49 results for Auckland University of Technology, Book item

  • Globalised desk-top skirmishes? Reporting from the colonies

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr. (2013-10-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Immersive Virtual Environments to facilitate authentic education in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    Reiners, T; Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter will cover our current research focus concerning developing and trialling immersive environments as an innovative and authentic approach to teaching and learning in Logistics and Supply Chain Management, incorporating seamlessly integrated assessment and feedback. Developed educational and assessment tools will allow students to demonstrate that they have successfully applied theoretical knowledge in real contexts and developed appropriate skills before entering the workforce. Greater authenticity allows students to experience different roles and exposes them to multiple business cases over supply chains that, in reality, span the globe. The project addresses the inauthentic pedagogical approaches in current classroom and distance-learning environments, and will propose a methodology that utilises existing technologies. The simulation will combine emerging technologies to represent multiple problem dimensions into one space; enabling students to observe, engage, interact, and participate in self-guided or group-based learning scenarios; receiving instant, multi-perspective, media-rich feedback to support their learning; and enabling further iterative scenario-based training.

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  • Coopetition in supply chains: a case study of a coopetitive structure in the horticulture industry

    Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Supply chain management has been increasingly seen as a strategic tool to improve the competitiveness of companies. Coopetition, the mingling of competitive and cooperative relationships, has been utilised by New Zealand companies in the horticulture industry to help break into and develop new markets. Using a case study various elements of the supply chain are examined from both strategic and operational perspectives for this group of companies and their customers and suppliers. The connections to the customer are shown to be enhanced through careful implementation, as the group of companies act to adjust their entire supply chains to make them increasingly customer-orientated. Significant benefits that are shown to accrue include improved information flow, increased ability to supply, and flexibility to meet customer requirements.

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  • Poverty reduction strategies via public-private partnerships: the role of e-government solutions in supporting supplier diversity programmes

    Jeeva, AS; Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Government procurement practices influence large volumes of spending in communities and further procurement can be influenced through legislative efforts. Through these mechanisms government bodies carry significant influence on the way in which procurement spend occurs and they have the ability to influence the direction that the procurement may take. Carefully constructed parameters in public-private partnerships (PPP) can shift the focus of procurement activities towards engaging with the local businesses and communities. This represents an approach for government bodies to increase supplier diversity so that, in alignment with UN Millennium goals of poverty reduction, local suppliers can be provided with business opportunities and methods to reduce poverty. A two-focus approach is adopted; first, government drivers and policies are examined in the context of social engagement. Second, the roles and challenges faced by small firms in the local communities are highlighted. This demonstrates the way in which e-government procurement systems play a pivotal role in supporting local sourcing initiatives.

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  • Creating Creative Technologists: playing with(in) education

    Walker, C; Connor, AM; Marks, S

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the industrial revolution, the organization of knowledge into distinct scientific, technical or creative categories has resulted in educational systems designed to produce and validate particular occupations. The methods by which students are exposed to different kinds of knowledge are critical in creating and reproducing individual, professional or cultural identities. (“I am an Engineer. You are an Artist”). The emergence of more open, creative and socialised technologies generates challenges for discipline-based education. At the same time, the term “Creative Technologies” also suggests a new occupational category (“I am a Creative Technologist”). This chapter presents a case-study of an evolving ‘anti-disciplinary’ project-based degree that challenges traditional degree structures to stimulate new forms of connective, imaginative and explorative learning, and to equip students to respond to a changing world. Learning is conceived as an emergent process; self-managed by students through critique and open peer review. We focus on ‘playfulness’ as a methodology for achieving multi-modal learning across the boundaries of art, design, computer science, engineering, games and entrepreneurship. In this new cultural moment, playfulness also re-frames the institutional identities of teacher and learner in response to new expectations for learning.

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  • Occupational science: the study of occupation

    Wright-St Clair, VA; Hocking, C (2011-10-16)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter explores how occupational science is informing occupational therapy practice. Firstly the discussion looks at occupational science as a basic science underpinning occupational therapy knowledge, before recent developments in occupational science are show-cased as a way of illustrating its growth as an applied science. Along the way, real world international examples are offered. Each highlights how the ‘science’ of occupational science is guiding evidence-based occupational therapy practice. Each example, in its own way, illustrates occupational science ‘in play’ within the everyday practice worlds of occupational therapists.

