2,131 results for 2000, Journal article, Share

  • The ethics of predictive risk modelling in the Aotearoa/New Zealand child welfare context: child abuse prevention or neo-liberal tool?

    Keddell, Emily (2014-07-28)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    The current White Paper on Vulnerable Children before the Aotearoa/New Zealand (A/NZ) parliament proposes changes that will significantly reconstruct the child welfare systems in this country, including the use of a predictive risk model (PRM). This article explores the ethics of this strategy in a child welfare context. Tensions exist, including significant ethical problems such as the use of information without consent, breaches of privacy and stigmatisation, without clear evidence of the benefits outweighing these costs. Broader implicit assumptions about the causes of child abuse and risk and their intersections with the wider discursive, political and systems design contexts are also discussed. Drawing on Houston et. al. (2010) this paper highlights the potential for a PRM to contribute to a neo-liberal agenda that individualises social problems, reifies risk and abuse, and narrowly prescribes service provision. However, with reference to child welfare and child protection orientations, the paper suggests ways the model could be used in a more ethical manner.

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  • A Report on the Community Development Conference 2015

    Stansfield, John; Masih, Abishhek (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The Community Development Conference 2015 was an effort by the Department of Social Practice at Unitec and Community Development practitioners to bring together practitioners, academics and students to share their knowledge, research and stories about community development. Thirty-­‐five completed feedback forms were received - summary included.

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  • Contrasting approaches to fuel poverty in New Zealand

    Lawson, Rob; Williams, John; Wooliscroft, Ben (2015-02-18)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    We contrast two measures of fuel poverty in New Zealand. The first is based on estimated expenditure of over 10% of household income on fuel. The second is self-reported deprivation of fuel because of an inability to afford it. Households denoted as fuel poor on the two measures are mostly different and the findings suggest that research is needed to investigate if different households make different trade-offs between expenditure on fuel and other necessities.

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  • Understanding the energy consumption choices and coping mechanisms of fuel poor households in New Zealand

    McKague, Fatima; Lawson, Rob; Scott, Michelle; Wooliscroft, Ben (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    One in four households in New Zealand are fuel poor. A growing body of evidence links the technical and economic aspects of this phenomenon, however comparatively little research has focused on the wider social impacts. The behavioural and social interactions associated with fuel poverty have not taken centre stage in the literature. This study presents, through fuel poor households’ voices, the realities of living in energy hardship, and the impact on day to day lives. Our research finds that fuel poverty impacts widely on the quality of life of participants, and highlights the barriers and support systems in place that may hinder or help their circumstances. This in depth, multi-faceted portrayal of fuel poverty will aid in policy development and contribute to efforts to curtail fuel poverty in New Zealand.

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  • From the clinical to the managerial domain : the lived experience of role transition from radiographer to radiology manager in South-East Queensland

    Thompson, Alarna M. N.; Henwood, Suzanne (2016-02-12)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    INTRODUCTION: This study seeks to add to current literature a descriptive account of the lived experience of radiographers’ transition to, and experiences of, management roles and identifies additional resources and support that are perceived as being beneficial for this transition. METHODS: This study employed a descriptive phenomenological stance. Using purposive sampling, six South- East Queensland based private practice radiology managers, who had held their position for longer than 3 months, participated in audiotape recorded in-depth interviews exploring their transition to, and experiences of management in radiology. Thematic analysis was used to describe and make meaning of the data. RESULTS: Overall, five central themes emerged through thematic analysis of the data. The results indicate that all participants’ had an underlying drive to succeed during their role transition and highlight the importance of a comprehensive orientation by a mentor; the training and support to enable preparation for the role, especially in the area of people management skills and communication; the importance of access to networking opportunities and the importance of concise expectations from higher management. CONCLUSION: Role transition can be marred with uncertainty, however; key suggestions indicate the importance of having support mechanisms in place before, during and after transitioning to a managerial role.

