainable practices and land use. Forest knowledge is found to be useful in identifying and locating resources and that sustainable practices ensured continuity of these resources. The study also identified spiritual knowledge and beliefs as fundamental for developing indigenous worldviews and environmental attitudes and values and that change in resource use may be both beneficial and harmful to biodiversity. The findings also revealed indigenous education as flexible, holistic and informal in nature and uses mostly oral history through verbal instruction and various non-verbal means. They showed that IE uses a variety of teaching and learning approaches that utilise the environment as a tool and that learning venues provide a realistic learning experience. The thesis concludes that IEK promotes biodiversity conservation in many ways and that indigenous education uses situated context to promote realistic learning. Indigenous environmental knowledge and education could therefore be used in biodiversity conservation education.

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  • Community Based Coastal Monitoring: Developing Tools For Sustainable Management

    Rickard, Darcel (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Burgeoning coastal development, recreational use, and the future affects of climate change are placing increasing strain on regulators to manage risk associated with coastal hazards. Low-lying coastal communities in particular are vulnerable to a range of natural hazards including coastal erosion, storm surge inundation, tsunami and water safety that come with varying levels of risk to life and property. New Zealand's coastal hazard monitoring network is patchy and resources are limited. As a consequence there is considerable potential for coastal communities are going to need to take a more active role in monitoring their environment and building data bases and knowledge that can be used to better manage their coast. This paper describes simple methodologies based on the needs of various community groups and sound science principles that can be used to monitor beaches and the coastal environment. By employing these tools councils, technical experts and community groups will be able to make better-informed decisions for managing activities in the coastal environment. One of the keys to the successful uptake of a monitoring programme by a community group is its relevance to the group. The programme and the tools provided must fit the interests, needs, capability and resources of the group. This project develops tools for coastal monitoring and targets coastal community groups such as Coast Care, Coastal Hapu, Secondary Schools, and Surf Life Saving Clubs. The monitoring methodologies have been developed in consultation with Tainui ki Whaingaroa hapu, Raglan Area School, and the Waikato Beach Care and Coast Care Bay of Plenty. Successful methodologies for measuring changes on the coast are also those that are matched to the type of beach, use appropriate equipment, collect structured data, provide data to which analysis can be applied, incorporate local knowledge of the environment, and feed results back to the community and other interested parties such as councils and science organisations. This project provides the target groups with simple monitoring methodologies, field forms/checklists, and appropriate survey and measurement equipment (which have undergone field trials) to carry out coastal monitoring. A web-based facility has been developed to input, check and store data; and provide immediate feedback using graphs and images. It also provides background information on coastal processes relevant to monitoring programmes. In this manner, a scientifically robust data set is collected and stored within a secure and future proofed archive, providing valuable information to coastal groups for years to come. Although the primary objective of this research is to develop a means for coastal communities to monitor changes in their environment, there are additional benefits associated with engaging communities in the study of their environment. These benefits include increasing awareness of coastal hazards, capacity building, providing valuable educational resources, and improving the temporal and spatial data coverage of information for the New Zealand coastline.

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  • Searching for magic in Dog Town: a photographic journey

    Hendeles, Su

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project began as an exploration of Henry F. Talbot’s 1839 description of his new photographic process as “a little bit of magic realized”. It examines the role of sympathetic magic and the participation of non-human agencies in the creation of the photograph and explores the potential of photography to evoke a sense of re-enchantment with the everyday environment. The project defocuses on a minor suburban waterway, the Mangaone Stream in Palmerston North, an unsung remnant of a significant ancient wetland. As the project unfolded, it became a personal journey of exploration of a familiar environment not normally renowned for its magical potential. The methodology includes the development of a ‘magical ’ photographic praxis, utilising simple, analogue, zone-plate cameras , and silver gelatin based media that reference historical processes. The project attempts to rekindle Talbot’s sense of magic at a time when the ability to photograph has become commonplace and unquestioned.  

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  • International Posture, L2 Motivation, and L2 Proficiency among South Korean Tertiary EFL Learners

