144 results for 1900, Book

  • Suffrage and beyond: international feminist perspectives

    (1994)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Guns and gold : as a result of reforms, New Zealand's Chief of Defence Force has a range of powers enjoyed by no other military chief in the West

    Smith, A (1999)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Gendered Kiwi

    (1999)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Gendered Kiwi, a collection of essays, analyses the ways Pākehā masculinity and femininity – gender relations – have changed over time. It brings together previously unpublished essays on topics as diverse as 1930s fashion and feminist men in the 1970s. Scholars such as Charlotte Macdonald re-open the debate about whether colonial New Zealand was really a man’s country, while Jock Philips asks new questions about late-twentieth-century leisure. Other writers canvass the stresses of depression-era masculinity, men’s and women’s different use of public space, office politics and power dressing. Gender relations and the family are a theme in several essays, including those about the colonial family, nineteenth-century criminal trials and World War II. The Gendered Kiwi builds on existing work in men’s and women’s history and points to new ways to analyse New Zealand’s past.

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  • Planning for life : Public Trust, once the conservative guardian of wills and estates, is now giving lawyers and financial planners a run for their money

    Smith, A (1999)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The New Zealand sea shore

    Morton, JE; Miller, Michael (1973)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This is a book about the ecology of animals and plants on the sea shore. Such a study must deal with living things in their natural environment, and the sea shore is - above all others - the habitat of a great diversity of life. ...

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  • Superannuation in New Zealand: Averting the Crisis

    Ashton, Toni; St John, S (1988)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    To date New Zealand has suffered a number of piecemeal changes to public superannuation schemes, and this book argues for a complete overhaul of the system in the light of the economic environment and the concerns for all people to enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Toni Ashton and Susan St John argue that such a complete overhaul is necessary because of the implications for the whole society of any alterations to retirement incomes. Already there has been a lot of publicity about the tax burden on the younger working population if the stsus quo is maintained, and the issues of economic growth and social equity are paramount. It is hard to escape the conclusion that the issues are not simply how best to provide an integrated policy package for retirement incomes, or whether schemes are funded of unfunded, but how to ensure an adequate redistribution from wealthier New Zealanders to poorer New Zealanders in general, and how to secure adequate growth of output to improve the base for such redistribution in the context of a growing retired population.

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  • Private Pensions in New Zealand: Can they Avert the 'Crisis'?

    St John, S; Ashton, Toni (1993)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The past five years have been a turbulent time for superannuation policy in New Zealand. This is nothing new. In the post-war period, there have been a number of dramatic changes as outlined in the earlier book by the authors, Superannuation in New Zealand, Averting the Crisis. What seems to be different in the early nineties is a sense of urgency, a need to end the policy instability and create certainty in the face of the impending demographic pressures. In many ways, New Zealand is very unusual with a tax neutral savings regime for private pensions and a non-contributory flat-rate state pension. As in other countries, there has been a strong move to encourage a shift away from state provision to take the 'burden' off workers of the future. The economic thinking behind this suggestion needs careful review. rather than assuming a shift will solve the problem, this book sets out a broader context in which all forms of public and private mixes can be evaluated against society's chosen income distribution objectives. This book was written during the period in which the government- appointed Task Force on Private Provision for Retirement was deliberating on how best to encourage greater self-reliance of retired people. The aim of this book is to contribute to the debate on the recommendations of the Task Force and to provide an historical and international context for that debate.

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  • Commerce at Otago 1912–1987: a personal perspective

    Cowan, T K (1988)

    Book
    University of Otago

    In 1988 we can look back on 76 years of teaching in Commerce subjects at the University of Otago. What had begun in 1912 as a modest University contribution to the provision of educational courses in accountancy subjects had developed by 1987 into one of the largest faculties of the University, covering in its teaching and research a range of business - related subjects that are now recognised as being of particular relevance to our changing New Zealand economy. A 75th anniversary provides (albeit a year late!) an opportunity to review the way we have come, and hopefully, to project a future built on the foundation that has been laid. This brief history is designed to contribute towards that review. For almost fifty years the Faculty was concerned mainly with the provision of high quality but low cost educational courses for students whose primary objective was the Accountancy Professional qualification. The high quality came from the involvement as part-time teachers of able professional accountants and lawyers, as well as the University's full time teachers in economics. The low cost was due to a combination of low remuneration to part-time teachers and the virtual absence of extra costs in accommodating classes and part-time staff members. During this long period, responsible part-time teachers gave faithful service in providing courses which changed little year by year. The pass rates achieved by students were consistently well above the average for New Zealand. But there are no exciting events to record, and there was little change to affect the ongoing operation of the Faculty, which seems to have functioned quite well for its first 40 years without any formal meetings! That is bad news for the historian, and also perhaps for the reader of the first part of this history. By way of contrast the last 25-30 years comprise a period of radical change and exciting developments. Thanks to the contributions in ideas, enthusiasm, and personal effort of many people, the Commerce Faculty evolved from a stable, largely out-of-hours facility for the education of future accountants to a mainly full-time, vigorous and innovative School of Business Studies with developed courses at undergraduate and postgraduate levels covering a range of business-related disciplines. What had been a tolerated adjunct to the University has become one of its most important faculties. This history has been written from a personal perspective. I participated in the pre-development era, first as a part-time student during the years 1933-9 and then as a part-time teacher in 1940 and from 1946-1960. I was deeply involved in the years of development and change as the first full-time teacher (1960), as Head of Department (to 1981), and as Dean of the Faculty during the critical years 1960-1975.Hopefully the insights from personal involvement will outweigh any bias in the interpretation of events. I am indebted to several people for their assistance with preparing this history; but the reviewing of my years of involvement with the Faculty as a teacher and administrator makes it clear that my principal debt is to my wife who gave tremendous support through the exciting and stressful years of development of the Faculty.