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  • People as a source of competitive advantage during recruitment and retention of senior managers in financial services sectors in Laos 

    Du Plessis, Andries; Sumphonphakdy, S. (2016-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The focus of the paper is to identify the importance of recruiting and retaining senior management in the banking industry in Laos. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods were adopted to collect data from three banks in Laos. Interview section: the questions were to explore the understanding of concepts of HRM, perspectives towards HRM about recruitment and retention. Questionnaire section: part one – demographics data, part two attitudes towards HRM processes recruitment and retention. Findings: HRM plays a critically important role in banks in keeping their competitive advantage; lack of development and implementation of HRM practices and policies to recruit and retain the right people.

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  • The productivity paradox in green buildings

    Byrd, Hugh; Rasheed, Eziaku Onyeizu (2016-04-08)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In this paper we challenge the notion that “green” buildings can achieve greater productivity than buildings that are not accredited as “green”. For nearly two decades, research has produced apparent evidence which indicates that the design of a “green” building can enhance the productivity of its occupants. This relationship between building design and productivity is claimed to be achieved through compliance with internal environmental quality (IEQ) criteria of Green rating tools. This paper reviews methods of measuring productivity and the appropriateness of the metrics used for measuring IEQ in office environments. This review is supported by the results of a survey of office building users which identifies social factors to be significantly more important than environmental factors in trying to correlate productivity and IEQ. It also presents the findings of observations that were discretely carried out on user-response in green buildings. These findings demonstrate that, despite a building’s compliance with IEQ criteria, occupants still resort to exceptional measures to alter their working environment in a bid to achieve comfort. The work has been carried out on “green” buildings in New Zealand. These buildings are rated based on the NZ “Green Star” system which has adopted the Australian “green star” system with its roots in BREEAM. Despite this, the results of this research are applicable to many other “green” rating systems. The paper concludes that methods of measuring productivity are flawed, that IEQ criteria for building design is unrepresentative of how occupants perceive the environment and that this can lead to an architecture that has few of the inherent characteristics of good environmental design.

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  • Theoretical Underpinnings of Kaupapa Maori Directed Practice

    Eketone, Anaru (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article attempts to unbundle and identify the theoretical underpinnings of Kaupapa Māori practice. It suggests that Kaupapa Māori as a concept, has been underpinned by two differing, sometimes competing theoretical perspectives. One is Critical Theory, which comes from the Marxist/socialist grand theoretical tradition seeking to challenge and transform oppressive structures. The second is constructivism, where knowledge is validated through a social construction of the world, thus is located and specific. This article contends that a Critical Theory informed approach is not the understanding held by many in the Māori community of what Kaupapa Māori practice is, instead, this article advocates for a constructivist ‘Native Theory’ approach as being one that fits better both with the community view as well as a theoretical explanation that is more conducive to Māori development. While these two theoretical explanations may seem to be in conflict with one another, a preliminary model is presented that integrates these approaches

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  • Where Should the Focus be in the Aftermath of Parental Separation: Children's Rights and Interests, or Parental Responsibility/Rights?

    Tapp, Pauline; Taylor, Nicola (2001)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    A study evaluates legal framework governing guardianship, custody and access arrangements for children in United Kingdom and Australia, together with the most recent research on the impact of parental separation on children. In England and Australia, legislation is used to educate parents to accept the importance for the child's well-being of settling custody and access disputes and continuing to co-operate as parents after separation.

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  • "I A Isabel, You Know?": Antipodean Framing of Jane Campion's 'Portrait of a Lady'

    Cooper, Annabel (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    If, as Jacqueline Rose argues, the unconscious dreams of nations have purpose and effect in the world, how can we approach an understanding of ourselves as national subjects–as creatures of these dreams? We trail behind us the traces of nationhood in what we make and do and choose and say, performing the productive historical fictions of origin and attachment to place and nation and shared past. These traces are not straightforward nor necessarily deliberate, nor even especially obedient to geography. How otherwise could Isabel Archer’s story, a ‘Northern’ woman’s story–an appropriate story, certainly, for the genres of heritage cinema and the woman’s film–start to look a bit Antipodean? Jane Campion’s first film not to be set in the Antipodes was her adaptation of Henry James’s The Portrait of a Lady (1996). This might on first glance look as though, with the success of The Piano (1993) behind her, established as an auteur, and at last backed by a very substantial budget, Campion was leaving behind her local affiliations and heading into the more prestigious territory of international cinema. The contention of this article is that despite its New York heroine and its English and Italian settings, the film has a distinct Antipodean framing and inflection which turns Campion’s adaptation of James’s story into appropriation. To trace this inflection is to detect a repositioning of the configuration of ‘woman’ and ‘nation’ between novel and film.

