1,539 results for 2000, Journal article, Use commercially

  • The productivity paradox in green buildings

    Byrd, Hugh; Rasheed, Eziaku Onyeizu (2016-04-08)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In this paper we challenge the notion that “green” buildings can achieve greater productivity than buildings that are not accredited as “green”. For nearly two decades, research has produced apparent evidence which indicates that the design of a “green” building can enhance the productivity of its occupants. This relationship between building design and productivity is claimed to be achieved through compliance with internal environmental quality (IEQ) criteria of Green rating tools. This paper reviews methods of measuring productivity and the appropriateness of the metrics used for measuring IEQ in office environments. This review is supported by the results of a survey of office building users which identifies social factors to be significantly more important than environmental factors in trying to correlate productivity and IEQ. It also presents the findings of observations that were discretely carried out on user-response in green buildings. These findings demonstrate that, despite a building’s compliance with IEQ criteria, occupants still resort to exceptional measures to alter their working environment in a bid to achieve comfort. The work has been carried out on “green” buildings in New Zealand. These buildings are rated based on the NZ “Green Star” system which has adopted the Australian “green star” system with its roots in BREEAM. Despite this, the results of this research are applicable to many other “green” rating systems. The paper concludes that methods of measuring productivity are flawed, that IEQ criteria for building design is unrepresentative of how occupants perceive the environment and that this can lead to an architecture that has few of the inherent characteristics of good environmental design.

    View record details
  • What Does Feminism Want?

    Horbury, Alison (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Like Freud’s famous inquiry ‘what does a woman want?’, this paper asks a similar question of the signifier ‘feminism’ for if one aims to (re)imagine feminism for the new millennium one must first ask: what does Feminism want? This (imperfect) reference to Freud’s question hopes to draw attention to the particular and the universal underpinning the signifier feminism, a slipperiness that works idiosyncratically at the threshold of public and private politics which, though it is perhaps the most unifying aspect of feminism, nevertheless undermines it. To politicize the personal one must question the signifier that comes to universalize an indefinite article for, as I argue in this paper, what ‘a’ woman wants is beneath the bar of what Feminism wants when it is mounted in public discourse. To continue to invest publically in a signifier of personal politics––as Jacqueline Rose advocates (2014)––then, one must rephrase the question: of what does this signifier Feminism speak when it is mounted in public discourse? This paper considers some mechanisms by which this signifier generates and mobilizes desire, fantasy, and phobia in public politics where feminism’s knowledge product covers over or, in Rose’s terms, “sanitizes” those “disturbing insight[s]” (2014: x) of experience, “everything that is darkest, most recalcitrant and unsettling” (2014 xii), in the “furthest limits of conscious and unconscious life” (2014: x). Here, where this signifier constitutes an ideal-ego, its effects are inhibiting. In short, this paper argues that before any future of feminism can be imagined, those occupying a feminist position—discourse, politics, or identity—must ask what their unconscious investment in this signifier is. In Lacanian terms, one must relinquish feminism’s discourse of protest and complete the circuit through the analyst’s discourse to ask: what does a woman want in feminism? What does Feminism want?

    View record details
  • Feminism in the Logic of Late Capitalism

    Kunkle, Sheila (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This essay considers how Feminism might become a force for radical change as construed through two perspectives: the Marxist vision of Kathi Weeks and the Hegelian logic of Slavoj Žižek. I begin by enumerating the antinomies of late capitalism and the ways it has subsumed our identities and commodified our social relations. I then elucidate how Weeks’ Marxist utopia (her demands of basic income and less work) require a “hopeful subject” and positive freedom, while Zizek’s Hegelian logic and vision of a communist future require the negativity of freedom, a divided subject, and hopelessness. Weeks’ feminism posits a direct opposition to capitalism, setting boundaries to its external limits, while Zizek’s Hegelian logic would require the reconfiguration of capitalism’s internal limits. Finally, I propose how a feminism geared towards its own extinction might make a Marxian move by way of Hegelian logic, through the consideration of Fredric Jameson’s “An American Utopia.”

