62 results for Auckland University of Technology, Report

  • The Computation of Key Properties of Markov Chains via Perturbations

    Hunter, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Computational procedures for the stationary probability distribution, the group inverse of the Markovian kernel and the mean first passage times of a finite irreducible Markov chain, are developed using perturbations. The derivation of these expressions involves the solution of systems of linear equations and, structurally, inevitably the inverses of matrices. By using a perturbation technique, starting from a simple base where no such derivations are formally required, we update a sequence of matrices, formed by linking the solution procedures via generalized matrix inverses and utilising matrix and vector multiplications. Four different algorithms are given, some modifications are discussed, and numerical comparisons made using a test example. The derivations are based upon the ideas outlined in Hunter, J.J., “The computation of stationary distributions of Markov chains through perturbations”, Journal of Applied Mathematics and Stochastic Analysis, 4, 29-46, (1991).

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  • Why the Kemeny Time is Constant

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    We present a new fundamental intuition for why the Kemeny feature of a Markov chain is a constant. This new perspective has interesting further implications.

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  • Leading in Collaborative, Complex Education Systems

    Gilbert, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • On the Edge: Shifting Teachers’ Paradigms for the Future

    Gilbert, J; Bull, A

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project was designed to explore the conditions needed for New Zealand teachers to experience the transformational learning we argue is needed for future-oriented schooling. Its focus was teachers’ thinking. The research looked at how a group of teachers’ thinking changed as they participated in a professional learning and development (PLD) programme. This PLD had two parts: a university course on educational futures, and a workshop designed to support cognitive growth.

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  • Evaluating a Shared Spaces Intervention. A Case Study of Street Users in Auckland, New Zealand

    Oliver, M; Badland, HM; Duncan, S; Wooller, L; Wright, R; Miner-Williams, W

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The environmental qualities of urban spaces have the potential to influence peoples’ behaviours, including mode of transport and physical activity patterns, shopper spending habits, and social engagement and behavioural characteristics. Increasingly, urban planners and transport engineers are integrating concepts such as self -­‐ explaining roads and shared spaces into environmental design approaches, for improved driver behaviour, pedestrian safety, and health behaviours. Despite this, research focusing on the effects of such interventions is limited, largely due to the substantial expense of implementing built environment infrastructure, and a general disconnect between researchers and regulatory bodies responsible for intervention implementation. Greater focu s needs to be on understanding the effects these interventions can have on the general population, to inform future infrastructural initiatives and investment. This study compares the profiles and perceptions of street users immediately post and sixteen mo nths after a major streetscape upgrade to a shared spaces mode in the the Fort Street precinct (central business district), in Auckland, New Zealand. A convenience sample strategy was employed for data collection and participants completed in -­‐ person survey s . Descriptive data treatment and inferential statistical analyses were undertaken to compare user profiles and opinions pre and post streetscape upgrades. In total , 373 street users in the Fort Street precinct participated in this research. Overall, findi ngs indicate positive perceptions of the Fort Street upgrades and positive impacts on health -­‐ related behaviours. Recommendations for further improvements to the area predominantly focused on improving pedestrian safety, including reducing traffic speeds, r educing car usage of the area, and providing better clarity on appropriate driver behaviours.

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  • New Zealanders with Disabilities and their Internet Use

    Smith, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings from a series of interviews conducted with New Zealanders with disabilities who talked about their experiences of Internet use. For people with disabilities in New Zealand, living in the digital age has much wider implications when it comes to their access and accessibility. This report presents the findings from interviews conducted with 11 New Zealanders with a range of disabilities about their Internet use. A description of the study design is outlined in Section One, followed by the presentation of the findings of the research in Section Two. These findings look at firstly, how the participants engage in certain strategies to enable their Internet use in relation to their disability or impairment; secondly, the various online activities they like to participate in; thirdly, the range of barriers they have encountered in their Internet use; and, fourthly, participants’ attitudes towards the Internet and how it has impacted on their lives in terms of technology and independence, identity and socialisation. The conclusion in Section Three reflects upon the findings of the research, offers recommendations and makes suggestions for future research

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  • News, Politics and Diversity in the 2014 New Zealand General Election

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Challenges and Recommendations for the Design and Conduct of Global Software Engineering Courses: A Systematic Review

