20 results for Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi, Conference item, 2010

  • ICT4D: working with communities for ICT enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Computing student views on sustainability: a snapshot

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    UNESCO launched the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development for 2005-2014 with the aim of integrating Education doe Sustainable Development (ESD) into all aspects of education and learning. The motivation for this study was to inform our decisions on embedding ESD into our teaching. Incoming computing students (n=116) were surveyed to capture their viewd on sustaunability before they engaged in formal learning and these views were compared to those of computing students at another institution. The study explored views on the relevance of sustainability to their study, sustainability [riorities and knowledge, possible actions they could take, their capacity to take these actions and make a difference, and how they would deal with a challenging scenario. Students were pro-ecological but did not believe they had the capability to make a difference. Significant variation was found in attitudes and cvalues across the various ethnicities in our sample, suggesting that careful consideration should be given to this aspect. This study adds to the emerging body of knowledge around sustainability perceptions and values of incoming students and informs curriculum for the embedding of ESD into education and learning.

    View record details
  • American influence on citizens through New Zealand commercial radio

    Reilly, B. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emerging consensus tends to suggest there is overwhelming American dominance of New Zealand radio in music. This study sets out to enquire on such claims by looking at music, and enquiring on its effect on citizens and their engagement and creation of culture. There is evidence emerging that indicates a mixture of American as well as British influence. Foreign influence in the radio scene has been apparent since the time it became a popular addition to the New Zealand household in the 1920s. Over the following decades, the radio industry has turned to the dominant Anglo-American players for guidance and inspiration. Now with a maturing local industry that is becoming more confident in its own skin, this reliance on foreign industry is coming under question regarding its affect on the indigenous population. We set out to question which theory best describes the new landscape that the radio industry finds itself in, and how this is affecting the production of content received by the listening public. Working within a framework of cultural imperialism and hybridity, the findings indicate where it is contrary to what has been simplistically alluded to as a simple mixture of global and local.

    View record details
  • Industry view of ICT roles and skills: needs in Canterbury

    Asgarkhani, M.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the ICT skills needs within both Canterbury region and New Zealand. ICTs play a crucial role in today’s knowledge-based economy. Organizations heavily rely on ICT solutions to develop and grow business. There is an increasing need for ICT skills within organizations – so as to benefit from the use of ICT tools and solutions. A focus group of industry representatives participated in this study – to identify the need for roles and skills within the ICT sector. It appears that there are consistencies in both the need for roles and the use of development platforms for the Canterbury region and all regions of New Zealand. That is to say, ICT qualifications designed to address national needs should address majority of ICT needs within the Canterbury region.

    View record details
  • Leadership in ICT organizations: skills or experience?

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) plays an essential role in both economic and social development. A diverse portfolio of ICT solutions is contributing towards a significant change in corporate business processes worldwide. ICT organization leadership is essential for setting up competitive businesses, managing global corporations, adding business value and providing valued products and/or services to their potential markets. Successful ICT organization leaders need to use a mix of technical skills, managerial skills and relevant management and technical experience so as to be able to provide effective leadership.

    View record details
  • Developing research and presentation skills in post graduate students

    Joyce, D.; Blackshaw, R.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, techniques used with postgraduate computing students to develop research, analysis and presentation skills are explained and their success is evaluated. Several different techniques are used with students entering post graduate study at different levels. The courses at each level and the research forums are described and analysed.

    View record details
  • Assessing with a unit test framework: variations of approach

    Lance, M.; Sarkar, A.; Bian, R. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This work describes two different uses of a Unit Testing Framework for automated marking of programming assignments. Usually unit testing focuses on verifying the correctness of individual methods. Here we firstly show how to use unit tests to give novice programmers feedback as they learn how to code simple data-centric Creation, Retrieval, Updating and Deletion (CRUD) tasks. Following this there is an explanation of how advancing novice programmers can be guided to create robust methods in a complex system through the feedback from automated acceptance tests. These are novel variations of the standard use of unit tests for automatic assessment of programming assignments and showcase the possibilities for vocational focused programming courses.

    View record details
  • The feedback loop: encouraging student submissions

    Kennedy, D. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The use of a network of tablet PCs to teach a first year computing degree mathematics class has shown that students value the learning involved in seeing other student’s submissions and the teacher comments on these as well as comments on their own submissions. The lecturers value receiving responses from many of the students and not just the few who always answer. This paper discusses the use of an active learning pedagogy, student submissions, and feedback in a database class based in a standard PC computer laboratory. Instructor perceptions and student reactions to this pedagogy are discussed. Student reactions were collated from a questionnaire. In spite of many technical problems both lecturers and students reported benefits for teaching and learning.

    View record details
  • ICT4D: A model for engagement with indigenous communities for ICT-enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Technology implementations in remote areas of South America, and, for that matter, other parts of the developing world have had limited success or final benefit for the recipients. In one particular case in the remote Peruvian Andes, a New Zealand team engaged with the local population to form an approach for rolling out the Internet with the result being one of the highest uptakes of technology in Peru and a huge benefit for the recipient communities. The approach, or method, developed for the project has been called “Community Centric Empowerment” (CCE). This paper outlines the reasons for the development of the methodology, describes its elements and how it was applied in the implementation of technology in the developing world.

