15 results for 2000, Massey University, Journal article

  • Let's talk about sexuality and relationships

    Buckley, L; Salisbury, R; Taylor, J; Harvey, ST (2009)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Overseas research on sexual and relational disorders is varied and widespread. However, relatively little is known about such problems in New Zealand. The present study describes a cohort of clients seen by the Sex Therapy New Zealand service in one year, with a particular focus on the presenting symptoms in relation to existing models of sexual functioning problems. The therapists of the 46 clients who consented to participate completed a short questionnaire about the client and the therapy process. The key finding was that therapists identified relational problems as central to the sexual problem, while these issues were not identified in the referral. A larger study on sexual problems in New Zealand is needed to replicate and extend the results of this study, with a view to developing an integrated diagnostic, assessment, and treatment model for sexual and relationship problems.

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  • Wanna drive? driving anxiety and fear in a New Zealand community sample

    Taylor, JE; Paki, D (2008)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Driving anxiety can impact everyday functioning and is common following motor vehicle crashes. However, no research has investigated its general community prevalence, despite the consistent finding that driving anxiety is not always a function of a vehicle crash. The present study explored the frequency and characteristics of driving anxiety and fear in a general community convenience sample of 100 participants who completed a questionnaire about driving anxiety, avoidance behaviour, and types of driving-related cognitions. Most of the sample described no anxiety, fear, or avoidance in relation to driving. However, 8% reported moderate to extreme anxiety about driving, and 7% described moderate to extreme driving fear. Women reported more driving anxiety, fear, and avoidance than men. These results indicate the need for more formal methods of establishing prevalence to clearly ascertain the extent of population-based driving anxiety and fear and its effects, so that research can begin to focus on developing effective treatment approaches for those whose anxiety has a psychological and functional impact.

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  • Resilience, Risk and Entrepreneurship

    Shadbolt, NM; olubode-awasola, F (2016-05-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Made available with permission. View the publisher's site here http://www.ifama.org/files/IFAMR/Vol19/Iss2/220140117.pdf

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  • Ethnicity, workplace bullying, social support and psychological strain in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Gardner, D; Bentley, TA; Catley, BE; Cooper-Thomas, H; O'Driscoll, MP; Trenberth, L (2013)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    This research explored whether respondents who self-identified as New Zealand Europeans experienced less bullying and less severe outcomes than those who self-identified as Māori, Pacific Island or other ethnic groups. Social support was also examined as a potential buffer against the negative effects of bullying. One thousand, seven hundred and thirty-three respondents from four sectors (health, education, hospitality and travel) responded to a selfreport questionnaire. Despite reporting higher levels of bullying than New Zealand Europeans, Pacific Island and Asian/Indian respondents reported lower levels of psychological strain. A possible explanation for this may lie in the somewhat higher levels of supervisor support reported by Pacific Island, Asian/Indian and Māori respondents, compared to those who self-identified as New Zealand European. Respondents with more supportive supervisors and colleagues reported experiencing less bullying and less strain. Bullying was related to negative outcomes for all groups. The implications of these findings for management of workplace bullying are discussed.

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  • Economic hardship among older people in New Zealand: The effects of low living standards on social support loneliness and mental health

    Stephens, C; Alpass, F; Towers, A (2010)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    By 2026 people aged 65 and over are projected to make up approximately 20% of the population of New Zealand. A focus on the positive aspects of ageing includes consideration of the factors that promote good mental health in the population. In the present study of early old age (65-70 years) we highlight factors that are amenable to social and structural change in order to support positive ageing as people move into retirement. Analysis of cross-sectional survey data from 1761 people aged 65-70 was used to test the prediction that economic living standards are related to social support and loneliness (taking into account gender and ethnicity differences) and these factors in turn will affect mental health. Multiple regression analysis showed that lower living standards are both independently related to mental health and also contribute to diminished opportunities for social support. Social support and loneliness in turn, are related to mental health. Such observations suggest the importance of changes in social attitudes and social policy to build societies in which older people are valued and supported both economically and socially.

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  • A study of older adults: Observation of ranges of life satisfaction and functioning

    Good, GA; LaGrow, S; Alpass, F (2011)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Levels of daily functioning and life satisfaction in older people are investigated in this study. Surveys and interviews included 425 people aged 65+ and comparisons were made between three age groups (ages 65-74, 75-84, 85 +) on levels of activity, independence and social support; satisfaction with levels of independence, activity and social support and overall life satisfaction, Results indicated that those aged 85+ had significantly lower levels of activity and independence than those in the two younger age groups. Differences were found in 8 of 12 domains of independence and in outdoor work and mobility activities. The oldest age group was also found to be significantly less satisfied with their levels of independence and activity than were the younger age groups. No significant differences were found between the groups in overall life satisfaction. Levels of activity and independence, satisfaction with social support and satisfaction with independence were found to make unique contributions to t to the prediction of variance in overall life satisfaction. Findings are important in understanding what to expect of ourselves and others as we age, which daily activities are likely to be most difficult for older people and what factors are predictors of overall life satisfaction.

