7,770 results for 2000, Journal article, 2000

  • Intentionalism, Intentionality and Reporting Beliefs

    Mitrovic, Branko (2009)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The dominant view of twentieth century analytic philosophy has been that all thinking is always in a language; that languages are vehicles of thought. In recent decades, however, the opposite view, that languages merely serve to express language-­‐independent thought-­‐contents or propositions, has been more widely accepted. The debate has a direct equivalent in the philosophy of history: when historians report the beliefs of historical figures, do they report the sentences or propositions that these historical figures believed to be true or false? In this paper I argue in favor of the latter, intentionalist, view. My arguments mostly center on the problems with translations that are likely to arise when a historian reports the beliefs of historical figures who expressed them in languages other than the one in which the historian is writing. In discussing these problems the paper presents an application of John Searle’s theory of intentionality on the philosophy of history. The debate between the view that all thinking is verbal and always in a language and the view that human beings think independently of any language (using their languages merely in order to express their thoughts) has had an extensive history in the philosophy of language for the past hundred years. It also has numerous implications for the philosophy of history, where the problem can be stated in general terms as the question of whether a historian, when reporting the beliefs of historical figures, reports the thought-­‐contents (conceived as independent of the language in which they were articulated) or the sentences that these people believed to be true or false. Among English-­‐speaking historians of philosophy, the latter view was promoted by Arthur Danto, the former by Quentin Skinner and Mark Bevir. Both positions are reflected in specific problems of history-­‐writing, such as, for instance, the question whether and how a historian can report the beliefs of historical figures who articulated them in languages different from the language in which the historian is writing. Both positions also fundamentally rely on the assumption that it is possible and legitimate to provide translations of sentences from one language to another when reporting the beliefs of historical figures; but, as we shall see, they are not on equal footing when it comes to explaining what counts as a legitimate translation. This paper explores the implications that these two views on the role of language in human thinking have for the philosophy of history. It will show that the view that all human thinking is verbal is not compatible with some fundamental and standard practices of history-­‐writing. Thus, the paper can be seen as a contribution to the debate about intentionalism in history-­‐writing. It argues in favor of the intentionalist approach by introducing new arguments derived from the philosophy of language, while at the same time proposing a formulation of the intentionalist position that relies on John Searle’s philosophical elaboration on the concept of intentionality.

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  • Enhancing Information Literacy: A Practical Exemplar

    Graham, Jeanine; Parsons, Kathryn (2003)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This case-study outlines a teaching partnership between library and academic staff at the University of Waikato. It describes the strategies adopted to develop greater student information literacy and knowledge of source materials; and demonstrates the inter-relationship between student assignments and library resourcing. Both achievements and areas of difficulty are discussed.

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  • Parental bereavement: From grief theory to a creative nonfiction perspective on grieving the death of a young adult child from cancer

    Arnold, S. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Gender and health promotion: a feminist perspective

    Yarwood, J. (2002)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Throughout the twentieth century feminist thinking underwent radical change as the women’s movement gained momentum. The social movement of feminism has embraced many guises, from liberal, to Marxist, to the postmodern. However, critical understanding of the experience of women’s oppression has remained the raison d’être of feminist thinking. The relevance of feminist scholarship within the interrelationship of gender and health care will be analysed and debated in this article, through the dominant discourse of health promotion.Throughout the twentieth century feminist thinking underwent radical change as the women’s movement gained momentum. The social movement of feminism has embraced many guises, from liberal, to Marxist, to the postmodern. However, critical understanding of the experience of women’s oppression has remained the raison d’être of feminist thinking. The relevance of feminist scholarship within the interrelationship of gender and health care will be analysed and debated in this article, through the dominant discourse of health promotion.

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  • Outsider influence and the utility of e-mail as an instrument for teaching in developing nations: a case study in Fiji

    Shanahan, M. W. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The impact of outsider influence in the advancement of human capital in developing nations is well documented1. This paper examines the utility of e-mail as a mechanism for delivery of outsider influence to middle managers in Fiji via a personal management development programme (PMDP). Thirteen participants took part in the PMDP over a six month period. The programme was aimed at enhancing their managerial skills by achievement of a series of negotiated objectives. There was one face-to-face meeting with each participant to set up the programme and negotiate objectives, and a second face-to-face meeting six weeks later to ensure all processes and systems were operational. During the six month duration of the programme, all other correspondence was limited to e-mail only.