    View record details
  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

    View record details
  • Computing student views on sustainability: a snapshot

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    UNESCO launched the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development for 2005-2014 with the aim of integrating Education doe Sustainable Development (ESD) into all aspects of education and learning. The motivation for this study was to inform our decisions on embedding ESD into our teaching. Incoming computing students (n=116) were surveyed to capture their viewd on sustaunability before they engaged in formal learning and these views were compared to those of computing students at another institution. The study explored views on the relevance of sustainability to their study, sustainability [riorities and knowledge, possible actions they could take, their capacity to take these actions and make a difference, and how they would deal with a challenging scenario. Students were pro-ecological but did not believe they had the capability to make a difference. Significant variation was found in attitudes and cvalues across the various ethnicities in our sample, suggesting that careful consideration should be given to this aspect. This study adds to the emerging body of knowledge around sustainability perceptions and values of incoming students and informs curriculum for the embedding of ESD into education and learning.

    View record details
  • ICT4D: working with communities for ICT enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    View record details
  • Industry view of ICT roles and skills: needs in Canterbury

    Asgarkhani, M.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the ICT skills needs within both Canterbury region and New Zealand. ICTs play a crucial role in today’s knowledge-based economy. Organizations heavily rely on ICT solutions to develop and grow business. There is an increasing need for ICT skills within organizations – so as to benefit from the use of ICT tools and solutions. A focus group of industry representatives participated in this study – to identify the need for roles and skills within the ICT sector. It appears that there are consistencies in both the need for roles and the use of development platforms for the Canterbury region and all regions of New Zealand. That is to say, ICT qualifications designed to address national needs should address majority of ICT needs within the Canterbury region.

    View record details
  • American influence on citizens through New Zealand commercial radio

    Reilly, B. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emerging consensus tends to suggest there is overwhelming American dominance of New Zealand radio in music. This study sets out to enquire on such claims by looking at music, and enquiring on its effect on citizens and their engagement and creation of culture. There is evidence emerging that indicates a mixture of American as well as British influence. Foreign influence in the radio scene has been apparent since the time it became a popular addition to the New Zealand household in the 1920s. Over the following decades, the radio industry has turned to the dominant Anglo-American players for guidance and inspiration. Now with a maturing local industry that is becoming more confident in its own skin, this reliance on foreign industry is coming under question regarding its affect on the indigenous population. We set out to question which theory best describes the new landscape that the radio industry finds itself in, and how this is affecting the production of content received by the listening public. Working within a framework of cultural imperialism and hybridity, the findings indicate where it is contrary to what has been simplistically alluded to as a simple mixture of global and local.

    View record details
  • Leadership in ICT organizations: skills or experience?

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) plays an essential role in both economic and social development. A diverse portfolio of ICT solutions is contributing towards a significant change in corporate business processes worldwide. ICT organization leadership is essential for setting up competitive businesses, managing global corporations, adding business value and providing valued products and/or services to their potential markets. Successful ICT organization leaders need to use a mix of technical skills, managerial skills and relevant management and technical experience so as to be able to provide effective leadership.

    View record details
  • Developing research and presentation skills in post graduate students

    Joyce, D.; Blackshaw, R.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, techniques used with postgraduate computing students to develop research, analysis and presentation skills are explained and their success is evaluated. Several different techniques are used with students entering post graduate study at different levels. The courses at each level and the research forums are described and analysed.

    View record details
  • The feedback loop: encouraging student submissions

    Kennedy, D. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The use of a network of tablet PCs to teach a first year computing degree mathematics class has shown that students value the learning involved in seeing other student’s submissions and the teacher comments on these as well as comments on their own submissions. The lecturers value receiving responses from many of the students and not just the few who always answer. This paper discusses the use of an active learning pedagogy, student submissions, and feedback in a database class based in a standard PC computer laboratory. Instructor perceptions and student reactions to this pedagogy are discussed. Student reactions were collated from a questionnaire. In spite of many technical problems both lecturers and students reported benefits for teaching and learning.

    View record details
  • Assessing with a unit test framework: variations of approach

    Lance, M.; Sarkar, A.; Bian, R. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This work describes two different uses of a Unit Testing Framework for automated marking of programming assignments. Usually unit testing focuses on verifying the correctness of individual methods. Here we firstly show how to use unit tests to give novice programmers feedback as they learn how to code simple data-centric Creation, Retrieval, Updating and Deletion (CRUD) tasks. Following this there is an explanation of how advancing novice programmers can be guided to create robust methods in a complex system through the feedback from automated acceptance tests. These are novel variations of the standard use of unit tests for automatic assessment of programming assignments and showcase the possibilities for vocational focused programming courses.

    View record details
  • ICT4D: A model for engagement with indigenous communities for ICT-enabled change

    Young, A.; Clear, T.; McCarthy, C.; Muller, L. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Technology implementations in remote areas of South America, and, for that matter, other parts of the developing world have had limited success or final benefit for the recipients. In one particular case in the remote Peruvian Andes, a New Zealand team engaged with the local population to form an approach for rolling out the Internet with the result being one of the highest uptakes of technology in Peru and a huge benefit for the recipient communities. The approach, or method, developed for the project has been called “Community Centric Empowerment” (CCE). This paper outlines the reasons for the development of the methodology, describes its elements and how it was applied in the implementation of technology in the developing world.

    View record details
  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

    View record details