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  • Same-sex Desire and the Asylum: A Colonial Experience

    Brickell, Chris (2005)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • A Letter from New Zealand: Home Detention—emerging issues after the first three years

    Gibbs, Anita (2004)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Home detention in New Zealand began on 1st October 1999, having developed from a political climate of punitiveness towards offenders and a desire to introduce tougher parole or post-imprisonment supervision regimes (Gibbs and King, 2002). Home detention had been unsuccessfully piloted in New Zealand in the mid-1990s (Church and Dunstan, 1997), but this made little difference to the National government of the day as it introduced a full-blown scheme through an amendment to the Criminal Justice Act 1985. The current scheme is promoted as a means of reintegration into the community for people who have been in prison, or as a diversion from imprisonment for people given prison sentences of up to two years. This piece will explore the operation and impact of home detention in its first three years (1999 to 2002), and consider some of its successes and limitations, in the light of its aims to reintegrate and divert.

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  • Whose "Special Treatment"? Heterosexism and the Problems with Liberalism

    Brickell, Chris (2001)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article examines the circulation of heterosexist positions within several recent New Zealand media texts. It argues that a recent form of discourse engages liberal language and assumptions in ways that support the privileged position of heterosexuality and the marginalization of homosexuality. The examples given highlight not only the tenor of some recent representations of homosexuality, but also some problems within liberalism. Most notable of these are liberalism's individualism and its failure to recognize the systemic nature of hierarchical power relationships and the constituting of lesbian and gay subjectivities within these relationships. These problems allow liberalism to play an active part in processes of domination and subordination.

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  • Maori concepts for social and community work

    Eketone, Anaru (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    For those working in Māori communities or organisations, it is important to understand some of the inherent Māori cultural concepts that are important to those contexts. Many groups and projects have struggled to involve Māori people and communities, often because of a lack of understanding of important Māori values and processes. As a Māori person born and raised in Otago but belonging to the Ngāti Maniapoto and Waikato Iwi of the North Island, I know what it is like to learn the hard way about Māori processes. When I was growing up, issues around tapu and noa were translated as cleanliness, or showing respect; mana was not necessarily talked about, but was interpreted as politeness, respect and good manners. I seemed to know a lot of the right things to do, but not why, even though there were times where I felt paralysed in my ignorance. At the age of 21 I moved back to my tribal area for 12 years to work as a youth worker and learnt a lot from the families and the communities I was associated with, as well as from my hapū and relatives. That gave me confidence, so that when I moved back to Otago, I was in a position to learn even more from the communities and people in that region. I came to realise that Māori social and community work is multi-layered and complex. Māori communities are not homogenous and sometimes have competing factions, histories and approaches. There may be differing perspectives between mana whenua and mātaawaka, rural communities and urban ones, traditional and modern, those who speak te reo and those who do not, those who have succeeded in education and those that have not and those whose primary identification is tribal (Iwi), ethnic (Māori), half-caste, or national (Kiwi). One extended family can reflect all these differences and variations, despite this, there are values that are arguably integral to most social and community work involving Māori. Therefore, I will highlight some important Māori concepts and constructs that affect how Māori may view or be involved in community development or community organisations. The following concepts are not necessarily used in social and community work per se, but are concepts that need to be understood for good community work to take place. I will use some of my personal experiences to explain some of the underpinnings of why, in Māori social and community work, we do what we do. The definitions and explanations are, by necessity, brief and may not necessarily give justice to what can be very deep concepts. Some concepts may differ between Iwi as they are multi-layered, so that the more you investigate them, the deeper they go. Therefore, the end of this article will provide further reading for those seeking a greater understanding. It should be noted that while very basic at times, (and I apologise for this), the purpose of this article is to be explicit about the meanings of different values and concepts that I wish had been spelt out more clearly for me as a young youth worker and community worker.