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  • Commerce Review: 1869–1969 Centennial of the University of Otago

    (1969)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The Otago Commerce Students' Association is pleased to present this magazine, The " COMMERCE REVIEW," in the Centennial Year of the University of Otago, as a record of the development and progress since its inception in 1912, of the Faculty of Commerce. It is perhaps important as a precedent for there is to date, no similar documentation… FROM THE PRESIDENT This magazine, the brainchild of the 1968 Association Committee, is published this year as our contribution to the University Centennial celebrations. Depending upon popular demand, an annual publication may be produced in the future, as a year-book of light-hearted vein… THE FACULTY OF COMMERCE —A History and A Tribute By R. A. Sinclair History is marked in moments, and for the sake of indulgent readers, I have accorded emphasis on significant periods rather than providing yearly surveys of all the happenings. For those omissions, some inadvertent, some of necessity, I express my regrets. There are three parts: the foundations, the middle years, and the boom period in which we find ourselves now… THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION By R. A. Strang and E. S. Edgar Founding to World War II The Otago University Commerce Faculty Students' Association was founded shortly after classes in commercial subjects began at the University in 1912. The first president was Mr Owen Wilkinson and the students were immediately involved in the sporting and other affairs of the University… EDUCATION FOR ACCOUNTANCY By 5. A. Valentine, B.Com., F.C.A. The Commerce Faculty at the University of Otago has played an important role in accountancy education in New Zealand. In Dunedin, a higher proportion of students entering the accountancy profession attend University and complete a Commerce Degree than in any other city in the country. The main reason for this situation is that the accountancy courses and teaching at the University have developed to meet the changing requirements of this modern age… THE CENTENNIAL OPEN LECTURE-JULY 24, 1969 MR S. J. R. CHATTEN THE ROLE OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW ZEALAND By S. J. R. Chatten, F.I.A., A.C.I.I. (London) Many of the large financial institutions in N.Z. are celebrating their centenaries at about this time and it seems appropriate to address a gathering of commerce students at a lecture to mark the Centenary of the University of Otago, on the role of the financial institutions in the development of New Zealand… THE COMMERCE COURSE-RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT By T. K. Cowan, M.Com., F.C.A. The Commerce Faculty owes its beginnings to the initiative and vigour of some Otago men such as Mr Peter Barr who played a leading role in the sound establishment of the New Zealand Society of Accountants. Until quite recently, its main role was to provide education in professional subjects for those desiring admission to the accountancy profession. It did this very economically indeed through evening and early morning classes taught by part-time staff drawn from the accountancy and legal professions. The final examinations set by the University of New Zealand were really professional examinations set and marked by practising accountants and lawyers. Some 80-90% of the students were interested in attaining admission to the New Zealand Society of Accountants rather than in completing a degree in Commerce… GALLERY THE DEANS… SOME PROMINENT LECTURERS…

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  • Caught between cultures : a New Zealand-born Pacific Island perspective

    Tiatia-Seath, Sipaea (1998)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Intra-conference and Post-conference Tour Guides, International Inter-INQUA Field Conference and Workshop on Tephrochronology, Loess, and Paleopedology

    Lowe, David J. (1994-02-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand consists of a cluster of islands, the three largest being North, South, and Stewart, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. They have a total land area of about 270 000 km2 (similar to that of the British Isles or Japan). The islands are the small emergent parts of a much larger submarine continental mass (Fig. 0.1) that was rafted away from Australia and Antarctica by sea-floor spreading in the proto-Tasman Sea between 85 and 60 Ma. Much of this New Zealand subcontinent is a remnant of the former eastern margin of Gondwanaland, the ancient southern supercontinent. The mainland islands form a long, narrow, NE-SW trending archipelago bisected by an active, obliquely converging, boundary between the Australian and Pacific lithospheric plates (Fig. 0.2), which has evolved over the last 25 million years (Kamp 1992). The plate boundary is marked by active seismicity and volcanic arcs, illustrating New Zealand's position as part of the Circum-Pacific Mobile Belt -the so-called "Pacific Ring of Fire". The NE-SW trend of the modem plate boundary cuts across mainly NW-SE oriented structural features inherited from earlier (mid-Cretaceous) rifting events.

