6 results for 1900, Open Polytechnic

  • Tumatanui: The experience of a group of Maori funeral directors: (A bicultural research project).

    Taurima, W.; Cash, M. (1999)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    Kia Ora He Roa rawa te iwi Maori e ratu ana he oranga, e kahore hoki te Maori e whaka takato kaupapa, oranga no reira matika ake to matou ropu me o matou whakaora, ki te tiro tiro me te whakatiki ? tika, me pehea, na tenei kupapa e puta ai e tenei ao huri huri. Ka hikoi matou ke te rapu, ki te pa-tai-tai, me pehea ra I puta ai, te kaha o tenei roopu Maori mo te Maori, I ranga tira ai ratou, ai ratou mahi? A ka titiro matou ki o matou awanga ? wanga ano, kei takakahi matou, I o ratou whakaaro ke pouri ratou. Te ropu nei- he tangata, whaka takoto, tupa-paku. Ka tahu matou ka titiro, he tino rereke, tenei ropu Maori ? he pakari, he matau hoki ki te whaka-puta e tenei kaupapa (kawa). Ka kite matou koia nei te taonga hei whai nga e Matou ? tuatahi. Ki te reo o te iwi Maori, whakaronga. Ka nga taringa me te ngakau kia ronga kia mohio, te iwi e rua nga kaupapa, he titiro tanga ma matou. Tuatahi ko te ture me te kawa o te marae. Ko te marae hoki te kainga hei kohi-kohi e te matauranga o tenei ropu, a me matou hoki te tohunga e whai haere nei. Te kaupapa Maori mo te whanau, hapu ranei. Tuara ? me kohi hoki e nga whaka ? auaki me nga whakapapa ? e ihi nei matou ?Tumatanui? ? mo te whanau e whai mai nei a po-po. Ta matou kaupapa kia mohio ai nga tangata I nga korero ?E ki ana tetahi o nga kai mahi na korero, tino tau-reka-reka tenei kaupapa ? I homai nga I to tatou kai hanga?. Te meanui kia kite ai te ao, ke tei kaha, kia tonu tatou te iwi whenua, ki te rapu ora ? e ngari whaka puaki ? nga mai te tauira ? kia kotahi ai tatou. For many years Maori business has been researched, but in a non-Maori way. Our aim was to correct this: to examine, in a culturally appropriate way, how Maori enterprises survive and thrive in a monocultural business world. Our goal was to find some answers to the question: ?What makes a Maori business Maori? We began our journey by looking at a very specific and culturally sensitive area of business: Maori funeral directors. We recognised that here Maori business people seemed to do business differently. The stories of four families of funeral directors had one striking feature in common ? they were all skilled at ?breaking the oundaries?. This became the title of our first research project. To enable the ?voice? of the Maori enterprises to be eard, we have developed two research tools. The first is a research ?protocol?. This protocol allows knowledge gathering to take place in a way that respects the knowledge of the participants, who are the principal researchers, and is responsible to them and through Maori ?mentors?, to the Maori community. The second tool is a culturally appropriate way of gathering stories. We call this way ?tumatanui? or ?opening up? stories. Our purpose is to allow the stories about what one participant called ?the most callous industry that our heavenly father ever allowed to be created?, to be heard. These stories will challenge the New Zealand business community to look again at the advantages that could be gained by working together in a bicultural way.

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  • Perceptions of the average driver's speed compared to perceived driver safety and driving skill.

    Walton, D.; Bathurst, J. (1998)

    Working or discussion paper
    Open Polytechnic

    This study investigates the self-enhancement bias in driver attitudes, the finding that drivers rate themselves better than the average driver on safety and skill perceptions (Svenson, 1978, 1981; McCormick, Walkey & Green, 1986). A sample of 86 New Zealand drivers were asked their perceptions of their own and others' speeds in two conditions, 50 km/h and 100 km/h. The results established the self-enhancement bias for speed and safety, but not skill. Between 85% and 90% of drivers claimed to drive slower than the 'average driver.' A new methodological technique derived from Harr? and Gillett (1994) was used to investigate the direction of the self-enhancement bias. The results support Downward Comparison Theory (Wills, 1981) because drivers consider other drivers negatively, rather than exaggerating their self-perceptions.