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  • Sen's capability approach in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes: promoting successful local application through focus groups

    Schischka, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At a theoretical level there has been wide acceptance of Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach (CA) in development. However, questions remain regarding operationalization of the approach within the constraints participants and practitioners and other stakeholders face in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes.

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  • Living in stories: Creative nonfiction as an effective genre to write about death and bereavement

    Arnold, S. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Through the telling of stories and interaction with listener or audience, we give structure to our experience and create order and meaning. Written narrative is, therefore, a medium well suited to exploring the experience of death and bereavement. 'We live in stories, not statistics,' Gilbert says (2002: 223). Parents' stories of their children's deaths serve the same purpose as parents' stories of their living children's ongoing lives. Writing about the death of one's child is a way not only to continue bonds and help other bereaved parents, but also a way to allow the 'wounded storyteller' to give voice to the dead and facilitate catharsis in the teller. Utilising the techniques of creative nonfiction to write such a story, the writer can create a compelling narrative that allows writer and reader to enter 'the space of the story for the other' (Frank 1995: 18). This paper discusses the human affinity with story telling and the reasons the bereaved write their stories. It also defines the genre of creative nonfiction and outlines the history of its development. Finally it examines four creative nonfiction texts that have influenced my own writing on the topic of parental bereavement.

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  • A cost-benefit analysis for using the internet in the language classroom

    Reinders, Hayo (2003)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In recent years, the Internet has obtained its place in the educational environment. As part of the examination requirements, students have to be able to use the Internet to find information and to gain experience with international communication, for example by using email. Investments in both time and money for this purpose are large, while the results are often hard to measure. Sometimes, computer literacy seems to be the only result of using computers in the classroom, the development of which may be a laudable goal, but is certainly not the responsibility of a language teacher. Using the Internet for language teaching purposes can of course provide benefits, but whether they balance the investments remains to be seen. To aid in this process the author developed a short quizz consisting of a number of questions, the answers to which determine whether the necessary investment to using a particular site is worth it. A ‘scorecard’ makes this easy.

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  • Nurses' views of family nursing in community contexts: An exploratory study

    Yarwood, J. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is chosen as it provides a community nurses' perspective about family nursing, of which there is a dearth of understanding both in New Zealand and abroad. The qualitative exploratory study was designed to give voice to community nurses views about working with families and to encourage debate and discussion about the possibilities of family nursing in nursing practice this country. To do this and to ensure it reached academic and clinical nurses to inform practice, it was important this article was published in the only national, well recognised scholarly, peer reviewed nursing journal, that focusses on nursing research, Nursing Praxis in New Zealand. This article was recently picked up internationally and cited in a literature review 'Study of the implementation of a new community health nurse role in Scotland' URL http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/03/1388/13.

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  • Pre-school children frequently seen but seldom heard in nursing care

    Watson, P. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A significant number of users of nursing services are ]3re-school children, and have a right to be heard in matters affecting their health. Despite nurses' duty to seek and take seriously the views of children in matters concerning children's health, children are rarely directly consulted as consumers of health care. Thus, children's voices are largely unheard in nursing practice. Furthermore, research about children's experience of illness generally excludes preschool children. Therefore, preschool children's voices are also mostly unheai-d in nursing research about the experience of being ill. Consequently, there is little evidence from nursing practice or research to show the potential benefits of ensuring these voices are heard. This line of reasoning forms the basis of recommending the need for research that seeks to understand how preschool children experience being ill and how they communicate those experiences to others.

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  • Researching the toxicity of party pills

    Gee, P.; Richardson, S. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Party pill use is on the increase. A research study at Christchurch Hospital's emergency department is tracking the adverse reactions to ingestion of these substances, which in New Zealand are freely availabe to any one aged over 18.

