90,990 results

  • Teachers’ perceptions of the impact of professional development on teaching practice: The case of one primary school

    Aminudin, Nurul Aini (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research examines teachers’ perceptions of the impact of their professional development experience on teaching practice. Teachers’ professional development is often regarded as the key to successful education reforms. Hence, teachers are expected to experience continuous professional development to keep abreast with the relentless change taking place in the education system. However, problems arise when too much emphasis is placed on making sure that teachers take part in professional development initiatives. To some teachers, professional development is seen as a burden and not as an opportunity to improve their practice as the reforms has intended. This happens as the teachers are made to take part in various standardised professional development programmes that are not tailored to their specific needs. As a result it has become less effective in helping the teachers improve their own practice. This research takes the form of a qualitative study that employs three research instruments: document analysis, questionnaires that are filled in by all the teachers and five semi-structured interview sessions. This research study is guided by three key questions: What are teachers’ perceptions of the impact of professional development on their teaching practice? Secondly, what factors influenced teachers’ perceptions of the impact of professional development on their teaching practice? Finally, what are the challenges or difficulties experienced? The findings reveal that the participants have issues with sustaining changes to their practice; they experience external professional development overload while at the same time they are also struggling to create more opportunities for school-based professional development. In addition, the findings from this study also indicate that the participants want to have some say for their own professional learning. In addition, this study also stresses on the need for to the participants to experience one professional development programme at a time and to have sufficient support and follow-up during that time to ensure that changes in teaching practice are best sustained.

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  • A design system for homes and housing: A rationalised approach to housing supply for Auckland.

    Roskruge, Alyssa (2011)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    New Zealand is currently experiencing a housing shortage. The economical recession has also had implications on housing affordability and as a result more people are relying on the government to help meet their housing needs. The government have given Housing New Zealand Corporation a target of increasing their housing stock to 70,194 by 2012. This is an increase of five percent. There is also a need to revitalise the housing stock. Over seventy percent of the houses were built before the 1980s and the stock is dated, cold and often mouldy. This project proposes a hybrid prefabricated system to enable Hosing New Zealand Corporation to efficiently provide quality housing. Throughout time a one size fits all approach has been applied to state housing. There has been a Europe¬an perspective in housing, Polynesians, Maori make up the majority of state house tenants with the other ethnici¬ties including Asians and Middle Eastern. A survey of past and current models shows the flaws in their design. In order to meet the diverse needs of tenants, it is necessary to go beyond the current approach to state housing with prototype houses that were placed repeatedly within a site. This project does not intend on experimenting on the poor but instead apply a collaboration of proven techniques in terms of both design and construction. The answer to the problem is a flexible system consisting of a concrete service core and a library of timber framed wall panels that can be applied to a pre-fabricated floor panel. This system is suitable for sites throughout the country as it can be reconfigured to suit each individual site and orientation. It can also be configured in multiple ways to create variations suited to the different family dynamics of the Housing New Zealand tenants. The system is an efficient solution, minimising time on site and able to be produced in bulk. The solution demonstrates and showcases emerging trends in housing and is able to show Housing New Zealand Corporation and other housing agencies a new approach to the housing shortage solution. The proposed solution can improve the standard of state housing, minimise the health issues associated with state housing and provide a better home for members of our community. Quality and quantity can be achieved.

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  • Determining the accuracy of budgets : a machine learning application for budget change pattern recognition

    Yip, Kai Leung (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    With the aid of open-sourced database and software libraries, we developed a data mining software prototype for SME business intelligent budgeting planning. The experiment demonstrates the existence of the change pattern of financial variables for a certain SME industry group. A budget inaccuracy alarm system is developed. The system classifies a budget whether viable or inviable. As a result, SME businesses or non-profit organisations can make better decisions by improving forward looking financial analysis. This allows them to immediately develop contingency measures, revise the policy and get the business back on the right track. This has been a long-desired function needed by a business or a bank.