    Beecham, S; Clear, T; Barr, J; Noll, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This SLR we are conducting traverses the many options available to Computer Science (CS) educators teaching CS courses involving global collaboration. The challenges and solutions in conducting global software engineering courses will be addressed. While there is a rich source of literature covering this topic, there is limited consolidated guidance available for CS educators wishing to implement a global course, in collaboration with other institutions. So building upon the existing knowledge in the literature in the area will help to produce a report that will serve as a broad ranging resource for global software engineering educators. The SLR focusses on two areas: 1. Learning GSE Theory: Developing courses based on GSE theory. I.e. How to teach students about developing software across multi-site teams (to include things like cultural training – i.e. how to build trust amongst a team that hasn’t met face to face, etc.). AND 2. Learning GSE by doing: Developing courses that show how to apply GSE methods in the classroom. E.g. where students develop software in multi-site teams (where the software developed is not really the focus, but ‘how’ to develop the software is what we would be looking at). We also include studies that take a hybrid approach by including a combination of theory and practice. I.e. research that presents experiences of running hybrid courses aimed at developing student capabilities in working as global professionals which have varying degrees of cross-site collaboration, and theorypractice balance.

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  • Debriefing following seclusion and restraint: a summary of relevant literature

    Sutton, D; Webster, S; Wilson, M

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report provides a summary of current debriefing practices that have been shown to support strategy six in the Six Core Strategies© and supports seclusion or restraint reduction programmes, drawn from a review or relevant literature. The document provides a foundation for services to develop or modify current debriefing practices in line with evidence-informed guidelines.

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  • Oscillation Revisited

    Beer, G; Cao, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In previous work by Beer and Levi [8, 9], the authors studied the oscillation Ω(f, A) of a function f between metric spaces hX, di and hY, ρi at a nonempty subset A of X, defined so that when A = {x}, we get Ω(f, {x}) = ω(f, x), where ω(f, x) denotes the classical notion of oscillation of f at the point x ∈ X. The main purpose of this article is to formulate a general joint continuity result for (f, A) 7→ Ω(f, A) valid for continuous functions.

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  • Pricing Variance Swaps in a Hybrid Model of Stochastic Volatility and Interest Rate With Regime-switching

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we consider the problem of pricing discretely-sampled variance swaps based on a hybrid model of stochastic volatility and stochastic interest rate with regime-switching. Our modeling framework extends the Heston stochastic volatility model by including the CIR stochastic interest rate and model parameters that switch according to a continuous-time observable Markov chain process. A semi-closed form pricing formula for variance swaps is derived. The pricing formula is assessed through numerical implementations, and the impact of including regime-switching on pricing variance swaps is also discussed.

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  • Three Open Problems on the Wijsman Topology

    Cao, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since it first emerged in Wijsman's seminal work [29], the Wijsman topology has been intensively studied in the past 50 years. In particular, topological properties of Wijsman hyperspaces, relationships between the Wijsman topology and other hyperspace topologies, and applications of the Wijsman topology in analysis have been explored. However, there are still several fundamental open problems on this topology. In this article, the author gives a brief survey on these problems and some up-to-date partial solutions.

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  • Our Futures. Te Pae Tawhiti. The 2013 census and New Zealand's changing population

    Hawke, G; Bedford, R; Kukutai, T; McKinnon, M; Olssen, E; Spoonley, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Our Futures: Te Pae Tawhiti brings together data and analysis from the 2013 census and other sources, together with input from a wide range of researchers, to provide evidence-based pointers to the future of New Zealand society. It covers seven key themes: diversity, population change, tangata whenua, migration, households and families, regional variation, and work.

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  • Clusters and Hubs: toward a regional architecture for voluntary adaptive migration in the Pacific

    Burson, B; Bedford, R

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Mid-term evaluation of the Strengthening Pacific Partnerships project

    Nunns, H; Roorda, M; Bedford, C; Bedford, R

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings of an independent, mid-term evaluation of the Strengthening Pacific Partnerships (SPP) project for the 18 month period October 2011 to March 2013. The main report presents the valuation findings about the SPP project, including general observations about the seven Pacific States involved in SPP. Appendix A includes the specific findings for each of the States.1 In this report, the term “respondent” refers to a person who was interviewed for the evaluation. The term “official” refers to a Government employee in a Pacific state unless otherwise stated.