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  • Data provenance and management in Radio Astronomy: a stream computing approach

    Mahmoud, M; Ensor, A; Biem, A; Elmegreen, B; and Gulyaev, S (2011-12-16)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    New approaches for data provenance and data management (DPDM) are required for mega science projects like the Square Kilometer Array, characterized by extremely large data volume and intense data rates, therefore demanding innovative and highly efficient computational paradigms. In this context, we explore a stream-computing approach with the emphasis on the use of accelerators. In particular, we make use of a new generation of high performance stream-based parallelization middleware known as InfoSphere Streams. Its viability for managing and ensuring interoperability and integrity of signal processing data pipelines is demonstrated in radio astronomy. IBM InfoSphere Streams embraces the stream-computing paradigm. It is a shift from conventional data mining techniques (involving analysis of existing data from databases) towards real-time analytic processing. We discuss using InfoSphere Streams for effective DPDM in radio astronomy and propose a way in which InfoSphere Streams can be utilized for large antennae arrays. We present a case-study: the InfoSphere Streams implementation of an autocorrelating spectrometer, and using this example we discuss the advantages of the stream-computing approach and the utilization of hardware accelerators.

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  • Organisational narcissim: a case of failed corporate governance?

    Grant, P; McGhee, P (2014-01-29)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This book addresses the question: how can institutions develop and maintain a good purpose? And how can managers contribute to this endeavour? Twelve contributions explore this question, using MacIntyrean inquiry as a basis for exploring four main themes: Can management be considered a practice in the MacIntyrean sense? What is the role of specific virtues in the development of a virtuous institution? What are management vices and what are the conditions in which they flourish? And, can we use MacIntyrean ideas to consider the management of all forms of institutions? The volume is an international and multidisciplinary collection, with contributions from wellknown writers in the field of management ethics, and innovative contributions that use MacIntyrean inquiry as a lens to examine fields such as hospitality, user generated music content and social sustainability. The papers are unified by their concern for the achievement of organizational excellence and integrity through ethical management. Unlike single author texts this edited volume brings together multiple perspectives on the topic of virtue ethics in management. In doing so, it explores the topic both more deeply and more widely than a single author can do. Because of its breadth, this book has the potential to become a turn-to research tool for those interested in virtue theory’s relevance to other academic interests such as organizational behavior (including motivation theory and social psychology), literature, contemporary social issue criticism, and business management.

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  • From Picardy to Picton

    Oosterman, A (2014-01-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    When New Zealand bound itself militarily to Great Britain at the outbreak of war with Germany in August 1914, discussion arose over how the news of the conflict was to be conveyed to readers back home. This chapter considers how news of the war on the Western Front was conveyed to New Zealanders back home and the role played by the country's first official war correspondent, Malcolm Ross.

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  • Female entrepreneurship

    Jaeger, S; Kesting, S (2013-06-19)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • A comparison of semi-deterministic and stochastic search techniques

    Connor, AM; Shea, K (2014-04-12)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper presents an investigation of two search techniques, tabu search (TS) and simulated annealing (SA), to assess their relative merits when applied to engineering design optimisation. Design optimisation problems are generally characterised as having multi-modal search spaces and discontinuities making global optimisation techniques beneficial. Both techniques claim to be capable of locating globally optimum solutions on a range of problems but this capability is derived from different underlying philosophies. While tabu search uses a semi-deterministic approach to escape local optima, simulated annealing uses a complete stochastic approach. The performance of each technique is investigated using a structural optimisation problem. These performances are then compared to each other as well as a steepest descent (SD) method.

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  • EEG signal processing for brain-computer interfaces

    Georgieva, P; Silva, F; Milanova, M; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter is focused on recent advances in electroencephalogram (EEG) signal processing for brain computer interface (BCI) design. A general overview of BCI technologies is first presented, and then the protocol for motor imagery noninvasive BCI for mobile robot control is discussed. Our ongoing research on noninvasive BCI design based not on recorded EEG but on the brain sources that originated the EEG signal is also introduced. We propose a solution to EEG-based brain source recovering by combining two techniques, a sequential Monte Carlo method for source localization and spatial filtering by beamforming for the respective source signal estimation. The EEG inverse problem is previously studded assuming that the source localization is known. In this work for the first time the problem of inverse modeling is solved simultaneously with the problem of the respective source space localization.

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  • The evolution of the evolving neuro-fuzzy systems: from expert systems to spiking-, neurogenetic-, and quantum inspired

    Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter follows the development of a class of intelligent information systems called evolving neuro-fuzzy systems (ENFS). ENFS combine the adaptive/ evolving learning ability of neural networks and the approximate reasoning and linguistically meaningful explanation features of fuzzy rules. The review includes fuzzy expert systems, fuzzy neuronal networks, evolving connectionist systems, spiking neural networks, neurogenetic systems, and quantum inspired systems, all discussed from the point of few of fuzzy rule interpretation as new knowledge acquired during their adaptive/evolving learning. This review is based on the author’s personal (evolving) research, integrating principles from neural networks, fuzzy systems and nature.

