91 results for Auckland University of Technology, Conference paper

  • Re-shaping the process of design & making: shifting the relationship between designer and client in the context of digital knitwear design and production systems

    Farren, Anne; Yang, Sooyung

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    New technologies have created a gap in designer knowledge and understanding of the design capabilities and production potential of new CAD software driven equipment. Significantly, within some sectors of the fashion industry, there is an assumption that CAD software run production technologies can eliminate the need for a designer, with production-based technologies “driven” by a technician. Our work with the garment industry supports the emergence of an assumption amongst production machinery manufacturers that CAD software systems can eliminate design input and associated costs (Mohammed, May, & Alavi, 2008; Eckert, Cross, & Johnson, 2000; Eckert, Kelly, & Stacey, 1999). CAD driven production technologies such as the Shima Seiki WholeGarment® knitting system have “predefined garment templates” (preregistered garment shapes in Shima Seiki’s terms) embedded in the software. The manufacturer of this machine claims that these preregistered garment shapes can minimize the creativity gap between the designer and technician. However it is our experience that the system is too complex for cost effective implementation of design innovation. Recent developments in CAD driven knitwear production systems have resulted in changes to the conventional relationships between the client, the designer and the technician. In this context, we have identified a new role, the “designer-interpreter”. Designer-interpreter denotes a professional knitwear designer with additional training in managing computerized seamless knitting machines. Research carried out at Curtin University has identified this as a creative role that is required to optimize design and production using computerized flat V-bed seamless knitting systems. Within current applications of computerised V-bed seamless knitting systems, the textile and garment design processes are fully integrated and cannot be effectivelymanipulated in isolation. There is a current assumption that a knitwear technician can be a design-interpreter. However the designer-interpreter is required to facilitate the creative integration of textile and garment design. This is achieved through the application of their specialist knowledge of knit design, CAD driven software and machine operation. The designer-interpreter can work with either another designer or the end user to develop fully customized garments. With the creative support of the designer-interpreter, a consumer without any design background effectively becomes a “designer”. This system repositions the relationship between designer, manufacturer and consumer. This paper presents research carried out by the Fashion Design & Research HUB at Curtin University into the creative potential of the design process using computerized flat V-bed seamless knitting technology for the client with little or no garment design experience. It reflects on observations made during workshops, of the changing nature in the relationships between designer-interpreter, client, design process and technology.

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  • Sociomateriality Implications of Software As a Service Adoption on IT-workers’ Roles and Changes in Organizational Routines of IT Systems Support

    Mbuba, F; Wang, YYC; Olesen, K

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper aims to deepen our understanding on how sociomateriality practices influence IT workers’ roles and skill set requirements and changes to the organizational routines of IT systems support, when an organization migrates an on-premise IT system to a software as a service (SaaS) model. This conceptual paper is part of an ongoing study investigating organizations that migrated on-premise IT email systems to SaaS business models, such as Google Apps for Education (GAE) and Microsoft Office 365 systems, in New Zealand tertiary institutions. We present initial findings from interpretive case studies. The findings are, firstly, technological artifacts are entangled in sociomaterial practices, which change the way humans respond to the performative aspects of the organizational routines. Human and material agencies are interwoven in ways that reinforce or change existing routines. Secondly, materiality, virtual realm and spirit of the technology provide elementary levels at which human and material agencies entangle. Lastly, the elementary levels at which human and material entangle depends on the capabilities or skills set of an individual.

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  • Elite Rowers Apply Different Forces Between Stationary and Sliding Ergometers, & On-water Rowing

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Rowing on ergometers is often required due to on-water conditions and testing requirements. Force generation between on-water sculling, fixed and sliding ergometers, has been examined, but there are only a few studies with elite level rowers. Forces at the handle, rowing gate, and foot block were recorded for four elite rowers during 1,000-m on a fixed ergometer, sliding ergometer and an on-water double scull. Handle forces were greater on the fixed and sliding ergometer than the on-water double. There was a trend for the foot forces to be similar between all three conditions. However, the timing of application of force was considerably earlier on the fixed and sliding ergometer than the on-water condition. The use of ergometers as a substitute for on-water rowing needs to be reconsidered in light of these results.