    View record details
  • “White Women Elected Trump”: Feminism in ‘Dark Times,’ Its Present and Future

    Faulkner, Joanne (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Women-centred social movements are currently undergoing a period of intense self-reflection and -criticism following the election of Donald J. Trump as President, and in the context of the large degree of support he received from white women. This paper analyses the event of the ‘women’s marches’ that took place globally the day following Trump’s presidential inauguration for its significance for the present and future of feminism. The consequence of the marches has been debated both by participants and non-participants, due to the broad range of issues, interests, and demands present at the events. While there was a diversity of participants in the marches, a common criticism from non-participants was that the march was insufficiently political in its goals and manifestation, too novice and too disparate to constitute real political action. This paper responds to this concern and its implications by staging an exchange between Hannah Arendt and Jacques Rancière, in order to clarify the possibilities of movements such as the marches for the future of feminism.

    View record details
  • Book Review - Althusser and Theology by Agon Hamza (Ed)

    McGowan, Todd (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Feminism, Finance and the Work of Reproduction

    Daellenbach, Shanti (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article begins to think the groundwork for a revolutionary feminist politics in an era shaped by contemporary finance capital and the increasing financialisation daily life. Conceiving of financialisation as a strategic response to a threat that must be brought under capital’s control through reorganising the exploitation of labour-power, it provides a reading of the seemingly abstract sphere of financial circulation as fundamentally dependent upon the very material and primary labour of reproduction. The article undertakes an analysis of how social reproduction is increasingly financialised today, in ways that play on and reinforce the persistently gendered reality of this work for the purpose of financial accumulation and increasing the profitability of labour. From the gendered targeting of financial instruments, to discursive tropes of women’s pathologies and responsibilities in household financial management, financialisation both creates new terrains of reproductive work and deepens households’ and women’s entanglement with financial markets to ensure their survival. Drawing on the critical writings and political strategies of autonomist feminism, this paper argues that women’s reproductive labour is central to the continued ascendancy of finance capital and, consequently, that feminist struggle’s for autonomy, self-valorisation and socialisation of reproduction are central to its destruction. Understanding what finance means to feminism and, in turn, what feminism might mean to finance today is imperative for a relevant contemporary feminist politics and to effective anti-capitalist strategy alike. This begins with a critical re-examination of the emergence of the hierarchical sexual division of labour particular to capital relations and its status in contemporary finance capital.

    View record details
  • Tending for Necessity: Reclaiming feminism on the left

    Fielder, Anna (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    In light of the feminist response to the presidential victory of Donald Trump, this piece draws upon the work of critical left thinkers such as Alain Badiou, Nancy Fraser and Fredric Jameson in order to advocate a future for feminism that is based on the radical left. Taking inspiration from Fredric Jameson’s suggestion that History is marked by “the collective struggle to wrest a realm of Freedom from a realm of Necessity” this piece argues for a feminism that does not individualise or commodify people’s relationships with Necessity, but that has as one if its central tenets a collective caring and tending for those inescapable aspects of living. This does not require a move away from contemporary feminist concerns for signification and language. How Necessity is brought (if only partially) into signification and collectively tended for, now constitute vital points of discussion in a left politics that feminists have little choice but to engage with.

    View record details
  • The Power of O

    Jöttkandt, Sigi (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Here I propose that a Lacanian feminist undertaking today requires the assertion of two sets of rights: the positive rights of a traditional feminist agenda, together with the rights of the not-all. To illustrate this, I draw on the contemporary political events of Donald Trump's inauguration and the Women's March on Washington.

    View record details
  • Book Review - The Trouble With Pleasure: Deleuze and Psychoanalysis by Aaron Schuster

    Crockett, Clayton (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • New Realisms, Materialisms, (Post-)Philosophy and the Possibility for a Feminist Internationalism

    Kolozova, Katerina (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The new forms of feminist realism and materialism could have significant political ramifications that should be owned by feminist scholars and activists as a way to create new possibilities for an internationalist political language and action that would be geographically, economically and in terms of nation-state politics as varied and as multi-centered as possible. Such a new universalism must emerge at the economic and academic margins, move concentrically toward the center seeking to provide the grounds for uncompromising comradeship worldwide. The universe it will establish is one in which power will be measured in materialist or realist terms and its chief categories will also be the most robust ones: economy and the power of the nation-state as the main means of women’s subjugation.

