21,782 results for 2000, Journal article

  • Financing community : economic development in New Zealand

    Jeffs, Lindsay (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Community economic development and social enterprise are growing fast across the globe in both developed and developing countries. They are major components of a new economics arising from the failure of traditional approaches to address the effects of complex and intractable social, economic and environmental problems. This paper examines how community economic development and social enterprise are currently financed in New Zealand. It suggests some alternative approaches and makes recommendations to stakeholders to reduce barriers, promote best practice and improve success factors. The initial discussion uses the findings of a comprehensive research process completed in 2014 by the New Zealand Community Economic Development Trust to understand the New Zealand context for community economic development and social enterprise. The discussion then outlines some alternative social finance approaches used in the UK, Canada, Ireland and Australia, and their potential use in New Zealand if certain barriers are removed and best practice models are used. The final section considers the potential for self-­financing by the not-­‐for-­‐profit sector based on data collected by the author over a two-­‐year period. Recommendations are made on how access to finance by community economic agencies can be improved, and the potentially ‘game changing’ impact of such access. The author of this paper has an extensive background as a practitioner and academic in the community economic development and social enterprise sectors, both within New Zealand and overseas.

    View record details
  • Potato Crisp moisture determination using NIR data and a Back Propagation Neural Network

    Yee, Nigel; Potgieter, Paul; Liggett, Stephen (2013-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Near infrared analysis is a tool used for non-destructive determination of material properties and the potato crisp production sector has been using the technique for determination of moisture content however near infrared spectral models suffer from problems associated with light scatter. Light scatter results from geometric irregularities in the samples geometry and this reduces the accuracy of near infrared calibration models without preprocessing for scatter removal. Quantitative calibration models have benefited from the development of artificial intelligence methods and the neural network is now a popular tool for quantitative calibration model formation. In this paper we compare the performance of a back propagation neural network calibration model using 3 forms of preprocessed data, orthogonal signal correction, standard normal variate and data with no scatter preprocessing prior. The correlation coefficient was used to determine the neural networks methods performance and it was found that a neural network using data with no scatter preprocessing yielded the best results.

    View record details
  • Article published on the Culberb Project: Baetsch.

    Woodruffe, Paul; Klasz, Walter; Kotradyova, Veronika (2013-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Another of CULBURB's projects, this one in the Viennese suburb of Ottakring, involved building a small hut and commu­nity space from locally collected materials. Led by New Zealand artist Paul Woodruffe, Austrian architect Walter Klasz, and Slovak designer Veronika Kotradyova, Baetsch in tbe City brought the New Zealand tradition of the bach to Austria. Short for "bachelor," the bach is a small holiday or beach house made from repurposed materials. Accord­ing lo Woodruffe, the bach is "defined by what it is not; it is not the everyday, but a sanctuary from the everyday." In Austria, the artists installed their bach-become­ Baetsch in a neighborhood park, building and furnishing it with materials con­tributed by local residents.

    View record details
  • Play & Learn: Designing Engaging Educational Games for Children

    Nand, Kalpana; Baghaei, Nilufar; Casey, John (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The use of computer games as common vehicles for education, as opposed to pure entertainment, has gained immense popularity in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the appealing characteristics of engaging computer games for children, and whether embedding these characteristics into an educational tool enhances children’s learning. We present the results of an evaluation study done with 120 primary school children over a period of two weeks. The study used an educational tool to teach children numeracy and embedded the characteristics we discovered in the first part of the research. The effectiveness of the educational tool was measured using a pre-test and a post-test, as well as other indicators such as the frequency and duration of time interacting with the tool. The results showed that the modified version of the tool with our features embedded was more effective in enhancing children’s learning.

    View record details
  • On the stochastic modeling and analysis of FxLMS adaptation algorithm

    Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H. (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This study represents a stochastic model for the adaptation process performed on adaptive control systems by the filtered-x least-mean-square (FxLMS) algorithm. The main distinction of this model is that it is derived without using conventional simplifying assumptions regarding the physical plant to be controlled. This model is then used to derive a set of closed-form mathematical expressions for formulating steady-state performance, stability condition and learning rate of the FxLMS adaptation process. These expressions are the most general expressions, which have been proposed so far. It is shown that some previously derived expressions can be obtained from the proposed expressions as special and simplified cases. In addition to computer simulations, different experiments with a real-time control setup confirm the validity of the theoretical findings.

