2,215 results for 2000, Journal article, Share

  • A Report on the Community Development Conference 2015

    Stansfield, John; Masih, Abishhek (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The Community Development Conference 2015 was an effort by the Department of Social Practice at Unitec and Community Development practitioners to bring together practitioners, academics and students to share their knowledge, research and stories about community development. Thirty-­‐five completed feedback forms were received - summary included.

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  • From the clinical to the managerial domain : the lived experience of role transition from radiographer to radiology manager in South-East Queensland

    Thompson, Alarna M. N.; Henwood, Suzanne (2016-02-12)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    INTRODUCTION: This study seeks to add to current literature a descriptive account of the lived experience of radiographers’ transition to, and experiences of, management roles and identifies additional resources and support that are perceived as being beneficial for this transition. METHODS: This study employed a descriptive phenomenological stance. Using purposive sampling, six South- East Queensland based private practice radiology managers, who had held their position for longer than 3 months, participated in audiotape recorded in-depth interviews exploring their transition to, and experiences of management in radiology. Thematic analysis was used to describe and make meaning of the data. RESULTS: Overall, five central themes emerged through thematic analysis of the data. The results indicate that all participants’ had an underlying drive to succeed during their role transition and highlight the importance of a comprehensive orientation by a mentor; the training and support to enable preparation for the role, especially in the area of people management skills and communication; the importance of access to networking opportunities and the importance of concise expectations from higher management. CONCLUSION: Role transition can be marred with uncertainty, however; key suggestions indicate the importance of having support mechanisms in place before, during and after transitioning to a managerial role.

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  • People as a source of competitive advantage during recruitment and retention of senior managers in financial services sectors in Laos 

    Du Plessis, Andries; Sumphonphakdy, S. (2016-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The focus of the paper is to identify the importance of recruiting and retaining senior management in the banking industry in Laos. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were adopted to collect data from three banks in Laos. Interview section: the questions were to explore the understanding of concepts of HRM, perspectives towards HRM about recruitment and retention. Questionnaire section: part one – demographics data, part two attitudes towards HRM processes recruitment and retention. Findings: HRM plays a critically important role in banks in keeping their competitive advantage; lack of development and implementation of HRM practices and policies to recruit and retain the right people.

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  • The productivity paradox in green buildings

    Byrd, Hugh; Rasheed, Eziaku Onyeizu (2016-04-08)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In this paper we challenge the notion that “green” buildings can achieve greater productivity than buildings that are not accredited as “green”. For nearly two decades, research has produced apparent evidence which indicates that the design of a “green” building can enhance the productivity of its occupants. This relationship between building design and productivity is claimed to be achieved through compliance with internal environmental quality (IEQ) criteria of Green rating tools. This paper reviews methods of measuring productivity and the appropriateness of the metrics used for measuring IEQ in office environments. This review is supported by the results of a survey of office building users which identifies social factors to be significantly more important than environmental factors in trying to correlate productivity and IEQ. It also presents the findings of observations that were discretely carried out on user-response in green buildings. These findings demonstrate that, despite a building’s compliance with IEQ criteria, occupants still resort to exceptional measures to alter their working environment in a bid to achieve comfort. The work has been carried out on “green” buildings in New Zealand. These buildings are rated based on the NZ “Green Star” system which has adopted the Australian “green star” system with its roots in BREEAM. Despite this, the results of this research are applicable to many other “green” rating systems. The paper concludes that methods of measuring productivity are flawed, that IEQ criteria for building design is unrepresentative of how occupants perceive the environment and that this can lead to an architecture that has few of the inherent characteristics of good environmental design.

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  • A method of sound wave diffusion in motor vehicle exhaust systems

    Singh, Niranjan (2017-04-04)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    It is common practice among young vehicle owners to modify the exhaust system of their vehicle to reduce exhaust backpressure with the perception that the output power increases. In the process of backpressure reduction, the output noise (Whakapau) of the vehicle also increases correspondingly. The conflict of interest that arises from modified vehicle exhaust systems and the general public is well publicised. This prototype was designed to meet the demands of exhaust back pressure reduction while at the same time mitigate the sound output of the vehicle. The design involves lining a cylindrical pipe with common glass marbles which is normally used for playing. The marbles are made of a sustainable material as it does not erode when exposed to exhaust gases and it is easily recycled. The prototype muffler is much smaller in size when compared to conventional mufflers. All tests were done in a simulated controlled environment and data collated using approved New Zealand Transport Agency testing regime. It has to be noted that the test focus was noise mitigation and not comprehensive engine performance testing. The results of the test prove a reduction of sound levels, however more testing needs to be undertaken with varying annulus depth, marble sizes and arrangements and engine loads