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  • Does a Modified Foot-stretcher Improve 500-m On-water and Ergometer Rowing Performance Time and Comfort?

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Foot-stretcher force contributes to rowing performance. A New Zealand designed modified rowing foot-stretcher has a rigid clog shoe with heel and toe wedges to allow contact of the whole surface of the foot to the foot-plate throughout the entire rowing stroke. This study examined the effect of modified and standard foot-stretchers for eight competitive rowers during on-water double scull and static Concept2 ergometer 500-m rowing. Race time and comfort were recorded. Comfort measures indicated that the modified foot-stretcher was preferred both on-water and ergometer. Performance time measures indicated a potential performance enhancement with the modified foot-stretcher on-water (2.0%), however due to large confidence intervals, the results were unclear. This modified foot-stretcher assisted athletes rowing comfort and showed potential for performance enhancement.

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  • Traversing the distance between known and unknown: fastening one’s seatbelt in postgraduate creative-practice research supervision

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr. (2010-05-10T21:22:45Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Practice-based research in art and design is only partially amenable to discursive explication. In an educational framework that relies on notions of master/student relationships, in which the former is supposed to pass knowledge on to the latter, this fact often creates anxieties for both. From Jacques Rancière’s point of view, the master’s ignorance is important for the student’s emancipation. In his book on The Ignorant Schoolmaster, Joseph Jacotot, he claims that learners become emancipated through their own activities of observing, retaining, repeating, verifying, doing, reflecting, taking apart and combining differently. In support of this method of the riddle, the supervisor can teach best by not knowing the subject matter but, instead, providing positive constraints to help keep the researcher on her own path, acknowledging that no two orbits are alike. For any researcher to be able to discover anything new, she has to learn the different languages of theories, things and media. The foundation of such knowledge is, however, not the supervisor/master. Her role, in contrast, is to claim the equality of each intelligent being, to discourage false modesty in students, and to encourage them to make discoveries through experiment and experience: to be attentive and use their own intelligence. For this to happen, master and student need a thing in common that establishes an egalitarian intellectual link between them. In practice-based research in design and art, the thing in common emerges largely through non-discursive media and modes of thought. Here, what can be seen, what can be thought about it, and what it can mean is also matter of translation, which Walter Benjamin, in The Task of the Translator, described as a mutually complimentary relationship between the languages of original and translation. No language in itself can give form to truth – and the task of a translation is to reveal what remains repressed in the original. In the many forms of translation involved in creative-practice research, candidate and supervisor work ‘between the lines’, in the interstices between the unknown and known, translating and re-translating. This paper explores, drawing on concepts by Benjamin, Rancière, Dewey, Wittgenstein and Kleist, which aspects help or prevent a situation in which students can respond to someone speaking to them, rather than examining them, under the sign of equality.

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  • Out there: Whare and Fale performing abroad

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr. (2010-05-10T21:22:47Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    What was once classed as 'savage ornament', which could not possibly register as architecture, has today morphed into the stuff of 'iconic architecture'. From another perspective, what began as a whare tupuna or a fale tele has sometimes turned into curios, for a time only or for ever. Along with the changes in status, these houses also changed their performative roles. This paper briefly traces the journeys abroad of Māori whare and Samoan fale, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which were designed for purposes other than that of their destinations, and some fale and whare that were designed to travel abroad in the 1960s and early 2000s. The houses in the former group often travelled with an accompanying expectation: that relationships would be performed and fulfilled. In the latter case, this expectation seems to have been replaced with more instrumental ones. But on the websites promoting them, relationships still feature as important parts of their essence and performance. This paper explores similarities and differences in the representation and performance of Māori and Samoan architecture and culture overseas, with respect to notions of relationships, visibility, agency, and interpretation.