    View record details
  • Leadership development for experienced New Zealand principals: Perceptions of effectiveness

    Cardno, Carol; Youngs, Howard (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article presents the perceptions of approximately 300 experienced New Zealand principals who participated in a pilot leadership development initiative funded by the Ministry of Education. The Experienced Principals Development Programme (EPDP) underwent a rigorous evaluation that included formative (mid-point) and summative (end-point) feedback to participants and providers over an 18-month period. As the literature on leadership development indicates, particular issues arise for those who are experienced in their leadership roles and have progressed beyond early career challenges. To sustain and develop experienced principals, leadership development programmes need to be relevant, personalized and unique. The evaluation methodology used in this study employed a mixed methods approach comprising quantitative and qualitative analysis of two major participant surveys and data collected for three case studies via observation of delivery events and focus group interviews with participants. The findings confirm that the programme was highly relevant for the participants because it was responsive to individual needs and learning styles. A highly effective component was the school-based inquiry project which was viewed as a conduit for personal development and school improvement. Overall, the programme provided opportunities for both personal and professional learning.

    View record details
  • To the "very Antipodes" : nineteenth century Dominican Sister-teachers in Ireland and New Zealand

    Collins, Jennifer (2013-07-02)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper examines the educational and religious lives of Dominican Sisters in nineteenth-century Ireland and New Zealand. It considers developments in Irish society and culture that shaped the educational mission of Dominican Sisters, as well as some of the challenges facing 10 Sisters who, in 1871, journeyed from Dublin to establish a foundation in Dunedin, New Zealand. Drawing on previously unpublished archival sources, including Sisters’ letters “home” to Ireland, this paper explores ways in which the expectations of the Founder Sisters were initially shaped by “Old World” social and cultural structures and their dependence on their motherhouse in Sion Hill, Dublin. It examines changes in the lives of Sisters as their links with Ireland diminished and they began to reshape their educational mission around a new cultural and religious identity. This paper challenges educational historians to acknowledge the role Catholic sister-teachers played in the formation of national education systems.

    View record details
  • Education and training deficits in industrial clusters : Empirical evidence that managers can use to rectify the skills gap in Auckland precinct.

    Du Plessis, Andries; Frederick, Howard; Maritz, Alex (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Tertiary institutions should seek continuous feedback from industries to keep track of the needs of businesses to provide education and training. In designing programmes and upgrading curricula, there are important factors to bear in mind so that programmes "cater" for all levels of learners. The Auckland City Council financed this study, focussing on Auckland's Rosebank Business Precinct (ARBP). Surrounding communities, particularly Maori, Pacific peoples and recent migrants, experience disparities in employment. The target population were 500+ businesses operating on Rosebank Road. A total of 529 businesses were identified. Interviews with 102 companies with a 36-question questionnaire were conducted. Areas were identified and covered in this paper in the ARBP for developing programmes and curricula for tertiary institutions to provide employable students with the right knowledge, skills and attributes to grow and manage existing ventures. In the analysis we point out what education or training is necessary for ARBP to provide greater efficiencies and improvement in profit levels. Recommendations and conclusions are provided.

    View record details
  • Images of academic leadership in large New Zealand polytechnics

    Cardno, Carol (2013-05)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    As accountability stakes continue to be raised in all education sectors, leadership as a factor that can have an impact on improved student outcomes is being studied with heightened interest. This study was conducted from 2011 to 2012 in New Zealand's large urban polytechnics with the aim of investigating the nature and expectations of academic leadership. The conceptualisation of academic leadership in the theory base is fraught with both complexity and paradox and is often presented in contradictory terms. The study identifies images of academic leadership practised by directors of an academic front line, by actors in the front line and supporters on the side line. In relation to polytechnic settings it is concluded that new and varied forms of academic leadership are provided by spreading the role that encompasses both leadership and management.