    Courtney, Matthew Gordon Ray (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Today, English is spoken by more non-native speakers than native speakers; current estimates by Graddol (2007) indicate five to one. With this transformation English has become the international language of business and intercultural communication. The emergence of English as Lingua Franca is apparent in Korean society where English plays a defining role in educational, career, social, cultural, and economic domains. Despite such inextricable links the acquisition of English in Korea has not been successful. This study examines the relationship between Korean university students' International Posture or non-ethnocentric attitude (Yashima, 2002, p. 57) and their L2 (Second Language) Learning Motivation, and L2 Proficiency in English, first described by Yashima (2002) in her study of Japanese EFL (English as a Foreign Language) tertiary students. The methodology used in this thesis was quantitative as it employed Likert scales in order to elicit students' International Posture, and L2 Motivation, and obtained L2 Proficiency from percentile grades in the TOEIC exam. With the use of path analysis software, AMOS 7, data from 118 university freshman (majoring in English literature) from Hannam University, South Korea were analyzed in order examine the relationship between International Posture, L2 Learning Motivation, and L2 Proficiency among South Korean EFL students. The results indicated a significant and very strong relationship between International Posture and L2 Learning Motivation and a significant and moderate relationship between L2 Learning Motivation and overall L2 Proficiency. The findings of the study conclude that EFL learner motivation can be understood by an agglomeration of integrative and instrumental motivational orientations. The findings in this study also suggest that the tendency for Korean EFL learners to approach, rather than avoid, interaction with people of different cultures is especially important to understanding Korean tertiary level students' attitude, motivation and performance in EFL. These findings could be implemented in the classroom by providing Korean EFL learners with safe and appropriate opportunities to interact with foreigners. Potential areas for further research include longitudinal studies (utilizing both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies) that look into the effect of EFL learner age, gender, and teaching pedagogy on International Posture, L2 Learning Motivation, and L2 Proficiency.

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  • A life-history analysis of achievement of Māori and Pacific Island students at the Church College of New Zealand

    Solomon, Tereapii Elinora (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The Church College of New Zealand is a private co-educational secondary school located near Hamilton, New Zealand and is sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Since its opening in 1958, it has hosted a large population of Polynesian students, in particular Māori. The questions that this thesis addresses centre on the nature, history and reasons for what seems to be a disproportionately higher level of achievement amongst Māori and Pacific Island students at Church College than in New Zealand more broadly. Through a life-history approach to research, this thesis provides an overview of the rich history behind the building of the Church College, and highlights the experiences of successful graduates over three particular timeframes - 1951-1969, 1970-1989 and the 1990s. A major contributing factor to the success of the students at Church College is an environment where both religious and cultural values of students are reaffirmed and considered normal. For some students, Church College provided an environment that validated what students were being taught in their own homes. For others, it provided a refuge from a conflicted home. With the growing pressures of social problems within the wider community for many Māori and Pacific Island families, the school environment of the Church College was a key factor in providing stability and security for some students at the College. On June 29 2006, an announcement was made by leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints of the phased out closure of Church College beginning in the year 2007 and eventually closing at the end of the year 2009. With Māori and Pacific Island students so under-represented in achievement and participation in education settings in New Zealand, the announcement of the closure provided an opportunity to highlight some of the successes experienced at the Church College of New Zealand.

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  • An Eclipse Environment for Z

    Xu, Chengdong (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis reports on the design, implementation and evaluation of a new interactive Z environment that is integrated into the Eclipse environment. The Z language is a formal specification notation that is used to describe and model computer-based systems. For the widespread use of Z, it is desirable to integrate Z support with a mature and popular editing environment, such as Eclipse. Eclipse was chosen as the basis for the new Z environment because it is widely used, it provides rich functionality and it is designed to be extensible. The Z environment described in this thesis extends Eclipse to provide a large set of useful features for editing and analyzing Z specifications, such as a table of Z symbols, constant detection of syntax and type errors, outlining facilities, cross-referencing of Z names and conversion between different Z markups. User feedback shows that the resulting Z environment is helpful for editing and correcting Z specifications. The development of the Z support for Eclipse is a part of the CZT (Community Z Tools) project, which is a Java framework for building Z tools and provides parsers, typecheckers and other Z tools.

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  • The relationship between leadership styles, perceived control and psychological ownership

    Li, Tian (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This study investigates the relationship between leadership styles (e.g., taskoriented, relationship-oriented and participative leadership style), perceived control, psychological ownership of the job and several volunteers' work attitudes. Particular attention is given to turnover intentions, psychological withdrawal and senses of responsibility. Research participants were 162 volunteer workers from diverse occupational groups across 19 non profit organizations. Results of Persons correlations and mediated regression analyses demonstrated that (a) psychological ownership did not have relationships with turnover intentions and sense of responsibility but was significantly related to psychological withdrawal; (b) task-oriented, relationshiporiented and participative leadership style were positively related to perceived control, (c) perceived control was positively related to psychological ownership; (d) psychological ownership did not have mediating effects between perceived control and the volunteers' work attitudes; (e) perceived control only had a mediating effect between task-oriented leadership and psychological ownership. Recommendations for further research and implications for management are discussed in the final chapter.

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  • Effort-based re-estimation during software projects

    MacDonell, SG (2011-08-13)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

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