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  • Designing blended learning to foster students’ digital information literacy : developing an in(ter)vention

    Schwenger, Bettina (2017-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    How to integrate online with face-to-face learning appropriately is an often-discussed question as New Zealand tertiary institutions increasingly offer blended learning. In this context, there is a need to develop students’ academic literacy, for example digital information literacy (DIL) as its significance for study (Feekery, 2013) and workplace (Bruce, 2004) success is well recognised. Embedding DIL in a blended learning course offers teachers options to create additional learning and practice opportunities for students. My research explores how blended learning design can support DIL, with a particular focus on the potential of online learning affordances. The article reports on the iterative process of creating an embedded digital information literacy (DIL) in(ter)vention aligned with the assessment in a first-year undergraduate course and focuses on the four online resources developed. The research is still in progress and this article therefore addresses the development process rather than the findings.

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  • Community attitudes and practices of urban residents regarding predation by pet cats on wildlife : an international comparison

    Hall, Catherine M.; Adams, Nigel; Bradley, J. Stuart; Bryant, Kate A.; Davis, Alisa A.; Dickman, Christopher R.; Fujita, Tsumugi; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Lepczyk, Christopher A.; McBride, E. Anne; Pollock, Kenneth H.; Styles, Irene M.; van Heezik, Yolanda; Wang, Ferian; Calver, Michael C. (2016-04-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    International differences in practices and attitudes regarding pet cats' interactions with wild-life were assessed by surveying citizens from at least two cities in Australia, New Zealand, the UK, the USA, China and Japan. Predictions tested were: (i) cat owners would agree less than non-cat owners that cats might threaten wildlife, (ii) cat owners value wildlife less than non-cat owners, (iii) cat owners are less accepting of cat legislation/restrictions than non-owners, and (iv) respondents from regions with high endemic biodiversity (Australia, New Zealand, China and the USA state of Hawaii) would be most concerned about pet cats threatening wildlife. Everywhere non-owners were more likely than owners to agree that pet cats killing wildlife were a problem in cities, towns and rural areas. Agreement amongst non-owners was highest in Australia (95%) and New Zealand (78%) and lowest in the UK (38%). Irrespective of ownership, over 85% of respondents from all countries except China (65%) valued wildlife in cities, towns and rural areas. Non-owners advocated cat legislation more strongly than owners except in Japan. Australian non-owners were the most supportive (88%), followed by Chinese non-owners (80%) and Japanese owners (79.5%). The UK was least supportive (non-owners 43%, owners 25%). Many Australian (62%), New Zealand (51%) and Chinese owners (42%) agreed that pet cats killing wildlife in cities, towns and rural areas was a problem, while Hawaiian owners were similar to the mainland USA (20%). Thus high endemic biodiversity might contribute to attitudes in some, but not all, countries. Husbandry practices varied internationally, with predation highest where fewer cats were confined. Although the risk of wildlife population declines caused by pet cats justifies precautionary action, campaigns based on wildlife protection are unlikely to succeed outside Australia or New Zealand. Restrictions on roaming protect wildlife and benefit cat welfare, so welfare is a better rationale.

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  • Scarcity of ecosystem services : an experimental manipulation of declining pollination rates and its economic consequences for agriculture

    Sandhu, Harpinder; Waterhouse, Benjamin; Boyer, Stephane; Wratten, Steve (2016-07-05)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Ecosystem services (ES) such as pollination are vital for the continuous supply of food to a growing human population, but the decline in populations of insect pollinators worldwide poses a threat to food and nutritional security. Using a pollinator (honeybee) exclusion approach, we evaluated the impact of pollinator scarcity on production in four brassica fields, two producing hybrid seeds and two producing open-pollinated ones. There was a clear reduction in seed yield as pollination rates declined. Open-pollinated crops produced significantly higher yields than did the hybrid ones at all pollination rates. The hybrid crops required at least 0.50 of background pollination rates to achieve maximum yield, whereas in open-pollinated crops, 0.25 pollination rates were necessary for maximum yield. The total estimated economic value of pollination services provided by honeybees to the agricultural industry in New Zealand is NZD $1.96 billion annually. This study indicates that loss of pollination services can result in significant declines in production and have serious implications for the market economy in New Zealand. Depending on the extent of honeybee population decline, and assuming that results in declining pollination services, the estimated economic loss to New Zealand agriculture could be in the range of NZD $295–728 million annually.