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  • Clay mineralogy of tephras and associated paleosols and soils, and hydrothermal deposits, North Island [New Zealand]

    Lowe, David J.; Percival, H.J. (1993-07-01)

    Book
    University of Waikato

    Tour themes and itinerary The tour centres on the occurrence and genesis of clay minerals, especially allophane, halloysite, and ferrihydrite, associated with both Quaternary rhyolitic airfall tephra (volcanic ash) deposits and volcanogenic alluvium, and on mineralisation and thermal activity in hydrothermal fields. After a brief overview of the basaltic volcanoes of Auckland City, our route essentially traverses the Central Volcanic Region by way of a large loop with overnight stops at Rotorua (2 nights), Tokaanu, and Auckland (Fig. 0.1). We have around five stops planned for each day (including lunch), three of these being scientific stops except on Day 4 when we have only one scientific stop because of the need to travel greater distances. Our route takes us progressively towards the locus of the most recently active volcanic centres of the Central Volcanic Region, and so the surficial tephra deposits and buried paleosols become successively younger and generally less weathered: tephras at the Mangawara section (Day 1) span c. 1 Ma; at Tapapa (Day 2), c. 140 ka; at Te Ngae (Day 2), c. 20 ka; and at De Bretts, c. 10 ka, and Wairakei, c. 2 ka (Day 3). Interspersed with these tephra-paleosol sections are stops to examine an allophane-halloysite soil drainage (leaching) sequence on volcanogenic alluvium (Day 1), hydrothermal activity and mineral deposits at Whakarewarewa (Day 2) and Waiotapu (Day 3), and pure ferrihydrite seepage deposits in Hamilton (Day 4). Following introductory and detailed background review material, the tour guide has been arranged on a day-by-day basis and includes an outline of the route and stops, and several pages describing the stratigraphy, mineralogy, chemistry, and pedology of the deposits or features at each of the main stops. We will attempt to point out and describe geological and other features as appropriate during travel periods. Other activities Examples of New Zealand's distinctive fauna and flora, including kiwis and tuataras, will be seen at close quarters at Rainbow Springs (Day 2), where we will also enjoy an agricultural farm show. In Rotorua we will partake in a Maori hangi (steam-cooked feast) and concert including traditional dance forms (hakas) and songs (Day 2). In Tokaanu, hot pools will be available to relax in near the slopes of Mt Tongariro (Day 3). At Waitomo, we will visit the Waitomo Cave and in Hamilton spend a short time at the Waikato Museum of Art and History (Day 4). Finally, the tour will conclude with a farewell dinner in Auckland.

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  • Land use capability classification of the Northland region : a report to accompany the second edition, New Zealand land resource inventory

    Harmsworth, G. R. (1996)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    The report describes the second-edition Land Use Capability (LUC) classification of the Northland region, an area of 1 582 698 ha (15 827 km2) in the north of the North Island, New Zealand. This region is one of 11 in the New Zealand Land Resource Inventory (NZLRI). The NZLRI provides a physical-resource inventory for land-resource and land-use planning, particularly for evaluating the potential of land for sustained production, using the Land Use Capability system of land classification. Fieldwork for the second-edition worksheets at 1:50 000 scale began in 1985 and was completed in 1990. A total of 11718 inventory map units were delineated in the Northland region. These map units were grouped into 91 LUC units on the basis of their management requirements, soil conservation needs and land-use potential. The LUC units have been arranged into eight LUC suites - groupings of LUC units which, although differing in capability, share a definitive physical characteristic that unites them in the landscape. Within LUC suites, LUC units are further grouped into LUC subsuites according to features such as micro-topography, rock-type characteristics (e.g. composition, age) soil type, erosion potential, wetness, and management. A description of Northland region's physical land resources is provided, as well as a key to the recognition of LUC units in LUC suites, and descriptions of each LUC unit.

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  • Guide to the Soils of Kaihiku-Hokonui land region

    McIntosh, Peter D. (1994)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    The Kaihiku-Hokonui land region covers about 410 000 hectares of land underlain by predominantly tuffaceous sandstone and mudstone rocks in central and eastern Southland and south Otago, New Zealand. Previous studies have established the parent material and soil variation within the region. This report collates this research, updates the soil classification, provides keys and models for the soil distribution pattern, extrapolates the information of detailed surveys to the wider area and assesses advantages and disadvantages of land for pastoral, horticultural and forestry use.