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  • Setting suns and rising stars : succession planning in New Zealand’s deaf education leadership workforce : a national study

    Taylor, Saul McKay (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This thesis is the first national study examining succession planning in New Zealand’s Deaf education leadership workforce. The sun is setting on the working tenure of baby-boomer educators, a large proportion of these people have reached school leadership positions. This research examines workforce demographics and the succession mechanisms in place for the rising future leaders of Deaf education in New Zealand. To date this has been an area that has not been investigated within the Aotearoa New Zealand context. A small but growing body of international and New Zealand educational literature indicates mainstream workforces are skewed towards ageing due to a unique demographic turning point as baby-boomers reach retirement age. In the arena of New Zealand Deaf education, workforce ageing presents a special concern. Teaching personnel in this workforce are highly specialised and leaders in this area hold exquisitely contextual knowledge. This thesis is concerned with investigating the need to ensure the quality and quantity of future leadership for Deaf students. If many seasoned leaders and experienced teachers are due to depart in the near term, and there are insufficient succession mechanisms in place, future leadership could be at risk. Three key questions concerning the need for succession planning, were analysed as part of this study. A mixed-methods approach was chosen that involved a quantitative survey of the three Deaf education providers in New Zealand. This was done alongside seven qualitative semi-structured interviews with the senior leaders drawn from across these organisations. Three levels of statistical analysis were applied to the quantitative data to reveal the first national demographic picture of the workforce. Thematic analysis of the qualitative findings revealed the workforce’s motivation to lead and leader’s perceptions of succession planning methods. Methodological triangulation of the findings from the two research tools revealed three main finding areas. Firstly, that an ageing workforce exists, secondly key factors in shaping motivation to lead were identified, and thirdly methods to develop future leaders were pinpointed. The workforce in Deaf education was found to have a more severe skew towards ageing than the mainstream education sector. Amongst a largely static workforce there was found to be a small group of highly motivated individuals who strongly aspired to leadership roles. Formal succession planning mechanisms for this workforce are needed, due to the ageing leadership. In addition to in-role development, pre-role preparatory support was required for aspirants. Specific reluctance and driving factors for leadership were uncovered and the importance of high interpersonal relational skills was emphasised to nurture aspirants and develop a leadership culture. Four recommendations for practice and one recommendation for research are made at the end of this study. The first key recommendation was that investment in leadership preparation and development in Deaf education is worthwhile at both national and organisational level. This stems from the findings that Deaf education personnel have an extremely low rate of attrition out of the profession. Once qualified, most teachers have been found to stay for their entire career. Investment is therefore not wasted. Secondly, there is a need for formal succession mechanisms. Current focus seems to be on volunteerism, self-nomination, development and replacement management. Mechanisms need to include preparation, training and encouragement pathways to identify and nurture future leadership. The third recommendation is based on schools and the Ministry of Education building their own detailed age profiles of personnel. The final practice recommendation is for increased input into building professional self-management skills. Increasingly, aspirants are being deterred from leadership due to reluctance about being able to cope with the impact of stress and workload on their lives. Such on-going professional development for neophyte leaders will assist them to gain the tools to enjoy the challenges of leadership. In terms of a recommendation for future research, gender statistics uncovered in the findings from this study revealed an opportunity for further investigation. A new line of inquiry about gender impact on Deaf students could reveal worthwhile results.

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  • Dynamic class imbalance learning for incremental LPSVM

    Lei Zhu (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Abstract Linear Proximal Support Vector Machines (LPSVM), like decision trees, classic SVM, etc. are originally not equipped to handle drifting data streams that exhibit high and varying degrees of class imbalance. For online classification of data streams with imbalanced class distribution, we propose an incremental LPSVM ter-med DCIL-IncLPSVM that has robust learning performance under class imbalance. In doing so, we simplify a weighted LPSVM, which is computationally not renewable, as several core matrices multiplying two simple weight coefficients. When data addition and/or retirement occurs, the proposed DCIL-IncLPSVM accommodates current class imbalance by a simple matrix and coefficient updating, meanwhile ensures no discriminative information lost throughout the learning process. Experiments on benchmark datasets indicate that the proposed DCIL-IncLPSVM outperforms batch SVM and LPSVM in terms of F-measure, relative sensitivity and G-mean metrics. Moreover, our application to online face membership authentication shows that the proposed DCIL-IncLPSVM remains effective in the presence of highly dynamic class imbalance, which usually poses serious problems to classic incremental SVM (IncSVM) and incremental LPSVM (IncLPSVM).