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  • Using predicted locations and an ensemble approach to address sparse data sets for species distribution modelling : Long-horned beetles (Cerambycidae) of the Fiji islands

    Aguilar, Glenn; Waqa-Sakiti, Hilda; Winder, Linton (2016-12-09)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Several modelling tools were utilised to develop maps predicting the suitability of the Fiji Islands for longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae) that include endemic and endangered species such as the Giant Fijian Beetle Xixuthrus heros. This was part of an effort to derive spatially relevant knowledge for characterising an important taxonomic group in an area with relatively few biodiversity studies. Occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and bioclimatic variables from the WorldClim database were used as input for species distribution modelling (SDM). Due to the low number of available occurrence data resulting in inconsistent performance of different tools, several algorithms implemented in the DISMO package in R (Bioclim, Domain, GLM, Mahalanobis, SVM, RF and MaxEnt) were tested to determine which provide the best performance. Occurrence sets at several distribution densities were tested to determine which algorithm and sample size combination provided the best model results. The machine learning algorithms RF, SVM and MaxEnt consistently provided the best performance as evaluated by the True Skill Statistic (TSS), Kappa and Area Under Curve (AUC) metrics. The occurrence set with a density distribution of one sampling point per 10km2 provided the best performance and was used for the final prediction model. An ensemble of the best-performing algorithms generated the final suitability predictive map. The results can serve as a basis for additional studies and provide initial information that will eventually support decision-making processes supporting conservation in the archipelago.

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  • What Does Feminism Want?

    Horbury, Alison (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Like Freud’s famous inquiry ‘what does a woman want?’, this paper asks a similar question of the signifier ‘feminism’ for if one aims to (re)imagine feminism for the new millennium one must first ask: what does Feminism want? This (imperfect) reference to Freud’s question hopes to draw attention to the particular and the universal underpinning the signifier feminism, a slipperiness that works idiosyncratically at the threshold of public and private politics which, though it is perhaps the most unifying aspect of feminism, nevertheless undermines it. To politicize the personal one must question the signifier that comes to universalize an indefinite article for, as I argue in this paper, what ‘a’ woman wants is beneath the bar of what Feminism wants when it is mounted in public discourse. To continue to invest publically in a signifier of personal politics––as Jacqueline Rose advocates (2014)––then, one must rephrase the question: of what does this signifier Feminism speak when it is mounted in public discourse? This paper considers some mechanisms by which this signifier generates and mobilizes desire, fantasy, and phobia in public politics where feminism’s knowledge product covers over or, in Rose’s terms, “sanitizes” those “disturbing insight[s]” (2014: x) of experience, “everything that is darkest, most recalcitrant and unsettling” (2014 xii), in the “furthest limits of conscious and unconscious life” (2014: x). Here, where this signifier constitutes an ideal-ego, its effects are inhibiting. In short, this paper argues that before any future of feminism can be imagined, those occupying a feminist position—discourse, politics, or identity—must ask what their unconscious investment in this signifier is. In Lacanian terms, one must relinquish feminism’s discourse of protest and complete the circuit through the analyst’s discourse to ask: what does a woman want in feminism? What does Feminism want?

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  • Feminism in the Logic of Late Capitalism

    Kunkle, Sheila (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This essay considers how Feminism might become a force for radical change as construed through two perspectives: the Marxist vision of Kathi Weeks and the Hegelian logic of Slavoj Žižek. I begin by enumerating the antinomies of late capitalism and the ways it has subsumed our identities and commodified our social relations. I then elucidate how Weeks’ Marxist utopia (her demands of basic income and less work) require a “hopeful subject” and positive freedom, while Zizek’s Hegelian logic and vision of a communist future require the negativity of freedom, a divided subject, and hopelessness. Weeks’ feminism posits a direct opposition to capitalism, setting boundaries to its external limits, while Zizek’s Hegelian logic would require the reconfiguration of capitalism’s internal limits. Finally, I propose how a feminism geared towards its own extinction might make a Marxian move by way of Hegelian logic, through the consideration of Fredric Jameson’s “An American Utopia.”

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  • “White Women Elected Trump”: Feminism in ‘Dark Times,’ Its Present and Future

    Faulkner, Joanne (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Women-centred social movements are currently undergoing a period of intense self-reflection and -criticism following the election of Donald J. Trump as President, and in the context of the large degree of support he received from white women. This paper analyses the event of the ‘women’s marches’ that took place globally the day following Trump’s presidential inauguration for its significance for the present and future of feminism. The consequence of the marches has been debated both by participants and non-participants, due to the broad range of issues, interests, and demands present at the events. While there was a diversity of participants in the marches, a common criticism from non-participants was that the march was insufficiently political in its goals and manifestation, too novice and too disparate to constitute real political action. This paper responds to this concern and its implications by staging an exchange between Hannah Arendt and Jacques Rancière, in order to clarify the possibilities of movements such as the marches for the future of feminism.