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  • Soils of the Conroy land system, Central Otago

    Hewitt, A. E. (1995)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    The Conroy land system includes rolling land, hill country and steeplands with a semi-arid climate around the margins of the Central Otago basins. The soils are dominantly Semiarid Soils and associated Recent Soils from schist. The land system is divided into four land components, and these in turn into land elements. The land elements form the basis of an empirical model which enables the location of soil types to be predicted. Land evaluation of soils in the Conroy land system identified the Hawksburn soils and Hawksburn bouldery soils as the most extensive versatile soils that (with irrigation) are capable of intensive use.

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  • Proceedings of a workshop on scientific issues in ecological restoration : held at Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research, Ilam, Christchurch on 22-23 February 1995

    (1997)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Compiled by M.C. Smale and C.D. Meurk.

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  • Geomorphology of the Wairau Plains : implications for floodplain management planning

    Basher, L. R.; Lynn, I. H.; Whitehouse, I. E. (1995)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Likely future changes to the Wairau River floodplain that will be important to floodplain management (aggradation, channel avulsion, coastal progradation) are assessed from an understanding of the past and present behaviour of the river, coastal dynamics and tectonism. The major factors determining floodplain development have been changes of river gradient in response to sea level variation and tectonism, sediment source and sediment load variation, the passage of gravel waves down the Wairau, and coastal progradation. Future evolution of the Wairau Plains will be determined by the effect of climate change and sea level rise, continuing aggradation of both gravel and sand/silt, the effect of earthquakes, and the possibility of stopbank failure or overtopping.

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  • New Zealand soil classification

    Hewitt, A. E. (1993)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Version 3.0 of the Zealand Soil Classification is the culmination of a period of development from its initiation in 1983 to wide circulation of versions 1.0 and 2.0 (Hewitt 1989) for comment and testing. It represents the best attempt, given the current state of knowledge, to classify New Zealand soils. As the knowledge and understanding of New Zealand soils grows, further revisions will be necessary. Accounts of the methods used in developing the soil classification and the rationale for the classes and differentia used are in preparation. The New Zealand Soil Classification is a national soil classification intended to replace the New Zealand Genetic Soil Classification (Taylor 1948; Taylor and Cox 1956; Taylor and Pohlen 1962). The New Zealand Genetic Soil Classificaltion grew out of the need for reconnaissance mapping of the nation's soil resources. It was successful as a unifying factor in New Zealand soil science, and it played a vital role in the development of pastoral agriculture. However, modern soil surveys and land evaluations required precise definition of classes and keys for their recognition. Furthermore, a new synthesis was needed of the large body of information collected since the 1950s. The present work has grown out of the New Zealand Genetic Soil Classification and, where possible, preserves successful parts of that classification. It has also been influenced by experience in testing the US Soil Taxonomy (Leamy et al. 1983).

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  • Public attitudes to rabbit calicivirus disease in New Zealand

    Wilkinson, Roger; Fitzgerald, Gerard (1998)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Since our earlier survey of public attitudes to rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and rabbit control in 1994, Rabbit Calicivirus Disease (RCD) has been the subject of considerable media attention and public debate. This document reports on our ongoing monitoring of New Zealand public attitudes to rabbits and RCD, as the debate unfolded. This work involved seven focus groups with members of the public and selected interest groups throughout New Zealand in mid-1996, followed by a national random survey of 600 people. Half of these had been interviewed in our 1994 survey. Despite the publicity given to rabbits and RCD, people's views of rabbits and the rabbit problem changed little between our two surveys. Most people continued to hold ambivalent views of rabbits: that they were a pest and a problem, but also ""cute and furry"" and an economic resource. Public recognition of RCD was widespread, yet little was actually known about it. RCD was perceived more favourably than was poisoning rabbits, but generally less favourably than shooting. Although RCD was favoured over shooting for its effectiveness and affordability, it was less attractive than shooting on the important public criteria of safety and humaneness. The respondents were fairly evenly divided between those who gave unconditional support to the introduction of RCD to New Zealand, those who were unconditionally opposed, and those who had a conditional position. Although the attitudes of those with unconditional positions on RCD appear stable, there was still a substantial proportion of respondents with unstable, conditional positions. The unofficial release of RCD in August 1997, nearly a year after our survey, affords an opportunity to monitor public attitudes to rabbits and RCD some time after the initial wave of media coverage and public attention has passed. This would provide high quality data on the monitoring of public perceptions of a major vertebrate pest and its biological control, which could be applied to the prediction of public responses to the potential biological control of other important vertebrate pests, such as possums.

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  • Glossary of soil physical terms

    McQueen, D. J. (1993)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Density -- Porosity -- Soil water -- Soil-water movement -- Non-accepting terms -- Rating systems.

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