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  • The immediate effects of manual therapy on dorsiflexion and joint position sense at the talocrural joint in participants with a history of lateral ankle sprain

    Alanson, Nathan (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The purpose of this literature review is to explore the literature pertaining to normal ankle function, ankle dysfunction and lateral ankle sprains to provide a theoretical background for further study. Firstly the literature review introduces manual therapy; gives a brief overview of normal ankle anatomy and function, and then describes proprioception and joint position sense (JPS). The following section addresses the topics of ankle injury, ankle dysfunction and lateral ankle sprains. The review then evaluates the methodological approaches used to assess both dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) and joint position sense (JPS) at the ankle. The final section includes a critical appraisal of studies concerning the effects of manual therapy on DF and JPS on participants with a history of lateral ankle sprain.

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  • Combating child sex tourism in a new tourism destination

    Sisavath, Phouthone (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This thesis investigated the current situation of child sex tourism (CST) at global, regional and national levels, while commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) is also frequently mentioned and discussed throughout this thesis. This is partly because the scale limitations of a master thesis have led the researcher to focus on CST, and partly because CST is one of four forms of CSEC that are closely linked to each other (Pimonsaengsuriva, 2008). These forms of CSEC can be found in a later section. In parallel with the increasing trend of the tourism industry at national, regional and global levels (Child Wise Australia, 2009; United Nations World Tourism Organisation, 2011), it is argued that sexual exploitation of children in the tourism sector might also increase, especially in developing countries in the Southeast Asian region. Therefore, the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) was chosen as a case study site in order to help the country in preventing and combating CST. In order to carry out the research, a qualitative research approach was adopted. 13 interviews were conducted, 8 of which were conducted with representatives of Lao government agencies and the other 5 were conducted with international organisations. In order to carry out the interviews and collect data, 10 fundamental interview questions were created. After analysing the findings, the researcher can conclude that developing countries, Laos in particular, can do better to prevent and combat the issue of child sexual exploitation if they can learn from past experiences in other countries. To achieve this, all forms of CSEC, which include child labour, child trafficking, child pornography, child sex tourism and child sexual abuse have to be combated as well as prevented simultaneously. Child protection, prevention and rehabilitation, and reintegration initiatives should be in place, and these initiatives should be effectively implemented if the fight against CST is to be achieved. Moreover, co-operation in terms of financial and human resources from all sectors concerned, at all levels from global to local, is crucial for the sustainability and effectiveness of the intervention. More research is needed concerning the effectiveness of the existing child protection mechanisms and initiatives. It is expected that the results of this research could valuably contribute to strengthen these mechanisms to reach an optimal outcome. This research is expected to give a broader picture of the issue to any shareholders concerned, especially in Laos, and to better understand and work together in order to combat and protect children from the sexual exploitation phenomenon.

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  • Teachers’ perspectives on the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) in two early childhood settings in New Zealand

    Kaur, Daljit (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research examined teachers’ perspectives on the impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in two early childhood settings in New Zealand. The research literature explained that in New Zealand there is scarcity of literature about teachers’ perspectives on the impact of different kinds of ICT in early childhood services. Therefore, to explore teachers’ perspectives must be beneficial to enhance our knowledge and for centres and participants to reflect on their practice for further development of the practice. A qualitative case study methodology was employed for this small-scale research. This included an anonymous questionnaire completed by teachers in two preschools and in-depth interviews. This research increases our knowledge about uses and challenges of ICT among early childhood educators. The results of the study showed that the teachers had variable access to training, as some teachers attended professional development courses, whereas others learnt about ICT from their colleagues and family members. The teachers in the study perceived that ICT is valuable for children’s learning. They believed that ICT increased learning opportunities as children used internet websites/Google to search for information about their favourite topics. They commented that ICT helped to make connections with parents/families, which enabled them to contribute to their children’s learning. They highlighted that children used cameras for taking the photos to revisit, check their learning and share it with parents. They commented that ICT offered children opportunities for listening to songs and stories. The study confirmed that teachers used ICT in their teaching practice. The teachers commented that they used ICT for writing learning story observations and for sharing them with parents. They used ICT for reflecting on their teaching practices and for finding more information about children’s favourite topics. They used internet websites for creating the resources and learnt poi dances. The study results revealed that ICT increased ways of communication with parents/families. The study suggests early childhood centres for arranging and supporting teachers for attending professional development related to ICT. It suggests providing the children with opportunities to use ICT along with other curriculum areas. The findings suggest teachers to use ICT for communication with parents.