    View record details
  • Old and New Constraints and Resistances of Feminism: the Role of Past Experiences in Rethinking of Class, Oppression and Patriarchy

    Toffanin, Tania (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper, I try to highlight some key issues involving feminism, its potentials and the obstacles it has been facing from the 1970s onwards. I stress the attention of the enduring left-wing patriarchy and its damaging consequences for feminist movements. I point out the need for to recover the past experiences of struggle, with particular reference to Lotta Femminista and the Wage for Housework network to emphasize, the role of black feminism in the practice of intersectionality as a structural point of reference. Also, I underline the need to debate the results of state feminism and women’s activity within organizations. As well as these, I call attention to the need to analyse the system of oppression within a revolutionary project which aims at overcoming both capitalism and patriarchy, as well as the key role that feminism has to play on the elaboration and implementation of this project. In this way, as feminism cannot be a sporadic commitment, women are asked to articulate every day, wherever they are and whatever they do to produce and reproduce subversion.

    View record details
  • Book Review - An Insurrectionist Manifesto: Four New Gospels for a Radical Politics by Blanton, Ward, Clayton Crockett, Jeffrey W. Robbins, and Noëlle Vahanian

    McKay, Niall (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Book Review - Capitalism and Desire: The Psychic Cost of Free Markets by Todd McGowan

    Zupancic, Alenka (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Notes on Contributors

    Zeiher, Cindy; Grimshaw, Mike (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Nasty Feminism, Nasty Feminists

    Thomas, Nicol (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The question “what does a woman want?” has been asked by psychoanalysts in the past—particularly by Freud and Lacan—and is a question that has been taken up by feminist scholarship and epistemology. This essay addresses this complex question via both feminist research and enquiry and a Lacanian psychoanalytic praxis. The issue of women’s very speech is crucial, which is a cornerstone element of the feminisms of Spender, Steinem, Hanisch, Irigaray, Cixous, Felski, Jane and Ford. Lacan makes the point that feminine jouissance stands outside the phallic order and thus must be incorporated in the psychoanalytic consideration of what is the sexed position, woman. This essay argues that Lacan’s psychoanalytic considerations have great political and practical import for contemporary feminist practices and epistemology, via the positioning of women’s very speech outside of—but apposite to—a provably violent misogynistic patriarchy.

    View record details
  • Leadership through peer mediation : research report

    Connor, Helene; Buccahan, Leo (2017-07-02)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This report presents the findings of preliminary research into the perceptions of overall stakeholder satisfaction of eight Auckland secondary schools of the Leadership through Peer Mediation (LtPM) programme, a core programme of the Foundation for Peace Studies Aotearoa New Zealand (the Peace Foundation). The research was commissioned by the Peace Foundation with funding assistance from the Metro ITP Voucher Scheme, and was conducted in the second half of 2015. This research is an expression of the Peace Foundation’s commitment to regular programme evaluation and improvement. A core aim of the LtPM programme is to empower students as ‘ambassadors of social justice’. The programme trains students in the mediation processes and leadership skills needed to assist peers to resolve personal conflicts in a peaceful manner. The training covers issues such as personal responsibility, rapport building, and active, empathic communication. This research report offers a preliminary, qualitative assessment of the perceptions of LtPM on school cultures and student wellbeing. The report is unable to contend whether or not LtPM has had a significant impact on changes in the levels of bullying and the like, though anecdotes from participants and LtPM coordinators suggest it may have some impact on the ways students relate to one another. About this series: Metro Reports present research conducted through the Unitec Research Voucher Scheme, which facilitates access by industry and community clients to Unitec research expertise. This research is conducted to client brief, similar to research consultancy. Voucher Scheme projects are published and disseminated according to a recommended, but flexible and adaptable format. In this format there is less emphasis on systematic, comprehensive research justification, elaboration and presentation of findings, but rather an emphasis on research process, narrative and outcomes. Voucher Scheme project reports are intended to be accessible to clients and other research users in ways traditional academic research may not be. All papers are blind reviewed. For more papers in this series please visit: www.unitec.ac.nz/epress/index.php/category/publications/epress-series/metro-reports/