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  • Community engagement post-disaster: Case studies of the 2006 Matata debris flow and 2010 Darfield earthquake, New Zealand

    Collins, S; Glavovic, B; Johal, S; Johnston, D (2011)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Engagement and participation are terms used to describe important processes in a democratic society. However, the definition and understanding of these terms is broad and varied. In a disaster context, community engagement and participation are recognised as important processes to support individual and community recovery. What these terms mean, who is responsible for leading engagement, and the processes that are to be used, are important issues that need to be clarified at the onset of recovery, if not before. Despite this, there are often barriers to community members being involved in the recovery process as active and valued participants. These include governance structures that do not adequately recognise the spectrum of community engagement and the power dynamics of information sharing and decision-making. This article discusses two New Zealand case studies where engagement activities were put in place to contribute to the communities’ post disaster recovery.

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  • Psychosocial recovery from disasters: A framework informed by evidence

    Mooney, MF; Paton, D; de Terte, I; Johal, S; Karanci, AN; Gardner, D; Collins, S; Glavovic, B; Huggins, TJ; Johnston, L; Chambers, R; Johnston, D (2011)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Following the Canterbury earthquakes, The Joint Centre for Disaster Research (JCDR), a Massey University and Geological and Nuclear Science (GNS Science) collaboration, formed a Psychosocial Recovery Advisory Group to help support organisations involved in the recovery process. This advisory group reviews and summarises evidence-based research findings for those who make requests for such information. Extensive experience within the group adds a practitioner perspective to this advice. This article discusses the definition of psychosocial recovery used by the group to date, and the group’s view that psychosocial recovery involves easing psychological difficulties for individuals, families/whānau and communities, as well as building and bolstering social and psychological well-being. The authors draw on a brief discussion of this literature to make practical suggestions for psychosocial recovery.

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  • New Zealanders' judgments of earthquake risk before and after the Canterbury earthquake: Do they relate to preparedness?

    McClure, J; Wills, C; Johnston, DM; Recker, C (2011)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Previous research has examined judgments about earthquake likelihood after citizens have experienced an earthquake, but has not compared judgments in the affected region with other regions. Following the Darfield (Canterbury) earthquake, this research compared earthquake risk judgments in the affected region and those outside the region. Participants in Christchurch, Wellington and Palmerston North judged the likelihood of an earthquake before and after the 2010 Canterbury (Darfield) earthquake, near Christchurch. Wellington was chosen as there had been higher expectations of an earthquake in that area. Palmerston North was chosen to be comparable to Christchurch before the Darfield earthquake, in that many New Zealanders have expected an earthquake in Wellington, not Palmerston North. Participants judged earthquake likelihoods for their own city, for the rest of New Zealand and for Canterbury. Christchurch participants also indicated their preparedness before and after the earthquake. Expectations of an earthquake in Canterbury were low before the Darfield earthquake in all three regions and rose significantly after that earthquake. In contrast, Wellingtonians’ judgments of the likelihood of an earthquake in Wellington were high before the Darfield earthquake and did not rise after that earthquake. Christchurch participants’ risk perceptions showed only a weak relation to their preparedness. These results clarify how disasters such as major earthquakes affect judgments of earthquake risk for citizens inside and outside the affected area. The results show that these effects differ in cities where an earthquake is expected. Broader issues about preparing for earthquakes are also discussed.

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  • The use of brief screening instruments for age-related cognitive impairment in New Zealand

    Strauss, H-M; Leathem, J; Humphries, S; Podd, J (2012)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    This study aimed to determine which measures are most commonly used to screen for age-related cognitive impairment in New Zealand, to describe how and why they are used, determine the factors clinicians deem most important in the selection of a particular screen and their levels of training and expertise in using particular screens. A web survey was completed by geriatricians, neurologists, psychiatrists, and psychologists (N=82). Cognitive screening measures were selected for the survey based on previous research. According to the sample, the most frequently used screen was the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), followed by the Clock Drawing Test (CDT) and Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Revised (ACE-R). Cognitive screening fulfilled a variety of functions in clinical practice and was widely used, especially in services for older people, however formal training was limited. Availability, reliability and validity, and brevity (respectively) were the most important factors clinicians considered when selecting a screening instrument. Respondent comments agreed with current literature that the MMSE is inadequate as a screening instrument for cognitive impairment, and this was reflected in the comments of respondents on the survey questionnaire, yet this was still the most commonly used measure in New Zealand.