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  • The perception and response to change by members of a multicultural working group : a case study

    Schuster, Blanka (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project explores the perception of members of a multicultural working group to communication relating to organisational change, and their response to it. For the analysis the impact of cultural dimensions such as “power distance” and “uncertainty avoidance” on this perception were investigated. A broadly qualitative approach using a case study methodology within a tertiary educational organisation in New Zealand was chosen to address the complex nature of intercultural communication issues implied in this goal. A mixed-methods two phase design was planned. In the first phase, quantitative data were collected through an exploratory survey to provide a general overview of how change communication was perceived, and an indication of possible trends relating to culture. This phase helped conceptualise the second qualitative phase, in which in-depth data were collected through a focus group and individual interviews. The findings of the study indicate that national culture may play a role in people’s attitude towards hierarchy and their perceptions of managers’ and staff members’ communication style and cultural dimensions appear to be partly relevant. But the findings also illustrate that ethnic culture is not the only influence on an individual’s perception and behaviour during change. Organisational culture, for instance, can positively influence whether employees voice their opinion amongst one other and whether they give feedback to their superiors. Moreover, the findings indicate that variations in communication style can lead to differing perceptions of a behavioural response to change. For example, voicing a critical opinion straightforwardly may be viewed as appropriate or inappropriate depending on the cultural background of the receiver. Additionally, the findings show some agreement between members of a multicultural working group such as what is important information during change, which management level should provide this information, and in what way communication should be managed in order to effectively engage organisational members. Importantly, national culture was not viewed as an additional barrier to communication during change implementation. Finally, the findings show that although intercultural communication competence is valued for all members in a multicultural organisation, including managers, other culturally independent characteristics like interpersonal competence were assessed as similar or more important. The outcomes of this study point to the need for further research to address the complexity of culture in its interplay with other major factors for efficient communication in multicultural settings.

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  • The manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand

    Revell, Elizabeth S. (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    In answering the main research question about the manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand, the author found that in public contexts in New Zealand, race as a topic is taboo and racists are social pariahs amongst Western, educated, middle-class members of society. Consequentially, race is often manifested in a variety of subtle ways in everyday communication interactions, and is difficult to identify and challenge. The subtle way in which race is manifested in everyday settings masks an undercurrent of prejudice and hostility. Whether or not these hidden tensions will emerge problematically in the future remains to be seen, as New Zealanders negotiate and manage their biculturalism and multiculturalism. In terms of the significance of race in New Zealand, the author concluded that New Zealand’s racial and ethnic identity is changing (browning), and that the longstanding New Zealand European (White) majority is decreasing in proportion and dominance. Some New Zealand Europeans are consciously and subconsciously trying to assert their authority, refusing to let the idea that a ‘true’ New Zealander is ‘White’ go because of a) a subconscious belief in the superiority of White skin and/or Western culture, and b) insecurity around what will happen to them and their lifestyle, if non-White ethnic and non-Western cultural groups continue to gain in proportion to White, Western groups. As a result, some non-White individuals are experiencing being subtly and overtly ‘othered’, excluded, disrespected, and negatively stereotyped. Being subjected to everyday racism has resulted in some non-White New Zealanders having a fractured sense of identity, and others having adopted the racist worldview of Whites.