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  • ISPs - pricing internet success

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:32Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Access to the Internet is provided by a number of commercial entities known as Internet Service Providers who constitute the Internet backbone and act as mediators between the user and the Internet. A variety of pricing methods have been considered in the literature and implemented in practice. While congestion control is a necessary condition for the smooth operation of the global Internet and affects all users, demand for service differentiation is related to the requirements of specific applications using the Internet as an infrastructure. The pricing model of an Internet Service Provider needs to be able to accommodate the levels of service offered.

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  • A multi-discipline approach linking related disciplines and stakeholder communities to develop business expertise for the new technological environment

    Petrova, K.; Sinclair, R. (2010-04-12T20:55:33Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although teaching institutions are typically well behind business in adopting new technologies, an attempt is being made at the Auckland University of Technology to introduce a new field of study and a new technological environment for its delivery - a comprehensive programme in eBusiness studies. The university works very closely with its stakeholder communities particularly in identifying new programme needs to ensure a balance is achieved between technical skill and business focus. As a result of this collaboration an operational model comprising a total of eight modules was constructed with the aim of integrating the proposed eBusiness qualifications within the structure of an existing Bachelor of Business degree. This paper discusses the background and development of a module called "Electronic Transactions and Security" and the interrelationship between other modules within the eBusiness field of study. The module comprises transaction processing, transaction security and risk management and has evolved into a multi-discipline partnership between the Accounting and Finance and Information Technology business disciplines. New digital technologies - such as on-line collaboration and on-line resource sharing and exchange will be an integral part of the teaching and learning process.

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  • The SMOL case: the SoDIS approach to teaching "electronic transactions security"

    Petrova, K.; Sinclair, R. (2010-04-12T20:55:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    There is an increasing vulnerability of businesses to attacks on their systems, which has given rise to an increased interest in areas such as information security and risk management. In the project discussed here, the methodology developed for SoDIS (Software Development Impact Statement) was applied to evaluate risks related to business stakeholders, and to justify a security solution. A teaching case study was used. This report provides an update on the project, as presented at the 8th SoDIS Symposium (July 2006) in Wellington, New Zealand.

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  • Teaching differently: a hybrid delivery model

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    A variety of frameworks for distant, online and flexible learning have been proposed. This paper looks into the defining features of some of these models and describes the hybrid model of flexible delivery. The hybrid model integrates face-to-face classes of instructed practical works, online learning environments and distance learning units. Based on guided and self-centred student learning the model is capable of recognising multiculturalism and diverse student learning needs. It supports and encourages contributions from all participants and a team approach to teaching and learning.

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  • Global networking: problems and solutions in branching to electronic commerce

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Moodle as a virtual learning environment

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:35Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Mobile commerce adoption: end-user/customer views

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:35Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    A number of research articles published recently emphasize the strong potential of mobile commerce, the competitive advantage it might bring to providers and to developers, and the benefits to be enjoyed by private and commercial end-users. On the other side, voices from the industry declare that mobile commerce has failed to deliver and that the initially rapid uptake has slowed down. The literature on mobile commerce is rich in frameworks and models, which vary in form from general to application-specific. To study this rapidly evolving phenomenon, we propose a research model which includes the relationships between users, the technology, and the mobile commerce value chain.

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  • A course design for flexible learning

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:35Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Interpreting innovation as “combining information from diverse sources into new knowledge” this paper looks into the advantages which information and communications technology development can bring into the design of a more flexible mode of a delivery. An example of an undergraduate business degree technical course is described.

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  • Valuing computer science education research?