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  • Proteins isolated with TRIzol are compatible with two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses

    Young, C; Truman, P (2012)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    TRIzol is used for RNA isolation but also permits protein recovery. We investigated whether proteins prepared with TRIzol were suitable for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Proteins from TRIzol-treated SH-SY5Y cells produced 2-DE spot patterns similar to those from an equivalent untreated sample. Subsequent identification of TRIzol-treated proteins using peptide mass fingerprinting was successful. TRIzol exposure altered neither the mass of myoglobin extracted from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels nor the masses of myoglobin peptides produced by in-gel trypsin digestion. These findings suggest that proteins isolated with TRIzol remain amenable to proteomic analyses.

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  • Anthropological engagement with the Anthropocene: A critical review

    Gibson, H; Venkateswar, S (2015-09-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    The new geological interval, the Anthropocene, or the ‘era of the human’ refers to the planetary scale of anthropogenic influences on the composition and function of the Earth’s ecosystems and all life forms (Steffen, Crutzen & McNeil 2007). Socio-political and geographic responses frame the unfolding but uneven topographies of climate change (Crate 2011; Moore 2010; Lazrus 2012), while efforts to adapt and mitigate its impacts extend across the social and natural sciences. This paper reviews anthropology’s evolving engagement with the Anthropocene, contemplative of the multifarious approaches to research. The growing body of contemporary thinking (Latour 2005, 2013; Haraway 2008, 2011) encompasses the emergence of multispecies ethnographic research (Kirksey and Helmreich 2010; Fuentes 2010; Tsing 2012; Paxon 2010) highlighting the entanglements of humans with other life forms. Such new ontological considerations are reflected in Kohn’s (2007) “Anthropology of Life,” ethnographic research that moves beyond an isolated focus on the human to consider other life processes and entities as research participants. Examples of critical engagement discussed include anthropology beyond disciplinary borders (Kelman & West 2009), queries writing in the Anthropocene (Rose 2009), and anthropology of climate change (Crate 2011). Although not exhaustive of contemporary anthropology, we demonstrate the diverse positions of anthropologists within this juncture in relation to our central trope of entanglements threaded through our discussion in this review.

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  • Evaluating the content and quality of cognitive-behavioural therapy case conceptualisations

    Haarhoff, BA; Flett, RA; Gibson, KL (2011)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Whilst case conceptualisation (CC) is considered a key Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy (CBT) competency, assessment and evaluation of the content and quality of CBT CC skills is not generally part of CBT training. In this paper, the content and quality of CCs produced by novice CBT clinicians was evaluated. Twenty-six novice CBT clinicians constructed CCs based on four clinical case vignettes. The content and quality of the CCs was evaluated using three rating scales, the Case Formulation Content Coding method, the Fothergill and Kuyken Quality of Cognitive-Therapy Case Formulation rating scale, and the CBT CC rating scale and benchmark conceptualisations. Descriptive statistical analysis of content displayed consistent distribution of subcategories of clinical information included, or omitted in the CCs. Underlying psychological mechanisms were emphasised. Information concerning biological, socio-cultural, protective factors, and the therapeutic relationship were generally omitted. As far as quality was concerned, between 50% - 61% of participants produced 'good-enough' CBT CCs. The consistent pattern of clinical information evidenced in the participants' CCs highlighted strengths and weaknesses which have implications for improving training in CC CBT competency.

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  • Using the common sense model of illness selfregulation to understand diabetes-related distress: The importance of being able to 'make sense' of diabetes

    Paddison, CAM; Alpass, F; Stephens, C (2010)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    This study examines the relationships between illness perceptions and illness-related distress among adults with type 2 diabetes. Research participants (N = 615) were randomly selected from a primary care database in New Zealand. Data were collected through a mailed questionnaire survey and review of medical records. The primary outcome was diabetes-related psychological distress measured using the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, clinical characteristics, and mental health showed that illness perceptions accounted for 15% of differences in distress about diabetes (F change (4,462) = 35.37, p < .001). Poor mental health and illness severity alone do not explain differences in diabetes-related emotional adjustment. Results suggest that ‘making sense’ of diabetes may be central to successfully managing the emotional consequences of diabetes.

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  • A Low-Power Voltage Limiter/Regulator IC in Standard Thick-Oxide 130 nm CMOS for Inductive Power Transfer Application

    Lapshev, S; Hasan, SMREZAUL (2014-12-18)

    Journal article
    Massey University

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