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  • Male relationship building that makes women roll their eyes: Implications for social work

    Eketone, Anaru (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Since 1994 I have worked in three sectors dominated by women: health promotion, social work and social work education. One of the tasks when working in these female-dominated fields is that to maintain any sort of credibility you need to act and talk in ways that do not offend women. One of the personal challenges I have faced is to work in these areas and still find ways of meeting the need I have to still be a ‘bloke’. Even within my own household I am the only male (that includes the dog), so privately you hold on to your masculinity, i.e. the socially defined roles, through being a husband and father. But I have also found the need to express myself physically – very occasionally through physical work, but more often through sport, mau rakau and even watching physical sport. (For Valentine’s Day I bought my wife a season ticket to watch rugby at Carisbrook; she returned the favour by giving me a season ticket to our local symphony orchestra.) There is not a great deal written about social work and Maori masculinity. This article seeks to discuss issues around some of the differences in the ways that many males choose to interact with each other and the implications this type of masculinity has for social work practice. Four examples will be described of a particular version of masculine ways of relating, which will be followed by a discussion.

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  • Parenting Adopted Children and Supporting Adoptive Parents: Messages from Research

    Gibbs, Anita (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article considers adoption from the perspective of parents, especially the strategies that they employ to enhance attachments and build positive parent-child relationships. The article draws particularly on recent New Zealand research regarding intercountry adoptive parenting, as well as overseas literature on good adoptive parenting practice generally in domestic and intercountry adoption. It also considers the research on methods of supporting parents who adopt and whether there are gaps in legislation, policy or practice in New Zealand that could be closed by borrowing from good examples in the literature, and, or current practice examples. The author is an adoptive parent of Russian-born children and is actively involved in adoptive parent support networks.

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  • Participation in decision-making: The experience of New Zealand children in care

    Atwool, Nicola (2006)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    One of the objections to a children's rights perspective is that children are unable to accept the responsibilities that go with rights. If children are to attain the status of citizens and exercise the responsibilities of citizenship, participation during childhood is essential. Yet children are frequently excluded when important decisions have to be made. This paper examines children's participation in decision-making from the perspective of New Zealand children in care. The paper discusses the importance of children's participation in decision-making, outlines the current situation in New Zealand, and identifies both the blocks to children's participation and the resulting consequences. Particular attention is paid to the implications of this perspective for New Zealand's indigenous population. The paper presents arguments in favour of increasing children's participation and suggests changes necessary to achieve this.

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  • Te Waka Tangata: Using Waka as a Model for the Structures of Maori Organisation

    Eketone, Anaru (2002)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Life Story Work: Optional extra or fundamental entitlement?

    Atwool, Nicola (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    In Aotearoa New Zealand the importance of life story books is outlined in the policy of our statutory care and protection agency Child, Youth and Family. Many children in care do not have access to such a resource, however, suggesting that social workers view this as an optional extra or “nice to have” rather than integral to good practice. This article begins with an outline of practice in Aotearoa New Zealand. The function and purpose of life story work and theoretical underpinnings are explored in order to address the question posed in the article's title. I argue that life story work is a fundamental entitlement which is often overlooked in practice. The article concludes with a discussion of dilemmas and challenges before identifying changes needed in the New Zealand context.

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  • Birth Family contact for children in care: How much? How often? Who with?

    Atwool, Nicola (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Irrespective of type of placement, contact with the birth family is one of the more contentious issues in decision-making for children in care. Despite widespread belief that contact with the birth family is beneficial for children and young people in care, this aspect of children's care experience has not received a great deal of attention. In this article I review the literature and draw on research I have undertaken to explore the views of children and young people in care, foster parents, and social work practitioners. The complexity of belonging to more than one family is discussed and tensions in relation to contact with the birth family are identified. It becomes clear that each situation is unique and that there is no “rule of thumb” that can be applied. Five key variables are identified: child or young person's developmental stage and history; child or young person's views and wishes; type of placement and future goals; cultural factors; and work with birth families. Practice guidelines in relation to these are developed in the final section.

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