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  • A comparison of activities undertaken by enrolled and registered nurses on medical wards in Australia: an observational study

    Chaboyer, W.; Wallis, M.; Duffield, C.; Courtney, M.; Seaton, P.; Holzhauser, K.; Schluter, J.; Bost, N. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: The past decade has seen increasing patient acuity and shortening lengths of stays in acute care hospitals, which has implications for how nursing staff organise and provide care to patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the activities undertaken by Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and Registered Nurses (RNs) on acute medical wards in two Australian hospitals. Design: This study used structured observation, employing a work sampling technique, to identify the activities undertaken by nursing staff in four wards in two hospitals. Nursing staff were observed for two weeks. The data collection instrument identified 25 activities grouped into four categories, direct patient care, indirect care, unit related activities and personal activities. Setting: Two hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Results: A total of 114 nursing staff were observed undertaking 14,528 activities during 482 hours of data collection. In total, 6,870 (47.3%) indirect, 4,826 (33.2%) direct, 1,960 (13.5%) personal and 872 (6.0%) unit related activities were recorded. Within the direct patient care activities, the five most frequently observed activities (out of a total of 10 activities) for all classifications of nursing staff were quite similar (admission and assessment, hygiene and patient/family interaction, medication and IV administration and procedures), however the absolute proportion of Level 2 RN activities were much lower than the other two groups. In terms of indirect care, three of the four most commonly occurring activities (out of a total of eight activities) were similar among groups (patient rounds and team meetings, verbal report/handover and care planning and clinical pathways). The six unit related activities occurred rarely for all groups of nurses. Conclusion: This study suggests that similarities exist in the activities undertaken by ENs and Level 1 RNs, supporting the contention that role boundaries are no longer clearly delineated.

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  • NMR-Solution structures of fluoro-substituted β-peptides: A 3 14-helix and a hairpin turn. The first case of a 90 [degrees] O=C-C-F dihedral angle in an α-fluoro-amide group

    Mathad, R. I.; Jaun, B.; Flögel, O.; Gardiner, J.; Löwenenck, M.; Codee, J. D.C.; Edmonds, M. K. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    To further study the preference of the antiperiplanar (ap) conformation in a-fluoro-amide groups two b-peptides (1, 2), containing a (2-F)-b3hAla and a (2-F)-b2hPhe residue, have been synthesized. Their NMR-solution structures in CD3OH were determined and compared with those of non-fluorosubstituted analogs (3, 4a). While we have found in a previous investigation (Helv. Chim. Acta 2005, 88, 266) that a stereospecifically introduced F-substituent in the central position of a b-heptapeptide is capable of “breaking” the 314-helical structure by enforcing the F–C–C=O ap-conformation, we could now demonstrate that this same procedure leads to a structure with the unfavorable ca. 90º F–C–C=O dihedral angle, enforced by the 314-helical folding in a b-tridecapeptide (1, Fig. 4). This is interpreted as a consequence of cooperative folding in the longer b-peptide. An F-substituent placed in the turn section of a b-peptidic hairpin turn was shown to be in an ap-arrangement with respect to the neighboring C=O bond (2, Fig. 7). Analysis of the non-fluorosubstituted b-tetrapeptides (with helix-preventing configurations of the two central b2/b3-amino acid residues) provides unusually tight hairpin structural clusters (3, 4a, Fig. 8, 9). The skeleton of the b-tetrapeptide H-(R)b3hVal-(R)b2hVal-(R)b3hAla-(S)b3hPhe-OH (4a) is proposed as a novel, very simple back-bone structure for mimicking a-peptidic hairpin turns.

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  • Risky work: Child protection practice

    Stanley, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The introduction of a differential response model to the New Zealand child protection system is an important social policy initiative. However, the differential response literature has yet to address the role that risk discourses play as organising and regulatory regimes in contemporary child protection work, and this paper addresses this gap. Child protection social work is strongly underpinned by discourses of risk, and this is best illustrated in the adoption of risk assessment tools that aim to assist the practices of risk assessment and its management. This paper traces the shifting and discursive functions of risk in child protection social work, and argues that Child, Youth and Family (CYF)2 social workers are negotiating a complex and increasingly pressured practice environment where difficult decisions can be legitimised through the use of risk discourses. The author’s doctoral study, which considered risk discourses and statutory social work practice decisions, is drawn on to illustrate how social workers may inadvertently compromise the differential response system – a system where the discursive functions of risk are likely to remain central and regulatory. There is a danger that CYF social workers might construct their role within such a system as increasingly the assessor and manager of high risk. This paper advocates for social work training and supervision as forums where practitioners can consider and better understand these risk discourses.