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  • A best practice for small to medium enterprises in the adventure tourism sector to effectively manage regulatory compliance in Queenstown in New Zealand

    Misodi, Roy (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The compliance burden problems encountered by small and medium size enterprises can be grouped into; Administrative cost- for example, processing and filing compliance forms. Capital cost-investment in equipment and facilities required for the activities. Indirect and efficiency cost- reduced productivity and innovation arising, for example, as a consequence of regulation (Ministry of Economic Development, 2006). The aim of this study is to propose solutions to compliance burdens within the adventure tourism industry in New Zealand, by first identifying which regulatory practices impose the greatest burden to small and medium sized enterprises in the industry. My research objectives are transformed to research questions, which guide the entire study. In addition, the research was conducted making use of the qualitative approach. A total of 10 interviews were conducted and covered land, water and air based activities. The data collecting method involved conducting an interview made up of 10 questions. After analysing the findings, the researcher concluded that complying with regulations is an issue within the adventure tourism sector in Queenstown in New Zealand. This is further hampered by jurisdictional split across the diverse agencies. To handle such shortcoming, the information gap has to be addressed so as to facilitate dissemination of information to all stakeholders within the sector. In addition,providing better managerial skills within the sector through government training schemes and free business advice to operators within the sector is recommended. Moreover, a common standard can be introduced across the sector by establishing guidelines for risk, during emergency while handling clients, staff, equipment, administering basic first aid and monitoring. The result of this research is expected to produce a picture of the prevailing nature of issues raised in the studies to all concerned stakeholders.

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  • Variations : flexibility and adaptability in medium density housing

    Grounds, Meagan. (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research design project challenges the current way of designing medium density housing in Auckland. In particular, it focuses on the ability to change and adapt ones home to suit changing needs and wants. This has been achieved by using flexible and adaptable strategies designed to deal with uncertainties of the future. As supported by research, it is apparent that the current method for designing houses at medium density lacks the ability to cater for a variety of different user groups and their ever changing needs. Housing needs to be able to grow and change with the user. Occupants will benefit from greater options and control over their homes and how they use the space within. The possibilities for flexible housing in Auckland’s urban context have been tested through the process of ‘research for design’ and ‘research by design’. Such research has clearly illustrated that flexible and adaptable housing has the potential to increase user control and variety within medium density housing while also having the ability to adapt to unknown future needs. Site: Hobsonville Point

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  • Back to basics : rethinking the motives behind Charismatic Church architecture

    Roome, Jason (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project looks at the current trend of the architecture of Charismatic churches, with its disregard for the significance of the built environment, and attempts to uncover a set of design principles and a built outcome which are theologically grounded and relate to the needs of people. The subject of the design is a congregation in Christchurch with an earthquake damaged building. The values established within the document have been reached through literary research, discussions with theologians and pastors, and a study of the historical development of Christian church architecture. The benchmark against which all research has been evaluated is the church’s set of doctrines. The rejection of ornament and beauty for an inner faith, as instigated through the Protestant Reformation, has been found to be an insubstantial display of the full nature of God. The design takes on a holistic approach in response to an understanding of the human nature, created by God, with its desires. These desires are not only for beauty but love, contemplation, play. The history of ecclesiastical buildings shows the time’s doctrines and fashions. Two of the most important precedents being the Jewish Temple, and the synagogues displaying an integration with the everyday. Architecture speaks, whether one intends it or not. A church building can and should be used as a minister, not only for the congregation but to all that might use it or wander past it. It should speak of the complete nature of God, which is both transcendent and immanent, and the heart of the church to love and care for the community. RESEARCH PROBLEM: Catholicism has published a vast sum of information regarding the architecture, and issues that relate to the architecture of the Catholic Church. The reformed churches have a variety of publications but generally are limited to the institutional denominations within the faith. Pentecostal and Charismatic beliefs regarding architecture represent among the lowest proportion of explicit information regarding a denomination’s view and requirements for architecture. This is likely due to the lower emphasis placed on the theological value and ability of architecture to inform part of the spiritual development of believers and the Christian impact on the community. Craig Bartholomew asserts that there are many literary descriptions of the Charismatic Christian importance of nature but far fewer regarding place and the environment of human life. Site: 150 Ferry Road, Phillipstown, Christchurch.