    View record details
  • Developing an "ecology of learning" within a school sustainability co-design project with children in New Zealand

    Wake, Sue; Eames, Chris (2013-01-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper analyses the inter-relatedness of layers of involvement, as contributing to learning, within a school sustainability project (the eco-classroom project). This engaged students, staff and community members (including professional practitioners) in an architectural co-design project that resulted, after 4 years, in a built classroom. The paper utilises an “ecology of learning” diagram to indicate layers and show connections, which are evidenced by findings from the project, alongside relevant literature in geographies of architecture and childhood, pedagogies of sustainable learning and children’s participatory and co-design examples. In conclusion, the ecology of learning approach is critiqued and encouragement of more sustainability co-design projects with children is recommended. It is proposed this could lead to improved processes for all participants while promoting authentic and relevant sustainability learning.

    View record details
  • Post-Web 2.0 Pedagogy: From Student-Generated Content to International Co-Production Enabled by Mobile Social Media

    Cochrane, Thomas Donald; Antonczak, Laurent; Wagner, Daniel (2013-10)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The advent of web 2.0 has enabled new forms of collaboration centred upon user-generated content, however, mobile social media is enabling a new wave of social collaboration. Mobile devices have disrupted and reinvented traditional media markets and distribution: iTunes, Google Play and Amazon now dominate music industry distribution channels, Twitter has reinvented journalism practice, ebooks and ibooks are disrupting book publishing, while television and movie industry are disrupted by iTunes, Netflix, YouTube, and Vimeo. In this context the authors critique the changes brought about in a case study of film and television higher education from initial explorations of student-generated mobile movie production to subsequent facilitation of international student mobile media co-production teams supported by the development of an international Community of Practice, illustrating new forms of post-web 2.0 pedagogy.

    View record details
  • Knowledge transfer, educational change and the history of education : new theoretical frameworks

    Collins, Jennifer; Allender, Tim (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical overview of the field of knowledge transfer and educational change and a discussion of the issues raised in the six papers in this special edition. Design/methodology/approach – A theoretical analysis of the field of knowledge transfer. Findings – The six papers consider issues such as the interplay of ideas between British and Indian educationalists, post-war debates over literacy standards, the use of curriculum materials for the process of citizen formation, the influence of international exchanges in the education of adolescents for citizenship, Vigotsky and the transfer of knowledge across time, space, culture, disciplines and networks, and the way constructions of Chinese identity within history books were shaped by knowledge processes that transcended nation states. Originality/value – This special issue of the History of Education Review engages with new approaches that have become available to historians in the past decade illustrating how they might be applied for the first time to key issues in the history of education across colonial and state borders. It addresses questions about the movement of knowledge across national and cultural boundaries, and examines key problems facing educators in a range of colonial and postcolonial contexts

    View record details
  • A pedagogy of biocentric relationality.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper theorises some implications for pedagogies for ‘sustainabilities’ in the light of the current climate crisis, reflecting particularly upon the work of eco-feminist philosopher, Rosi Braidotti, in order to re-imagine a pedagogy of biocentric relationality. A notion of complex, inter-related sustainabilities is promoted as holding pedagogical promise in response to the ecological and cultural challenges of our times. The discussion then moves to focus on Aotearoa as a site for place-based pedagogies founded in local Indigenous understandings. Lastly, some examples from a recent study within early childhood care and education settings in Aotearoa are employed to illustrate some pedagogical possibilities.

    View record details
  • Indigenous onto-epistemologies and pedagogies of care and affect in Aotearoa.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article reflects on research conducted in one kindergarten that was part of a wider project focusing on 'caring for ourselves, others and the environment' in early years education in Aotearoa New Zealand. The project drew upon Māori and western theoretical frames. In this article I respond to Bruno Latour's suggestion that we renew our theoretical considerations to make our practice more responsive to 'matters of concern'. The interlinked matters of concern that are the focus of this article are the endangered status of both indigenous peoples' worldviews and of the well-being of the planet. Early childhood teachers during the project introduced Māori (Indigenous) seasonal and healing practices within their daily pedagogies, in some small ways perhaps transcending the ongoing disruption and intergenerational trauma of the history of colonisation. It is argued that indigenous ways of being, knowing, and doing enact an ethic of biocentric relationality which, when applied through early childhood pedagogies, offer a source of hope in this era of anthropogenic climate crisis.

    View record details
  • The Forgotten 60%: bird ecology and management in New Zealand's agricultural landscape.