    View record details
  • Positive size and scale effects of all-cellulose composite laminates

    Dormanns, J.W.; Weiler, F.; Schuermann, J.; Müssig, J.; Duchemin, B.J.C.; Staiger, M.P. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Negative size effects are commonly reported for advanced composite materials where the strength of the material decreases with increasing volume of the test specimen. In this work, the effect of increasing specimen volume on the mechanical properties of all-cellulose composites is examined by varying the laminate thickness. A positive size effect is observed in all-cellulose composite laminates as demonstrated by a 32.8% increase in tensile strength as the laminate thickness is increased by 7 times. The damage evolution in all-cellulose composite laminates was examined as a function of the tensile strain. Enhanced damage tolerance concomitant with increasing specimen volume is associated with damage accumulation due to transverse cracking and strain delocalisation. A transition from low-strain failure to tough and high-strain failure is observed as the laminate thickness is increased. Simultaneously, scale effects lead to an increase in the void content and cellulose crystallinity at the core, with increasing laminate thickness.

    View record details
  • Complementary characterization data in support of uniaxially aligned electrospun nanocomposites based on a model PVOH-epoxy system

    Karimi, S.; Staiger, M.P.; Buunk, N.; Fessard, A.; Tucker, N. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper presents complementary data corresponding to characterization tests done for our research article entitled “Uniaxially aligned electrospun fibers for advanced nanocomposites based on a model PVOH-epoxy system” (Karimi et al., 2016) [1]. Poly(vinyl alcohol) and epoxy resin were selected as a model system and the effect of electrospun fiber loading on polymer properties was examined in conjunction with two manufacturing methods. A novel electrospinning technology for production of uniaxially aligned nanofiber arrays was used. A conventional wet lay-up fabrication method is compared against a novel, hybrid electrospinning–electrospraying approach. The structure and thermomechanical properties of resulting composite materials were examined using scanning electron microscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and tensile testing. For discussion of obtained results please refer to the research paper (Karimi et al., 2016) [1].

    View record details
  • Assistive technology for relieving communication lumber between hearing/speech impaired and hearing people

    Akmeliawati, R.; Bailey, D.; Demidenko, S.; Gamage, N.; Khan, S.; Kuang, Y. C.; Ooi, Melanie; Gupta, G. S. (2017-05-10T05:40:10Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This study proposes an automatic sign language translator, which is developed as assistive technology to help the hearing/speech impaired communities to communicate with the rest of the world. The system architecture, which includes feature extraction and recognition stages is described in detail. The signs are classified into two types: static and dynamic. Various types of sign features are presented and analysed. Recognition stage considers the hidden Markov model and segmentation signature. Real-time implementation of the system with the use of Windows7 and LINUX Fedora 16 operating systems with VMware workstation is presented in detail. The system has been successfully tested on Malaysian sign language.

    View record details
  • Efficient analytical moments for the robustness analysis in design optimisation

    Rajan, A.; Ooi, Melanie; Kuang, Y. C.; Demidenko, S. (2017-05-10T05:40:07Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    System uncertainties play a vital role in the robustness (or sensitivity) analysis of system designs. In an iterative procedure such as design optimisation, the robustness analysis that is simultaneously accurate and computationally efficient is essential. Accordingly, the current state-of-the-art techniques such as univariate dimension reduction method (DRM) and performance moment integration (PMI) approach have been developed. They are commonly used to express the sensitivity while utilising the statistical moments of a performance function in an advanced design optimisation paradigm known as the reliability-based robust design optimisation (RBRDO). However, the accuracy and computational efficiency scalability for increasing the problem dimension (i.e. the number of input variables) have not been tested. This study examines the scalability of the above-mentioned pioneering techniques. Additionally, it also introduces a novel analytical method that symbolically calculates the sensitivity of the performance function prior to the iterative optimisation procedure. As a result, it shows a better computational cost scalability when tested on performance functions with increased dimensionality. Most importantly, when applied to real-world RBRDO problems such as the vehicle side impact crashworthiness, the proposed technique is three times faster than the mainstream method while yielding a high quality and safe vehicle design

    View record details