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:25Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper critically enquires into the value systems which rule the activities of teaching and research. This critique is intended to demonstrate the application of critical enquiry in Computer Science Education Research and therefore uses critical theory as a method of analysis.A framework of Research as a Discourse is applied to explore how the notions of research as opposed to teaching are presented, and how discipline and research communities are sustained. The concept of a discourse, based upon the work of Foucault, enables critical insight into the processes which regulate forms of thought. This paper positions the field of Computer Science Education Research, as an illustrative case, within the broader discourse of Research, and argues that Computer Science Education Researchers and educators need to understand and engage in this discourse and shape it to their own ends.

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  • International collaborative learning - the facilitation process

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:26Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    International collaborative learning is becoming more viable through a variety of Internet enabled software products. Group Support Systems appear to offer promise. But it is not well understood how to facilitate the teaching and learning process in electronic environments. If education is to involve an interactive process of collaborative inquiry and dialogue between remote groups of learners, then designing meaningful learning experiences presents challenges in logistics, technology support, software design, and pedagogy. To better model the facilitation process in such environments, a theoretical framework based on an extension of Adaptive Structuration Theory is suggested. This framework is then related to experiences with custom application software development using Lotus Notes Domino(TM), internal trials and a limited scale collaborative learning exercise between students at Auckland Institute of Technology and Uppsala University. The paper concludes by providing some recommendations for the redesign of the application, suggesting revisions to the collaborative process based on the framework presented, and discussing further extensions to the trials.

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  • Using Groupware for international collaborative learning

    Clear, Tony; Daniels, M. (2009-05-27T22:14:26Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    The paper reports the lessons learned from a two year collaborative learning trial between students at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and Uppsala University. The trials took place using a combination of email and a custom developed Lotus NotesTM database. The first trial involved a case study in which students performed different roles in designing a software solution for an Auckland based nailcare distributor. The second trial built upon the knowledge base of the earlier trial, and required students to evaluate and rank the previous design proposals. A theoretical model developed from the group support systems literature guided some of the changes in the second trial. The software, the collaboration process and the evaluation methods evolved over the course of these trials. The challenges of creating global student communities within a short collaboration window in existing courses of study are discussed. Further extensions to this research are proposed and some general recommendations are made

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  • A cyber-icebreaker for an effective virtual group?

    Clear, Tony; Daniels, M. (2009-05-27T22:14:27Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports selected results from the most recent of a series of international collaborative trials between students at Auckland University of Technology and Uppsala University. The trials require students to work together in virtual groups, comprising students from each institution, to perform a common task. The topic of this paper is how to form and sustain more effective virtual groups. In this trial a cyber-icebreaker task has been introduced and its contribution to group effectiveness is explored. Some conclusions are drawn pinpointing the strengths and weaknesses of this trial design, and some insights into effective design of electronic collaborative learning groups are gained.

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  • 2D & 3D introductory processes in virtual groups

    Clear, Tony; Daniels, M. (2009-05-27T22:14:27Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports on a collaborative learning trial conducted in 2002 between students at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand and Uppsala University, Sweden. The trial design included an initial phase in which virtual groups became acquainted using different modes of cyber-icebreaker and a subsequent phase with a common task involving group decision making - evaluating and ranking the different icebreaker experiences. The software used in the trial comprised 1) a custom-developed web-based groupware database and 2) a Java 3D application, implying configurable avatars, which could be manipulated in a virtual world. Each of these applications supported icebreaking activities intended to establish trust between virtual group members, the latter in 3D mode and the former in 2D mode. The trial process and the software are initially outlined. The evaluation strategy and approaches to data analysis are then discussed and the paper concludes with a report of preliminary findings from the trial.

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  • Using IT for active student feedback in the learning environment

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:28Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the use of a web-based groupware product (specifically a Lotus NotesTM & DominoTM discussion database), as a means of gaining direct and regular feedback from students on the progress of a course. Some of the pitfalls and issues are discussed, including motivation for use, barriers to effective feedback, the value of anonymity and appropriate netiquette. Some recommendations are made for others wishing to use such a feedback mechanism, and for those who do not have Lotus Notes installed, how a feedback system such as this might be implemented in some other web based product.

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