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  • Experienced principals’ accounts of their character development : their inside stories

    Klein, Gus (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The aim of this research was to examine experienced principals’ stories of how they gave account of their character development and how this made an impact on their practice as leaders. Six experienced primary school principals from low decile schools in Auckland were selected. The research was in the form of a narrative, with the data being collected using semi-structured interviews and were in the form of stories. Each interview revealed the unique character and values of each participant. Personal values were shaped from mostly their early lives from parents and in some cases extended family or other people. Most of the values focused on behaviour that revealed the importance of caring for others, trust, family, and humility. Further to these historical values, the participants revealed significant others in their lives decreased as they became more experienced as principals. Before becoming a principal, several people they mentioned who had impacted their lives, though this did not reflect their current situation. Principalship was also seen to be the context where most of the character development took place, suggesting that learning when applied to a leader’s character, is lived experience; it cannot be taught first. The findings indicated both character and competence play a strong role in the participant’s principalship. Participants who developed their own selfawareness and awareness of others were able to lead effectively by creating teams that complemented their strengths and weaknesses. Values and beliefs also proved to be an important aspect, as these dictated the way the participant handled their governing educational values and their interaction with staff. Moral dilemmas for the participants were more or less confined to taking action in relation to staff and community issues. There was a suggestion that larger dilemmas could occur when the participant’s governing educational values conflicted with changes being asked of their school by policy makers. Therefore, an overall finding of this study is that leadership is more than developing a set of skills but also includes the character of the leader, and that character and its development is unique which in turn makes it difficult to find a general definition of leadership.

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  • Relational connections

    Croucher, Harry. (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project is an exploration of tectonic detailing. It aims to get an understanding of how tectonic detailing can be used to reflect social interactions between groups of people. The project site is located at Pakiri approximately an hour's drive north of Auckland. There is an existing horse facility. The project programme aims to design a facility for dressage (teaching, practicing and exhibiting) and to also develop a branch for equine-assisted psychotherapy.

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  • Osteopathy use in families of the Auckland Playcentre Association of New Zealand : prevalence and associated factors

    Karuna, Felice (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    To determine the prevalence of osteopathy use in New Zealand (NZ) preschool children and their parents and establish whether factors associated with Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use are relevant to the use of osteopathy; providing information about health care practices and preferences to health care professionals, in particular osteopaths, that can be utilised towards meeting the current health, safety and education needs of NZ families. PREFACE: This research project explores the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), and more specifically osteopathy, in New Zealand (NZ) families, and is presented here in 3 main parts. Firstly, in order to contextualise the findings, the literature review describes the contribution of CAM to western health care. The development of western health care and the role of CAM and osteopathy in the NZ health care system are explored. Factors associated with CAM use for both adults and children are summarized and, with relevance to the paediatric population in particular, concerns about CAM use and the issues surrounding the use of osteopathy and manual therapy for children are also outlined; providing a basis for understanding the implications of the findings of this study. Secondly, the study is presented as a manuscript with related appendices to suit publication in the International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, utilising the stipulated formatting and referencing style. Thirdly, the appendix contains documentation of ethics approval, participant information and guidelines for journal publication.

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  • Museum of space : a study of the limits of metaphorical representations of various theories of space that can be achieved in architecture

    McIntosh, Joshua (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Space is the subject of this thesis. Mankind’s quest to understand the impalpable medium known as space has been a remarkable journey. A journey that has spanned time, culture, and academic persuasion- and resulted in a multitude of diverse theories. This research is an in-depth, architectural exploration of six pre-eminent spatial theories that have emerged in historic and contemporary thought. The exploration process aims to represent these theories through architecture in a Euclidean world. Owing to the alternative spatial conceptions being endowed in properties different from ordinary real world, Euclidean space, the problem becomes impossible to resolve.This thesis aims to capture and represent the history of mankind’s understanding of space in the design of an architectural building. Chosen site is located on the promontory of Point Erin Peninsular in Saint Marys Bay, Aucklnad City. This site currently accommodates a public swimming pool complex. This surrounds green area is used as a public park and reserve.