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  • Book Review - Althusser and Theology by Agon Hamza (Ed)

    McGowan, Todd (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Feminism, Finance and the Work of Reproduction

    Daellenbach, Shanti (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article begins to think the groundwork for a revolutionary feminist politics in an era shaped by contemporary finance capital and the increasing financialisation daily life. Conceiving of financialisation as a strategic response to a threat that must be brought under capital’s control through reorganising the exploitation of labour-power, it provides a reading of the seemingly abstract sphere of financial circulation as fundamentally dependent upon the very material and primary labour of reproduction. The article undertakes an analysis of how social reproduction is increasingly financialised today, in ways that play on and reinforce the persistently gendered reality of this work for the purpose of financial accumulation and increasing the profitability of labour. From the gendered targeting of financial instruments, to discursive tropes of women’s pathologies and responsibilities in household financial management, financialisation both creates new terrains of reproductive work and deepens households’ and women’s entanglement with financial markets to ensure their survival. Drawing on the critical writings and political strategies of autonomist feminism, this paper argues that women’s reproductive labour is central to the continued ascendancy of finance capital and, consequently, that feminist struggle’s for autonomy, self-valorisation and socialisation of reproduction are central to its destruction. Understanding what finance means to feminism and, in turn, what feminism might mean to finance today is imperative for a relevant contemporary feminist politics and to effective anti-capitalist strategy alike. This begins with a critical re-examination of the emergence of the hierarchical sexual division of labour particular to capital relations and its status in contemporary finance capital.

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  • Tending for Necessity: Reclaiming feminism on the left

    Fielder, Anna (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    In light of the feminist response to the presidential victory of Donald Trump, this piece draws upon the work of critical left thinkers such as Alain Badiou, Nancy Fraser and Fredric Jameson in order to advocate a future for feminism that is based on the radical left. Taking inspiration from Fredric Jameson’s suggestion that History is marked by “the collective struggle to wrest a realm of Freedom from a realm of Necessity” this piece argues for a feminism that does not individualise or commodify people’s relationships with Necessity, but that has as one if its central tenets a collective caring and tending for those inescapable aspects of living. This does not require a move away from contemporary feminist concerns for signification and language. How Necessity is brought (if only partially) into signification and collectively tended for, now constitute vital points of discussion in a left politics that feminists have little choice but to engage with.

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  • The Power of O

    Jöttkandt, Sigi (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Here I propose that a Lacanian feminist undertaking today requires the assertion of two sets of rights: the positive rights of a traditional feminist agenda, together with the rights of the not-all. To illustrate this, I draw on the contemporary political events of Donald Trump's inauguration and the Women's March on Washington.

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  • Book Review - The Trouble With Pleasure: Deleuze and Psychoanalysis by Aaron Schuster

    Crockett, Clayton (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • New Realisms, Materialisms, (Post-)Philosophy and the Possibility for a Feminist Internationalism

    Kolozova, Katerina (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The new forms of feminist realism and materialism could have significant political ramifications that should be owned by feminist scholars and activists as a way to create new possibilities for an internationalist political language and action that would be geographically, economically and in terms of nation-state politics as varied and as multi-centered as possible. Such a new universalism must emerge at the economic and academic margins, move concentrically toward the center seeking to provide the grounds for uncompromising comradeship worldwide. The universe it will establish is one in which power will be measured in materialist or realist terms and its chief categories will also be the most robust ones: economy and the power of the nation-state as the main means of women’s subjugation.

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  • Old and New Constraints and Resistances of Feminism: the Role of Past Experiences in Rethinking of Class, Oppression and Patriarchy

    Toffanin, Tania (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper, I try to highlight some key issues involving feminism, its potentials and the obstacles it has been facing from the 1970s onwards. I stress the attention of the enduring left-wing patriarchy and its damaging consequences for feminist movements. I point out the need for to recover the past experiences of struggle, with particular reference to Lotta Femminista and the Wage for Housework network to emphasize, the role of black feminism in the practice of intersectionality as a structural point of reference. Also, I underline the need to debate the results of state feminism and women’s activity within organizations. As well as these, I call attention to the need to analyse the system of oppression within a revolutionary project which aims at overcoming both capitalism and patriarchy, as well as the key role that feminism has to play on the elaboration and implementation of this project. In this way, as feminism cannot be a sporadic commitment, women are asked to articulate every day, wherever they are and whatever they do to produce and reproduce subversion.

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  • Book Review - An Insurrectionist Manifesto: Four New Gospels for a Radical Politics by Blanton, Ward, Clayton Crockett, Jeffrey W. Robbins, and Noëlle Vahanian

    McKay, Niall (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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