3 results for 2000, Journal article, Characteristics of nurses providing diabetes community and outpatient care in Auckland

  • Characteristics of nurses providing diabetes community and outpatient care in Auckland

    Daly, B; Arroll, B; Sheridan, N; Kenealy, Timothy; Scragg, R (2013-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    INTRODUCTION: There is a worldwide trend for diabetes care to be undertaken in primary care. Nurses are expected to take a leading role in diabetes management, but their roles in primary care are unclear in New Zealand, as are the systems of care they work in as well as their training. AIM: To describe and compare demographic details, education and diabetes experience, practice setting and facilities available for the three main groups of primary health care nurses working in the largest urban area in New Zealand. METHOD: Of the total number of practice nurses, district nurses and specialist nurses working in Auckland (n=1091), 31% were randomly selected to undertake a self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview in 2006-2008. RESULTS: Overall response was 86% (n=284 self-administered questionnaires, n=287 telephone interviews). Almost half (43%) of primary care nurses were aged over 50 years. A greater proportion of specialist nurses (89%) and practice nurses (84%) had post-registration diabetes education compared with district nurses (65%, p=0.005), from a range of educational settings including workshops, workplaces, conferences and tertiary institutions. More district nurses (35%) and practice nurses (32%) had worked in their current workplace for >10 years compared with specialist nurses (14%, p=0.004). Over 20% of practice nurses and district nurses lacked access to the internet, and the latter group had the least administrative facilities and felt least valued. DISCUSSION: These findings highlight an ageing primary health care nursing workforce, lack of a national primary health care post-registration qualification and a lack of internet access.

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  • Characteristics of nurses providing diabetes community and outpatient care in Auckland

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy; Scragg, Robert (2013)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    INTRODUCTION: There is a worldwide trend for diabetes care to be undertaken in primary care. Nurses are expected to take a leading role in diabetes management, but their roles in primary care are unclear in New Zealand, as are the systems of care they work in as well as their training. AIM: To describe and compare demographic details, education and diabetes experience, practice setting and facilities available for the three main groups of primary health care nurses working in the largest urban area in New Zealand. METHOD: Of the total number of practice nurses, district nurses and specialist nurses working in Auckland (n=1091), 31% were randomly selected to undertake a self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview in 2006-2008. RESULTS: Overall response was 86% (n=284 self-administered questionnaires, n=287 telephone interviews). Almost half (43%) of primary care nurses were aged over 50 years. A greater proportion of specialist nurses (89%) and practice nurses (84%) had post-registration diabetes education compared with district nurses (65%, p=0.005), from a range of educational settings including workshops, workplaces, conferences and tertiary institutions. More district nurses (35%) and practice nurses (32%) had worked in their current workplace for >10 years compared with specialist nurses (14%, p=0.004). Over 20% of practice nurses and district nurses lacked access to the internet, and the latter group had the least administrative facilities and felt least valued. DISCUSSION: These findings highlight an ageing primary health care nursing workforce, lack of a national primary health care post-registration qualification and a lack of internet access.

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  • Characteristics of nurses providing diabetes community and outpatient care in Auckland

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, Bruce; Sheridan, Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy; Scragg, Robert (2013-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    INTRODUCTION: There is a worldwide trend for diabetes care to be undertaken in primary care. Nurses are expected to take a leading role in diabetes management, but their roles in primary care are unclear in New Zealand, as are the systems of care they work in as well as their training. AIM: To describe and compare demographic details, education and diabetes experience, practice setting and facilities available for the three main groups of primary health care nurses working in the largest urban area in New Zealand. METHOD: Of the total number of practice nurses, district nurses and specialist nurses working in Auckland (n=1091), 31% were randomly selected to undertake a self-administered questionnaire and telephone interview in 2006-2008. RESULTS: Overall response was 86% (n=284 self-administered questionnaires, n=287 telephone interviews). Almost half (43%) of primary care nurses were aged over 50 years. A greater proportion of specialist nurses (89%) and practice nurses (84%) had post-registration diabetes education compared with district nurses (65%, p=0.005), from a range of educational settings including workshops, workplaces, conferences and tertiary institutions. More district nurses (35%) and practice nurses (32%) had worked in their current workplace for >10 years compared with specialist nurses (14%, p=0.004). Over 20% of practice nurses and district nurses lacked access to the internet, and the latter group had the least administrative facilities and felt least valued. DISCUSSION: These findings highlight an ageing primary health care nursing workforce, lack of a national primary health care post-registration qualification and a lack of internet access.

    View record details