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  • Exploration of a School of Design

    Young, Athena (2011)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Motivation: Architectural discourse is divided between intellectual theory and built reality. Design Schools want to achieve contemporary architecture through the static image intending to publicise the avant-garde nature of Design School image within its creative industry at the expense of students. The unification of a School of Designs learning process (reality) and the speculative academic philosophy (theory) would create an innovative contemporary School. Methods: Research into design, theory, site analysis, literature and precedents illustrates the constant balance between the image and built reality. The research identified the conflicting and contradictory nature of design theory, terminology. The research resulted in the key principles of function-specific and flexible space, site vitality and stagnation and Pedestrian and occupant movement being established. The conclusion drawn was the connection between the learning process and the image a School of Design is achievable, reinforced through applying the key principles and responding to site conditions. Site: Mortimer Pass, Newmarket, Auckland.

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  • Building blocks for a community

    Follas, Cameron (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The traditional New Zealand dream of the 'quarter acre Pavlova paradise', a standalone suburban dwelling, is fast becoming unsuitable on the basis of our steadily growing population, shifts in urban demographics, changing lifestyle preferences and rising costs, both ecological and economic. As outlined in the Auckland City Council Master Plan for 2050, intensification will be the key initiative to address the increased demand for housing in the 21st century. This architectural project will focus on accommodation that caters to individual needs while enhancing a sense of community. At the same 'affordability' will be a focus in future developments of high density housing schemes. The region of Arch Hill on the fringe of the Auckland CBD is the context chosen. Located between Great North Road and the North Western Motorway the site site has strong links both to Newton and Ponsonby and the wider context of Grey Lynn. Relocation / redesign of existing buildings within the site boundaries was an idea that emerged mid-way through the master planning stage of the project. This re-use allow for a sustainable approach to be achieved through the reduction in the amount of the embodied energy produced during the construction process,. and time and cost involved in the new build. The existing Newton Central Primary School was integrated into the housing scheme.

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  • Play and learn : designing educational tools for children

    Nand, Kalpana (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Pedagogy is a dynamic science and needs to constantly change with time. During the last decade, there has been a substantial jump in terms of communications technology, the ubiquity of electronic devices capable of running applications, and having access to information on the internet. The technological developments have been able to grip a major part of society, particularly in the form of entertainment. One technology that has gripped society, particularly children, is playing of Computer based games, simulating either a real life scenario or a completely fictional one. The success rate of computer games in engaging and motivating children has prompted educational researchers to see if similar techniques can be used to engage children into learning related tasks. This thesis is one such study. In this thesis, we investigate what the appealing characteristics of effective computer games for children are, whether adding these appealing characteristics to an educational tool enhances children’s learning and whether children enjoy using the proposed educational tool with those characteristics embedded. Then we present the results of an experiment done on primary school children, in which a computer game was used as an educational tool to teach primary school curriculum areas of Numeracy and Te Reo. The study used computer gaming industry research works, in conjunction with primary school children’s perception of computer games, to identify the three most prominent features that make them popular. The identified features were feedback, challenge and graphics. These features were then embedded in an open source game, Who Wants to be a Millionaire, based on a popular TV game, and modified to teach the two curriculum areas to 9 and 10 year old children in a primary school in Auckland, over a period of 4 weeks. The effectiveness of the educational tool was measured using a pre-test and a post-test, as well as other indicators such as the frequency and duration of time on playing the game. The results showed that the features enriched game was more effective as an educational tool in both Numeracy and Te Reo curriculum areas, when compared to the version with minimal features, that is, feature devoid version. In the case of Numeracy, the increase in scores was twice as much as the feature devoid version and in the case of Te Reo it was five times as much. Similar results were also shown by other indicators such as time and frequency. In summary, the results of this thesis establishes evidence on aspects. Firstly, it identifies the most appealing characteristics of computer games from primary school children’s point of view, as well as literature. Secondly, the results show that the identified features can be effectively used to develop educational tools, similar to computer games that can enhance children’ learning. Finally, the results prove that the feature enriched game was more popular with children and they were more inclined to play this version of the game in future compared to the feature devoid version.

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