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  • Super City? State of Auckland report

    Neill, CM; Crothers, C; McGregor, J; Hanna, K; Fletcher, M; Wilson, D (2013-12-12)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Auckland is New Zealand’s bold experiment in local government. Is the Super City a success, a disappointment or something in between? The local government elections in 2013 provide an opportunity to assess the state of Auckland. How is New Zealand’s largest city measuring up three years on from the unique governance reforms that created it? This report examines various areas of living in Auckland; its people and communities, democratic participation, the economy, the state of the built and natural environment, transport and other infrastructure, public services, confidence in Auckland’s regional and local governance and value for money. It aims to help citizens make informed decisions when they vote in the 2013 local government elections. It also allows them to be involved in a continuing research project that assesses the city they live in.

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  • Strengthening engagements between schools and the science community

    Gilbert, J; Bolstad, R; Bull, A; Carson, S; MacIntyre, W; Spiller, L (2013-12-05)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research aimed to generate evidence-based recommendations for strengthening partnerships between schools and the science community to support students’ science learning and engagement. It was underpinned by a future-oriented perspective, framed by larger questions about the purpose of science education in the context of a rapidly changing 21st-century world. The report digs beneath assumptions about why learners’ and teachers’ engagement with the science community is considered important, and examines what kinds of approaches and supports might sustain future-oriented science education for New Zealand learners.

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  • The Internet in New Zealand 2013

    Gibson, A; Miller, M; Smith, P; Bell, A; Crothers, C (2013-12-16)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Executive Summary The fourth survey of the World Internet Project New Zealand (WIPNZ) was conducted between late July and early September 2013. For the first time, the sample in 2013 used both telephone and internet surveys. This report presents an analysis of the usage of and attitudes to the internet of the resulting sample of 2006 New Zealanders. As internet use approaches saturation in New Zealand, our focus turns from ‘how many people use the internet?’ to ‘how do people use the internet?’ and ‘why do some not use the internet at all?’ To answer these questions, the sample has been divided into five categories: never-users (5% of sample), ex-users (3%), low level users (14%), first generation users (40%) and next generation users (38%). Usage For a large number of people the internet is used daily. Four out of five spend an hour or more online at home every day. Almost everyone under 40 is online, so that only 1% of our under-40 sample are non-users. Accessing the internet ‘on the go’ is prevalent. Seven out of ten users access the internet from a hand-held mobile device such as a smartphone or an iPad. Almost half of the internet users surveyed (48%) said that they had accessed the internet through a tablet, while an even higher proportion (68%) connected through their mobile phone in the past year. Activities Most internet users say they surf or browse the web (96%) or visit social networking sites (81%). 34% of internet users report that they use the cloud, 41% purchase apps and almost two thirds (65%) download free apps. Most users check their email daily (89%). Just over 60% of men aged 30–44 said they have looked at sites with sexual content. Māori and Pasifika internet users, especially those in lower income households, take the lead in subscriptions to music streaming services like Spotify. More than one in five Māori (21%) and Pasifika (23%) users in households with annual incomes of less than $50,000 have paid for a subscription to a music streaming service in the past year. The internet is used as a tool for consumer decision making, with 94% of users looking for information about products online – more than half of users do this at least weekly. For 85% of users, this kind of online research includes comparing prices. Almost half of our users (47%) have logged in to secure areas on Government or Council websites, and 51% have paid taxes, fines or licences online in the past year. Comparing the importance of media Comparing the importance of various forms of media as information sources, 81% of all our respondents rated the internet (including online media such as streamed radio) as important or very important. This was very much higher than the proportion who rated offline media as important: television (47%), radio (37%) and newspapers (37%). One of the most dramatic differences according to age group is the importance of the internet as a source of entertainment and leisure. While watching (offline) television is an important leisure activity for people across all ages, using the internet as a form of entertainment is a young-person phenomenon: 80% of respondents aged 16–29 rate it as important or very important. This 2013 survey has a different sample structure than previous years in order to include New Zealanders without a landline. The questionnaire has also undergone substantial updating to keep pace with changing digital technologies. For these reasons, the present report focuses solely on the findings for 2013, and longitudinal analyses will be presented in a subsequent report next year.

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  • Women's career progression in Auckland law firms: views from the top, views from below

    Pringle, J; Giddings, L; Harris, C; Jaeger, S; Lin, S; Ravenswood, K; Ryan, I (2014-03-17)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Hospitality report: reporting on New Zealand's hospitality industry 2013

    Williamson, D; Neill, L; Kruesi, M; Waldren, N (2013-07-10)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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