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  • Elder abuse and neglect: Past endeavours as a springboard for the future

    Brook, G. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper traces the emergence of, and responses to, the phenomenon known as elder abuse and neglect in Aotearoa New Zealand and considers where to from here.

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  • The use of yeasts and moulds as sensing elements in biosensors

    Baronian, K. H. R. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Whole cell biosensors are able to provide information that sensors based on single and multiple types of molecules are unable to do. For example broad-spectrum catabolite analysis, cell toxicity and genotoxicity are best detected in the context of a functioning cell. Most whole cell sensors have used bacterial cells as the sensing element. Fungal cells, however, can provide all of the advantages bacterial cells offer but in addition they can provide information that is more relevant to other eukaryote organisms. These cells are easy to cultivate, manipulate for sensor configurations and are amenable to a wide range of transducer methodologies. An overview of the use of yeast and filamentous fungi as the sensing element of some biosensors is presented here.

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  • Electrochemical detection of wild type Saccharomyces Cerevisiae responses to estrogens

    Baronian, K. H. R.; Gurazada, S. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The presence of an estrogen binding protein (EBP) and an endogenous ligand in three yeast species was first reported in 1982/1983. The ligand was shown to be 17-estradiol and the binding affinities of EBP were demonstrated to be similar to those of rat estrogen receptors. This report describes detection of the behaviour of a putative estrogen binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a double mediator electrochemical detection system. The response to estrogen is shown to be quantitative with signals detectable from 10-8 to 10-14 M. An incubation period of 5 hours is established and a method to block electrochemical signals produced by the catabolism of exogenous substrates is demonstrated to be effective. The system provides a method that permits the use of wild type S. cerevisiae to quantify estrogens.

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  • Third-party courseware in higher education: The case of Microsoft official courses at one tertiary institution

    Correia, E. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A tertiary institution can purchase third-party courseware for its own purposes. The use of Microsoft courseware, for instance, though it raises a number of wide-ranging issues and challenges, can offer significant cost-effective benefits to an academic institution, especially one having to adapt to declining levels of funding. Large providers enjoy the economies of scale to be able to keep course material current, and produce not just information in paper format, but also multimedia materials that appeal to diverse students and improve the quality of teaching and learning in higher education.

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  • Student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities

    Cronje, T.; Coll, R.K. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities (‘learning communities’) derived from a cross-case analysis of four case studies across the New Zealand university and polytechnic sectors. Here we explore student expectations and experiences of the higher education sector and canvass their views as to the infrastructure and resources in their institutions of study, and how they see their learning serves their careers aims. Student career aims and perceptions of how their learning addresses these aims is next. Student perceptions of pedagogies employed in their institutions, along with their preferred pedagogies follows; including staff-student interactions and consideration of the importance of practical skill development. The paper finishes by considering student perceptions of support structures and an analysis of their understanding of aspects of the nature of science (NoS) and engineering. The research findings suggest the students become more independent and responsible for their own learning, enjoy smaller class sizes and interactive learning activities such as practical work and tutorials, and stressed the importance of establishing good relationships with their teachers. Polytechnic students were more positive about their learning and felt the more practice features of their learning led to enhanced career prospects. Students from university and polytechnic sectors were aware of formal learning support structures, but only used them as a last resort; instead first working with peers and teachers.

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  • Not accepting oblivion - The career of Cedric Savage

    Pauli, D. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is the result of my continuing engagement with biography as a mode of framing art historical research. It proved challenging to write because during the later stages of his career, Savage frequently moved between Europe and New Zealand and had to negotiate on-going economic and political changes, both at home and abroad. Moreover, his career coincided with the rise of modernism, and the subsequent split of the already distinctly regionalised New Zealand art world into pro- and anti-modernist factions. Not least because of his working class background, complex personality and ambiguous sexual orientation, this proved to be a difficult context for Savage to negotiate. His letters are often frank, and discuss in some detail the realities of trying to make a living as an artist in New Zealand. Writing his biography therefore allowed me to develop a more nuanced perspective of the life of a professional painter in 20th century New Zealand painting, beyond the more commonly applied modernist paradigm.

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