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  • Computational modeling with spiking neural networks

    Schliebs, S; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter reviews recent developments in the area of spiking neural networks (SNN) and summarizes the main contributions to this research field. We give background information about the functioning of biological neurons, discuss the most important mathematical neural models along with neural encoding techniques, learning algorithms, and applications of spiking neurons. As a specific application, the functioning of the evolving spiking neural network (eSNN) classification method is presented in detail and the principles of numerous eSNN based applications are highlighted and discussed.

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  • Brain, gene, and quantum inspired computational intelligence

    Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter discusses opportunities and challenges for the creation of methods of computational intelligence (CI) and more specifically – artificial neural networks (ANN), inspired by principles at different levels of information processing in the brain: cognitive, neuronal, genetic, and quantum, and mainly, the issues related to the integration of these principles into more powerful and accurate CI methods. It is demonstrated how some of these methods can be applied to model biological processes and to improve our understanding in the subject area; generic CI methods being applicable to challenging generic AI problems. The chapter first offers a brief presentation of some principles of information processing at different levels of the brain and then presents brain inspired, gene inspired, and quantum inspired CI. The main contribution of the chapter, however, is the introduction of methods inspired by the integration of principles from several levels of information processing, namely: A computational neurogenetic model that in one model combines gene information related to spiking neuronal activities. A general framework of a quantum spiking neural network (SNN) model. A general framework of a quantum computational neurogenetic model (CNGM). Many open questions and challenges are discussed, along with directions for further research.

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  • Personalised information modelling technologies for personalised medicine

    Hu, Y; Kasabov, N; Liang, W (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Personalised modelling offers a new and effective approach for the study in pattern recognition and knowledge discovery, especially for biomedical applications. The created models are more useful and informative for analysing and evaluating an individual data object for a given problem. Such models are also expected to achieve a higher degree of accuracy of prediction of outcome or classification than conventional systems and methodologies. Motivated by the concept of personalised medicine and utilising transductive reasoning, personalised modelling was recently proposed as a new method for knowledge discovery in biomedical applications. Personalised modelling aims to create a unique computational diagnostic or prognostic model for an individual. Here we introduce an integrated method for personalised modelling that applies global optimisation of variables (features) and an appropriate size of neighbourhood to create an accurate personalised model for an individual. This method creates an integrated computational system that combines different information processing techniques, applied at different stages of data analysis, e.g. feature selection, classification, discovering the interaction of genes, outcome prediction, personalised profiling and visualisation, etc. It allows for adaptation, monitoring and improvement of an individual’s model and leads to improved accuracy and unique personalised profiling that could be used for personalised treatment and personalised drug design.

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  • Information methods for predicting risk and outcome of stroke

    Liang, L; Krishnamurthi, R; Kasabov, N; Feigin, V (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and mortality in most economically developed countries. It is the second leading cause of death worldwide (after cancer and heart disease) [55.1, 2] and a major cause of disability in adults in developed countries [55.3]. Personalized modeling is an emerging effective computational approach, which has been applied to various disciplines, such as in personalized drug design, ecology, business, and crime prevention; it has recently become more prominent in biomedical applications. Biomedical data on stroke risk factors and prognostic data are available in a large volume, but the data are complex and often difficult to apply to a specific person. Individualizing stroke risk prediction and prognosis will allow patients to focus on risk factors specific to them, thereby reducing their stroke risk and managing stroke outcomes more effectively. This chapter reviews various methods–conventional statistical methods and computational intelligent modeling methods for predicting risk and outcome of stroke.

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  • Ontologies and machine learning systems

    Tegginmath, S; Pears, R; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this chapter we review the uses of ontologies within bioinformatics and neuroinformatics and the various attempts to combine machine learning (ML) and ontologies, and the uses of data mining ontologies. This is a diverse field and there is enormous potential for wider use of ontologies in bioinformatics and neuroinformatics research and system development. A systems biology approach comprising of experimental and computational research using biological, medical, and clinical data is needed to understand complex biological processes and help scientists draw meaningful inferences and to answer questions scientists have not even attempted so far.

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  • Role of mathematical modelling and applications in university service courses: an across countries study

    Klymchuk, S; Zverkova, T

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The aim of this study was to find out what university students, studying mathematics as a service course, think about the role of the mathematical modelling process and application problems in their studies. For this purpose a questionnaire was given to more than 500 students from 14 universities in 9 countries. The research was not a comparison of countries or universities: an across countries study approach was chosen to reduce the affect of differences in education systems, curricula, cultures. The results of the questionnaire were analysed and presented in the paper. In particular, an attempt was made to identify which step of the mathematical modelling process the students found most difficult.

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  • Pacific youth connecting through Poly

    Fairbairn Dunlop, P

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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