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  • Nga riwai: Maori potatoes.

    Harris, G. F.; Niha, P. P. (1999)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    It is generally accepted by scholars that potatoes were first introduced to New Zealand in the late eighteenth century by Captain James Cook and the French explorer, Marion du Fresne. Further introductions from a variety of sources, including possible direct introductions from South America, followed into the nineteenth century. Maori were quick to recognise the advantages these new introductions had over the kumara (Ipomea batatas) and other traditional food sources. Potatoes soon became both a staple item in the Maori diet and a trade commodity. The various cultivars (cultivated varieties) were given Maori names and many of these early introductions are still grown by Maori today. These 'Maori potatoes' with their deep-set eyes, often knobbly irregular shape and colourful tubers, are quite distinct from modern potatoes and are known as Maori as riwai, taewa, parareka and mahetau.

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  • Developments in the provision of quality electronic summative assessments.

    French, P. (1998)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This is a Work in Progress paper backgrounding a research area which is to be developed further at the Open Polytechnic. This initial study overviews the written and electronic literature available at 29 June 1998 identifying developments in the field of electronic assessment. In this study I have focused on ascertaining what was available electronically in summative assessment methods. For some institutions this has simply resulted in the range of traditional forms of assessment being translated onto a computer, while other groups have developed variations available only because of computer usage. This has ranged from the use of electronic mail to transmit assignments between student and tutors to the development of computer adaptive testing. Specifically the study covers summative testing via multichoice questions, constructed answers, essays and practical performance assessments via simulations. There is little information available on summative electronic testing in alternative forms of assessment and so this study does not specifically cover learning contracts, projects, peer assessment, oral examinations, seminar presentations, case studies, laboratory work, or other submitted written work such as literature reviews, book reviews, reports or journalling. The next stage of the research is to select an appropriate electronic medium for application to an Open Polytechnic programme and to explore the conversion of the assessments in this programme to an electronic base.

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  • Stakeholder influences on assessment methodology.

    Warren, J. M. (1998)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This is a Work-in-Progress paper backgrounding a research activity currently being undertaken in New Zealand establishing the requirements for assessment from various stakeholders and comparing to educational philosophies. Part of the initial study investigates the requirements of human resource practitioners, who are registered members of the Institute of Personnel Managers (IPM), when recruiting for management positions. The study contrasts qualifications obtained as certification under the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) unit standards and degrees obtained through universities. This reinforced the tension between the need to provide education at degree level, with aims to develop autonomous decision makers, and the NZQA level 7 which assesses observable competencies in the skills to perform required managerial functions. The research attempts to identify the stakeholders in education including industry, education and training providers, professional associations, and the individual students. There are future plans to extend investigations from New Zealand into Australasian and global requirements. This paper will review earlier philosophical debates between providing education and training and examine works alerting educationalists to the danger of increasingly assessing for diplomas of specific abilities. This and the current concerns still emphasising contrasting concepts of teaching between technocratic-reductionist and professional-contextualist based philosophies will be incorporated into research and the requirements of various stakeholders will be examined. A paper has been presented at the recent ANZAM Conference [Warren, 1997] with a request for interested parties to share information and experiences of the application of competency-based standards within a qualification framework and to share experiences of other frameworks. The next stage of this research is outlined with the preparation and use of questionnaires for identified primary stakeholders.

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  • The learning styles of first year distance education students.

    Hutton, J. L. (1998)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of research in progress on the learning styles of first year students studying with The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand. The paper reviews background literature on learning styles and distance education. It examines the learning styles profiles of the students and discusses the instructional design implications of those profiles.

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