    Macleod, Catriona; Blackwell, Grant; Moller, Henrik; Innes, John; Powlesland, Ralph (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Production lands make up 58% of Aotearoa New Zealand’s landcover and contribute greatly not only to the national economy but also to patterns and trends in native and introduced avian biodiversity. However, unlike in native forest and other indigenous habitats, birds in agro-ecosystems have received little attention to date. We argue that this is due to (1) a research focus on understanding the causes of the dramatic decline of New Zealand’s critically endangered, endemic species, (2) an adherence to a ‘preservation for intrinsic value’ over a ‘conservation through sustainable use’ paradigm for environmental management, and (3) a historical view of production landscapes as being devoid of endemic and native species and thus of no conservation value. In countering these attitudes, we suggest that the agricultural matrix may contain more native species than many people believe, and that many introduced bird species are key contributors to the social and environmental performance and resilience of these systems. We draw attention to the context, composition, ecology, and status of native and introduced birds in production landscapes in New Zealand, particularly in the face of ongoing agricultural intensification. We first identify the potential roles of local habitat, landscape composition, and introduced predators in shaping farmland bird communities. We then highlight the potential threats and opportunities for birds posed by ongoing intensification, particularly the influences of habitat modification and simplification, increased ecological subsidies through farm inputs, increased stocking rates and yields, and altered predator–prey interactions. We suggest the landscape is the appropriate spatial scale for research and management, and call for an integrated approach to the investigation of farmland birds that combines ecology, sociology, and agro-ecosystems management, and includes farmers, researchers, regulators, and the wider New Zealand public.

    View record details
  • Stoat density, diet and survival compared between alpine grassland and beech forest habitats

    Smith, Des; Wilson, Deborah; Moller, Henrik; Murphy, Elaine; Pickerell, Georgina (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand, alpine grasslands occur above the treeline of beech forest. Historically stoat control paradigms in New Zealand’s montane natural areas have assumed alpine grassland is a marginal habitat that limits dispersal between beech forest stoat populations. We compared the summer-to-autumn (January–April) density, weight, diet and winter survival of stoats between these two habitatsduring years of low beech seedfall. Stoats were live-trapped, marked and released in alpine grassland and low-altitude beech forest in the Borland Valley, Fiordland National Park, during 2003 and 2004, and were caught and euthanased for necropsy in 2005. Stoat density was estimated using spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR). The proportion of stoats marked in one year but recaptured in the next was used as a measure of ‘observed survival’. Prey remains were identified from scats collected during 2003 and 2004 and stomachs from stoats killed in 2005. Stoat density was similar in both habitats over the two years, about one stoat per square kilometre. Observed survival from 2003–2004 was also similar, but survival from 2004–2005 was higher in alpine grassland than in beech forest. In 2003, male stoats were on average heavier in alpine grassland than in beech forest, although average weights were similar in the other years. Diet differed significantly between the two habitats, with stoats in alpine grasslands eating mainly ground weta (a large invertebrate) (72%) and hares (23%), while stoats in beech forest ate mainly birds (31%) and mice (19%). Collectively these results suggest that alpine grasslands are not a poor quality habitat for stoats. Traditionally it has been thought that stoats cannot survive on invertebrate prey alone. This research demonstrates that stoats relying largely on invertebrate prey can occur at similar densities and with equivalent survival to stoats relying on vertebrate prey.

    View record details
  • The Origins of Syrian Nationhood; Histories, Pioneers and Identity [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-11)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Origins of Syrian Nationhood; Histories, Pioneers and Identity', edited by Adel Beshara,

    View record details
  • Al-Andalus Rediscovered: Iberia's New Muslims [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Al-Andalus Rediscovered: Iberia’s New Muslims', by Marvine Howe.

    View record details
  • Religion, Ethnicity and Contested Nationhood in the Former Ottoman Space [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Religion, Ethnicity and Contested Nationhood in the Former Ottoman Space', edited by Jørgen Nielsen, Leiden, Brill.

    View record details
  • The Muslim conquest of Iberia: medieval Arabic narratives [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-10)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Muslim conquest of Iberia: medieval Arabic narratives', by Nicola Clarke.

    View record details